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Archive for the ‘Institutional Capital Raised by Female Founders’ Category


 

From Technicall.y Philly.com

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Spark Therapeutics’ $4.8B deal confirmed as biggest-ever VC-backed exit in Philly

Quick update on this week’s news: The University City life sciences company’s acquisition by Swiss pharma giant Roche is the biggest acquisition ever of a VC-backed company within city limits, per PitchBook and PACT.

The eye-popping $4.8 billion sticker price on Spark Therapeutics’acquisition deal with Roche announced on Monday is shaping up to be the largest exit ever within city limits for a venture-backed company, according to data from financial data provider PitchBook and the Philadelphia Alliance for Capital and Technologies (PACT).

“Filtering down to just Philadelphia proper does reveal that Spark Therapeutics, once the deal closes, will be the biggest exit ever for Philly-based venture-backed exits,” the company said in an email, citing data from an upcoming report.

According to the Seattle-based company’s data, the current holder of the largest Philly-proper exit title goes to Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, which in 2010 announced its acquisition by Lilly in a deal valued at up to $800 million.

Founded in 2013, Spark is a publicly traded spinout of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), which invested $33 million in the company. The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that CHOP stands to reap a total return of $430 million for its minority stake in Spark Therapeutics.

As part of the acquisition deal, the company will remain based out of 3711 Market St., and continue to do business as a standalone Roche company.

“This transaction demonstrates the enormous value that global biotech companies like Roche see in gene therapy, a field in which Philadelphia is the unquestioned leader,” said Saul Behar, senior VP of  advancement and strategic initiatives at the University City Science Center, the West Philly research park where Spark began and grew its operations. “[This] further validates Greater Philadelphia’s status as a biotech hub with a very bright future.”

Spark CEO Jeff Marrazzo said the deep pool of resources from Roche, the company plans to “accelerate the development of more gene therapies for more patients for more diseases and further expedite our vision of a world where no life is limited by genetic disease.”

Other articles on Gene Therapy and Retinal Disease on this Open Access Online Journal include:

Women Leaders in Cell and Gene Therapy

AGTC (AGTC) , An adenoviral gene therapy startup, expands in Florida with help from $1 billion deal with Biogen

Artificial Vision: Cornell and Stanford Researchers crack Retinal Code

D-Eye: a smartphone-based retinal imaging system

 

 

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37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019: Deals and Announcements

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

From Biospace.com

JP Morgan Healthcare Conference Update: FDA, bluebird, Moderna and the Price of Coffee

Researcher holding test tube up behind circle of animated research icons

Tuesday, January 8, was another busy day in San Francisco for the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference. One interesting sideline was the idea that the current government shutdown could complicate some deals. Kent Thiry, chief executive officer of dialysis provider DaVita, who is working on the sale of its medical group to UnitedHealth Group this quarter, said, “We couldn’t guarantee that even if the government wasn’t shut down, but we and the buyer are both working toward that goal with the same intensity if not more.”

And in a slightly amusing bit of synchrony, U.S.Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s keynote address that was delivered by way of video conference from Washington, D.C., had his audio cut out in the middle of the presentation. Gottlieb was talking about teen nicotine use and continued talking, unaware that his audio had shut off for 30 seconds. When it reconnected, the sound quality was reportedly poor.

Click to search for life sciences jobs

bluebird bio’s chief executive officer, Nick Leschlygave an update of his company’s pipeline, with a particular emphasis on a proposed payment model for its upcoming LentiGlobin, a gene therapy being evaluated for transfusion-dependent ß-thalassemia (TDT). The gene therapy is expected to be approved in Europe this year and in the U.S. in 2020. Although the price hasn’t been set, figures up to $2.1 million per treatment have been floated. Bluebird is proposing a five-year payment program, a pledge to not raise prices above CPI, and no costs after the payment period.

Eli Lilly’s chief executive officer David Ricks, just days after acquiring Loxo Oncologyoffered up projections for this year, noting that 45 percent of its revenue will be created by drugs launched in 2015. Those include Trulicity, Taltz and Verzenio. The company also expects to launch two new molecular entities this year—nasal glucagons, a rescue medicine for high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and Lasmiditan, a rescue drug for migraine headaches.

CNBC’s Jim Cramer interviewed Allergan chief executive officer Brent Saunders, in particular discussing the fact the company’s shares traded in 2015 for $331.15 but were now trading for $145.60. Cramer noted that the company’s internal fundamentals were strong, with multiple pipeline assets and a strong leadership team. Some of the stock problems are related to what Saunders said were “unforced errors,” including intellectual property rights to Restasis, its dry-eye drug, and Allergan’s dubious scheme to protect those patents by transferring the rights to the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe in New York. On the positive side, the company’s medical aesthetics portfolio, dominated by Botox, is very strong and the overall market is expected to double.

One of the big areas of conversation is so-called “flyover tech.” Biopharma startups are dominant in Boston and in San Francisco, but suddenly venture capital investors have realized there’s a lot going on in between. New York City-based Radian Capital, for example, invests exclusively in markets outside major U.S. cities.

“At Radian, we partner with entrepreneurs who have built their businesses with a focus on strong economics rather than growth at all costs,” Aly Lovett, partner at Radian, told The Observer. “Historically, given the amount of money required to stand up a product, the software knowledge base, and coastal access to capital, health start-ups were concentrated in a handful of cities. As those dynamics have inverted and as the quality of living becomes a more important factor in attracting talent, we’re not seeing a significant increase in the number of amazing companies being built outside of the Bay Area.”

“Flyover companies” mentioned include Bind in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Solera Health in Phoenix, Arizona; ClearDATA in Austin, Texas; Healthe, in Eden Prairie, Minnesota; HistoSonics in Ann Arbor, Michigan; and many others.

Only a month after its record-breaking IPO, Moderna Therapeutics’ chief executive officer Stephane Bancelspent time both updating the company’s clinical pipeline and justifying the company’s value despite the stock dropping off 26 percent since the IPO. Although one clinical program, a Zika vaccine, mRNA-1325, has been abandoned, the company has three new drugs coming into the clinic: mRNA-2752 for solid tumors or lymphoma; mRNA-4157, a Personalized Cancer Vaccine with Merck; and mRNA-5671, a KRAS cancer vaccine. The company also submitted an IND amendment to the FDA to add an ovarian cancer cohort to its mRNA-2416 program.

One interesting bit of trivia, supplied on Twitter by Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, this year at the conference, 33 female chief executive officers were presenting corporate updates … compared to 19 men named Michael. Well, it’s a start.

And for another bit of trivia, Elisabeth Bik, of Microbiome Digest, tweeted, “San Francisco prices are so out of control that one hotel is charging the equivalent of $21.25 for a cup of coffee during a JPMorgan conference.”

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

36th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE January 8 – 11, 2018

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

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Institutional Capital Raised by Female Founders in 2016 – A Global Perspective vs the US Economy: Globally 1,272 in the United States 600

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

2016 REVIEW OF FEMALE FOUNDERS RAISING INSTITUTIONAL CAPITAL

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

 

The Data Reflects Several Key Trends
Key Takeaways

Raising a Series A led by an institutional VC remains difficult, but female founders in NYC continued to be the most successful (compared to those in other cities) in 2016.
At 17%, the percentage of total A rounds led by female CEOs in 2016 represents the highest total percentage since Female Founders Fund started tracking the data in 2013.
In addition, New York saw a record number of Series B and C rounds led by female founders in 2016.
Female Founders Fund remains the most active institutional VC firm investing in early-stage female-led companies.
Funds that have traditionally been uninterested in e-commerce have renewed interest in the e-commerce sector following the Dollar Shave Club and Jet.com acquisitions by large strategic investors.

2016 Series A Rounds — NYC — Female CEO
Rockets of Awesome — $12.5 million — December — Rachel Blumenthal
Ellevest — $9.0 million — September — Sallie Krawcheck
CoheroHealth — $9.0 million — November — Melissa Manice
Away — $8.5 million — September — Steph Korey
Primary– $8.0 million — June — Galyn Bernard
goTenna — $7.5 million — March — Daniela Perdomo
LOLA — $7.0 million — December — Alex Friedman and Jordana Kier
Uncharted Play — $7.0 million — September — Jessica Matthews
Thrive Global — $7.0 million — August — Arianna Huffington
Everplans — $6.4 million — June — Abby Schneiderman
pymetrics — $6.1 million — February — Frida Polli
Sakara Life — $4.8 million — January — Whitney Tingle, Danielle DuBoise
Shoppable — $3.5 million — August — Heather Marie
MMLaFleur — Sarah LaFleur

2016 Series A Rounds — Bay Area — Female CEO

Cortexyme — $15.0 million — January — Casey Lynch
FOVE — $11.0 million — March — Yuka Kojima
Front — $10.0 million — May — Mathilde Collin
REBBL — $10.0 million — December — Sheryl O’Loughlin
Nima — $9.2 million — May — Shireen Yates
Rocksbox — $8.7 million — March — Meaghan Rose
LaunchDarkly — $8.7 million — December — Edith Harbaugh
Modsy — $8.0 million — February — Shanna Tellerman
ThirdLove — $8.0 million — February — Heidi Zak
Node — $7.5 million — June — Falon Fatemi
Shippo — $7.0 million — September — Laura Behrens Wu
Mobilize — $6.5 million — September — Sharon Savariego
Neurotrack — $6.5 million — January — Elli Kaplan
Sourcery — $5.0 million — September — Na’ama Moran
Luka — $4.4 million — April — Eugenia Kuyda
SupportPay — $4.1 million — December — Sheri Atwood
Zybooks — $4.0 million — February — Smita Bakshi
Schoola — $3.6 million — May — Stacey Boyd

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

 

 

Series A Rounds in 2016

Our 2016 analysis began with an overall review of Series A rounds globally, nationally and regionally.

2017 Research Graph 1

Series A Rounds Raised Globally, Nationally and Regionally in 2016

Series A Rounds in 2016:

 

 

 

2016 Series A Rounds in 2016:

Globally: 1,272
United States: 600
Bay Area: 187
NYC: 84
Boston: 31
Los Angeles: 38
Seattle: 26
Austin: 7
Washington D.C.: 17

2015 Series A Rounds in 2015:

Globally: 1,164

United States: 664

Bay Area: 205

NYC: 96

Boston: 50

Los Angeles: 40

Seattle: 25

Austin: 22

Washington D.C.: 17

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

The total number of Series A rounds in the U.S. decreased by 10% in 2016. Of the seven regions that we track in the U.S., Seattle is the only region that experienced an increase in the number of Series A raises in 2016, at 4%.

While overall Series A activity declined slightly in Los Angeles, there were two large Series A raises for female-led businesses — (i) HopSkipDrive, led by CEO Joanna McFarland, which raised $10.2 million in January 2016 from Upfront Ventures and FirstMark Capital; and (ii) Hutch, led by CEO Beatrice Fischel-Bock, which raised $5 million in July 2016 from Founders Fund. Los Angeles remains among the most female entrepreneur-friendly cities in the U.S.

 

VC’s investing in female-led companies in 2016.

Female Founders Fund remained the most active investor, participating in 3 of the 14 — or 21% — of all female-led A rounds in NYC. – See more at: http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

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