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Archive for the ‘Patient’s Voice: Personal Experience with Invasive Medical Procedures’ Category


Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

This article appeared on the website of Cardiovascular Business

‘Patient No. 1’ from a Hep C heart transplant study shares his story

By the time three transplant physicians approached Tom Giangiulio Jr. about being the first patient in a new clinical trial to accept a heart from a Hepatitis C-positive donor, Giangiulio didn’t have much of a choice.

He had already been on the heart transplant waitlist for more than two years, he was a live-in at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and he had a body size (6-foot-2, 220 pounds) and blood type (O-positive) that was difficult to match to a donor.

It took Giangiulio less than 24 hours to speak to his previous cardiologist and his family and decide to enroll in the program. The doctors at Penn explained to him that because of new medications that can cure Hepatitis C, they were confident the virus could be eradicated post-transplant.

“There was no hesitation at all, not with me,” said Carin Giangiulio, Tom’s wife of 33 years. “Because I knew what the alternative was and we didn’t have too much choice except for going on a VAD (ventricular assist device) … and he didn’t want to do that. I said, ‘If they have a cure, then it’s a no-brainer. Let’s just do it.’ And I’m glad we did because I don’t think he would’ve been here today.”

Tom, 59, is set to celebrate his second anniversary with his new heart in June. He received the heart the day after Father’s Day in 2017 and subsequently contracted Hepatitis C, which was promptly wiped out with a 12-week regimen of elbasvir/grazoprevir (Zepatier).

Some of Giangiulio’s doctors at Penn published in February their experience with the first 10 patients in the clinical trial, called USHER, in the American Journal of Transplantation. All nine patients who survived were cured of Hepatitis C thanks to the antiviral therapy.

The implications of the research are massive, said Rhondalyn McLean, MD, MHS, the medical director of Penn’s heart transplant program and lead author of the recently published study. For the past two decades, the U.S. has struggled to increase the number of heart transplants above about 3,000 per year. And every year, patients die waiting for a heart transplant or become too sick to handle a transplant surgery.

McLean estimated 700 hearts from donors with Hepatitis C are discarded each year in the U.S. If even half of those are suitable for transplant, it would increase by 10 percent the number of organs that are available for implantation.

“There are so many people who have end-stage heart failure who die waiting for transplant, so anytime that we can increase our access to organs then I think we’re all going to be happy about that,” McLean said. “I think the people believe in the medicine, they believe that Hepatitis C is curable, so the risk to these folks is low. With the results of the study, I think we’ve proven that we can do this safely and the medications have great efficacy.”

Transplanting Hepatitis C-positive hearts isn’t a new idea, McLean explained.

“We used to do this all the time (with) the thinking that Hepatitis C usually doesn’t cause a problem for many, many years, so if hearts are only going to last 13 years or so and Hepatitis C doesn’t usually cause a problem for 30 years in someone, it should be an OK thing to do,” she said.

But then a study published in the 1990s found Hepatitis C-negative patients who accepted a heart from a donor with Hepatitis C actually had an increased risk of death compared to those who received normal hearts, and the practice of using these organs ceased.

However, with the new medications—the first commercially available treatment for Hepatitis C was approved by the FDA in 2014—McLean and her team are systematically studying the safety of implanting these hearts and then wiping out the virus once it’s contracted. And they’re optimistic about the program, which showed the first 10 patients had no evidence of the virus after their 12-week medication regimens.

“That met the criteria for sustained virologic response and those patients are deemed to be cured,” she said. “There’s no reason to think that this population would be any different than your normal, nontransplant population (in terms of Hepatitis C reappearing) so I think it was a pretty successful study.”

Penn researchers are also studying a similar approach in kidney and lung transplant candidates, which could help patients stuck on waitlists for those organs as well.

McLean described the increasing availability of these organs as an “unfortunate benefit” of the opioid epidemic. Through sharing needles, many opioid users are contracting Hepatitis C and dying young. Organs from young donors tend to perform better and often have no other problems, so solving the Hep C issue through medication could have a huge impact if this strategy is eventually rolled out on a broader scale.

“It’s hard when you have single-center studies,” McLean said. “They’re always promising, but in order to get a better assessment of what we’re doing and how the drug is doing I think you need to combine numbers so there has to be a registry that looks at all of the patients who have received these drugs and then using numbers to determine whether this is a successful strategy for us. And I believe that it will be.”

Those are the large-scale implications of this research. Tom Giangiulio can share the personal side.

Patient No. 1

Giangiulio said he feels “extremely gifted” to be Patient No. 1 in the USHER program. He knows he may not be alive if he wasn’t.

He recalls going into ventricular tachycardia about a week before his transplant and said it “scared the daylights” out of him.

“The amount of red tape, meetings and research, technology, and things that had to happen at a very precise moment in time for me to be the first … it’s mind-boggling to think about it,” he said. “But for all that to happen and for it to happen when it happened—and for me to get the heart when I got it—there was a lot of divine intervention along with a lot of people that were involved.”

Giangiulio has also experienced some powerful moments since receiving the transplant. After a bit of written correspondence with his donor’s family, he met the young man’s family one weekend in December of 2018.

He said riding over to the meeting was probably the most tense he’s ever been, but once he arrived the experience far exceeded his expectations.

“We were there for 2 ½ hours and nobody wanted to leave,” Giangiulio said.

The donor’s mother got Giangiulio a gift, a ceramic heart with a photograph of her son. A fellow transplant patient had told Giangiulio about a product called Enso, a kidney-shaped object you can hold in your hand which plays a recording of a user’s heartbeat.

Giangiulio decided to give it to her.

“I was very cautious at the advice of the people here at Penn,” he said. “Nobody knew how she would react to it. It might bother her, she could be thrilled to death. And she was, she was thrilled to death with it and she sleeps with it every night. She boots up the app and she listens to my heartbeat on that app every night.”

Another moment that sticks out to Giangiulio is meeting Patient No. 7 in the USHER program, who he remains in touch with. They ran into each other while waiting to get blood work done, and began talking about their shared experience as transplant recipients.

The clinical trial came up and Giangiulio slow-played his involvement, asking Patient No. 7 about the trial and not letting on that he was ultra-familiar with the program.

When Giangiulio finally told him he was Patient No. 1, Patient No. 7 “came launching out of his chair” to hug him.

“He said, ‘I owe you my life,’” Giangiulio recalled.

After Giangiulio responded that it was the doctors he really owed, Patient No. 7 said he had specifically asked how Patient No. 1 was doing when McLean first offered the program to him.

“She explained that I was going to be No. 7. … I didn’t care about 6, 5, 4, 3 or 2. I wanted to know how No. 1 was doing,” Giangiulio recalled of the conversation. “He said, ‘That was you. … They told me how well you were doing and that if I wanted you’d come here and talk to me, so I owe you.’”

Giangiulio feels strongly about giving back and reciprocating the good fortune he’s had. That’s why he talks to fellow patients and the media to share his story—because it could save other people’s lives, too.

