Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Rare diseases’


Targeting amyloidopathy

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

LPBI

 

Targeting a rare amyloidotic disease through rationally designed polymer conjugates

Inmaculada Conejos–Sánchez, Isabel Cardoso, Maria J. Saraiva, María J.Vicent
Journal of Controlled Release 178 (2014), 95–100
Saraiva et al. discovered in 2006 a RAGE-based peptide sequence capable of preventing transthyretin (TTR) aggregate-induced cytotoxicity, hallmark of initial stages of an inherited rare amyloidosis known as Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy (FAP). To allow clinical progression of this peptidic sequence as FAP treatment, a family of polymer conjugates has been designed, synthesised and fully characterised. This approach fulfills the strategies defined in the Polymer Therapeutics area as an exhaustive physico-chemical characterisation fitting activity output towards a novel molecular target that is described here. RAGE peptide acts extracellularly, therefore, nointracellular drug delivery was necessary. PEG was selected as carrier and polymer–drug linker optimisation was then carried out by means of biodegradable (disulphide) and non-biodegradable (amide) covalent bonds. Conjugate size in solution, stability under invitro and in vivo scenarios and TTR binding affinity through surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was also performed with all synthesised conjugates. In their in vitro evaluation by monitoring the activation of caspase-3 in Schwann cells, peptide derivatives demonstrated retention of peptide activity reducing TTR aggregates (TTRagg) cytotoxicity upon conjugation and a greater plasma stability than the parent free peptide. The results also confirmed that a more stable polymer–peptide linker (amide) is required to secure therapeutic efficiency.

Polymer therapeutics are well established as successful first generation nanomedicines for treatment of infectious diseases and cancer[1]. Polymer–protein, drug and aptamer conjugates are innovative chemical entities capable of improving bioactive compound properties and thus increasing efficacy and decreasing toxicity[2,3]. Design of second generation of conjugates is now focussing on improved polymer structures, polymer–based combination therapy and novel molecular targets with great potential to further progress the clinical importance of these unique technologies [4]. Novel conjugates for the treatment of neuropathological disorders are proposed in this study. Amyloidosis is well known in the form of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but the target disease here is a rarer pathological disorder named familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP). FAPs constitute an important group of inherited amyloidosis diseases, and one of the most commonFAPs is caused by a mutated protein called transthyretin (TTR), which forms amyloid deposits, mainly in the peripheral nervous system [5]. The aggregation cascade of this mutated protein, produces a TTR aggregate (TTRagg) able to trigger neurodegeneration through engagement with the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) which is present on peripheral neurons. RAGE signalling has been defined to be involved in many human pathologies such as Alzhehimer’s disease, diabetes and ageing, among others. This receptor is also up-regulated in tissues fromFAP patients [6]. The secreted RAGE form, named soluble RAGE (sRAGE), acts as a decoy to trap ligands and prevent interaction with cell surface receptors. sRAGE was shown to have important inhibitory effects in several cell cultures and transgenic mouse models, in which it prevented or reversed full-length RAGE signalling.

Saraiva et al. [7] discovered a specific peptidic sequence (named RAGE peptide) that is able to suppress TTRagg-induced cytotoxicity in cell culture. A reduced version of that peptide was proved to maintain the activity and the affinity of the initial peptide. The final peptide (compound A) contains 6 amino acids and responds to the sequence (from N to C terminus): YVRVRY. Although this provides an opportunity to design novel therapeutics for FAP treatment, peptide therapeutics themselves display well known challenges for in vivo use, e.g. low stability, poor pharmacokinetics and potential immunogenicity. Moreover the RAGE peptide demonstrates low solubility in plasma limiting its potential for i.v.administration.

……

Herein, novel specific nanoconjugates for the treatment of amyloidosis, and in particular familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy are reported. Apart from the research reported by Prof Arima et al. [22] using a hepatocyte-targeted FAP siRNA complex with lactosylated dendrimer (G3)/α-cyclodextrin(Lac-α-CDE(G3)), no other type of polymer therapeutic has been reported up to now for the treatment of this chronic degenerative family of diseases. Our rational design started from an active biomolecule of peptidic nature (RAGE peptide) that recognises the TTR prefibrillar aggregates responsible to promote cell death in FAPpatients [7]. The clinical progress of this promising inhibitor was masked by the well-known limitations of peptides, such as low solubility, low stability and possible immunogenicity. PEGylation through various linking strategies was successfully accomplished here as a solution for the named drawbacks, using a systematic approach to maintain peptide activity and receptor binding specificity. The data relating toTTR binding affinity, conjugate linker stability and the conjugate size distribution in solution of PEG– RAGE peptide conjugates indicate that the conjugates containing amide linkers have the greatest potential for further development as FAP inhibitors. Moreover, this novel conjugate has promising possibilities as a FAP therapeutic to be used alone in the early stages of the disease or as part of rationally designed combination therapy [23,24]. Preliminary in vivo studies (biodistribution) are shown in the supporting information demonstrating the enhanced plasma stability of the peptide upon conjugation (Fig.5S) , showing nospecific accumulation in any organ and renal excretion. More exhaustive in vivo experiments are currently ongoing with selected conjugates.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »