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Posts Tagged ‘cardiovascular’


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

A heart-healthy diet has been the basis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) prevention and treatment for decades. The potential cardiovascular (CV) benefits of specific individual components of the “food-ome” (defined as the vast array of foods and their constituents) are still incompletely understood, and nutritional science continues to evolve.

 

The scientific evidence base in nutrition is still to be established properly. It is because of the complex interplay between nutrients and other healthy lifestyle behaviours associated with changes in dietary habits. However, several controversial dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have received significant media exposure and are stuck by hype.

 

Decades of research have significantly advanced our understanding of the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of ASCVD. The totality of evidence includes randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, case-control studies, and case series / reports as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Although a robust body of evidence from RCTs testing nutritional hypotheses is available, it is not feasible to obtain meaningful RCT data for all diet and health relationships.

 

Studying preventive diet effects on ASCVD outcomes requires many years because atherosclerosis develops over decades and may be cost-prohibitive for RCTs. Most RCTs are of relatively short duration and have limited sample sizes. Dietary RCTs are also limited by frequent lack of blinding to the intervention and confounding resulting from imperfect diet control (replacing 1 nutrient or food with another affects other aspects of the diet).

 

In addition, some diet and health relationships cannot be ethically evaluated. For example, it would be unethical to study the effects of certain nutrients (e.g., sodium, trans fat) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality because they increase major risk factors for CVD. Epidemiological studies have suggested associations among diet, ASCVD risk factors, and ASCVD events. Prospective cohort studies yield the strongest observational evidence because the measurement of dietary exposure precedes the development of the disease.

 

However, limitations of prospective observational studies include: imprecise exposure quantification; co-linearity among dietary exposures (e.g., dietary fiber tracks with magnesium and B vitamins); consumer bias, whereby consumption of a food or food category may be associated with non-dietary practices that are difficult to control (e.g., stress, sleep quality); residual confounding (some non-dietary risk factors are not measured); and effect modification (the dietary exposure varies according to individual/genetic characteristics).

 

It is important to highlight that many healthy nutrition behaviours occur with other healthy lifestyle behaviours (regular physical activity, adequate sleep, no smoking, among others), which may further confound results. Case-control studies are inexpensive, relatively easy to do, and can provide important insight about an association between an exposure and an outcome. However, the major limitation is how the study population is selected or how retrospective data are collected.

 

In nutrition studies that involve keeping a food diary or collecting food frequency information (i.e., recall or record), accurate memory and recording of food and nutrient intake over prolonged periods can be problematic and subject to error, especially before the diagnosis of disease.

 

The advent of mobile technology and food diaries may provide opportunities to improve accuracy of recording dietary intake and may lead to more robust evidence. Finally, nutrition science has been further complicated by the influences of funding from the private sector, which may have an influence on nutrition policies and practices.

 

So, the future health of the global population largely depends on a shift to healthier dietary patterns. Green leafy vegetables and antioxidant suppliments have significant cardio-protective properties when consumed daily. Plant-based proteins are significantly more heart-healthy compared to animal proteins.

 

However, in the search for the perfect dietary pattern and foods that provide miraculous benefits, consumers are vulnerable to unsubstantiated health benefit claims. As clinicians, it is important to stay abreast of the current scientific evidence to provide meaningful and effective nutrition guidance to patients for ASCVD risk reduction.

 

Available evidence supports CV benefits of nuts, olive oil and other liquid vegetable oils, plant-based diets and plant-based proteins, green leafy vegetables, and antioxidant-rich foods. Although juicing may be of benefit for individuals who would otherwise not consume adequate amounts of fresh fruits and vegetables, caution must be exercised to avoid excessive calorie intake. Juicing of fruits / vegetables with pulp removal increases calorie intake. Portion control is necessary to avoid weight gain and thus cardiovascular health.

 

There is currently no evidence to supplement regular intake of antioxidant dietary supplements. Gluten is an issue for those with gluten-related disorders, and it is important to be mindful of this in routine clinical practice; however, there is no evidence for CV or weight loss benefits, apart from the potential caloric restriction associated with a gluten free diet.

 

References:

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28254181

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0735109713060294?via%3Dihub

 

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/119/8/1161

 

http://refhub.elsevier.com/S0735-1097(17)30036-0/sref6

 

https://www.scopus.com/record/display.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0031709841&origin=inward&txGid=af40773f7926694c7f319d91efdcd40c

 

https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/hosp.2000.61.4.1875

 

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2548255

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/05/31/supplements-offer-little-cv-benefit-and-some-are-linked-to-harm-in-j-am-coll-cardiol/

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Eric Topol, M.D., Gary & Mary West Endowed Chair of Innovative Medicine, Scripps Research, Executive VP, Scripps Research, Ex-Chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic and Founder of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

Curators: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Eric Topol, M.D. is professor of genomics and holds the Scripps endowed chair in innovative medicine. He is the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, California. Previously, he led the Cleveland Clinic to its #1 ranking in heart care, started a new medical school, and led key discoveries in heart disease.

Professor of Genomics
Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine
California Campus
Laboratory Website
etopol@scripps.edu
(858) 554-5708

Scripps Research Joint Appointments

Director, Scripps Translational Science Institute
Faculty, Graduate Program

Other Joint Appointments

Chief Academic Officer, Scripps Health
Senior Consultant, Scripps Clinic, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases

Research Focus

My research is on indvidualized medicine, using the genome and digital technologies to understand each person at the biologic, physiologic granular level to determine appropriate therapies and prevention. An example is the use of pharmacogenomics and our research on clopidogrel (Plavix). By determining the reasons for why such a large proportion of people do not respond to this medication, we can use alternative treatment strategies to prevent blood clots.

 

Education

M.D., University of Rochester, New York, 1979
B.A., Biomedicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1975

Professional Experience

University of Virginia, B.A. With Highest Distinction, 1975
University of Rochester, M.D. With Honor, 1979
University of California, San Francisco, Internal Medicine Residency, 1979-1982
Johns Hopkins, Cardiology Fellowship, 1982-1985
University of Michigan, Professor with Tenure, Department of Internal Medicine, 1985-1991
Cleveland Clinic, Chairman of the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, 1991-2006
Cleveland Clinic, Chief Academic Officer, 2000-2005
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine,Founder and Provost
Case Western Reserve University, Professor of Genetics,2003-2006

Awards & Professional Activities

Elected to Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences
Simon Dack Award, American College of Cardiology
American Heart Association, Top 10 Research Advances (2001, 2004)
Top 10 Most Cited Researchers in Medicine, Institute for Scientific Information
Doctor of the Decade, Thompson Scientific Award

Selected References

Goetz L, Bethel K, Topol EJ. Rebooting cancer tissue handling in the sequencing era. JAMA 309: in press, 2013

Harper AR, Topol EJPharmacogenomics in clinical practice and drug developmentNature Biotechnology, 2012 Nov;30(11):1117-24. [PMID: 23138311]

Komatireddy R, Topol EJ. Medicine Unplugged: The Future of Laboratory Medicine. Clin Chem. 2012 Oct 15. [PMID: 23071365]

Harismendy O, Notani D, Song X, Rahim NG, Tanasa B, Heintzman N, Ren B, Fu X-D, Topol EJ, Rosenfeld MG, Frazer KA. 9p21 DNAvariants associated with coronary artery disease impair interferon-c signalling response. Nature470(7333):264-268, 2011. [PMID 21307941]

Bloss CS, Schork NJ, Topol EJEffect of Direct-to-Consumer Genomewide Profiling to Assess Disease RiskNew England Journal of Medicine 364(6):524-534, 2011. [PMID 21226570]

Topol EJ, Schork NJ. Catapulting clopidogrel pharmacogenomics forward. Nature Medicine 17(1):40-41, 2011. [PMID 21217678]

Rosenberg S, et al, Topol EJ; PREDICT Investigators. Multicenter validation of the diagnostic accuracy of a blood-based gene expression test for assesing coronary artery disease in nondiabetic patients. Annals of Internal Medicine153(7):425-434, 2010. [PMID 20921541]

Topol, EJ. Transforming Medicine via Digital Innovation. Science Translational Medicine 2(16):16cm4, 2010. [PMID 20371472]

http://creativedestructionofmedicine.com/?p=3

The wireless future of medicine

http://www.ted.com/talks/eric_topol_the_wireless_future_of_medicine

FinanciaPost‘s Digital revolution in antiquated health-care industry a major operation

Listen to Dr. Topol’s podcast interview with Knowledge@Wharton

In his new book, The Creative Destruction of Medicine: How the Digital Revolution Will Create Better Health Care, Eric Topol argues that medicine is set to undergo its biggest shakeup in history, pushed by demanding consumers and the availability of game-changing technology. Topol — a cardiologist, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute and co-founder of the West Wireless Health Institute in La Jolla, Calif. — was recently interviewed for Knowledge@Wharton by C. William Hanson, III, a professor of anesthesiology and critical care, and director, surgical intensive care, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Hanson’s latest book is titled, Smart Medicine: How the Changing Role of Doctors Will Revolutionize Health Care, published in 2011.

Below is an edited transcript of the conversation.

William Hanson: I thought it might be worthwhile to quickly give you a sense of who I am and where I’m coming from [in this interview]. I’m an anesthesiologist and an intensivist, primarily a surgical intensivist, and serve as chief medical information officer at Penn. So I have some interests that will skew in that direction.

I love the title of your book. There are many people on both sides of this question. Some would say that the creative destruction of medicine is a pretty scary concept, and I think there would be plenty of us who would agree that something drastic needs to happen. You’re obviously in the latter category.

Eric Topol: I’m in the [group that feels] something drastic needs to happen. I think it can happen, it will happen and I’m hoping that we can help facilitate or catalyze that.

Hanson: You have been in a prominent role in terms of questioning traditional medical concepts. Maybe you could describe for the audience what your personal practice is and some of the issues in which you have engaged the traditional medical establishment in the past.

Topol: What I’ve done to try to change medicine in many different ways [includes] research on how to come up with better therapies. These were in large trials, as large as 40,000 patients with heart attacks, but also in [other] ways, such as starting a new medical school with a very innovative curriculum and challenging a drug safety issue which was really important for the public. So I’ve had different experiences over the years.

But what was changing for me was that four or five years ago, we recognized we had this new emerging capability of digitizing human beings, which we’ve never had before. Everybody is used to digitizing books, movies and newspapers, whatever. But when you digitize human beings by knowing the sequence of their DNA, all their physiologic metrics, like their vital signs, their anatomy [and so forth], this comes together as a unique kairos — this supreme opportune moment in medicine.

Hanson: That’s a nice lead in. I want to return to that digitization because it is something I’m dealing with in our IT systems, as I’m sure you are — what to do with the digitized information, how much of it to keep, how to analyze it. But I wanted to come back to your book title and to one of the gentlemen who endorsed the book, Clayton Christensen. He has written a couple of books as you know, including The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Prescription.

Topol: He has written three books on innovation and is renowned for his insights and leadership in [that] space. But there’s a little bit of a difference between us.

Hanson: Maybe you could elaborate on that.

Topol: Yes. I look to him as one of the real guiding lights of innovation. He’s not a physician. In the book, Innovator’s Prescription, he worked with a young physician, Jason Hwang, who is now out at Stanford.

Hanson: Yes, I have met him.

Topol: The difference, though, is that I am coming at it from almost three decades in the medical profession, and I’m not calling for an innovation. He calls it disruptive innovation. I’m looking at a much more radical thing. This is like taking what Clayton has popularized [and making it much bigger] … in terms of how transformative this can be, this whole ability to digitize human beings.

Hanson: In his work, he has talked about the digitization of the music industry, for example, and the film industry. Recognizing that you’re dealing at a much deeper level with the medical side of things, [it has to do with] how products enter the market at the low end and disrupt and take over higher-end products. For me and you at academic medical centers, where we think we’re providing state of the art care, I wonder to what extent we are likely to be made irrelevant by radical disruptions of the kind you’re talking about. What do you think about that?

Topol: I think that the medical community has been incredibly resistant to change. That’s across not just academic medical centers, but the whole continuum of medicine, [including] practicing physicians. But there is a consumer-driven health care revolution out there where each individual has access to their smart phone, all their vital signs and relevant data. There’s an ability to tap into their DNA sequence and all of their genomics. And of course that’s superimposed on this digital infrastructure that each person has now with a social network, with broadband Internet access and pervasive connectivity.

The Atlantic’s
 Q&A with Dr. Topol

Destroying Medicine to Rebuild It: Eric Topol on Patients Using Data

The emergency announcement on the transcontinental flight was terse and urgent: “Is there a doctor on board?” A passenger in distress was feeling intense pressure in his chest.

Eric Topol strode down the aisle to examine the passenger to see if he was having a heart attack, a diagnosis that normally would be tough at 35,000 feet. But Topol was armed with a prototype device that can take a person’s electrocardiogram (ECG) using a smartphone. The director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute near San Diego, he had just demonstrated how it worked during a lecture in Washington, D.C.

“It’s a case that fits over your iPhone with two built-in sensors connected to an app,” says Topol, showing me the device, made by Oklahoma City-based AliveCor. “You put your fingers on the sensors, or put them up to your chest, and it works like an ECG that you read in real-time on your phone.”

Dr. Topol’s guest blog for ForbesThe Power of Digitizing Human Beings and his Q&A with SalonThe Coming Medical Revolution

Read Wired’s Q&A with Dr. Topol: Why Doctors Need to Embrace Their Digital Future Now

Slate featured the book on their blog “Future Tense”

And here for an interview on Keen On (Tech Crunch TV): Why the Entrepreneurial Opportunities are Limitless http://www.pbgtoolkit.com/docs_pbg/1331561497Doc6.jpg

“Keen On” http://www.pbgtoolkit.com/docs_pbg/1331915366topol.jpg

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Heart, Vascular Smooth Muscle, Excitation-Contraction Coupling (E-CC), Cytoskeleton, Cellular Dynamics and Ca2 Signaling


Heart, Vascular Smooth Muscle, Excitation-Contraction Coupling (E-CC), Cytoskeleton, Cellular Dynamics and Ca2 Signaling

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Author and Cardiovascular Three-volume Series, Editor: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC, and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Abbreviations

AP, action potential; ARVD2, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy type 2; CaMKII, Ca2+/calmodulim-dependent protein kinase II; CICR, Ca2+ induced Ca2+ release;CM, calmodulin; CPVT, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia;  ECC, excitation–contraction coupling; FKBP12/12.6, FK506 binding protein; HF, heart failure; LCC, L-type Ca2+ channel;  P-1 or P-2, phosphatase inhibitor type-1 or type-2; PKA, protein kinase A; PLB, phosphoplamban; PP1, protein phosphatase 1; PP2A, protein phosphatase 2A; RyR1/2, ryanodine receptor type-1/type-2; SCD, sudden cardiac death; SERCA, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase; SL, sarcolemma; SR, sarcoplasmic reticulum.

This is Part V of a series on the cytoskeleton and structural shared thematics in cellular movement and cellular dynamics.

