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Archive for the ‘Investment in Technological Breakthrough’ Category


The Future of Hospitals – How Medical Care and Technology Work Together to Advance Patient Care 

Curator: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Gap Medics (https://www.gapmedics.com/blog/), the world’s leading provider of hospital work experience placements for high school and university students, recently released their “Futuristic Hospitals” infographic. The infographic reviews a collection of top hospitals in the world based on several key factors:

  • overall patient care,
  • innovative medical and technological excellence,
  • efforts toward sustainability,
  • environmental stewardship, and
  • social responsibility, as well as
  • other innovative health care features

to help advance the field of medicine and, ultimately, patient care.

Futuristic Hospitals Infographic

Image SOURCE: Infographic of Futuristic Hospitals courtesy of Evolved Digital and Gap Medics. Reprinted here with Permission from the Source.

 

“Many leading hospital facilities are now rolling out significant improvements and changes that couldn’t have been envisioned 10 years ago,” said Ian McIntosh, Director, Evolved Digital (http://evolveddigital.co.uk/), a U.K.-based digital marketing company specializing in search engine optimization and content marketing, whose team created the infographic for Gap Medics.

Science and innovation are working together to help convey higher expectations for quality medical and health care and advancements in the hospital experience for health care providers, patients and their families.

Particularly, the infographic analyzed prominent hospitals around the world so patients and their families can learn about the latest advances and efforts in patient care and hospital and medical technology.

In this infographic, we investigated the most cutting-edge hospital facilities in the world, where best-in-class technology and innovative medical care are making a difference in providing a quality experience all over the world.

“Gap Medics creates programs offered to thousands of students from Europe, Asia and the United States so they have the opportunity to gain insights into the work of doctors, nurses, physician assistants, midwives and dentists before the students begin their clinical training,” said Dave Brown, Director, Gap Medics, a U.K.-based company that provides hospital work experience between 1-8 weeks to students 16 years of age and older.

This one-in-a-lifetime opportunity helps students better understand their chosen career path, develop as people, and strengthen their university application process.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

http://evolveddigital.co.uk/

https://www.gapmedics.com/blog/2017/03/27/futuristic-hospitals/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

“Sudden Cardiac Death,” SudD is in Ferrer inCode’s Suite of Cardiovascular Genetic Tests to be Commercialized in the US

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/10/sudden-cardiac-death-sudd-is-in-ferrer-incodes-suite-of-cardiovascular-genetic-tests-to-be-commercialized-in-the-us/

 

Hybrid Cath Lab/OR Suite’s da Vinci Surgical Robot of Intuitive Surgical gets FDA Warning Letter on Robot Track Record

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/19/hybrid-cath-labor-suites-da-vinci-surgical-robot-of-intuitive-surgical-gets-fda-warning-letter-on-robot-track-record/

 

3D Cardiovascular Theater – Hybrid Cath Lab/OR Suite, Hybrid Surgery, Complications Post PCI and Repeat Sternotomy

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/19/3d-cardiovascular-theater-hybrid-cath-labor-suite-hybrid-surgery-complications-post-pci-and-repeat-sternotomy/

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A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education 

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Richmond University Medical Center (www.RUMSCI.org), an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine, is a 470+ bed health care facility and teaching institution in Staten Island, New York. The hospital is a leader in the areas of acute, medical and surgical care, including emergency care, surgery, minimally invasive laparoscopic and robotic surgery, gastroenterology, cardiology, pediatrics, podiatry, endocrinology, urology, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care and maternal health. RUMC earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for quality and patient safety.

RUMC is a designated Level 1 Trauma Center, a Level 2 Pediatric Trauma Center, a Level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), which is the highest level attainable, and a designated Stroke Center, receiving top national recognition from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.  Their state-of-the-art Cardiac Catheterization Lab has Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) capabilities, for elective and emergent procedures in coronary angioplasty that treats obstructive coronary artery disease, including unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and multi-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD).

RUMC maintains a Wound Care/Hyperbaric Center and a Sleep Disorder Center on-site at its main campus.  The facility also offers behavioral health services, encompassing both inpatient and outpatient services for children, adolescents and adults, including emergent inpatient and mobile outreach units.  RUMC is the only facility that offers inpatient psychiatric services for adolescents in the community.

In April 2016, RUMC announced its intent to merge with Staten Island Mental Health Society in order to expand its footprint in Staten Island and integrate behavioral health services alongside primary care. As part of New York’s Medicaid reforms, funding is available to incentivize providers to integrate treatment for addiction, mental health issues and developmental disabilities with medical services.

With over 2,500 employees, RUMC is one of the largest employers on Staten Island, New York.

rumcexteriorrumcexterior2rumcinterior

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, New York. Interior and exterior photographs of the hospital.

 

Below is my interview with President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, which occurred in September, 2016.

What has been your greatest achievement?

Dr. Messina: Professionally, my greatest achievement is my current responsibility – to be President and Chief Executive Officer of one of the greatest hospitals with a strong, solid foundation and rich history. I was born in this hospital and raised on Staten Island, so to me, there is no greater gift than to be part of a transformative organization and have the ability to advance the quality of health care on Staten Island.

My parents taught me the value of responsibility and motivation and instilled in me the drive and tenacity to be the best person I could be – for my employees and for my family. I am a highly competitive person, who is goal-oriented, hands-on and inspired by teamwork. I rarely sit behind my desk as I believe my place is alongside my team in making things happen.

As a personal goal, I recently climbed the 20,000-foot Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. It was the experience of a lifetime. I could not have completed this challenge without the support of the guides and porters who helped me and my group along the way. For me, it was a challenge in proving to myself that I could be out of my comfort zone. My group and I hiked hours and hours each day, dodging rocks and scrambling along rock walls with the goal of reaching the summit. In many ways, it takes a village to climb the mountain, relying on each other in the group to get you to the next level.

In many ways, that is how I see my professional day at the hospital, working with a strong team of dedicated medical staff and employees who are focused on one goal, which is to continue our hard work, continue to improve care and continue to move forward to advance life and health care.

The mission of Richmond University Medical Center, an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine, serves the ethnically diverse community of Staten Island, New York, by providing patients with a range of services.

How has your collaboration with the Mount Sinai network helped to expand health care delivery and services for patients of Staten Island, New York?