He can’t do as much physical labor as he used to, but he remains involved in the excavating company he owns with his brothers and is the Emergency Management Coordinator for Waterford Township, New Jersey. He also serves on the township’s planning board and was previously Director of Public Safety.

“To me, he’s Superman,” Carin Giangiulio said. “It was insane, completely insane what the human body can endure and still survive.”

That now includes being given a heart with Hepatitis C and then wiping out the virus with the help of modern medicine.

“I would tell (other transplant candidates) to not fear it, especially if you’re here at Penn,” Giangiulio said. “I know there’s a lot of good hospitals across the country, but my loyalty kind of lies here for understandable reasons.”

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2016

People with blood type O have been reported to be protected from coronary heart disease, cancer, and have lower cholesterol levels.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/11/people-with-blood-type-o-have-been-reported-to-be-protected-from-coronary-heart-disease-cancer-and-have-lower-cholesterol-levels/

2015

A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery from Diagnosis and Intervention to Recovery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/10/a-patients-perspective-on-open-heart-surgery-from-diagnosis-and-intervention-to-recovery/

No evidence to change current transfusion practices for adults undergoing complex cardiac surgery: RECESS evaluated 1,098 cardiac surgery patients received red blood cell units stored for short or long periods

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/08/no-evidence-to-change-current-transfusion-practices-for-adults-undergoing-complex-cardiac-surgery-recess-evaluated-1098-cardiac-surgery-patients-received-red-blood-cell-units-stored-for-short-or-lon/

2013

ACC/AHA Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/05/accaha-guidelines-for-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-surgery/

On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac SurgeryPrediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/

 

Editor’s note:

I wish to encourage the e-Reader of this Interview to consider reading and comparing the experiences of other Open Heart Surgery Patients, voicing their private-life episodes in the ER that are included in this recently published volume, The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/21/the-voices-of-patients-hospital-ceos-health-care-providers-caregivers-and-families-personal-experience-with-critical-care-and-invasive-medical-procedures/

 

I also wish to encourage the e-Reader to consider, if interested, reviewing additional e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases from the same Publisher, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, on Amazon.com.

  • Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms, on Amazon since 6/2/12013

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

  • Cardiovascular, Volume Two: Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation, on Amazon since 11/30/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics, on Amazon since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four: Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases, on Amazon since 12/26/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

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Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

This article appeared on the web site of Harley Street Concierge, one of the U.K.’s leading independent providers of clinical, practical and emotion support for cancer patients. 

Cancer at Work: An Interview With Barbara Wilson

Whether you’re supporting an employee through cancer at work. Or you’re a cancer patient struggling to get the support you need. Either way, this Q and A with Barbara Wilson will help you out. Read on for a glimpse into Barbara’s personal experience with breast cancer. Find out where companies are falling short of supporting employees. Discover what you need to do if you’re feeling unsupported at work. And learn what’s unacceptable for Barbara in a modern and civilised society.

In a 2013 interview about cancer at work, you expressed amazement at “the lack of understanding there is about cancer. And what the impact is on individuals”. How would you say this has improved in the last 4 years? And what do you feel still needs to change?

There’s greater awareness and understanding about cancer at work. More organisations are aware of the difficulties people face. But many organisations don’t appreciate that recovery isn’t straightforward or quick. They also tend to rely on generic return to work policies. And these are inappropriate when it comes to supporting people recovering from cancer. A lot still depends on how far the local line manager is prepared to support an employee. And whether they’ll bend rules if need be about leave or sick pay.

You were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and given the all clear in 2010. What did you learn about yourself through treatment and recovery?

 

I learned that I wasn’t immortal or superhuman! And also that life is precious and so it’s important to make the best of it. That doesn’t actually mean counting off things on your bucket list. Or living each day as if it’s your last. It’s about appreciating what you have, family, friends and the sheer joy of being alive.

“Life is precious. It’s about appreciating what you have, family, friends and the sheer joy of being alive.”

It’s a common misperception that people in remission want more family time or to travel the world. What reasons do your clients share with you for wanting to get back to work?

Yes. Before I had cancer, I remember asking a terminally ill employee why she still wanted to work. And she worked until a fortnight before her death. The simple answer is that it’s about feeling normal. Using your brain. Being with friends and colleagues rather than on your own. And losing yourself in your work. There are also financial reasons. But typically – and I can say this based on my own experience – it’s about being ‘you’ again rather than a cancer patient.

“I remember asking a terminally ill employee why she still wanted to work. And she worked until a fortnight before her death. Typically – and I can say this based on my own experience – it’s about being ‘you’ again rather than a cancer patient.”

You share tips for employers and HR professionals in this article for Macmillan. And you set out how to support a colleague during and after cancer treatment. What would you say to an employee who isn’t feeling supported by their employer or colleagues in this way?

In my experience there are two main reasons why people often aren’t supported.

1. Bosses and colleagues don’t understand the full impact of cancer treatment. They won’t understand what fatigue is or chemo brain or peripheral neuropathy. So they often expect people to get ‘back to normal’ work after 6 to 8 weeks. But recovery can take many months. This isn’t helped by the person often looking fit and well.

2. People don’t like talking about cancer at work. They feel awkward. And as a result often decide to say nothing. We advise people to be open from the outset. To understand their right to reasonable adjustments. And their responsibility to update their employer about their recovery and support needs. Employees recovering from cancer often have to take the lead. They have to guide their colleagues about the specific help they need. You can’t expect others to do it for you. It sounds wrong but that’s how it is.

“Bosses and colleagues often expect people to get ‘back to normal’ work after 6 to 8 weeks. But recovery can take many months. “

More than 100,000 people had to wait more than 2 weeks to see a cancer specialist in the UK last year. 25,153 had to wait more than 62 days to start treatment. What’s your reaction to these statistics?

It’s shocking. The worry for patients and their families during this period is totally debilitating. And on top of this it means that the cancer is growing unchecked. Where the cancer is aggressive, the delay may threaten lives. And it will certainly add to the overall costs of care. We really have to address this. It’s just not acceptable in a modern and civilised society.

“The worry for patients and their families during this period is totally debilitating. We really have to address this.”

Finally, can you tell us more about Working With Cancer?

Working With Cancer is a social enterprise and was established in June 2014. We support people affected by cancer to lead fulfilling and rewarding working lives. That means helping people to successfully return to work or remain in work. Or sometimes it’s about helping people to find work – depending on their personal needs. We work with corporate, charities and other third sector organisations to support people throughout the UK.

We coach people diagnosed with cancer to re-establish their working lives. And we train employers to understand how to manage work and cancer. We’ll advise teams about how to support a colleague affected by cancer. And we help carers juggle work whilst supporting their loved ones. Working With Cancer also helps organisations to update or improve their policies.

Barbara Wilson - Cancer at Work

About Barbara Wilson

Barbara Wilson is a senior HR professional with almost 40 years’ experience.  Roles include Group Head of Strategic HR at Catlin Group Ltd. Deputy Head of HR at Schroders Investment Management. And Chief of Staff to the Group HR Director at Barclays. After a breast cancer diagnosis, Barbara launched Working With Cancer. It’s a Social Enterprise providing coaching, training and consultancy to employers, employees, carers and health professionals.