The Series consists of the following articles:

Part I: Identification of Biomarkers that are Related to the Actin Cytoskeleton

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/10/identification-of-biomarkers-that-are-related-to-the-actin-cytoskeleton/

 

Part II: Role of Calcium, the Actin Skeleton, and Lipid Structures in Signaling and Cell Motility

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Stephen Williams, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/26/role-of-calcium-the-actin-skeleton-and-lipid-structures-in-signaling-and-cell-motility/

 

Part III: Renal Distal Tubular Ca2+ Exchange Mechanism in Health and Disease

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Stephen J. Williams, PhD
 and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/09/02/renal-distal-tubular-ca2-exchange-mechanism-in-health-and-disease/

 

Part IV: The Centrality of Ca(2+) Signaling and Cytoskeleton Involving Calmodulin Kinases and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Failure, Arterial Smooth Muscle, Post-ischemic Arrhythmia, Similarities and Differences, and Pharmaceutical Targets

 

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/09/08/the-centrality-of-ca2-signaling-and-cytoskeleton-involving-calmodulin-kinases-and-ryanodine-receptors-in-cardiac-failure-arterial-smooth-muscle-post-ischemic-arrhythmia-similarities-and-differen/

 

Part V: Heart, Vascular Smooth Muscle, Excitation-Contraction Coupling (E-CC), Cytoskeleton, Cellular Dynamics and Ca2 Signaling

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/26/heart-smooth-muscle-excitation-contraction-coupling-cytoskeleton-cellular-dynamics-and-ca2-signaling/

 

Part VI: Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/01/calcium-molecule-in-cardiac-gene-therapy-inhalable-gene-therapy-for-pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-and-percutaneous-intra-coronary-artery-infusion-for-heart-failure-contributions-by-roger-j-hajjar/

 

Part VII: Cardiac Contractility & Myocardium Performance: Ventricular Arrhythmias and Non-ischemic Heart Failure – Therapeutic Implications for Cardiomyocyte Ryanopathy (Calcium Release-related Contractile Dysfunction) and Catecholamine Responses

Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/28/cardiac-contractility-myocardium-performance-ventricular-arrhythmias-and-non-ischemic-heart-failure-therapeutic-implications-for-cardiomyocyte-ryanopathy-calcium-release-related-contractile/

In the first part, we discussed common MOTIFs across cell-types that are essential for cell division, embryogenesis, cancer metastasis, osteogenesis, musculoskeletal function, vascular compliance, and cardiac contractility.   This second article concentrates on specific functionalities for cardiac contractility based on Ca++ signaling in excitation-contraction coupling.  The modifications discussed apply specifically to cardiac muscle and not to skeletal muscle.  Considering the observations described might raise additional questions specifically address to the unique requirements of smooth muscle, abundant in the GI tract and responsible for motility in organ function, and in blood vessel compliance or rigidity. Due to the distinctly different aspects of the cardiac contractility and contraction force, and the interactions with potential pharmaceutical targets, there are two separate articles on calcium signaling and cardiac arrhythmias or heart failure (Part 2 and Part 3).  Part 2 focuses on the RYANODINE role in cardiac Ca(2+) signaling and its effect in heart failure.  Part 3 takes up other aspects of heart failure and calcium signaling with respect to phosporylation/dephosphorylation. I add a single review and classification of genetic cardiac disorders of the same cardiac Ca(2+) signaling and the initiation and force of contraction. Keep in mind that the heart is a syncytium, and this makes a huge difference compared with skeletal muscle dynamics. In Part 1 there was some discussion of the importance of Ca2+ signaling on innate immune system, and the immunology will be further expanded in a fourth of the series.

SUMMARY:

This second article on the cardiomyocyte and the Ca(2+) cycling between the sarcomere and the cytoplasm, takes a little distance from the discussion of the ryanodine that precedes it.  In this discussion we found that there is a critical phosphorylation/dephosphorylation balance that exists between Ca(+) ion displacement and it occurs at a specific amino acid residue on the CaMKIId, specific for myocardium, and there is a 4-fold increase in contraction and calcium release associated with this CAM kinase (ser 2809) dependent exchange.  These events are discussed in depth, and the research holds promise for therapeutic application. We also learn that Ca(2+) ion channels are critically involved in the generation of arrhythmia as well as dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.  In the case of arrhythmiagenesis, there are two possible manners by which this occurs.  One trigger is Ca(2+) efflux instability.  The other is based on the finding that when the cellular instability is voltage driven, the steady-state wave­length (separation of nodes in space) depends on electrotonic coupling between cells and the steepness of APD and CV restitution. The last article is an in depth review of the genetic mutations that occur in cardiac diseases.  It is an attempt at classifying them into reasonable groupings. What are the therapeutic implications of this? We see that the molecular mechanism of cardiac function has been substantially elucidated, although there are contradictions in experimental findings that are unexplained.  However, for the first time, it appears that personalized medicine is on a course that will improve health in the population, and the findings will allow specific targets designed for the individual with a treatable impairment in cardiac function that is identifiable early in the course of illness. This article is a continuation to the following articles on tightly related topics: Part I: Identification of Biomarkers that are Related to the Actin Cytoskeleton     Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/10/identification-of-biomarkers-that-are-related-to-the-actin-cytoskeleton/ Part II:  Role of Calcium, the Actin Skeleton, and Lipid Structures in Signaling and Cell Motility    Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Stephen Williams, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/26/role-of-calcium-the-actin-skeleton-and-lipid-structures-in-signaling-and-cell-motility/ Part III: Renal Distal Tubular Ca2+ Exchange Mechanism in Health and Disease    Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Stephen J. Williams, PhD
 and  Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/09/02/renal-distal-tubular-ca2-exchange-mechanism-in-health-and-disease/ Part  IV:  The Centrality of Ca(2+) Signaling and Cytoskeleton Involving Calmodulin Kinases and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Failure, Arterial Smooth Muscle, Post-ischemic Arrhythmia, Similarities and Differences, and Pharmaceutical Targets Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN  http:/pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013.09.089/lhbern/The Centrality of Ca(2+) Signaling and Cytoskeleton Involving Calmodulin Kinases and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Failure, Arterial Smooth Muscle, Post-ischemic Arrhythmia, Similarities and Differences, and Pharmaceutical Targets

Part V:  Heart Smooth Muscle and Cardiomyocyte Cells: Excitation-Contraction Coupling & Ryanodine Receptor (RyR) type-1/type-2 in Cytoskeleton Cellular Dynamics and Ca2+ Signaling

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/26/heart-smooth-muscle-excitation-contraction-coupling-cytoskeleton-cellular-dynamics-and-ca2-signaling/ Part VI:  Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/01/calcium-molecule-in-cardiac-gene-therapy-inhalable-gene-therapy-for-pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-and-percutaneous-intra-coronary-artery-infusion-for-heart-failure-contributions-by-roger-j-hajjar/ and Advanced Topics in Sepsis and the Cardiovascular System at its End Stage Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/18/advanced-topics-in-sepsis-and-the-cardiovascular-system-at-its-end-stage/

The Role of Protein Kinases and Protein Phosphatases in the Regulation of Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Function

EG Kranias, RC Gupta, G Jakab, HW Kim, NAE Steenaart, ST Rapundalo Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry 06/1988; 82(1):37-44. · 2.06 Impact Factor http://www.researchgate.net/publication/6420466_Protein_phosphatases_decrease_sarcoplasmic_reticulum_calcium_content_by_stimulating_calcium_release_in_cardiac_myocytes Canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum is phosphorylated by

  • adenosine 3,5-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent and
  • calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinases on
  • a proteolipid, called phospholamban.

Both types of phosphorylation are associated with

  •  an increase in the initial rates of Ca(2+) transport by SR vesicles
  • which reflects an increased turnover of elementary steps of the calcium ATPase reaction sequence.

The stimulatory effects of the protein kinases on the calcium pump may be reversed by an endogenous protein phosphatase, which

  • can dephosphorylate both the CAMP-dependent and the calcium calmodulin-dependent sites on phospholamban.

Thus, the calcium pump in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum appears to be under reversible regulation mediated by protein kinases and protein phosphatases. calcium release calmodulin + ER Ca(2+) and contraction

Regulation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Channel by Luminal Ca2+ involves Luminal Ca2+ Sensing Sites

I Györke, S Györke.   Biophysical Journal 01/1999; 75(6):2801-10. · 3.65 Impact factor  http:// www.researchgate.net/publication/13459335/Regulation_of_the_cardiac_ryanodine_receptor_channel_by_luminal_Ca2_involves_luminal_Ca2_sensing_sites The mechanism of activation of the cardiac calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR) by luminal Ca(2+) was investigated in native canine cardiac RyRs incorporated into lipid bilayers in the presence of 0.01 microM to 2 mM Ca(2+) (free) and 3 mM ATP (total) on the cytosolic (cis) side and 20 microM to 20 mM Ca(2+) on the luminal (trans) side of the channel and with Cs+ as the charge carrier. Under conditions of low [trans Ca(2+)] (20 microM), increasing [cis Ca(2+)] from 0.1 to 10 microM caused a gradual increase in channel open probability (Po). Elevating [cis Ca(2+)] [cytosolic] above 100 microM resulted in a gradual decrease in Po. Elevating trans [Ca(2+)] [luminal] enhanced channel activity (EC50 approximately 2.5 mM at 1 microM cis Ca2+) primarily by increasing the frequency of channel openings. The dependency of Po on trans [Ca2+] [luminal] was similar at negative and positive holding potentials and was not influenced by high cytosolic concentrations of the fast Ca(2+) chelator, 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N, N-tetraacetic acid. Elevated luminal Ca(2+)

  1. enhanced the sensitivity of the channel to activating cytosolic Ca(2+), and it
  2. essentially reversed the inhibition of the channel by high cytosolic Ca(2+).