Dr. Messina: Being able to serve our patients year after year continues to be a top priority, so we are constantly improving upon our rich history of 100 years of exceptional patient-focused care given by our medical and surgical health care professionals as well as innovative technologies and programs created by our award-winning hospital team. We have committed medical specialists, passionate employee staff, exceptional Board of Trustees, supportive elected government officials – all who in their own way contributes to providing the highest level of patient care to the more than 500,000 residents of Staten Island, New York.

As a member of the Mount Sinai Health network, we have found ways to work collaboratively with our academic partner to ensure that our patients’ health care needs not only are fully met but also exceeded. This alliance will facilitate the development of a new, Comprehensive Breast and Women’s Healthcare Center. We have leveraged our Breast and Women’s Health Center with our RUMC general surgeons in conjunction with breast imaging, fellowship-trained physicians from Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. The physicians who are granted this renowned fellowship interact with our patients and become an active participant in multidisciplinary breast conferences and resident and medical student education. For patients, this means that they have access to the best minds and latest research, therapies and treatment regimens throughout our network.

What makes Richmond University Medical Center and its specialty areas stand out from other hospitals?

Dr. Messina: We bring the highest level of advanced medicine to our patients. For more than 100 years, we have built a rich history of delivering patient-focused care that is unique. Our organization is recognized as a family organization with strong community spirit and family values. We are proud to be a high-technology/high-touch organization of caring professionals that go above and beyond the standard of health care. Our strengths lie in the areas of acute, medical and surgical care, including emergency care, surgery, minimally invasive laparoscopic and robotic surgery, gastroenterology, cardiology, pediatrics, podiatry, endocrinology, urology, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care and maternal health.

Each year, we embark upon a comprehensive, robust strategic planning process that involves our senior leadership team, clinical chairs, Board of Trustees as well as our medical and surgical staff and hospital employees that looks out three to five years in the future to determine what is best for the patient. We are each committed in our own way to quality patient care and building an even stronger organization.

Some of our achievements are noteworthy:

  • As a New York City Department of Emergency Services designated Level 1 Trauma Center and Level 2 Pediatric Trauma Center, the only Trauma Center dually verified in New York City, we rely on sophisticated equipment so our medical and surgical specialists are prepared to treat severe conditions within minutes.
  • Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a designated Level 3 facility, the highest level attainable. The unit delivers 3,000 babies annually and it was recognized as having the lowest mortality rate in the metropolitan area and a survival rate of 99 percent, that exceeds national benchmarks. Our specialists in our pediatric ambulatory services department treat over 10,000 patients annually and our children’s urgent care area records over 23,000 visits annually.
  • Our state-of-the-art, 38,000-square-foot Emergency Department (ED), which will be replaced by an expanded facility and projected to open in 2018, will provide for more focused care, operational efficiency and flexibility for our staff and patient. We also will be better integrated and connected to the entire hospital campus.

Originally designed to serve 22,000 patients each year, the ED is expected to accommodate an increased volume of patients, which is estimated at 70,000 and give our medical specialists the tools they need to provide the best in care for this volume of patients. In a new patient and family-centered space with 49 treatment positions, the new ED will be connected to the existing hospital, close to surgical services, the radiology department and lab services.

Equally as important, the hospital has been strong in the face of natural disasters, especially Hurricane Sandy which occurred a few years ago, and the new ED is being designed with storm resilient and redundant design to minimize impact from severe weather conditions.

In fact, the New York City Council and the Staten Island Borough President have set aside a combined $13.5 million for this $60+ million project and believe in the transformative impact that it will have on emergency care on Staten Island. These local officials believe that Staten Island residents deserve quality, readily accessible health care.

  • Heroin addiction is an epidemic on Staten Island, so we have a number of programs in place at RUMC’s Silberstein Center to provide outpatient treatment, rehabilitation and clinics, along with group therapy sessions, Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and individual therapy sessions.
  • Our new primary care/walk-in facility in the heart of Staten Island borough is operational and there are no appointments required. Patients can visit with one of three physicians or a nurse practitioner. This off-site facility is not located in the hospital complex and is an expansion of our services outside of the hospital walls.
  • We also maintain a Wound Care Center, Pain Management Center and a Sleep Disorder Center at our facility. In fact, we are the only local facility that offers inpatient psychiatric services for adolescents and we are expanding our capacity to meet the needs of the community.

 

RUMC has been awarded a top designation jointly by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association. What does that mean to the hospital?

Dr. Messina: This designation makes us proud as the recipient of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Quality Achievement Award for six consecutive years and its first Elite Plus recognition. This means that we have achieved 85 percent or higher adherence in indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month periods to improve quality of patient care and outcomes for stroke patients.

Our cardiac catheterization lab with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) capabilities – the newest facility of its kind on Staten Island — now treats semi-urgent and elective coronary procedures.

For patients, this means that we have a commitment to ensure that stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence. With a stroke, when time is lost, brain is lost, and this award demonstrates our commitment to ensuring patients receive care based on evidenced-based guidelines. We are dedicated to continually improving the quality of stroke care and this recognition helps us achieve that goal.

Studies have shown that hospitals that consistently follow these quality improvement measures can reduce length of stay and 30-day readmission rates and reduce disparities in care. To qualify for the Elite Plus recognition, we met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. If given intravenously in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. We earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

The values of Richmond University Medical Center are summarized in the acronym, WE CARE (Welcoming Energized Compassion Advocacy Respect Excellence). How is this part of your day-to-day life?

Dr. Messina: For more than 100 years, Richmond University Medical Center has

been building a rich history of exceptional patient-focused care for the residents of Staten Island. Each year, we carry that tradition forward by our medically innovative and patient-focused care and services we offer. It is the passion, creativity and caring of everyone who is part of our ‘hospital team’ that moves the organization to new heights.

The chart below summarizes our credo, the values that guide us every day and help us focus on the care and well-being of the people who come through our doors.

We are welcoming and gracious toward each other, and toward all who come to receive our services.

Personnel are energized for quality, creativity, commitment and teamwork.

Compassion is the way we share deep concern and care toward each person.

Advocacy is our activity that promotes the rights and responsibilities of patients, families and staff, in the hospital setting and in the community.

We show respect by recognizing the basic dignity of every person in all our interactions and in the formulation of policies and procedures.

Excellence is our way of demonstrating that we can always be more and always be better.

 

The Richmond University Medical Center Board is comprised of distinguished leaders of the Staten Island community who are committed to the success of the hospital and to the health of Staten Islanders.

How is this local approach revolutionizing health care for the Staten Island community?