 

For more information about Working With Cancer, click here to visit the websiteFollow this link to connect with Barbara on Twitter. Email admin@workingwithcancer.co.uk. Or call 07508 232257 or 07919 147784.

 

SOURCE

https://harleystreetconcierge.com/cancer-at-work/

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

2018

Top 10 Cancer Research Priorities

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/12/24/top-10-cancer-research-priorities/

Innovation + Technology = Good Patient Experience

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/12/24/innovation-technology-good-patient-experience/

2017

Inspiring Book for ALL Cancer Survivors, ALL Cancer Patients and ALL Cardiac Patients – The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/10/24/inspiring-book-for-all-cancer-survivors-all-cancer-patients-and-all-cardiac-patients-the-voices-of-patients-hospitals-ceos-health-care-providers-caregivers-and-families-personal-experience-with/

2016

Funding Opportunities for Cancer Research

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/08/funding-opportunities-for-cancer-research/

2012

The Incentive for “Imaging based cancer patient’ management”

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/27/the-incentive-for-imaging-based-cancer-patient-management/

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Tweets by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 for #PMConf  at The 13th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, From Concept to the Clinic, November 14–16, 2017, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur Boston, MA 02115

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

 

All TWEETS from LPBI’s Twitter.com handles at #PMConf 

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari Retweeted Gary An

    nice comment

    Aviva Lev-Ari added,

  2. Narrative plan unsupported by facts

  3. Robert C. Green, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Genomes2People Research Program, Professor of Medicine (Genetics), Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Broad Institute and Harvard Medical School pharmacogenomics can harm if odds are so low adherence will be lower

  4. Michael Snyder, Ph.D., Stanford W. Ascherman Professor, Chair, Department of Genetics, Director, Center of GenomiPersonalized Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine Personal sequencing for multiple etiologies rich people are sequenced

  5. Tom Miller, M.S., Founder, Managing Partner, GreyBird Ventures LLC duty to call up therapies that will not work, balance addressed by PM – diagnostics in PM clinical utility from patient selection for the therapy the patient will respond to

  6. Sandro Galea, M.D., School of Public Health, Boston University US expense on Health care the highest in the World comes on the expense of housings, mental health, education – curative vs preventive care MDs are insentiviced to keep patients sick

  7. Robert C. Green, M.D., Broad Institute and HMS Platinum vs gold standard 59 genes will identify 80,000 will get the disease and 47,000 will never get the disease, is the technology the reason for investment vs Family history?

  8. Bryce Olson, Global Marketing Director, Health and Life Sciences Group, Intel Corporation Genome sequencing found his Pi3K Pathway – PIK3CA p.E54 – Anti Inhibitor for Pi3K = Precision Medicine

  9. Sean Khozin, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Director (Acting), Oncology Center of Excellence, FDA 21st Century – metastatic solid tumors – 900 patients: accommodated plan Lab developed Tests: new approach Efficiency, transparency

  10. innovation INFORMS at NIH Center of Excellence – data collection and analysis of multiple data types Biometric sensors collecting data on cancer patients collaboration with Academia, single arm vs randomized decentralized devices are collecting data

  11. FDA considers N of One, small samples, EGFR drug was approved in 2 1/2 years since Phase 1 of NDA New trial designs: reduce bias and alternative end points narrow criteria for participation, more personalized and more patient-centered innovation

  12. Sean Khozin, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Director (Acting), Oncology Center of Excellence, FDA Advances of technology of biomarkers, disease indication Accelerated approval by FDA a collaborative of speeding the process companion diagnosis assays

  13. Unmet need, commitment is there, innovation and connectivity drive access, collaboration not competition – helps Precision medicine in emerging nations. Access to PM anywhere in the world suggested Kristin Pothier, MS, Global Head, Life Sciences EY

  14. Stephen L. Eck, M.D., Ph.D., President, CEO, Aravive Biologics; Board Chairman, PMC Laxo – A molecular target to be found by diagnostics TEST — as a basis to develop a drug Pricing and value – dimensions of Value to society How PM is done today?

  15. Marc S. Williams, MD Geisinger Clinical Genomics vs Physician specialist (i.e.,hypercholestoralemia), both in same place – paper and EMR Outcomes – tracking patients over decades – systems in place to capture the data Virtual Cycle Clinical data

  16. Timothy Cannon, M.D., Inova Molecular Tumor Board, 5 hospital in VA, Precision Genomics Cancer Therapy Poor understanding of molecular results by MDs, Refractory Patients no Forum to discuss other options 220 patients presented beyond InovaOncologi

  17. Scott A. Beck, Mayo Clinic, MN, AZ PM, Genomics sequencing, BioEthics, IT, Translational Perspective in Epi-genomics, Discovery to Translation Applicattions Pharmacy- Formulary – EMR – Champions from Disease areas to practice environment Testing

  18. payment dominates delivery of care, future PM from Genomics cost to patients Transform acceptability of PM suggested Ronald A. Paulus, M.D., M.B.A., President, CEO, Mission Health, NC, ex-Geisinger, CIO

  19. Genomics based PM to be turned into Wellness Strategy – the path not yet knows said Jeffrey R. Balser, M.D., Ph.D., Dean, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; President, CEO, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

  20. Millianlian Diabetics NOT on Medicare, Analytics: iPhone telling patient dishes to order since SYSTEM KNOWS BLOOD SUGER 24×7 – target care by Analytics Genomics paid by NIH PM Analytics is built at Vanderbilt University MC, Jeffrey R. Balser, CEO

  21. Survival of patient with mutation and targeted drug LIVE LONGER David B. Roth, M.D., Ph.D., Simon Flexner Professor Chair, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania

  22. Lotte Steuten, Ph.D., School of Pharmacy at University of Washington, Seattle aggregate big data , models as evidence, has value to clinical, the model under development NGS Profile of Patient vs current standard of care.

  23. David B. Roth, M.D., Ph.D., UPenn Director, Penn Center for Precision Medicine 5000 patients underwent genome sequencing Interpretation is the issue that is hard Health IT are still in silos: Pharmacy data, financial data, EMR

  24. Michael Pellini, M.D., M.B.A., Chairman, Board of Directors, Foundation Medicine; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition, we know there is value in PM we need to work together on the challenges — to prove the value in PM

  25. Andrea Stern Ferris, M.B.A., President, Chairman of the Board, LUNGevity Foundation – PATIENT to be included in the conversation patient after successful treatment have hope work pay taxes pay to health plans continue family life

  26. Molecular Era, NEJM, 2017, 377, 1813-1823, BRAF in Melanoma – 80% do not need additional therapy vs 20% benefitted in the Non-Molecular Era, data by Dane J. Dickson, CureOne (formerly MED-C); Oregon Health and Science University

  27. CURES – CAR-T are they cures??? A teen-ager’s Value-based Price: $475,000 x years lived suggests  Steven D. Pearson, M.D., M.Sc., Founder, President, Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER)

  28. Of 134 drugs in development – 42 have the potential to become Personalized medicine therapies, said Stephen J. Ubl, President, CEO, PhRMA

  29. Transplantation vs enhancement – resistance to senescence and pathogens to be achieved by gene editing suggests George M. Church, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics

  30. Regulatory oversight on engineering embrios is coming, metric of success in recruitment of patients said Arthur L. Caplan, Ph.D., Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Chair, Director, Division of Medical Ethics, New York Univ

  31. CRISPR does not handle all mutation many require a different editing tool said George M. Church, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics, Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology

  32. understand well enough  the gentic application where CRISPR will assist medicine: Retinal degeneration, two aspects one worked in Japan said Katrine Bosley, CEO, Editas Medicine

  33. Aviva Lev-Ari Retweeted Aviva Lev-Ari

    Amazing Power in hands of informed patients

    Aviva Lev-Ari added,

  34. Patients input and sophistication increased – IRB is not aware of the engagement of Patients and their challenging feedback say Deborah Schrag, M.D., M.P.H, Dana Farber

  35. Physicians needs interfaces, dashboard information delivered to MDs, data sits unused, new tools are needed for the data display by relevance to the MDs – clinicians needs decision support in their office

  36. Standards: Toxicity criteria – library of 882 symptoms, Patient reported outcomes by Patients, Resist criteria applied to imaging data criteria for brain tumors said Deborah Schrag, M.D., M.P.H., Chief Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber

  37. drafting document on Verify data integrity in clinical trials, detect discrepancies compromise the integrity of the data – audits by FDA said Sean Khozin, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Director (Acting), Oncology Center of Excellence, FDA

  38. pre-existing autoimmune disease – not indicated for them Immunotherapy even though patients wish to try said Deborah Schrag, M.D., M.P.H., Chief, Division of Population Sciences, Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

  39. Drug approved for one indication, provide new data for supplemental indications said Sean Khozin, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Director (Acting), Oncology Center of Excellence, FDA

  40. Eric G. Klein, Pharm.D, Eli Lilly Aggregate burden of disease, existence of co-morbidities Genomics: WHY is explained – precise tools data vs intelligence – interoperability Past clinical trial, replicate studies retrospective data

  41. linkages vs computational techniques we do not have consistent data, data structured Vital sign or WBC count – we have data standardization is evolving said Deborah Schrag, M.D., M.P.H., Chief, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

  42. use data sets prospective vs retrospective studies asked Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical Officer, Chief Scientific Officer, Flatiron Health; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition

  43. Clinical sense vs research context, FDA is more comfortable with other than oncology products beyond drugs, namely diagnostics, diagnostics company seeking partnership with many drug areas Thermo FIscher and Novartis partnership

  44. Cost of CT Scan vs an NGS Test – Genomic testing is much cheaper yet volume is still low said Jacob S. Van Naarden, Chief Business Officer, Loxo Oncology

  45. NGS – time results come back what the mutation mean? NOW results come in few days, data analysis assist the said Joydeep Goswami, Ph.D., M.B.A., M.S., President, Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing, Oncology, Thermo Fisher Scientifi

  46. 3D BioPrinting of Drugs and the innovation storm of agents — are both benefits, value based pricing, elasticities, is that price sufficient to support R&D, dynamic environment said Joshua Ofman, SVP, Global Value, Access, Amgen

  47. Awardee of Leadership in PM, Illumina, HC system not yet ready for Precision Medicine

  48. Amgen and Harvard Pilgrims interpretation of Values related to partnerships: Novartis

  49. at Illimina – Consumer Advocacy added to Technology breakthroughs in genome sequencing said Jay T. Flatley, M.S., Executive Chairman, Illumina

  50. National Genomic Service – Sequencing becoming STANDARD of Care, phynotypes, $10 million to be spent NIH said Jay T. Flatley, M.S., Executive Chairman, Illumina

  51. 13th Annual Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award AWARDEE | Jay T. Flatley, M.S., Executive Chairman, Illumina

  52. 13th Annual Leadership in PM Award to Jay T Flatlet, Illumina

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Source Articles on Perception of Care: Delivery of Care – External Sources

Reporter and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Delivery of Care – External Sources – Intentionally are Left as References in Live Links.

  1. Track, trigger and teamwork: Communication of deterioration in acute medical and surgical wards Article
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 26, Issue 1, Pages 10-17
    Donohue, L.A.; Endacott, R.
    Cited by Scopus (19)
  2. Communication interaction in ICU-Patient and staff experiences and perceptions Article
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 22, Issue 3, Pages 167-180
    Magnus, V.S.; Turkington, L.
    Cited by Scopus (39)
  3. Nursing care in a high-technological environment: Experiences of critical care nurses Article
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 31, Issue 2, Pages 116-123
    Tunlind, A.; Granstrom, J.; Engstrom, A.
  4. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers towards prevention of pressure ulcers in intensive care units: A descriptive cross-sectional study Article
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 26, Issue 6, Pages 335-342
    Strand, T.; Lindgren, M.
  5. Rehabilitation during mechanical ventilation: Review of the recent literature Review article
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 31, Issue 3, Pages 125-132
    Ntoumenopoulos, G.
  6. Reducing risk for ventilator associated pneumonia through nursing sensitive interventions Article
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, Volume 29, Issue 5, Pages 261-265
    Micik, S.; Besic, N.; Johnson, N.; Han, M.; Hamlyn, S.; Ball, H.
  7. The lived experiences of adult intensive care patients who were conscious during mechanical ventilation: A phenomenological-hermeneutic study Article
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City of Hope, Duarte, California – Combining Science with Soul to Create Miracles at a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer InstituteAn Interview with the Provost and Chief Scientific Officer of City of Hope, Steven T. Rosen, M.D.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

City of Hope (https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage), a world leader in the research and treatment of cancer, diabetes, and other serious diseases, is an independent, biomedical research institution and comprehensive cancer center committed to researching, treating and preventing cancer, with an equal commitment to curing and preventing diabetes and other life-threatening diseases. Founded in 1913, City of Hope is one of only 47 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute.

City of Hope possesses flexibility that larger institutions typically lack. Innovative concepts move quickly from the laboratory to patient trials — and then to market, where they benefit patients around the world.

As a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, their research and treatment protocols advance care throughout the nation. They are also part of ORIEN (Oncology Research Information Exchange Network), the world’s largest cancer research collaboration devoted to precision medicine. And they continue to receive the highest level of accreditation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer for their exceptional level of cancer care.