Potentiation of Po by increased luminal Ca(2+) occurred irrespective of whether the electrochemical gradient for Ca(2+) supported a cytosolic-to-luminal or a luminal-to-cytosolic flow of Ca(2+) through the channel. These results rule out the possibility that under our experimental conditions, luminal Ca(2+) acts by interacting with the cytosolic activation site of the channel and suggest that the effects of luminal Ca2+ are mediated by distinct Ca(2+)-sensitive site(s) at the luminal face of the channel or associated protein. F1.large  calcium movement and RyR2 receptor

Protein phosphatases Decrease Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Content by Stimulating Calcium Release in Cardiac Myocytes

D Terentyev, S Viatchenko-Karpinski, I Gyorke, R Terentyeva and S Gyorke Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX J Physiol 2003; 552(1), pp. 109–118.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.046367 Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ca2+ transport proteins by cellular kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in regulation of cardiac excitation–contraction coupling; furthermore,

  • abnormal protein kinase and phosphatase activities have been implicated in heart failure.

However, the precise mechanisms of action of these enzymes on intracellular Ca2+ handling in normal and diseased hearts remains poorly understood. We have investigated

  •   the effects of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A on spontaneous Ca(2+) sparks and SR Ca(2+) load in myocytes permeabilized with saponin.

Exposure of myocytes to PP1 or PP2A caused a dramatic increase in frequency of Ca(2+) sparks followed by a nearly complete disappearance of events, which were accompanied by depletion of the SR Ca(2+) stores, as determined by application of caffeine. These changes in

  •  Ca(2+) release and
  • SR Ca(2+) load

could be prevented by the inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A phosphatase activities okadaic acid and calyculin A. At the single channel level, PP1 increased the open probability of RyRs incorporated into lipid bilayers. PP1-medited RyR dephosphorylation in our permeabilized myocytes preparations was confirmed biochemically by quantitative immunoblotting using a phosphospecific anti-RyR antibody. Our results suggest that

  •  increased intracellular phosphatase activity stimulates
  • RyR mediated SR Ca(2+) release
    • leading to depleted SR Ca(2+) stores in cardiac myocytes.

In heart muscle cells, the process of excitation–contraction (EC) coupling is mediated by

  •  Ca(2+) influx through sarcolemmal L-type Ca(2+) channels
  • activating Ca(2+) release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR).

Once activated, the RyR channels allow Ca(2+) to be released from the SR into the cytosol to induce contraction. This mechanism is known as Ca(2+)-induced calcium release (CICR) (Fabiato, 1985; Bers, 2002).  During relaxation, most of the Ca(2+) is resequestered into the SR by the Ca(2+)-ATPase. The amount of Ca(2+) released and the force of contraction depend on

  •  the magnitude of the Ca(2+) trigger signal,
  • the functional state of the RyRs and
  • the amount of Ca(2+) stored in the SR.

F1.large  calcium movement and RyR2 receptor Ca(2+) and contraction calcium release calmodulin + ER Reversible phosphorylation of proteins composing the EC coupling machinery plays an important role in regulation of cardiac contractility (Bers, 2002). Thus, during stimulation of the b-adrenergic pathway, phosphorylation of several target proteins, including

  • the L-type Ca(2+) channels,
  • RyRs and
  • phospholamban,

by protein kinase A (PKA) leads to an overall increase in SR Ca2+ release and contractile force in heart cells (Callewaert et al. 1988, Spurgeon et al. 1990; Hussain & Orchard, 1997; Zhou et al. 1999; Song et al. 2001; Viatchenko-Karpinski & Gyorke, 2001). PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the L-type Ca(2+) channels increases the Ca2+ current (ICa), increasing both

  • the Ca2+ trigger for SR Ca2+ release and
  • the SR Ca(2+) content

(Callewaert et al. 1988; Hussain & Orchard, 1997; Del Principe et al. 2001). Phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) relieves the tonic inhibition dephosphorylated PLB exerts on the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) resulting in enhanced SR Ca(2+) accumulation and enlarged Ca(2+) release (Kranias et al. 1985; Simmermann & Jones, 1998). With regard to the RyR, despite clear demonstration of phosphorylation of the channel in biochemical studies (Takasago et al. 1989; Yoshida et al. 1992), the consequences of this reaction to channel function have not been clearly defined. RyR phosphorylation by PKA and Ca(2+)–calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) has been reported to increase RyR activity in lipid bilayers (Hain et al. 1995; Marx et al. 2000; Uehara et al. 2002). Moreover, it has been reported that in heart failure (HF), hyperphosphorylation of RyR causes

  •  the release of FK-506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) from the RyR,
    • rendering the channel excessively leaky for Ca(2+) (Marx et al. 2000).

However, other studies have reported no functional effects (Li et al. 2002) or even found phosphorylation to reduce RyR channel steady-state open probability (Valdivia et al. 1995; Lokuta et al. 1995).  The action of protein kinases is opposed by dephosphorylating phosphatases. Three types of protein phosphatases (PPs), referred to as PP1, PP2A and PP2B (calcineurin), have been shown to influence cardiac performance (Neumann et al. 1993; Rusnak & Mertz, 2000). Overall, according to most studies phosphatases appear to downregulate SR Ca(2+) release and contractile performance (Neumann et al. 1993; duBell et al. 1996, 2002; Carr et al. 2002; Santana et al. 2002). Furthermore, PP1 and PP2A activities appear to be increased in heart failure (Neumann, 2002; Carr et al. 2002). However, again the precise mode of action of these enzymes on intracellular Ca(2+) handling in normal and diseased hearts remains poorly understood.  In the present study, we have investigated the effects of protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A on local Ca(2+) release events, Ca(2+) sparks, in cardiac cells. Our results show that

  •  phosphatases activate RyR mediated SR Ca(2+) release
    • leading to depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores.

These results provide novel insights into the mechanisms and potential role of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in normal and diseased hearts. F2.large   RyR and calcium

RESULTS

Effects of PP1 and PP2A on Ca2+ sparks and SR Ca(2+) content.

[1]  PP1 caused an early transient potentiation of Ca2+ spark frequency followed by a delayed inhibition of event occurrence. [2]  PP1 produced similar biphasic effects on the magnitude and spatio-temporal characteristics of Ca(2+) sparks Specifically, during the potentiatory phase (1 min after addition of the enzyme), PP1 significantly increased

  • the amplitude,
  • rise-time,
  • duration and
  • width of Ca(2+) sparks;

during the inhibitory phase (5 min after addition of the enzyme),

  •  all these parameters were significantly suppressed by PP1.

The SR Ca(2+) content decreased by 35 % or 69 % following the exposure of myocytes to either 0.5 or 2Uml_1 PP1, respectively (Fig. 1C). Qualitatively similar results were obtained with phosphatase PP2A. Similar to the effects of PP1, PP2A (5Uml_1) produced a transient increase in Ca(2+) spark frequency (~4-fold) followed by a depression of event occurrence and decreased SR Ca(2+) content (by 82 % and 65 %, respectively). Also similar to the action of PP1, PP2A increased

  •  the amplitude and
  • spatio-temporal spread (i.e. rise-time, duration and width) of Ca(2+) sparks at 1 min
  • and suppressed the same parameters at 5 min of exposure to the enzyme (Table 1).