Dr. Messina: The members of our distinguished Board of Trustees, who represent a cross-section of business professionals and community leaders, continue our goal of meeting the needs of our patients and our hospital.

Our Board remains committed to providing solutions for our patients to challenging healthcare issues they face every day and to making a difference in the lives of patients by providing the latest thinking and technology solutions. Our Board Chairperson Kathryn K. Rooney, Esq., and Vice Chairperson Ronald A. Purpora, as well as the other Board members, and even our elected government officials, have a strong connection to Staten Island and we believe it truly ‘takes a village’ to make this organization flourish.

Each year, our Board of Trustees is presented with new opportunities and possibilities for growth and development. That is why their top priority for this past year was approving the construction of a state-of-the-art Emergency Department (ED) as this undertaking will serve both the patients and staff equally. In order to serve the residents of Staten Island properly, the new ED will accommodate an increased number of patients and our medical staff will receive the tools and technology to provide the best in care for our patients.

This past year, we were provided with a $1.5 million gift from the Staten Island Foundation that will go toward the hospital’s capital campaign to construct the new $60 million Emergency Department. We decided to name the RUMC’s Allan Weissglass Pavilion Center for Ambulatory Care, in honor of our long-time community and business leader, who is a founding Board member and Board of Trustees member. Allan Weissglass devoted his time, energy and talent to the success of this hospital over many years.

We are positioning our organization for the future and we continuously build on our strengths, being responsive to the needs of the community. In the past, we saw the patient was the only ‘customer’ of the hospital. Today, that perception is evolving and our ‘customers’ are many.  With the help and support of donors, local foundations, volunteers, staff, and the community, local government officials, we are building a bright future for Richmond University Medical Center.

What is RUMC’s commitment to graduate medical education?

Dr. Messina: Our six Graduate Medical Education (GME) programs in Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Diagnostic Radiology and Podiatry, signify our commitment to teaching as a cornerstone of our philosophy. Our medical staff are seen as role models for our medical residents and provide quality training, medical education and research capabilities. Our existing medical staff functions as supervising physicians and gives medical residents exposure to specific responsibilities and patient care, as well as scholarly opportunities. One interesting fact is that the doctors we train come back to help treat our patients by using their knowledge and experience to work in our community.

You mentioned that ‘outreach in the community’ as a key factor in the success of the hospital’s mission to enhance the quality of life for residents of Staten Island. What types of activities are under way?

Dr. Messina: Our lifesaving work takes many forms. We are constantly finding new and different ways to engage with our community – to raise awareness and educate on a number of diseases and conditions, and, hopefully move toward better health care. We believe that our patients need to see us outside of a clinical environment, which strengthens our relationship.

For example, over the past year:

  • We sponsored an annual health and wellness expo with the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation that was attended by over 2,000 people to equip the community with knowledge about their health and the local health services available to them.
  • We pioneered an organ donor enrollment day by welcoming 59 visitors and guests who can potentially donate their organs to save lives.
  • We partnered with the New York City Department of Transportation and our own Trauma team to demonstrate and educate the community on car seat safety.
  • Our Dermatologist team took part in the Borough President’s “Back to the Beach” festival by performing skin screenings and distributing sunscreen and information on skin cancer.
  • Our Obstetrics and Gynecology team hosted a baby expo to talk with new mothers and mothers-to-be about services available at the hospital.
  • Our Diabetologist team partnered with the YMCA on a 16-week partnership to curb the diabetes epidemic on Staten Island through information talks and health screenings.
  • We were even present at last year’s Staten Island Yankees home opening baseball game to throw out the first pitch and conduct a blood drive while distributing wellness information.

 

Since roughly one third of the residents on Staten Island are enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare, what steps are you taking to improve the delivery of treatment for them?

Dr. Messina: We started several initiatives last year that were funded by the federal and state governments to look at the way care is delivered to patients who are enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid. So far, we’ve reduced costs by $3.75 million and realized $1.8 million in shared savings that are re-invested in key hospital programs.

As you know, Medicare and Medicaid are two different government-run programs that were created in 1965 in response to the inability of older and low-income Americans to buy private health insurance. They were part of our government’s social commitment to meeting individual health care needs. Medicare is a federal program that provides health coverage if you are 65 or older or have a severe disability, no matter your income, while Medicaid is a state and federal program that provides health coverage if you have a very low income.

We’ve set up our own Richmond Quality Accountable Care Organization (ACO), that comprises 30 providers serving 7,500 Medicare patients. This innovative program is accountable for the quality, cost and overall care provided to people on Medicare and who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-service program.  One program that is ongoing is one that we’ve partnered with the Visiting Nurse Service of Staten Island to prevent hospital readmissions and to identify hospitalized patients who would benefit from a higher level of care and home care services.

Another program that is under way for our Medicaid patients is teaching our staff to prevent hospital readmissions by creating an accurate list of medications that a patient takes and comparing that list against physician’s admission, transfer and discharge orders to ensure that the correct medication plan is in place.

We believe that we are transforming the underlying systems with a focus on delivering quality care and hopefully better outcomes for patients.

RUMC recently announced a merger with Staten Island Mental Health Society (SIMHS) to integrate SIMHS’ broad range of behavioral health programs into the hospital’s existing medical and behavioral program throughout Staten Island. What does this merger bring to the community?

Dr. Messina: We believe that the proposed merger between RUMC and the Staten Island Mental Health Society (SIMHS) will provide a strengthened, comprehensive network of behavioral health services across Staten Island.

This partnership will bring together two Staten Island institutions, with a combined 230 years of service to the borough, and create one strong and vibrant organization dedicated to meeting the health needs of the diverse community.

Merging the range of community-based behavioral health services provided by SIMHS with the solid foundation of primary care services provided by RUMC will create a seamless range of behavioral and medical services for our residents. We are in the unique position to transform and enhance the services of these two vital health care providers. The SIMHS will keep its name and become a division of the hospital. The merger is expected to close during calendar year 2017.

 rumcdanmessina

Image SOURCE: Photograph of President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, courtesy of Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, New York.

Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA
President & Chief Executive Officer

Daniel Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, became President and Chief Executive Officer of Richmond University Medical Center (RUMC) – an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine – in April 2014.