As an innovator, City of Hope is a pioneer in bone marrow and stem cell transplants with one of the largest and most successful of its kind in the world. Other examples of its leadership and innovation include,

  • Numerous breakthrough cancer drugs, including Herceptin, Rituxan, Erbitux, and Avastin, are based on technology pioneered by City of Hope and are saving lives worldwide.
  • To date, City of Hope surgeons have performed more than 10,000 robotic procedures for prostate, kidney, colon, liver, bladder, gynecologic, oral and other cancers.
  • They are a national leader in islet cell transplantation, which has the potential to reverse type 1 diabetes, and also provide islet cells for research at other institutions throughout the U.S.
  • Millions of people with diabetes benefit from synthetic human insulin, developed through research conducted at City of Hope.
  • Their scientists are pioneering the application of blood stem cell transplants to treat patients with HIV- and AIDS related lymphoma. Using a new form of gene therapy, their researchers achieved the first long-term persistence of anti-HIV genes in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma — a treatment that may ultimately cure lymphoma and HIV/AIDS.

 

Additionally, City of Hope has three on-campus manufacturing facilities producing biologic and chemical compounds to good manufacturing practice (GMP) standards.

City of Hope launched its Alpha Clinic, thanks to an $8 million, five-year grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). The award is part of CIRM’s Alpha Stem Cell Clinics program, which aims to create one-stop centers for clinical trials focused on stem cell treatments for currently incurable diseases. The Alpha Clinics Network is already running 35 different clinical trials involving hundreds of patients, 17 of which are being conducted at City of Hope. Current clinical trials include transplants of blood stem cells modified to treat patients with AIDS and lymphoma, neural stem cells to deliver drugs directly to cancers hiding in the brain, and T cell immunotherapy trials.

Located just northeast of Los Angeles, landscaped gardens and open spaces surround City of Hope’s leading-edge medical and research facilities at its main campus in Duarte, California. City of Hope also has 14 community practice clinics throughout Southern California.

COH robotic (1)COH Helford H (1)COH1 Dr__Rosen_Clinic-2 (2)COH8 Janice_Huss-7COH7 COH_1369COH6 GMP_0454COH4 DSC_9279

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of City of Hope, Duarte, California. Interior and exterior photos of the City of Hope, including Dr. Steven T. Rosen and his team.

 

Below is my interview with the Provost and Chief Scientific Officer of City of Hope, Steven T. Rosen, M.D., which occurred in April, 2017.

 

What sets City of Hope apart from other hospitals and research centers?

Dr. Rosen: City of Hope offers a unique blend of compassionate care and research innovation that simply can’t be found anywhere else.

We’re more than a medical center, and more than a research facility. We take the most compassionate patient-focused care available, combine it with today’s leading-edge medical advances, and infuse both with a quest to deliver better outcomes.

I’m proud to say that we’re known for rapidly translating scientific research into new treatments and cures, and that our technology has led to the development of four of the most widely used cancer-fighting drugs, Herceptin (trastuzumab), Avastin (bevacizumab), Erbitux (cetuximab), and Rituxin (rituximab).

City of Hope is a family. Our special team of experts treats the whole person and the family, not just a body, or a case or a disease. In fact, some of our patients have shared their stories of success. It is gratifying for me and our many health professionals to be able to make a positive difference in their lives.

Eleven years ago, Los Angeles firefighter Gus Perez was facing a battle far greater than any he’d ever known. He was diagnosed with CML (chronic myelogenous leukemia). Gus began receiving the drug Gleevec, which put him into remission. Given the drug’s success, he almost resigned himself to staying on it, yet was drawn to another option: undergoing a bone marrow transplant at City of Hope. “I went to my favorite ocean spot,” Gus recalls. “I put on my wetsuit, like I’ve done thousands of times, and paddled out. Every wave was special because I wasn’t sure if I was ever going to be back. And I remember getting out of the water and counting the steps to my car, thinking, ‘I’m going to beat this. I’m going to retrace those steps.’ And I’m happy to say I was able to do it.” Gus and his family recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of his bone marrow transplant. “City of Hope is more than just medical treatment,” Gus says. “They have to put you back together from the ground up. And to me, that’s truly a miracle.”

 

As an active 14-year-old, Nicole Schulz loved cheerleading and hanging out with her friends. Then her whole world changed. Nicole learned that her fatigue and other symptoms weren’t “just the flu,” but the effects of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), an aggressive disease that rendered her bone marrow 97 percent cancerous. Nicole spent the next three and a half months at City of Hope, fighting the cancer with a daily regimen of chemotherapy and blood and platelet transfusions. “It put me into remission,” Nicole says. “But I wasn’t cured. And I wanted a cure.” Fortunately, Nicole was a candidate for a bone marrow transplant. Her malfunctioning marrow cells would be replaced with healthy marrow from a matching unrelated donor. “I never gave up — and neither did City of Hope,” Nicole says. After two bone marrow transplants and tremendous perseverance, Nicole is back to living the life she once knew and quickly making up for lost time.

 

When Jim Murphy’s doctor called and asked to see him on Christmas Eve, Jim knew it wasn’t going to be good news. And he was right. “The diagnosis was esophageal cancer,” Jim says. “Once they tell you that, there’s nothing you can do but formulate your action plan.” Jim would need to undergo chemotherapy, radiation and surgery to remove the tumor from his esophagus. It would require taking two-thirds of his esophagus and a third of his stomach. Despite the intense treatment, Jim was determined to keep his life as normal as possible. Throughout his chemotherapy and radiation therapy, he never missed a day of work, even riding his mountain bike to and from City of Hope to take his treatments. “I needed to show myself one victory after another,” Jim says. “I know City of Hope appreciated the fact that I was fighting as hard as they were.” Now cancer-free for several years, Jim credits City of Hope with giving him the best chance to fight his disease. “What really impressed me was that the research was right there at City of Hope. If they have something experimental, it goes from the researcher, right to the doctor and right to you. It’s the ultimate weapon — doctors reaching out for researchers, researchers reaching out for doctors. And the patient wins.”

 

City of Hope is a pioneer in the fields of bone marrow transplantation, diabetes and breakthrough cancer drugs based on technology developed at the institution.  How are you transforming the future of health care by turning science into a practical benefit for patients? 

Dr. Rosen: This is a distinctive place where brilliant research moves rapidly from concept to cure. That’s what we do—we speed breakthroughs in the lab to benefit patients in the clinic

Many know us for our leadership in fighting cancer, but fighting cancer is only part of our story. For decades, we’ve been making history in the fight against diabetes and other life-threatening illnesses that can be just as dangerous, and shattering, to patients and their families.

Every year, we conduct 400+ clinical trials, enrolling 6,000+ patients; hold 300+ patents and submit nearly 30 applications to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for investigational new drugs; and offer comprehensive assistance for patients and their families, including patient education, support groups, social resources, mind-body therapies and patient navigators.

We also translate breakthrough laboratory findings into real, lifesaving treatments and cures, and manufacture them at three on-campus facilities. Our goal is to get patients the treatments they need as fast as humanly possible.

We are in the race to save lives – and win. In our research efforts, we are teaching immune cells to attack tumors and Don J. Diamond [Ph.D.], Vincent Chung, [M.D.], and other City of Hope researchers launched a clinical trial seeking ways to effectively activate a patient’s own immune system to fight his or her cancer. The team is combining an immune-boosting vaccine with a drug that inhibits tumor cells’ ability to grow — to encourage immune cells to attack and eliminate tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, triple-negative breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma and many other cancer types.