Together, these results suggest that phosphatases enhance spark-mediated SR Ca2+ release, leading to decreased SR Ca(2+) content. Preventive effects of calyculin A and okadaic acid Preventive effects of ryanodine

PP1-mediated RyR dephosphorylation

F3.large  cardiomyocyte SR F3.large  cardiomyocyte SR F2.large   RyR and calcium coupled receptors coupled receptors The cardiac RyR is phosphorylated at Ser-2809 (in the rabbit sequence) by both PKA and CAMKII (Witcher et al. 1991; Marx et al. 2000). Although additional phosphorylation sites may exist on the RyR (Rodriguez et al. 2003), but Ser-2809 is believed to be the only site that is phosphorylated by PKA, and RyR hyperphosphorylation at this site has been reported in heart failure (Marx et al. 2000).  To test whether indeed phosphatases dephosphorylated the RyR in our permeabilized myocyte experiments we performed quantitative immunoblotting using an antibody that specifically recognizes the phosphorylated form of the RyR at Ser-2809 (Rodriguez et al. 2003). Myocytes exhibited a significant level of phosphorylation under baseline conditions. Maximal phosphorylation was 201 % of control. When exposed to 2Uml_1 PP1, RyR phosphorylation was 58 % of the control basal condition. Exposing to a higher PP1 concentration (10Uml_1) further reduced RyR phosphorylation to 22% of control. Thus, consistent with the results of our functional measurements,

  •  PP1 decreased RyR phosphorylation in cardiac myocytes.

Figure 1. Effects of PP1 on properties of Ca(2+) sparks and SR Ca(2+) content in rat permeabilized myocytes    see .  http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.046367 A, spontaneous Ca(2+) spark images recorded under reference conditions, and 1 or 5 min after exposure of the cell to 2Uml_1 PP1. Traces below the images are Ca(2+) transients induced by application of 10 mM caffeine immediately following the acquisition of sparks before (3 min) and after (5 min) application of PP1 in the same cell. The Ca(2+) transients were elicited by a whole bath application of 10 mM caffeine. B, averaged spark frequency at early (1 min) and late (5 min) times following the addition of either 0.5 or 2Uml_1 of PP1 to the bathing solution. C, averaged SR Ca(2+) content for 0.5 or 2Uml_1 of PP1 measured before and 5 min after exposure to the enzyme. Data are presented as means ± S.E.M. of 6 experiments in different cells. Figure 2. Effects of PP2A on properties of Ca2+ sparks and SR Ca2+ content in rat permeabilized myocytes   see .  http://dx.doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.046367 A, spontaneous Ca(2+) spark images recorded under reference conditions, and 1 or 5 min after exposure of the cell to 5Uml_1 PP2A. Traces below the images are Ca(2+) transients induced by application of 10 mM caffeine immediately following the acquisition of sparks before (3 min) and after (5 min) application of PP2A in the same cell. B and C, averaged spark frequency (B) and SR Ca(2+) content (C) for the same conditions as in A. Data are presented as means ± S.E.M. of 6 experiments in different cells.

 DISCUSSION

In the present study, we have investigated the impact of physiologically relevant exogenous protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A on RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+) release (measured as Ca(2+) sparks) in permeabilized heart cells. Our principal finding is that

  • phosphatases stimulated RyR channels lead to depleted SR Ca(2+) stores.

These results have important ramifications for understanding the mechanisms and role of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in

  •  modulation of Ca(2+) handling in normal and diseased heart.

Modulation of SR Ca2+ release by protein phosphorylation/dephophorylation

Since protein dephosphorylation clearly resulted in increased functional activity of the Ca(+)release channel, our results imply that a reverse, phosphorylation reaction should reduce RyR activity. If indeed such effects take place, why do they not manifest in inhibition of Ca(+)sparks? One possibility is that enhanced Ca(+) uptake by SERCA

  •  masks or overcomes the effects phosphorylation may have on RyRs.

In addition, the potential inhibitory influence of protein phosphorylation on RyR activity in myocytes could be countered by feedback mechanisms  involving changes in luminal Ca(2+)(Trafford et al. 2002; Gyorke et al. 2002). In particular, reduced open probability of RyRs would be expected to lead to

  •  increased Ca2+ accumulation in the SR;
  • and increased intra-SR [Ca(2+)], in turn would
  • increase activity of RyRs at their luminal Ca(2+) regulatory sites

as demonstrated for the RyR channel inhibitor tetracaine (Gyorke et al. 1997; Overend et al. 1997). Thus

  • potentiation of SERCA
  • combined with the intrinsic capacity of the release mechanism to self-regulate

could explain at least in part why PKA-mediated protein phoshorylation results in maintained potentiation of Ca(2+) sparks despite a potential initial decrease in RyR activity.

Role of altered RyR Phosphorylation in Heart Failure

Marx et al. (2000) have proposed that  enhanced levels of circulating catecholamines lead to increased phosphorylation of RyR in heart failure.  Based on biochemical observations as well as on studying properties of single RyRs incorporated into artificial lipid bilayers, these investigators have hypothesized that

  •  hyperphosphorylation of RyRs contributes to pathogenesis of heart failure
    • by making the channel excessively leaky due to dissociation of FKBP12.6 from the channel.

We show that the mode of modulation of RyRs by phosphatases does not support this hypothesis as

  • dephosphorylation caused activation instead of

Interestingly, our results provide the basis for a different possibility in which

  •  dephophosphorylation of RyR rather than its phosphorylation causes depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by stimulating RyRs in failing hearts.

It has been reported that PP1 and PP2 activities are increased in heart failure (Huang et al. 1999; Neumann et al. 1997; Neuman, 2002). Furthermore,  overexpression of PP1 or ablation of the endogenous PP1 inhibitor, l-1, results in

  • depressed contractile performance and heart failure (Carr et al. 2002).

Our finding that PP1 causes depletion of SR Ca(2+) stores by activating RyRs could account for, or contribute to, these results.

References

1 DelPrincipe F, Egger M, Pignier C & Niggli E (2001). Enhanced E-C coupling efficiency after beta-stimulation of cardiac myocytes. Biophys J 80, 64a. 2 Gyorke I & Gyorke S (1998). Regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor channel by luminal Ca2+ involves luminal Ca2+ sensing sites. Biophys J 75, 2801–2810. 3 Gyorke S, Gyorke I, Lukyanenko V, Terentyev D, Viatchenko-Karpinski S & Wiesner TF (2002). Regulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by luminal calcium in cardiac muscle. Front Biosci 7, d1454–d1463. 4 Gyorke I, Lukyanenko V & Gyorke S (1997). Dual effects of tetracaine on spontaneous calcium release in rat ventricular myocytes. J Physiol 500, 297–309. 5 MacDougall LK, Jones LR & Cohen P (1991). Identification of the major protein phosphatases in mammalian cardiac muscle which dephosphorylate phospholamban. Eur J Biochem 196, 725–734. 6 Marx SO, Reiken S, Hisamatsu Y, Jayaraman T, Burkhoff D, Rosemblit N & Marks AR (2000). PKA phosphorylation dissociates FKBP12.6 from the calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor): defective regulation in failing hearts. Cell 101, 365–376. 7 Rodriguez P, Bhogal MS & Colyer J (2003). Stoichiometric phosphorylation of cardiac ryanodine receptor on serine-2809 by calmodulin-dependent kinase II and protein kinase A. J Biol Chem (in press).

The δC Isoform of CaMKII Is Activated in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Induces Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure

T Zhang, LS Maier, ND Dalton, S Miyamoto, J Ross, DM Bers, JH Brown.  University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, Calif; and Loyola University, Chicago, Ill. Circ Res. 2003;92:912-919.    http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5 Recent studies have demonstrated that transgenic (TG) expression of either Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) or CaMKIIδB, both of which localize to the nucleus, induces cardiac hypertrophy. However,

  •  CaMKIV is not present in heart, and
  • cardiomyocytes express not only the nuclear CaMKIIδB
    • but also a cytoplasmic isoform, CaMKII δC.