Dr. Messina, a life-long resident of Staten Island, is a seasoned executive with nearly 30 years of healthcare leadership expertise. For the previous 13 years, he served as the System Chief Operating Officer of CentraState Healthcare System in Freehold, New Jersey, where his responsibilities included all System Operations for the Medical Center, Assisted Living Facility, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and Continuing Care Retirement Community. While in this role, Dr. Messina developed additional growth strategies that include a new Cancer Center, a Proton Therapy Center, Radio-Surgery, a new Infusion Center and programs in Robotics, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Bariatric and Neurosurgery. Other accomplishments include a new state-of-the-art 26-bed Critical Care Unit, a 49-bed Emergency Department, and the development of an 180,000 sq. ft. Ambulatory Campus and Wellness Center anchored by a 35,000 sq. ft. Medical Fitness Center. Additionally, Dr. Messina developed the Linda E. Cardinale MS Center – one of the largest and most comprehensive MS Centers in the tristate area – leading to a fundraising event that has generated over $2 million.

Dr. Messina received his B.S. in Health Science/Respiratory Therapy from Long Island University Brooklyn, and earned his M.P.A. in Healthcare Administration from LIU Post. He obtained his Ph.D. in Health Sciences and Leadership at Seton Hall University where he currently serves as an adjunct professor in the School of Health and Allied Sciences. He is active in the American College of Health Care Executives, is board certified in healthcare management as an ACHE Fellow, and recently completed a three-year term as Regent for New Jersey.

Dr. Messina serves as trustee on the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the New Jersey Metro Chapter, and the Alumni Board of Trustees at Seton Hall University. He is a Board member of the VNA Health Group of New Jersey and a member of the Policy Development Committee of the New Jersey Hospital Association. Dr. Messina has been honored by various organizations for his service to the community, including Seton Hall University with the “Many Are One” award, the American College of Healthcare Executives with Senior, Early and Distinguished Service Awards, New Jersey Women Against MS, CentraState Auxiliary, and the Staten Island CYO.

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank William Smith, director of Public Relations, Richmond University Medical Center, for the help and support he provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

 

Richmond University Medical Center (http://rumcsi.org/Main/Home.aspx)

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/annualreport.aspx

Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_University_Medical_Center

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/rumcinthenews/si-live-5202016-170.aspx

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/rumcinthenews/merger-agreement-4132016-159.aspx

Retrieved from http://blog.silive.com/gracelyns_chronicles/2016/06/rumc_receives_presitigious_bab.html

Retrieved from https://www.statnews.com/2016/10/17/vivan-lee-hospitals-utah/

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Healthcare conglomeration to access Big Data and lower costs

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/13/healthcare-conglomeration-to-access-big-data-and-lower-costs/

A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

2013

Helping Physicians identify Gene-Drug Interactions for Treatment Decisions: New ‘CLIPMERGE’ program – Personalized Medicine @ The Mount Sinai Medical Center

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/15/helping-physicians-identify-gene-drug-interactions-for-treatment-decisions-new-clipmerge-program-personalized-medicine-the-mount-sinai-medical-center/

Nation’s Biobanks: Academic institutions, Research institutes and Hospitals – vary by Collections Size, Types of Specimens and Applications: Regulations are Needed

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/26/nations-biobanks-academic-institutions-research-institutes-and-hospitals-vary-by-collections-size-types-of-specimens-and-applications-regulations-are-needed/

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Milestones in Physiology & Discoveries in Medicine and Genomics: Request for Book Review Writing on Amazon.com


physiology-cover-seriese-vol-3individualsaddlebrown-page2

Milestones in Physiology

Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics

Patient-centric Perspective 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU 

2015

 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

Preface

Introduction 

Chapter 1: Evolution of the Foundation for Diagnostics and Pharmaceuticals Industries

1.1  Outline of Medical Discoveries between 1880 and 1980

1.2 The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century

1.3 The Classification of Microbiota

1.4 Selected Contributions to Chemistry from 1880 to 1980

1.5 The Evolution of Clinical Chemistry in the 20th Century

1.6 Milestones in the Evolution of Diagnostics in the US HealthCare System: 1920s to Pre-Genomics

 

Chapter 2. The search for the evolution of function of proteins, enzymes and metal catalysts in life processes

2.1 The life and work of Allan Wilson
2.2  The  evolution of myoglobin and hemoglobin
2.3  More complexity in proteins evolution
2.4  Life on earth is traced to oxygen binding
2.5  The colors of life function
2.6  The colors of respiration and electron transport
2.7  Highlights of a green evolution

 

Chapter 3. Evolution of New Relationships in Neuroendocrine States
3.1 Pituitary endocrine axis
3.2 Thyroid function
3.3 Sex hormones
3.4 Adrenal Cortex
3.5 Pancreatic Islets
3.6 Parathyroids
3.7 Gastointestinal hormones
3.8 Endocrine action on midbrain
3.9 Neural activity regulating endocrine response

3.10 Genomic Promise for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dementias, Autism Spectrum, Schizophrenia, and Serious Depression

 

Chapter 4.  Problems of the Circulation, Altitude, and Immunity

4.1 Innervation of Heart and Heart Rate
4.2 Action of hormones on the circulation
4.3 Allogeneic Transfusion Reactions
4.4 Graft-versus Host reaction
4.5 Unique problems of perinatal period
4.6. High altitude sickness
4.7 Deep water adaptation
4.8 Heart-Lung-and Kidney
4.9 Acute Lung Injury

4.10 Reconstruction of Life Processes requires both Genomics and Metabolomics to explain Phenotypes and Phylogenetics

 

Chapter 5. Problems of Diets and Lifestyle Changes

5.1 Anorexia nervosa
5.2 Voluntary and Involuntary S-insufficiency
5.3 Diarrheas – bacterial and nonbacterial
5.4 Gluten-free diets
5.5 Diet and cholesterol
5.6 Diet and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
5.7 Diet and exercise
5.8 Anxiety and quality of Life
5.9 Nutritional Supplements

 

Chapter 6. Advances in Genomics, Therapeutics and Pharmacogenomics

6.1 Natural Products Chemistry

6.2 The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance

6.3 Viruses, Vaccines and immunotherapy

6.4 Genomics and Metabolomics Advances in Cancer

6.5 Proteomics – Protein Interaction

6.6 Pharmacogenomics

6.7 Biomarker Guided Therapy

6.8 The Emergence of a Pharmaceutical Industry in the 20th Century: Diagnostics Industry and Drug Development in the Genomics Era: Mid 80s to Present

6.09 The Union of Biomarkers and Drug Development

6.10 Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

6.11 Epigenomics and Companion Diagnostics

 