City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. Research is already underway to unlock the immune system’s role in diabetes, including T cell modulation and stem cell-based therapies that may reverse the autoimmune attack on islet cells in the pancreas, which is the cause of T1D. City of Hope’s Bart Roep [Ph.D.], previously worked at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, where he was instrumental in launching a phase 1 clinical trial for a vaccine that aims to spur the immune system to fight, and possibly cure, T1D. Plans are developing for a larger, phase 2 trial to launch in the future at City of Hope.

 

What makes your recent alliance with Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) different from other efforts in precision medicine around the country and within our Government to identify treatments for cancer?

Dr. Rosen: Precision medicine is the future of cancer care. Since former Vice President’s Joe Biden’s Moonshot Cancer program was launched to achieve 10 years of progress in preventing, diagnosing and treating cancer, within five years, federal cancer funding has been prioritized to address these aims.

City of Hope and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) have formed an alliance to fast-track the future of precision medicine for patients. Our clinical leadership as a comprehensive cancer center combined with TGen’s leadership in molecular cancer research will propel us to the forefront of precision medicine and is further evidence of our momentum in transforming the future of health.

In fact, most recently scientists at TGen have identified a potent compound in the fight for an improved treatment against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadly type of adult brain cancer. This research could represent a breakthrough for us to find an effective long-term treatment. The compound prevents glioblastoma from spreading, and leaves cancer vulnerable to chemotherapy and radiation.  Aurintricarboxylic Acid (ATA) is a chemical compound that in laboratory tests was shown to block the chemical cascade that otherwise allows glioblastoma cells to invade normal brain tissue and resist both chemo and radiation therapy.

The goal is to accelerate the speed at which we advance research discoveries into the clinic to benefit patients worldwide.

 

As a prestigious Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope was named this year as one of the top 20 cancer centers for the past 10 years. How do you achieve that designation year after year? And what specific collaborations, clinical trials and multidisciplinary research programs are under way that offer benefits to patients?

Dr. Rosen: It’s simple – we achieve this through the compassion, commitment and excellence of the City of Hope family, which includes our world-class physicians, staff, supporters and donors.

We look to find the best and brightest professionals and bring them to City of Hope to work with our amazing staff on research, treatments and cures that not only change people’s lives, but also change the world.

We also have a community of forward-looking, incredibly generous and deeply committed supporters and donors. People who get it. People who share our vision. People who take their capacity for business success and apply it to helping others. They provide the fuel that drives us forward, enabling us to do great things.

City of Hope has a long track record of research breakthroughs and is constantly working to turn novel scientific research into the most advanced medical services.

Right now, we have a number of collaborative programs underway, including: Our alliance with TGen to make precision medicine a reality for patients, The Wanek Family Project to Cure Type 1 Diabetes, and Immunotherapy and CAR-T cell therapy clinical trials, which aim to fight against brain tumors and blood cancers.

More specifically, our research team led by Hua Yu, [Ph.D.] and Andreas Herrmann, [Ph.D.], developed a drug to address the way in which cancer uses the STAT3 protein to “corrupt” the immune system. The drug, CpG-STAT3 siRNA, halts the protein’s ability to “talk” to the immune system. It blocks cancer cell growth while sending a message to surrounding immune cells to destroy a tumor, and it may also enhance the effectiveness of other immunotherapies, such as T-cell therapy.

We could also see a functional cure for HIV in the next 5 to 10 years. Gene therapy pioneer, John A. Zaia, [M.D.], the Aaron D. Miller and Edith Miller Chair in Gene Therapy, the director of the Center for Gene Therapy within City of Hope’s Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, as well as principal director of our Alpha Clinic, and researchers are building on knowledge gained from the case of the so-called “Berlin patient” whose HIV infection vanished after receiving a stem cell transplant for treatment of leukemia. The donor’s CCR5 gene, HIV’s typical pathway into the body, had a mutation that blocked the virus. The team launched a clinical trial that used a zinc finger nuclease to “cut out” the CCR5 gene, leaving HIV with no place to go. Their goal: to someday deliver a one-time treatment that produces a lifetime change. Integral to the first-in-human trials are the nurses who understand the study protocols, potential side effects and symptoms.

 

Would you share some of the current science under way on breakthrough cures for cancer?

Dr. Rosen: We are achieving promising results in many innovative approaches – gene therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy and all aspects of precision medicine. We are also forging new partnerships and collaboration agreements around the world.

Let me share with you a few examples of our cutting-edge science.

City of Hope researchers identified a promising new strategy for dealing with PDAC, an aggressive form of pancreatic cancer. The bacterial-based therapy homes to tumors and provokes an extremely effective tumor-killing response.

Teams at City of Hope are working to load nanoparticles with small snippets of DNA molecules that can stimulate the immune system to attack tumor cells in the brain. This innovative approach can overcome the blood-brain barrier, which blocks many drugs from reaching the tumor site.

A pioneer in islet cell transplantation for the treatment of diabetes, City of Hope conducted a clinical trial to refine its transplantation protocol. Because this new protocol includes an ATG (antithymoglobulin) induction, the immune system will not harm the transplant. The immune-suppression strategy used in the trial is considered a significant improvement over the protocol used in previous islet cell transplant trials.

City of Hope physicians and scientists joined a multinational team in reporting the success of a phase II clinical trial of a novel drug against essential thrombocythemia (ET). ET patients make too many platelets (cells essential for blood clotting), which puts them at risk for abnormal clotting and bleeding. All 18 patients treated with the drug, imetelstat, exhibited decreased platelet levels, and 16 showed normalized blood cell counts.

Researchers found that the CMVPepVax vaccine — developed at City of Hope to boost cellular immunity against cytomegalovirus (CMV) — is safe and effective in stem cell transplant recipients. Building on this discovery, City of Hope and Fortress Biotech formed a company to develop two vaccines, PepVax and Triplex, against CMV, a life-threatening illness in people who have weakened or underdeveloped immune systems such as cancer patients and developing fetuses. The vaccines are the subjects of multisite clinical trials. These City of Hope vaccines could open the door to a new way of protecting cancer patients from CMV, a devastating infection that affects hundreds of thousands of people worldwide.

 

In what ways does the initial vision of Samuel H. Golter impact the work you are doing today? What does the tagline – “The Miracle of Science with Soul” – mean?

Dr. Rosen: 100+ years ago, Samuel Golter, one of the founders of City of Hope said: “There is no profit in curing the body if in the process we destroy the soul.” For decades, City of Hope has lived by this credo, providing a comprehensive, compassionate and research-based treatment approach.

“The Miracle of Science with Soul” refers to the lives that we save by uniting science and research with compassionate care.

“Miracle” represents what people with cancer and other deadly diseases say they want most of all.

“Science” speaks to the many innovations we’ve pioneered, which demonstrate that medical miracles happen here.

“Soul” represents our compassionate care. We’re an untraditional health system — and our people, culture and campus reflect this.