In the present study, we demonstrate that

  1.  expression of the δC isoform of CaMKII is selectively increased and
  2. its phosphorylation elevated as early as 2 days and continuously for up to 7 days after pressure overload.

To determine whether enhanced activity of this cytoplasmic δC isoform of CaMKII can lead to phosphorylation of Ca(2+) regulatory proteins and induce hypertrophy, we generated TG mice that expressed the δC isoform of CaMKII.  Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that the expressed transgene is confined to the cytoplasm of cardiomyocytes isolated from these mice. These mice develop a dilated cardiomyopathy with up to a 65% decrease in fractional shortening and die prematurely. Isolated myocytes are enlarged and exhibit reduced contractility and altered Ca2(2+) handling. Phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) at a CaMKII site is increased even before development of heart failure, and

  • CaMKII is found associated with the RyR  from the CaMKII TG mice.
  • Phosphorylation of phospholamban is increased specifically at the CaMKII but not at the PKA phosphorylation site.

These findings are the first to demonstrate that CaMKIIδC can mediate phosphorylation of Ca(2+) regulatory proteins in vivo and provide evidence for the involvement of CaMKIIδC activation in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.  Multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM kinases or CaMKs) are transducers of Ca2+ signals that phosphorylate a wide range of substrates and thereby affect Ca(2+)-mediated cellular responses.1 The family includes CaMKI and CaMKIV, monomeric enzymes activated by CaM kinase kinase,2,3 and CaMKII, a multimer of 6 to 12 subunits activated by autophosphorylation.1 The CaMKII subunits α, β, γ, and δ show different tissue distributions,1 with

  • the δ isoform predominating in the heart.4–7
  • Splice variants of the δ isoform, characterized by the presence of a second variable domain,4,7 include δB, which contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS), and
  • δC, which does not. CaMKII composed of δB subunits localizes to the nucleus, whereas CaMKIIδC localizes to the cytoplasm.4,8,9

CaMKII has been implicated in several key aspects of acute cellular Ca(2+) regulation related to cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. CaMKII

  • phosphorylates sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) proteins including the ryanodine receptors (RyR2) and
  • phospholamban (PLB).10–14

Phosphorylation of RyR has been suggested to alter the channel open probability,14,15 whereas phosphorylation of PLB has been suggested to regulate SR Ca(2+) uptake.14 It is also likely that CaMKII phosphorylates the L-type Ca(2+) channel complex or an associated regulatory protein and thus

  1. mediates Ca(2+) current (ICa) facilitation.16-18 and
  2. the development of early after-depolarizations and arrhythmias.19

Thus, CaMKII has significant effects on E-C coupling and cellular Ca(2 +) regulation. Nothing is known about the CaMKII isoforms regulating these responses.  Contractile dysfunction develops with hypertrophy, characterizes heart failure, and is associated with changes in cardiomyocyte (Ca2+) homeostasis.20  CaMKII expression and activity are altered in the myocardium of rat models of hypertensive cardiac hypertrophy21,22 and heart failure,23 and

  • in cardiac tissue from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.24,25

Several transgenic mouse models have confirmed a role for CaMK in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, as originally suggested by studies in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.9,26–28 Hypertrophy develops in transgenic mice that overexpress CaMKIV,27 but this isoform is not detectable in the heart,4,29 and CaMKIV knockout mice still develop hypertrophy after transverse aortic constriction (TAC).29  Transgenic mice overexpressing calmodulin developed severe cardiac hypertrophy,30 later shown to be associated with an increase in activated CaMKII31; the isoform of CaMKII involved in hypertrophy could not be determined from these studies. We recently reported that transgenic mice that overexpress CaMKIIδB, which is highly concentrated in cardiomyocyte nuclei, develop hypertrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy.32 To determine whether

  • in vivo expression of the cytoplasmic CaMKIIδC can phosphorylate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) regulatory proteins and
  • induce hypertrophy or heart failure,

we generated transgenic (TG) mice that expressed the δC isoform of CaMKII under the control of the cardiac specific α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter. Our findings implicate CaMKIIδC in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure and suggest that

  • this occurs at least in part via alterations in Ca(2+) handling proteins.33

Ca(2+) and contraction RyR yuan_image3  Ca++ exchange yuan_image3  Ca++ exchange

Results

 Expression and Activation of CaMKIIδC Isoform After TAC

To determine whether CaMKII was regulated in pressure overload–induced hypertrophy, CaMKIIδ expression and phosphorylation were examined by Western blot analysis using left ventricular samples obtained at various times after TAC.  A selective increase (1.6-fold) in the lower band of CaMKIIδwas observed as early as 1 day and continuously for 4 days (2.3-fold) and 7 days (2-fold) after TAC (Figure 1A).  To confirm that CaMKIIδC was increased and determine whether this occurred at the transcriptional level, we performed semiquantitative RT-PCR using primers specific for the CaMKIIδC isoform. These experiments revealed that

  • mRNA levels for CaMKIIδC were increased 1 to 7 days after TAC (Figure 1B).

In addition to examining CaMKII expression, the activation state of CaMKII was monitored by its autophosphorylation, which confers Ca2-independent activity.

Figure 1. Expression and activation of CaMKII δC isoform after TAC.

see http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5 A, Western blot analysis of total CaMKII in left ventricular (LV) homogenates obtained at indicated times after TAC. Cardiomyocytes transfected with CaMKIIδB and δC (right) served as positive controls and molecular markers. Top band (58 kDa) represents CaMKIIδB plus δ9, and the bottom band (56 kDa) corresponds to CaMKIIδC. *P0.05 vs control. B, Semiquantitative RT-PCR using primers specific for CaMKIIδC isoform (24 cycles) and GAPDH (19 cycles) using total RNA isolated from the same LV samples. C, Western blot analysis of phospho-CaMKII in LV homogenates obtained at various times after TAC. Three bands seen for each sample represent CaMKIIγ subunit (uppermost), CaMKIIδB plus δ9 (58 kDa), and CaMKIIδC (56 kDa). Quantitation is based on the sum of all of the bands. *P0.05 vs control.

 Figure 2. Expression and activation of CaMKII in CaMKIIδC transgenic mice.

see  http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5 A, Transgene copy number based on Southern blots using genomic DNA isolated from mouse tails (digested with EcoRI). Probe (a 32P-labeled 1.7-kb EcoRI-SalI -MHC fragment) was hybridized to a 2.3-kb endogenous fragment (En) and a 3.9-kb transgenic fragment (TG). Transgene copy number was determined from the ratio of the 3.9-kb/2.3-kb multiplied by 2. B, Immunocytochemical staining of ventricular myocytes isolated from WT and CaMKIIδTG mice. Myocytes were cultured on laminin-coated slides overnight. Transgene was detected by indirect immunofluorescence staining using rabbit anti-HA antibody (1:100 dilution) followed by FITC-conjugated goat antirabbit IgG antibody (1:100 dilution). CaMKIIδB localization to the nucleus in CaMKIIδB TG mice (see Reference 32) is shown here for comparative purpose. C, Quantitation of the fold increase in CaMKIIδprotein expression in TGL and TGM lines. Different amounts of ventricular protein (numbers) from WT control, TG () and their littermates () were immunoblotted with an anti-CaMKIIδ antibody. Standard curve from the WT control was used to calculate fold increases in protein expression in TGL and TGM lines. D, Phosphorylated CaMKII in ventricular homogenates was measured by Western blot analysis (n5 for each group). **P0.01 vs WT.

 Generation and Identification of CaMKIIδC Transgenic Mice

TG mice expressing HA-tagged rat wild-type CaMKIIδC under the control of the cardiac-specific α-MHC promoter were generated as described in Materials and Methods. By Southern blot analysis, 3 independent TG founder lines carrying 3, 5, and 15 copies of the transgene were identified. They were designated as TGL (low copy number), TGM (medium copy number), and TGH (high copy number), The founder mice from the TGH line died at 5 weeks of age with marked cardiac enlargement.  The other two lines showed germline transmission of the transgene. The transgene was expressed only in the heart. Although CaMKII protein levels in TGL and TGM hearts were increased 12- and 17-fold over wild-type (WT) controls (Figure 2C), the amount of activated CaMKII was only increased 1.7- and 3-fold in TGL and TGM hearts (Figure 2D). The relatively small increase in CaMKII activity in the TG lines probably reflects the fact that the enzyme is not constitutively activated and that the availability of Ca2/CaM, necessary for activation of the overexpressed CaMKII, is limited. Importantly,

  • the extent of increase in active CaMKII in the TG lines was similar to that elicited by TAC.

 Cardiac Overexpression of CaMKIIδC Induces Cardiac Hypertrophy and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

There was significant enlargement of hearts from CaMKIIδC TGM mice by 8 to 10 weeks [see  http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5%5D  (Figure 3A) and from TGL mice by 12 to 16 weeks. Histological analysis showed ventricular dilation (Figure 3B), cardiomyocyte enlargement (Figure 3C), and mild fibrosis (Figure 3D) in CaMKIIδC TG mice. Quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte cell volume from 12-week-old TGM mice gave values of 54.7 + 0.1 pL for TGM (n = 96) versus 28.6 + 0.1 pL for WT littermates (n=94; P0.001). Ventricular dilation and cardiac dysfunction developed over time in proportion to the extent of transgene expression. Left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) was increased by 35% to 45%, left ventricular posterior wall thickness (LVPW) decreased by 26% to 29% and fractional shortening decreased by 50% to 60% at 8 weeks for TGM and at 16 weeks for TGL. None of these parameters were significantly altered at 4 weeks in TGM or up to 11 weeks in TGL mice, indicating that heart failure had not yet developed.  Contractile function was significantly decreased. Figure 6. Dilated cardiomyopathy and dysfunction in CaMKIIδC TG mice at both whole heart and single cell levels.  [see Fig 6:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5] C, Decreased contractile function in ventricular myocytes isolated from 12-week old TGM and WT controls presented as percent change of resting cell length (RCL) stimulated at 0.5 Hz. Representative trace and mean values are shown. *P0.05 vs WT. Figure 7. Phosphorylation of PLB in CaMKIIδC TG mice.  [see Fig 7: http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5] Thr17 and Ser16 phosphorylated PLB was measured by Western blots using specific anti-phospho antibodies. Ventricular homogenates were from 12- to 14-week-old WT and TGM mice (A) or 4 to 5-week-old WT and TGM mice (B). Data were normalized to total PLB examined by Western blots (data not shown here). n = 6 to 8 mice per group; *P0.05 vs WT.

 Cardiac Overexpression of CaMKIIδC Results in Changes in the Phosphorylation of Ca2 Handling Proteins

To assess the possible involvement of phosphorylation of Ca2cycling proteins in the phenotypic changes observed in the CaMKIIC TG mice, we first compared PLB phosphorylation state in homogenates from 12- to 14-week-old TGM and WT littermates. Western blots using antibodies specific for phosphorylated PLB showed a 2.3-fold increase in phosphorylation of Thr17 (the CaMKII site) in hearts from TGM versus WT (Figure 7A). Phosphorylation of PLB at the CaMKII site was also increased 2-fold in 4- to 5-week-old TGM mice (Figure 7B). Significantly, phosphorylation of the PKA site (Ser16) was unchanged in either the older or the younger TGM mice (Figures 7A and 7B). (see  http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5)  To demonstrate that the RyR2 phosphorylation changes observed in the CaMKII transgenic mice are not secondary to development of heart failure, we performed biochemical studies examining RyR2 phosphorylation in 4- to 5-week-old TGM mice. At this age, most mice showed no signs of hypertrophy or heart failure (see Figure 6B) and there was no significant increase in myocyte size (21.3 + 1.3 versus 27.7 + 4.6 pL; P0.14). Also, twitch Ca2 transient amplitude was not yet significantly depressed, and mean δ [Ca2+]i (1 Hz) was only 20% lower (192 + 36 versus 156 + 13 nmol/L; P0.47) versus 50% lower in TGM at 13 weeks.33  The in vivo phosphorylation of RyR2, determined by back phosphorylation, was significantly (2.10.3-fold; P0.05) increased in these 4- to 5-week-old TGM animals (Figure 8C), an increase equivalent to that seen in 12- to 14-week-old mice. We also performed the RyR2 back-phosphorylation assay using purified CaMKII rather than PKA. RyR2 phosphorylation at the CaMKII site was also significantly increased (2.2 + 0.3-fold; P0.05) in 4- to 5-week-old TGM mice (Figure 8C).  (http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000069686.31472.C5) The association of CaMKII with the RyR2 is consistent with a physical interaction between this protein kinase and its substrate. The catalytic subunit of PKA and the phosphatases PP1 and PP2A were also present in the RyR2 immunoprecipitates, but not different in WT versus TG mouse hearts (Figure 8D). These data provide further evidence that

  • the increase in RyR2 phosphorylation, which precedes development of failure in the 4- to 5-week-old CaMKIIδC TG hearts, can be attributed to the increased activity of CaMKII.

 Discussion

  1. CaMKII is involved in the dynamic modulation of cellular
  2. Ca2 regulation and has been implicated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.14
  3. Published data from CaMK-expressing TG mice demonstrate that forced expression of CaMK can induce cardiac hypertrophy and lead to heart failure.27,32

However, the CaMK genes expressed in these mice are neither the endogenous isoforms of the enzyme nor the isoforms likely to regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) handling, because they localize to the nucleus.

  1.  the cytoplasmic cardiac isoform of CaMKII is upregulated at the expression level and is in the active state (based on autophosphorylation) after pressure overload induced by TAC.
  2.  two cytoplasmic CaMKII substrates (PLB and RyR) are phosphorylated in vivo when CaMKII is overexpressed and its activity increased to an extent seen under pathophysiological conditions.
  3. CaMKIIδ is found to associate physically with the RyR in the heart.
  4.  heart failure can result from activation of the cytoplasmic form of CaMKII and this may be due to altered Ca(2+) handling.

 Differential Regulation of CaMKIIδ Isoforms in Cardiac Hypertrophy

  1.  The isoform of CaMKII that predominates in the heart is the δ isoform.4–7 Neither the α nor the β isoforms are expressed and there is only a low level of expression of the γ isoforms.39
  2. Both δB and δC splice variants of CaMKIIδ are present in the adult mammalian myocardium36,40 and expressed in distinct cellular compartments.4,8,9

We suggest that the CaMKIIδ isoforms are differentially regulated in pressure-overload–induced hypertrophy, because the expression of CaMKIIδC is selectively increased as early as 1 day after TAC. Studies using RT-PCR confirm that

  • CaMKIIδC is regulated at the transcriptional level in response to TAC. In addition,
  • activation of both CaMKIIδB and CaMKIIδC, as indexed by autophosphorylation, increases as early as 2 days after TAC.
  • Activation of CaMKIIδB by TAC is relevant to our previous work indicating its role in hypertrophy.9,32
  • The increased expression, as well as activation of the CaMKIIδC isoform, suggests that it could also play a critical role in both the acute and longer responses to pressure overload.

In conclusion, we demonstrate here that CaMKIIδC can phosphorylate RyR2 and PLB when expressed in vivo at levels leading to 2- to 3-fold increases in its activity. Similar increases in CaMKII activity occur with TAC or in heart failure. Data presented in this study and in the accompanying article33 suggest that altered phosphorylation of Ca(2+) cycling proteins is a major component of the observed decrease in contractile function in CaMKIIδC TG mice. The occurrence of increased CaMKII activity after TAC, and of RyR and PLB phosphorylation in the CaMKIIδC TG mice suggest that

  • CaMKIIδC plays an important role in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

These results have major implications for considering CaMKII and its isoforms in exploring new treatment strategies for heart failure.