Chapter  7

Integration of Physiology, Genomics and Pharmacotherapy

7.1 Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

7.2 Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

7.3 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

7.4 Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

7.5 Diagnosing Diseases & Gene Therapy: Precision Genome Editing and Cost-effective microRNA Profiling

7.6 Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

7.7 Neuroprotective Therapies: Pharmacogenomics vs Psychotropic drugs and Cholinesterase Inhibitors

7.8 Metabolite Identification Combining Genetic and Metabolic Information: Genetic association links unknown metabolites to functionally related genes

7.9 Preserved vs Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available and Needed Therapies

7.10 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by

7.11 Demonstrate Biosimilarity: New FDA Biosimilar Guidelines

 

Chapter 7.  Biopharma Today

8.1 A Great University engaged in Drug Discovery: University of Pittsburgh

8.2 Introduction – The Evolution of Cancer Therapy and Cancer Research: How We Got Here?

8.3 Predicting Tumor Response, Progression, and Time to Recurrence

8.4 Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

8.5 Innovation: Drug Discovery, Medical Devices and Digital Health

8.6 Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse Effects

8.7 Nanotechnology and Ocular Drug Delivery: Part I

8.8 Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) system and nanotechnology: Part II

8.9 The Delicate Connection: IDO (Indolamine 2, 3 dehydrogenase) and Cancer Immunology

8.10 Natural Drug Target Discovery and Translational Medicine in Human Microbiome

8.11 From Genomics of Microorganisms to Translational Medicine

8.12 Confined Indolamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) Controls the Homeostasis of Immune Responses for Good and Bad

 

Chapter 9. BioPharma – Future Trends

9.1 Artificial Intelligence Versus the Scientist: Who Will Win?

9.2 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on KannaLife Sciences and the Discipline and Potential of Pharmacognosy

9.3 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on Computer-Aided Drug Design and Gfree Bio, LLC

9.4 Heroes in Medical Research: The Postdoctoral Fellow

9.5 NIH Considers Guidelines for CAR-T therapy: Report from Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee

9.6 1st Pitch Life Science- Philadelphia- What VCs Really Think of your Pitch

9.7 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

9.8 Heroes in Medical Research: Green Fluorescent Protein and the Rough Road in Science

9.9 Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

9.10 The SCID Pig II: Researchers Develop Another SCID Pig, And Another Great Model For Cancer Research

Epilogue

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Pioneers of Cancer Cell Therapy:  Turbocharging the Immune System to Battle Cancer Cells — Success in Hematological Cancers vs. Solid Tumors

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: Players in Basic & Translational Research and Biotech/Pharma

The companies are teamed with academic pioneers:

  • Novartis with University of Pennsylvania;
  • Kite Pharma with the National Cancer Institute; 
  • Juno Therapeutics with Sloan Kettering,
  • the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

cancer33

IMAGE SOURCE: National Cancer Institute

 

 “CAR-T cell immunotherapy” –  genetically modified T cells that are engineered to target specific tumor antigens and/or genes that are involved in survival, proliferation, and the enhancement of effector functions have been under intense research.

 

CAR technology was originally reported by Zelig Eshhar in 1993.

https://www.weizmann.ac.il/immunology/sci/EshharPage.html

Prof. Zelig Eshhar, Ph.D., served as Chairman of the Department of Immunology at the Weizmann Institute. Prof. Eshhar has been Chair of Scientific Advisory Board at TxCell S.A. since April 2016. Prof. Eshhar has been a Member of Scientific Advisory Board at Kite Pharma, Inc. since August 8, 2013. Prof. Eshhar served as a Member of Scientific Advisory Board at Intellect Neurosciences, Inc. since April 2006.

Prof. Eshhar pioneered the CAR approach (or T-Body as he termed it) to redirect T cells to recognize, engage and kill patient’s tumor cells by engineering them with a construct that combines the anti-target specificity of an antibody with T cell activation domains. Prof. Eshhar serves on several editorial boards, including Cancer Gene Therapy, Human Gene Therapy, Gene Therapy, Expert Opinion on Therapeutics, European Journal of Immunology and the Journal of Gene Medicine. He was a Research Fellow in the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and in the Department of Chemical Immunology at the Weizmann Institute in Israel. His achievements were recognized by several international awards, most recently the CAR Pioneering award by the ATTACK European Consortium. Prof. Eshhar obtained his B.Sc. in Biochemistry and Microbiology and his M.Sc. in Biochemistry from the Hebrew University, and his Ph.D. in the Department of Immunology from the Weizmann Institute of Science.

http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/people/person.asp?personId=32720993&privcapId=32390485

 

Zelig Eshhar and Carl H. June honored for research on T cell engineering for cancer immunotherapy

New Rochelle, NY, November 11, 2014–Zelig Eshhar, PhD, The Weizmann Institute of Science and Sourasky Medical Center, and Carl H. June, MD, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, are co-recipients of the Pioneer Award, recognized for lentiviral gene therapy clinical trials and for their leadership and contributions in engineering T-cells capable of targeting tumors with antibody-like specificity through the development of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, is commemorating its 25th anniversary by bestowing this honor on the leading Pioneers in the field of cell and gene therapy selected by a blue ribbon panel* and publishing a Pioneer Perspective by the award recipients. The Perspectives by Dr. Eshhar and Dr. June are available free on the Human Gene Therapy website at http://www.liebertpub.com/hgt until December 11, 2014.

In his Pioneer Perspective entitled “From the Mouse Cage to Human Therapy: A Personal Perspective of the Emergence of T-bodies/Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells” Professor Eshhar chronicles his team’s groundbreaking contributions to the development of the CAR T-cell immunotherapeutic approach to treating cancer. He describes the method’s conceptual development including initial proof-of-concept, and the years of experimentation in mouse models of cancer. They first tested the CAR T-cells on tumors transplanted into mice then progressed to spontaneously developing cancers in immune-competent mice, which Dr. Eshhar describes as “a more suitable model that faithfully mimics cancer patients.” He recounts successful antitumor effects in mice with CAR modified T-cells injected directly into tumors, with effects seen at the injection site and at sites of metastasis, and even the potential of the CAR T-cells to prevent tumor development.

Dr. Carl H. June has led one of the clinical groups that has taken the CAR therapeutic strategy from the laboratory to the patients’ bedside, pioneering the use of CD19-specific CAR T-cells to treat patients with leukemia. In his Pioneer Perspective, “Toward Synthetic Biology with Engineered T Cells: A Long Journey Just Begun” Dr. June looks back on his long, multi-faceted career and describes how he combined his knowledge and research on immunology, cancer, and HIV to develop successful T-cell based immunotherapies. Among the lessons Dr. June has embraced throughout his career are to follow one’s passions. He also says that “accidents can be good: embrace the unexpected results and follow up on these as they are often times more scientifically interesting than predictable responses from less imaginative experiments.”

“These two extraordinary scientists made seminal contributions at key steps of the journey from bench to bedside for CAR T-cells,” says James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Human Gene Therapy, and Director of the Gene Therapy Program, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

SOURCE

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-11/mali-ze111114.php

The General procedure of CAR-T cell therapy involves the follwoing steps:

1) Separate T cells from patient;

2) Engineer these T cells to express an artificial receptor, which is called “CAR” that usually targets tumor-specific antigen;

3) Expand the CAR T cells to a sufficient amount;

4) Re-introduce the CAR T cells to patient.

There are two major components that are critical to the CAR-T cell immunotherapy:

  • the design of CAR itself and
  • the choice of the targeted tumor specific antigen.

SOURCE

http://www.ochis.org/node/209

 

First publication on Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is an attractive approach for generating antitumor immune responses

Eradication of B-lineage cells and regression of lymphoma in a patient treated with autologous T cells genetically engineered to recognize CD19

James N. Kochenderfer, Wyndham H. Wilson, John E. Janik, Mark E. Dudley, Maryalice Stetler-Stevenson, Steven A. Feldman, Irina Maric, Mark Raffeld, Debbie-Ann N. Nathan, Brock J. Lanier, Richard A. Morgan, Steven A. Rosenberg

Abstract

Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is an attractive approach for generating antitumor immune responses. We treated a patient with advanced follicular lymphoma by administering a preparative chemotherapy regimen followed by autologous T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that recognized the B-cell antigen CD19. The patient’s lymphoma underwent a dramatic regression, and B-cell precursors were selectively eliminated from the patient’s bone marrow after infusion of anti–CD19-CAR-transduced T cells. Blood B cells were absent for at least 39 weeks after anti–CD19-CAR-transduced T-cell infusion despite prompt recovery of other blood cell counts. Consistent with eradication of B-lineage cells, serum immunoglobulins decreased to very low levels after treatment. The prolonged and selective elimination of B-lineage cells could not be attributed to the chemotherapy that the patient received and indicated antigen-specific eradication of B-lineage cells. Adoptive transfer of anti–CD19-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new approach for treating B-cell malignancies. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00924326.

SOURCE

According to Setting the Body’s ‘Serial Killers’ Loose on Cancer

After a long, intense pursuit, researchers are close to bringing to market a daring new treatment: cell therapy that turbocharges the immune system to fight cancer.

By ANDREW POLLACK  AUG. 1, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/02/health/cancer-cell-therapy-immune-system.html?_r=0

Dr. June’s 2011 publications did not cite Dr. Rosenberg’s paper [Blood, 2010] from the previous year, prompting Dr. Rosenberg to write a letter to The New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. June’s publications also did not acknowledge that the genetic construct he had used was the one he had obtained from Dr. Campana of St. Jude.

From the Lab to the bedside to the Out Patient Clinic

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Thriving Three Groups on LinkedIn

Groups Launcher and Group Manager: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Cardiovascular Biotech & Pharma UK & US Networking Group

906 members

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4357927

 

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

336 members

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4346921

 

 

Innovation in Israel

172 members

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/2987122

 

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Supreme Court declining to hear an appeal from Sequenom, that markets a Prenatal Test based on Screening Fetal DNA – A Natural Biological Process

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Supreme Court on Monday left a whole lot of biotech entrepreneurs fearful that their inventions may not be worth all that much after all.

The justices spooked the industry by declining to hear an appeal from Sequenom, a California company that markets a prenatal test based on screening fetal DNA. A lower court had ruled that Sequenom couldn’t patent the test because it was based on a natural biological process.

“This is a huge ruling,” said David O. Taylor, an assistant professor at Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law.

Justices in lower courts were effectively pleading for the Supreme Court to provide some guidance on the issue of patent eligibility in biotech, Taylor said. The top court’s silence leaves an entire industry guessing.

Taylor predicted that companies and investors will be less likely to fund expensive research for fear of having patents invalidated by the courts. Sequenom CEO Dirk van den Boom made a similar argument.

“Their refusal to clarify this area of the law would seem to point in the direction of reduced investment in diagnostic invention, and that is obviously problematic from a public health concern,” Taylor said.

Sequenom’s opponent in the legal case, Ariosa Diagnostics, said the fetal test was not novel enough to deserve a patent. Asking the justices to intervene “is inviting the court to revisit and rewrite decades of jurisprudence covering patent-eligible subject matter,” the company wrote in a brief. “In the future, there may be a case that tests the boundaries” of what’s appropriate to patent, Ariosa wrote, “but this is not that case.”

The tell-tale DNA

Sequenom’s story begins in 1996, when a pair of doctors noted that there were trace amounts of tell-tale fetal DNA in the plasma of expectant mothers. So they created a test that could extract that DNA and determine a baby’s sex and risk of genetic disorders like Down syndrome, without the need for the invasive procedures that were then the norm. They patented the idea the following year, and their test is now sold by Sequenom as MaterniT21. But a lower court invalidated that patent in 2013.

He and others fear that the Supreme Court’s ruling in Mayo was so broad that judges will be able to invalidate a slew of life science patents by picking apart the components of an invention to find the naturally occurring biological process that inspired it.

Even Noonan, however, said courts were unlikely to invalidate patents based on truly novel discoveries, such as CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing, which is about to be tested in humans.

The CRISPR technology harnesses a naturally occurring process, but it’s “so revolutionary,” Noonan said, “that even the Supreme Court wouldn’t overrule it.”

 

Damian Garde can be reached at damian.garde@statnews.com
Follow Damian on Twitter @damiangarde

 

BIOTECH CRISPR DIAGNOSTICS – See LINKS at

The Supreme Court decision that’s shaking up biotech

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Federal Court Invalidates Patent Underlying Sequenoms MaterniT21 Plus
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Sequenom Patent Invalidation May Have Ramifications for NIPT Field, Entire MDx Industry
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SOURCE

https://www.statnews.com/2016/06/27/supreme-court-biotech-patents/?s_campaign=tw&utm_content=buffer5a219&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

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A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s newest private healthcare service provider, headed by newly appointed Chief Executive Officer Timothy Low, M.D., is a private, acute tertiary institution that represents an innovation in hospital administration, incorporating the latest technology to support better decision making for better patient outcomes and shorter hospital stays along with the beauty of nature and art to enhance the patient experience. The hospital, opened in March 2016, is sited within Singapore’s first, fully integrated healthcare and hospitality complex, called Connexion, which is Asia’s first, integrated lifestyle hub for healthcare and wellness. Connexion houses the 220-bed Farrer Park Hospital with its more than 300-accredited specialists and 18 operating rooms, a 10-floor specialist Medical Center, along with a five-star hotel and spa. In 2016, Farrer Park Hospital was awarded best new hospital of the year in Asia Pacific by Global Health and Travel Awards.