 

Can you please describe how City of Hope has evolved throughout its 100-year history from a tuberculosis sanitorium into a world-class research-centered institution? 

Dr. Rosen: City of Hope is a leading comprehensive cancer center and independent biomedical research institution. Over the years, our discoveries have changed the lives of millions of patients around the world.

We pioneered the research leading to the first synthetic insulin and the technology behind numerous cancer-fighting drugs, including Herceptin (trastuzumab), Avasatin (bevacizumab), Erbitux (cetuximab), and Rituxin (rituximab).

As previously mentioned, we hold 300+ patents, have numerous potential therapies in the pipeline at any given time, and treat 1,000+ patients a year in therapeutic clinical trials.

These numbers reflect our commitment to innovation and rapid translation of science into therapies to benefit patients.

We are home to Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, the first of only five Beckman Research Institutes established by funding from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. It is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.

Recognizing our team’s accomplishments in cancer research, treatment, patient care, education and prevention, the National Cancer Institute has designated City of Hope as a comprehensive cancer center. This is an honor reserved for only 47 institutions nationwide. Our five Cancer Center Research Programs run the gamut from basic and translational studies, to Phase I and II clinical protocols and follow-up studies in survivorship and symptom management.

City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute offers a broad diabetes and endocrinology program combining groundbreaking research, unique treatments and comprehensive education to help people with diabetes and other endocrine diseases live longer, better lives.

Our dedicated, multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals at the Hematologic Malignancies & Stem Cell Institute combine innovative research discoveries with superior clinical treatments to improve outcomes for patients with hematologic cancers.

Working closely with the City of Hope comprehensive cancer center’s Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Program and other cancer centers, the Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research multidisciplinary program includes basic, translational and clinical research and fosters collaborations among scientists and clinicians.

City of Hope’s Radiation Oncology Department is on the forefront of improving patient care, and our staff is constantly studying new research technologies, clinical trials and treatment methods that can lead to better outcomes and quality of life for our patients.

What attracted you to City of Hope? And how do you define success in your present role as provost and CSO?

Dr. Rosen: Helping cancer patients and their families gives me a sense of purpose. I encourage everyone to find a passion and find an organization that fits their passion. City of Hope is a special place. What we do is bigger than ourselves.

I define success as finding cures and helping patients live stronger, better lives. I am focused on leading a diverse team of scientists, clinicians and administrative leaders committed to discovering breakthroughs and specialized therapies.

COH2 Dr__Steve_Rosen_

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Provost and Chief Scientific Officer Steven T. Rosen, M.D., courtesy of City of Hope, Duarte, California.

 

Steven T. Rosen, M.D.
Provost and Chief Scientific Officer

City of Hope
Duarte, California

Steven T. Rosen, M.D., is provost and chief scientific officer for City of Hope and a member of City of Hope’s Executive Team. He also is director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center and holds the Irell & Manella Cancer Center Director’s Distinguished Chair, and he is director of Beckman Research Institute (BRI) and the Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences.

Dr. Rosen sets the scientific direction of City of Hope, shaping the research and educational vision for the biomedical research, treatment and education institution. Working closely and collaboratively with City of Hope’s scientists, clinicians and administrative leaders, he develops strategies that contribute to the organization’s mission.

As director of BRI, he works with faculty across the institution to help shape and direct the scientific vision for BRI while leading the vital basic and translational research that is fundamental to our strategic plan and mission. He focuses on opportunities for expanding and integrating our research initiatives; recruiting and leading talented scientists; helping our talented researchers achieve national and international recognition; and promoting our national standing as a premier scientific organization.

Prior to joining City of Hope, Dr. Rosen was the Genevieve Teuton Professor of Medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago. He served for 24 years as director of Northwestern’s Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Under his leadership, the center received continuous National Cancer Institute (NCI) funding beginning in 1993 and built nationally recognized programs in laboratory sciences, clinical investigations, translational research and cancer prevention and control. The center attained comprehensive status in 1997.

Dr. Rosen has published more than 400 original reports, editorials, books and book chapters. His research has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of America and Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

Dr. Rosen also has served as an adviser for several of these organizations and on the external advisory boards of more than a dozen NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers. He is the current editor-in-chief of the textbook series “Cancer Treatment & Research.”

Recognized as one of the Best Doctors in America, Dr. Rosen is a recipient of the Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award from Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the Man of Distinction Award from the Israel Cancer Research Fund. He earned his bachelor’s degree and medical degree with distinction from Northwestern University from which he also earned the Alumni Merit Award, and is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.

Editor’s Note: 

We would like to thank Mary-Fran Faraji, David Caouette, and Chantal Roshetar of the Communications and Public Affairs department at the City of Hope, for the gracious help and invaluable support they provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

The City of Hope (https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage), Duarte, California.

Other related articles

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/people/rosen-steven

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/research/beckman-research-institute

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/research/comprehensive-cancer-center

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/research/research-overview/diabetes-metabolism-research-institute

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/patients/departments-and-services/hematologic-malignancies-and-stem-cell-transplantation-institute

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/patients/departments-and-services/medical-oncology-and-therapeutics-research/medical-oncology-research

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/patients/cancers-and-treatments/departments-and-services/radiation-oncology/radiation-oncology-research

                        

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2017

Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials: New Drug Formulary Created – The NCI Formulary is a public-private partnership between NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/12/expedite-use-of-agents-in-clinical-trials-new-drug-formulary-created-the-nci-formulary-is-a-public-private-partnership-between-nci-part-of-the-national-institutes-of-health-and-pharmaceutical-and/

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022 & Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/03/projected-sales-in-2020-of-worlds-top-ten-oncology-drugs/

2016

Funding Opportunities for Cancer Research

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/08/funding-opportunities-for-cancer-research/

Recent Breakthroughs in Cancer Research at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology- 2015

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/03/recent-breakthroughs-in-cancer-research-at-the-technion-israel-institute-of-technology-2015/

New York Times Articles on Cancer Immunotherapy and Cancer Treatment Options

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/09/new-york-times-articles-on-immunotherapy-and-cancer-treatment-options/

  • Cancer Biology & Genomics for Disease Diagnosis, on Amazon since 8/11/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-c-e-books-on-cancer-oncology/volume-2-immunotherapy-in-oncology/

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Forthcoming e-Book on Amazon.com

Inspiring Book for Cancer Survivors, Cancer Patients and Cardiac Patients

 

“The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures”

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076HGB6MZ

 

CLICK, below for All the 11 we published on Amazon.com

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_9?ie=UTF8&text=Aviva+Lev-Ari&search-alias=digital-text&field-author=Aviva+Lev-Ari&sort=relevancerank

The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Care Givers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

2017 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, Northampton, MA

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

and

Contributing Editor and Author

Gail S. Thornton, PhD(c)

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, New Jersey

gailsthornton@yahoo.com

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief BioMed e-Series of e-Books

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, Boston

avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

BioMedical e-Books e-Series:

Cardiovascular, Genomics, Cancer, BioMed, Patient-centered Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Abbreviated electronic Table of Contents (eTOCs)

