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Posts Tagged ‘Neurological Disorders’


Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: Precision Medicine Beyond Oncology June 5 Philadelphia PA

Reporter: Stephen J Williams PhD @StephenJWillia2

Precision Medicine has helped transform cancer care from one-size-fits-all chemotherapy to a new era, where patients’ tumors can be analyzed and therapy selected based on their genetic makeup. Until now, however, precision medicine’s impact has been far less in other therapeutic areas, many of which are ripe for transformation. Efforts are underway to bring the successes of precision medicine to neurology, immunology, ophthalmology, and other areas. This move raises key questions of how the lessons learned in oncology can be used to advance precision medicine in other fields, what types of data and tools will be important to personalizing treatment in these areas, and what sorts of partnerships and payer initiatives will be needed to support these approaches and their ultimate commercialization and use. The panel will also provide an in depth look at precision medicine approaches aimed at better understanding and improving patient care in highly complex disease areas like neurology.
Speaker panel:  The big issue now with precision medicine is there is so much data and hard to put experimental design and controls around randomly collected data.
  • The frontier is how to CURATE randomly collected data to make some sense of it
  • One speaker was at a cancer meeting and the oncologist had no idea what to make of genomic reports they were given.  Then there is a lack of action or worse a misdiagnosis.
  • So for e.g. with Artificial Intelligence algorithms to analyze image data you can see things you can’t see with naked eye but if data quality not good the algorithms are useless – if data not curated properly data is wasted
Data needs to be organized and curated. 
If relying of AI for big data analysis the big question still is: what are the rates of false negative and false positives?  Have to make sure so no misdiagnosis.

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@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

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#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

TEDMED 2012
Reisa Sperling

Can new imaging techniques help determine who will develop Alzheimer’s before symptoms show? Sperling says early detection and prevention research is the best defense against a disease we discover too late to treat.

View Video

http://www.tedmed.com/videos-info?name=Reisa_Sperling_at_TEDMED_2012&q=updated&year=all&sid=195&vid=305

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Reported by: Dr. Venkat S. Karra, Ph.D.

A new proof-of-concept study shows that plasma concentrations of precursor fragments of the neuropeptide enkephalin (proenkephalin A, or PENK-A) are elevated in patients with acute stroke compared with those with TIA and nonischemic events.

Researchers are making efforts to investigate neuropeptides in patients presenting with symptoms of acute cerebrovascular disease.

Although the mature neuropeptides are degraded within minutes, their precursor fragments are much more stable and represent neuropeptide synthesis in stoichiometric relations. “They are therefore well suited as biomarkers and may be suitable for measurement in clinical settings,” said Dr. Doehner.

The precursor neuropeptides proenkephalin A (PENK-A) and protachykinin (PTA) are markers of blood-brain barrier integrity and have been recently discussed in vascular dementia and neuroinflammatory disorders.

{Ernst  A., Kohrle  J., Bergmann  A.;  Proenkephalin A 119—159, a stable proenkephalin. A precursor fragment identified in human circulation, Peptides 27 2006 1835-1840
Ernst  A., Suhr  J., Kohrle  J., Bergmann  A.;  Detection of stable N-terminal protachykinin A immunoreactivity in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, Peptides 29 2008 1201-1206}

Researchers are making efforts to use these precursor fragments as markers to distinguish an ischemic stroke from a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or an intracerebral hemorrhage.

The authors strongly hope that it may help to advance the use of biomarkers in the clinical evaluation of stroke patients.

Despite the limitations, elevated PENK-A levels correlated with stroke severity and with brain lesion size, and they predicted mortality and more functional disability.

“There is clearly an unmet need to establish biomarker-guided prognostic and functional evaluations for patients with stroke, said the lead author Wolfram Doehner, MD, PhD, from the Center for Stroke Research, in Berlin, Germany

The new report was published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleid=1217869

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/768457?src=nldne

 

 

 

 

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