Farrer Park Hospital at Connexion at night

Image SOURCE: Photograph courtesy of Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore. An integrated healthcare and hospitality complex, called Connexion, Asia’s first, integrated lifestyle hub for healthcare and wellness, which includes Farrer Park Hospital.  

The hospital is also a teaching site for undergraduate medical training, providing enhanced medical care, service quality and professional integrity and value. Supported by approximately 600 hospital staff, specialists at Farrer Park Hospital provide a range of services, such as cardiology, oncology, orthopedic surgery, gastroenterology and ophthalmology. A 24-hour emergency department provides attention for acute illnesses and the hospital has the most modern facilities for diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and clinical laboratories.

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore. Left is a deluxe suite, top right is Farrer Park Hospital lobby, bottom right is Farrer Park Hospital building.

 

Medical tourism — the process of traveling outside your country of residence to receive medical care — represents a worldwide, multi-billion-dollar business that is expected to grow considerably in the next decade. Interestingly, Singapore’s medical tourism market is projected to grow by 8.3 percent annually and reach revenue of USD $1.36 billion a year by 2018.

My first question is: Why has Singapore emerged in the past few years as an international healthcare and research hub?

Dr. Low:  With Singapore’s excellent patient services and its dedication to research and wellness, the country continues to remain as the top destination for those seeking medical care. By providing convenience and trust in our medical sector, there is no doubt that it will continue to expand and grow. Our dedication is towards the patient, cutting-edge technology and personalized care. This makes Singapore a multi-faceted medical hub and a center of excellence. Patient can receive excellent standard of medical treatment, comparable to the Europe and the USA.

Currently, we are attracting foreign patients who expect five- or six-star hotel service, because we’re a private hospital. That’s why I’m strict about appearances. We have to look as groomed, and we need to be as personable, as those in hospitality and the airlines.

Please describe the concept behind Farrer Park Hospital as Singapore’s first, fully integrated healthcare and hospitality complex.

Dr. Low: The Farrer Park Hospital was designed and built to be a hospital of the future, combining innovation in medical care and medical education. The hospital was initially created by medical specialists to respond to the growing challenges of healthcare in Singapore and, more broadly, throughout the Asia Pacific region. We have ‘reimagined’ private healthcare in order to enhance medical care, service quality, professional integrity and value.

We are leading the way in healthcare innovation as we are a premier institution for medical care and education that is based upon three important tenets for the patient — comfort, fairness and value. In fact, our top accredited medical staff, along with state-of-the-art equipment and technology, contributes to increased efficiency, reduced cost, and most, importantly improved patient outcomes.

As an innovation in hospital administration, Farrer Park Hospital embraces technology and improves medical care through its state-of-the-art equipment that facilities telemedicine consulting services across the world. To create a conducive environment for medical professionals, the hospital’s 18 operating rooms are linked via fiber-optic connections to various locations through the Connexion complex, including the hospitals’ education center and lecture hall, teaching clinics and tutorial rooms as well as the hotel’s function rooms. In addition to being equipped with the latest in useful medical technology, the hospital has state-of-the-art information technology which enables seamless and rapid flow of information between the admission services, inpatient areas, operating theaters, diagnostic and therapeutic centers, clinical laboratories and medical clinics. We also are the country’s first private hospital to become a teaching site, with the medical students from Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University.

What is the type of environment you are creating at Farrer Park Hospital?

Dr. Low: Our care philosophy extends beyond healing and the management of disease to engaging with our patients as partners in pursuit of good health and providing an oasis for healing and relaxation. Throughout our facility, patients will find that attention has been given to every aspect and detail of our facility – from the comfort of our patients, to its impact on the environment, to the speed and ease of obtaining medical attention and to the maintenance of hygiene.

As healthcare players go, we are small and that has made us very aware of our challenges. As such, we have encouraged a culture of innovation, to grasp opportunities quickly. Healthcare is a very traditional industry, resistant to change and thus tend to be laggards in technology. Farrer Park Hospital, however, embraces technology. The seamlessness of information flow was the focus at the onset of the project. This hospital was planned technologically to be relevant for the next 20 years.

Being an institution built by healthcare practitioners has its advantages. We achieve painstaking perfection in our attention to detail. The hospital has many practical features that serve the needs of practitioners and patients while the hoteliers add details for comfort, luxury and aesthetics.

Our hospital is also supported by a hospital staff, who provide a range of specialty services, such as cardiology, oncology, orthopedic surgery, gastroenterology and ophthalmology, along with a 24-hour emergency clinic, which provides immediate care for acute illnesses. The hospital also has the most modern facilities for diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and clinical laboratories. There is even a holistic service which focuses on screening, preventive medicine and lifestyle enhancement.

What is your perspective of engaging with patients?  

Dr. Low: The hospital’s care philosophy extends beyond healing and the management of disease to engaging patients in pursuit of good health. Healing does not end after a successful operation. It is not just about coming to the hospital for a procedure and then recuperating at home. It is about having the best and most comfortable services to get the patient on their feet. And having a family support structure close by, where relatives can stay close to the hospital, is essential in the rehabilitation process. That is why, as part of Connexion, the hospital is Asia’s first, integrated lifestyle hub for healthcare and wellness that is linked to a five-star hotel and spa.

Patients are treated by an experienced team of medical and health specialists in an environment meticulously designed to maximize comfort and efficiency while promoting well-being, rest and recovery.

How are you positioned technologically to be a leader in developing first-rate patient care? 

Dr. Low: We have taken the lead in many areas. Our facility is wired completely, any tests and treatments is automated whenever possible and the information is sent in real time to all stakeholders who require it. Our doctors can access this technology and make decisions as if they are in the hospital anywhere in the world.

What type of physician are you attempting to attract?