Part One: Perceptions of Care

Chapter 1

1.1    Personal Tale of JL’s Whole Genome Sequencing
1.2    Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision 
1.3    Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision 
1.4    Supportive Treatments: Hold the Mind Strong During Cancer
1.5    Finding My Voice: A Laryngectomee’s Story
 

Chapter 2

2.1     Delivery of Care – See Live links in the body of the e-Book, below

2.2  Hospital CEO:  A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park 
2.3  Drug Discovery for Cancer Cure:  Value for Patients – Turning 
2.4  Hospital CEO: A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care 
2.5  Hospital CEO:  University Children’s Hospital Zurich 

2.6 Hospital CEO: Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

Part Two: The Voice of Cancer Survivors

Chapter 3

3.1    Cancer Companion Diagnostics

3.2    lncRNAs in Human Cancers
3.3    Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance
3.4    Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers for Personalized Cancer 
 

Chapter 4

4.1 Personalized Medicine: Cancer Cell Biology and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

4.2    Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse 
 

Chapter 5

5.1       Thyroid Cancer

5.1.1    Experience with Thyroid Cancer
5.1.2    Cancer Signaling Pathways and Tumor Progression
5.2      Brain Surgery
5.2.1   A Cousin’s Experience with a Pituitary Acromegaly
5.2.2    Loss of Normal Growth Regulation
5.2.3    Glioma, Glioblastoma and Neurooncology
5.3       Breast Cancer
5.3.1    Faces of Breast Cancer – Find Your Story, Join the Conversation
5.3.2    An Emotional and Thoughtful Decision Over BRAC1 and Surgery
5.4       Ovarian Cancer
5.4.1    A Curated History of the Science Behind the Ovarian Cancer
5.4.2    Good and Bad News Reported for Ovarian Cancer Therapy
5.4.3    Almudena’s Story:  A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength
5.5       Hematological Malignancies
5.5.1    Hematological Malignancy Diagnostics
5.5.2    Hematological Cancer Classification
5.5.3    Chemotherapy in AML
5.5.4    Update on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
5.5.5    Rituximab for a variety of B-cell malignancies
5.5.6    T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways 
5.5.7    Gene expression and adaptive immune resistance mechanism
5.5.8    Sunitinib brings Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) to R
5.5.9    Management of Follicular Lymphoma
5.5.10   Gene Expression and Adaptive Immune Resistance Mechanisms 
5.6       Other Types of Cancer
5.6.1    Lung Cancer Therapy
5.6.2    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer drugs
5.6.3    Colon Cancer
5.6.4    GERD and esophageal adenocarcinoma
5.6.5    Melanoma
5.6.6   Adenocarcinoma of the Duodenum – Nathalie’s Story: A Health 
5.7     Organ Transplantation
5.7.1     Marcela’s Story: A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life 
 

Chapter 6

6.1   Nutrition: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com
6.2   Epigenetics, Environment and Cancer: Articles of Note 
6.3   The relationship of stress hypermetabolism to essential 
6.4   Cancer Drug-Resistance Mechanism
6.5   Biochemistry and Dysmetabolism of Aging and Serious Illness
6.6   Experience of and Alleviation of Pain
 

Chapter 7

7.1   Metabolomics: its applications in food and nutrition research
7.2   Neutraceuticals

Part Three: The Voice of Open Heart Surgery Survivors

Chapter 8
8.1   A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery
8.2   Triple-bypass operation at age 69 – Ralph’s Story
8.3   A Fantastic Vessel-Clearing Innovation on The vessel-clearing 

 

VIEWS – All time for HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTITUTIONS –

LIVE Interviews by Gail Thornton

 

TITLE

URL

# Views

on 4/12/2017

Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

# Views

on 4/12/2017

60

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/03/23/swiss-paraplegic-centre-nottwil-switzerland-a-world-class-clinic-for-spinal-cord-injuries/

 

60
University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland – A Prominent Center of Pediatric Research and Medicine

# Views

on 4/12/2017

84

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/21/university-childrens-hospital-zurich-universitats-kinderspital-zurich-switzerland-a-prominent-center-of-pediatric-research-and-medicine/

 

84
A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education

# Views

on 4/12/2017

 139

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/17/a-rich-tradition-of-patient-focused-care-richmond-university-medical-center-new-yorks-leader-in-health-care-and-medical-education/

 

139
Value for Patients – Turning Advances in Science: A Case Study of a Leading Global Pharmaceutical Company – Astellas Pharma Inc.

# Views

on 4/12/2017

329

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/24/value-for-patients-turning-advances-in-science-a-case-study-of-a-leading-global-pharmaceutical-company-astellas-pharma-inc/

 

329
A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

# Views

on 4/12/2017

670

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

 

670

VIEWS – All time for Patient Experience

LIVE Interviews by Gail Thornton

 

TITLE

URL # Views
WEGO Health Awards Competition Focuses on Patients

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

17

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/09/13/wego-health-awards-competition-focuses-on-patients/

 

17
Almudena’s Story: A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

109

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/10/almudenas-story-a-life-of-hope-rejuvenation-and-strength/

 

109
Nathalie’s Story: A Health Journey With A Happy Ending

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

300

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/30/nathalies-story-a-health-journey-with-a-happy-ending/

 

300
Ralph’s Story: An Entertainer at Heart

# Views

on 4/12/2017

143

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/30/ralphs-story-an-entertainer-at-heart/

 

143
Marcela’s Story: A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

48

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/23/marcelas-story-a-liver-transplant-gives-the-gift-of-life/

 

48
The Role of Big Data in Medicine

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

55

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/16/the-role-of-big-data-in-medicine/

 

55
A Revolutionary, Personalized Approach in Brain Tumor Research

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

46

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/11/a-revolutionary-personalized-approach-in-brain-tumor-research/

 

46

 

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WEGO Health Awards Competition Focuses on Patients

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A., PhD(c)

WEGO Health, a network of over 100,000 influential members of the online health community, empowers patients who drive the health care conversation online.

For their annual “health activist” award competition this year, Gail Thornton, was nominated as the editor/author of a series of compelling patient profiles on chronic and invasive medical conditions that are posted on the online scientific journal, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence.

“The story of patients and their health journey is a critical one to tell and I was blessed to have such inspirational, caring people who shared their lives with me,” said Gail Thornton.” Also many thanks to  Aviva Lev-Ari for her vision in creating this series — and for considering me to be part of it all.”

The series also will be part of an e-book, entitled, The VOICES of Patients, Health Care Providers, Care Givers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group. Here is the link:  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-e-titles-in-the-strategic-plan-for-2014-1015/2014-the-patients-voice-personal-experience-with-invasive-medical-procedures/

final series E covers volumes 1_4-vol1

 

“Your contribution to the e-Book is very substantial in bringing the LIVE voices of Patients and Health Care Providers to the EAR of the Public at large,” said Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., on 9/13/2016, Director and Founder, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston.

Also thanks to Gabriela Contreras for suggesting some of these patients.

Please visit the the link below to review Gail’s nomination details and to endorse her!

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12485

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