Dr. Low: The environment at Farrer Park Hospital is about clinical and service excellence, supported by physical and technological constructs that facilitates both these endeavors. We are building a culture of fairness and promoting decision making that is free from self-interest and toward better patient outcome. The doctors who join us must be aware that we take our code of comfort, fairness and value seriously.

What is the thinking behind the philosophy of incorporating nature and art into healthcare in Farrer Park Hospital?

Dr. Low: The architecture of Farrer Park Hospital and Connexion reflects the deep commitment to creating a true learning environment. Synergies between our hospital along with a closely linked hotel stimulate many innovations for improving the healthcare experience. The concept of a hospital near a hotel is not new, however, to integrate it to the level that we have is something novel. We followed a biophilic architecture approach throughout the facility, incorporating nature and art to enhance healing. Hospitals are traditionally not the best place for recuperation. We strive to have the restful ambiance of a hotel, in addition to proximity of doctors and family under the same roof, as well as using technology to enable seamless and speedy decision making; all this in support of better patient outcome and shorter stays.

You could say we are different in how we view private healthcare. A traditional hospital would not carve out 15 gardens at multiple levels throughout the facility so that patients and families can have places to feel the warmth of the sun and breathe fresh air whenever they like. The facility also hosts a private collection of over 700 commissioned Asian paintings meant to enhance the healing environment.

In land-scarce Singapore, a typical businessperson would not have fewer paid parking lots, making them one and a half times the size of a standard lot to allow a patient on crutches to comfortably extend the car door fully to disembark. A standard project manager would not insist that contractors construct a curved sink so that surgeons will not have water dripping down his elbows after scrubbing his or her hands, or a bath bench with a cut out that allows patients to sit while washing themselves. This may seem unnecessary but these innovative approaches translate to actual benefits to people who ‘value’ them.

Everyone has the same end goal, a good experience and better patient outcome. Our strategy is simple. We take our responsibilities to patients, their families and the clinicians seriously. Attend to their needs, anticipate their wants, and find the best way to address these concerns through innovation and technology. This ultimately brings value to patients.

How does nature and art come together at Farrer Park Hospital?

Dr. Low: The hospital, hotel and specialist center share and enjoy 15 gardens created at multiple levels in the building. One of the gardens, The Farm @ Farrer, grows fruits, vegetables and herbs for the hotel kitchens, and at the same time, is a large outdoor green space for recovering patients to stroll and sun. Uniquely, Farrer Park Hospital patients enjoy meals prepared by chefs in the hotel’s kitchens and confectionery.

Our inpatient food service, for example, is also automated, so whatever appears on the electronic screen on a patient’s personal tablet matches their dietary restrictions. The menu is a matrix of over 200 items customized by hotel chefs and our hospital nutritionist. Food that is fresh, delicious and safe for patient consumption is our primary focus.

Not only do we benchmark ourselves with hospitals, but also we take our inspiration from other industries. We believe to be at the top, you need to look beyond, break through and recreate process models and apply them for use in healthcare.

 

Dr. Timothy Low Photo

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Chief Executive Officer Timothy Low, M.D., courtesy of Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore.

Chief Executive Officer of Farrer Park Hospital, Timothy Low, M.D., brings a strong leadership background in managing award-winning hospitals. Prior to his current role, Dr. Low served as CEO of Gleneagles Hospital in Singapore. Through his leadership, the hospital established itself as a six-star private healthcare provider, clinching 14 local and regional awards including the prestigious Asian Hospital Management Award as well as the the ‘National Work Redesign Model Company’ by Spring Singapore, a governing agency for innovation in Singapore. Under his leadership, revenues exceed 42 percent to over USD $100 million.

Having also served in senior management positions for pharmaceutical and medical device industries in the Asia Pacific region, Dr. Low’s breath of exposure allowed him to pioneer the establishment of a global contract research organization, validating Singapore as its regional headquarters.

With more than 28 years of experience in the health care industry with such leading companies as Covidien, Covance and Schering-Plough, Dr. Low brings with him a strong background of leadership within the business and medical community. With his vast experience and contributions to the industry, Dr. Low is listed in the ranks of Stanford Who’s Who.

Dr. Low received his Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and is also a graduate of the NUS Graduate School of Business, Stanford University Executive Program and the Singapore Management University Asia Pacific Hospital Management Program.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

Tan, W. (2016). Farrer Park Hospital patients can recuperate at adjoining hotel to ease ward crunch. The Straits Times. Retrieved from  http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/farrer-park-hospital-patients-can-recuperate-at-adjoining-hotel-to-ease-ward-crunch

Tan, W. (2016). New Farrer Park Hospital aims to offer ‘affordable’ private care. The Straits Times. Retrieved from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/new-farrer-park-hospital-aims-to-offer-affordable-private-care

Anonymous (2012). Singapore Medical Tourism: Farrer Park Healthcare and Hospitality Complex Will Open in 2013. International Medical Travel Journal. Retrieved from http://www.imtj.com/news/singapore-medical-tourism-farrer-park-healthcare-and-hospitality-complex-will-open-2013/

Retrieved from http://news.asiaone.com/news/yourhealth/farrer-park-hospital-appoints-new-ceo

Retrieved from http://today.mims.com/topic/farrer-park-hospital-opened-with-a-call-for-healthcare-changes-to-adapt-for-an-ageing-population-

Retrieved from http://www.farrerpark.com/hospital/Pages/Home.aspx

Retrieved from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/new-farrer-park-hospital-aims-to-offer-affordable-private-care

Retrieved from http://www.bca.gov.sg/friendlybuilding/FindBuilding/Building.aspx?id=4534

Retrieved from http://www.ttgasia.com/article.php?article_id=23292

 

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

Third Annual BioPrinting and 3D Printing in the Life Sciences, 21-22 July 2016 at Academia, Singapore General Hospital Campus

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/18/third-annual-bioprinting-and-3d-printing-in-the-life-sciences-21-22-july-2016-at-academia-singapore-general-hospital-campus/

2015

Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Experience

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/15/patient-satisfaction-with-hospital-experience/

2013

Cardiac Surgery Theatre in China vs. in the US: Cardiac Repair Procedures, Medical Devices in Use, Technology in Hospitals, Surgeons’ Training and Cardiac Disease Severity 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/08/cardiac-surgery-theatre-in-china-vs-in-the-us-cardiac-repair-procedures-medical-devices-in-use-technology-in-hospitals-surgeons-training-and-cardiac-disease-severity/

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Hospitals in China

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/options/scientific-delegation/shanghai-may-2013/hospitals-in-china/

 

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