Cardiac Electrophysiological Dynamics From the Cellular Level to the Organ Level

Daisuke Sato and Colleen E. Clancy Department of Pharmacology, University of California – Davis, Davis, CA. Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology 2013:5: 69–75 http://www.la-press.com.   http://dx.doi.org/10.4137/BECB.S10960 Abstract: Cardiac alternans describes contraction of the ventricles in a strong-weak-strong-weak sequence at a constant pacing fre­quency. Clinically, alternans manifests as alternation of the T-wave on the ECG and predisposes individuals to arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. In this review, we focus on the fundamental dynamical mechanisms of alternans and show how alternans at the cellular level underlies alternans in the tissue and on the ECG. A clear picture of dynamical mechanisms underlying alternans is important to allow development of effective anti-arrhythmic strategies. The cardiac action potential is the single cellular level electrical signal that triggers contraction of the heart.1 Under normal conditions, the originating activation signal comes from a small bundle of tissue in the right atrium called the sinoatrial node (SAN). The action potentials generated by the SAN initiate an excitatory wave that, in healthy tissue, propagates smoothly through a well-defined path and causes excitation and contraction in the ventricles. In disease states, the normal excitation pathway is disrupted and a variety of abnormal rhythms can occur, including cardiac alternans, a well-known precursor to sudden cardiac death. Cardiac alternans was initially documented in 1872 by a German physician, Ludwig Traube.2 He observed contraction of the ventricles in a strong-weak-strong-weak sequence even though the pacing frequency was constant. Clinically, alternans mani­fests as alternation of the T-wave on the ECG, typi­cally in the microvolt range. It is well established that individuals with microvolt T-wave alternans are at much higher risk for arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. A clear picture of physio­logical mechanisms underlying alternans is important to allow development of effective anti-arrhythmic drugs. It is also important to understand dynamical mechanisms because while the cardiac action poten­tial is composed of multiple currents, each of which confers specific properties, revelation of dynamical mechanisms provides a unified fundamental view of the emergent phenomena that holds independently of specific current interactions. The ventricular myocyte is an excitable cell pro­viding the cellular level electrical activity that under­lies cardiac contraction. Under resting conditions, the membrane potential is about -80 mV. When the cell is stimulated, sodium (Na) channels open and the membrane potential goes above 0 mV. Then, a few ms later, the inward current L-type calcium (Ca) current activates and maintains depolarization of the mem­brane potential. During this action potential plateau, several types of outward current potassium (K) chan­nels also activate. Depending on the balance between inward and outward currents, the action potential duration (APD) is determined.The diastolic interval (DI) that follows cellular repolarization describes the duration the cell resides in the resting state until the next excitation. During the DI, channels recover with kinetics determined by intrinsic time constants. APD restitution defines the relationship between the APD and the previous DI (Fig. 1 top panel). In most cases1, the APD becomes longer as the previous DI becomes longer due to recovery of the L-type Ca channel (Fig. 1, bottom panel), and thus the APD restitution curve has a positive slope. Figure 1. (Top): APD and DI. (Bottom): The physiological mechanism of APD alternans involves recovery from inactivation of ICaL.  [see  http://dx.doi.org/10.4137/BECB.S10960]

 Action Potential Duration Restitution

In 1968 Nolasco and Dahlen showed graphically that APD alternans occurs when the slope of the APD res­titution curve exceeds unity. Why is the steepness of the slope important? As shown graphically in Figure 2, APD alternans amplitude is multiplied by the slope of the APD restitution curve in each cycle. When the slope is larger than one, then the alternans amplitude will be amplified until the average slope reaches 1 or the cell shows a 2:1 stimulus to response ratio.  The one-dimensional mapping between APD and DI fails to explain quasi-periodic oscillation of the APD. Figure 2. APD restitution and dynamical mechanism of APD alternans.   [see  http://dx.doi.org/10.4137/BECB.S10960]

Calcium Driven Alternans

A strong-weak-strong-weak oscillation in contrac­tion implies that the Ca transient (CaT) is alternating. Until 1999 it was assumed that if the APD is alternat­ing then the CaT alternates because the CaT follows APD changes. However, Chudin et al showed that CaT can alternate even when APD is kept constant during pacing with a periodic AP clamp waveform.14 This implies that the intracellular Ca cycling has intrinsic nonlinear dynamics. A critical component in this process is the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), a subcellular organelle that stores Ca inside the cell. When Ca enters a cell through the L-type Ca channel (or reverse mode Na-Ca exchanger (NCX) ryanodine receptors open and large Ca releases occur from the SR (Ca induced Ca release). The amount of Ca release steeply depends on SR Ca load. This steep relation between Ca release and SR Ca load is the key to induce CaT alternans.  A one-dimensional map between Ca release and SR calcium load can be constructed to describe the relationship21 similar to the map used in APD restitution.

 Subcellular Alternans

A number of experimental and computational stud­ies have been undertaken to identify molecular mechanisms of CaT alternans by identifying the specific components in the calcium cycling process critical to formation of CaT alternans. These compo­nents include SR Ca leak and load, Ca spark frequency and amplitude, and rate of SR refilling. For example, experiments have shown that alternation in diastolic SR Ca is not required for CaT alternans.24 In addition, stochastic openings of ryanodine receptors (RyR) lead to Ca sparks that occur randomly, not in an alternating sequence that would be expected to underlie Ca altern-ans. So, how do local random sparks and constant dia­stolic SR calcium load lead to global CaT alternans? Mathematical models with detailed representations of subcellular Ca cycling have been developed in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Model­ing studies have shown that even when SR Ca load is not changing, RyRs, which are analogous to ICaL in APD alternans, recover gradually from refractoriness. As RyR availability increases (for example during a long diastolic interval) a single Ca spark from a RyR will be larger in amplitude and recruit neighboring Ca release units to generate more sparks. The large resultant CaT causes depletion of the SR and when complete recovery of RyRs does not occur prior to the arrival of the next stimulus, the subsequent CaT will be small. This process results in an alternans of CaT amplitude from beat-to-beat.

 Coupling Between the Membrane Potential and Subcellular Calcium Dynamics

Importantly, the membrane voltage and intracellu­lar Ca cycling are coupled via Ca sensitive channels such as the L-type Ca channel and the sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX). The membrane voltage dynamics and the intracellular Ca dynamics are bi-directionally coupled. One direction is from voltage to Ca. As the DI becomes longer, the CaT usually becomes larger since the recovery time for the L-type Ca channel in increased and the SR Ca release becomes larger. The other direction is from Ca to voltage. Here we consider two major currents, NCX and ICaL. As the CaT becomes larger, forward mode NCX becomes larger and pro­longs APD. On the other hand, as the CaT becomes larger, ICaL becomes smaller due to Ca-induced inacti­vation, and thus, larger CaT shortens the APD. There­fore, depending on which current dominates, larger CaT can prolong or shorten APD. If a larger CaT pro­longs (shortens) the APD, then the coupling is positive (negative). The coupled dynamics of the membrane voltage and the intracellular Ca cycling can be cate­gorized by the instability of membrane voltage (steep APD restitution), instability of the intracellular Ca cycling (steep relation between Ca release versus SR Ca load), and the coupling (positive or negative). If the coupling is positive, alternans is electromechani­cally concordant (long-short-long-short APD cor­responds to large-small-large-small CaT sequence) regardless of the underlying instability mechanism. On the other hand, if the coupling is negative, alternans is electromechanically concordant in a voltage-driven regime. However, if alternans is Ca driven, alternans becomes electromechanically discordant (long-short-long-short APD corresponds to small-large-small-large CaT sequence). It is also possible to induce quasi- periodic oscillation of APD and CaT when volt­age and Ca instabilities contribute equally.

 Alternans in Higher Dimensions

Tissue level alternans in APD and CaT also occur and here we describe how the dynamical mechanism of alternans at the single cell level determines the phenomena in tissue. Spatially discordant alternans (SDA) where APDs in different regions of tissue alternate out-of-phase, is more arrhythmogenic since it causes large gradients of refractoriness and wave-break, which can initiate ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. How is SDA induced? As the APD is a function of the previous DI, con­duction velocity (CV) is also function of the previ­ous DI (CV restitution) since the action potential propagation speed depends on the availability of the sodium channel. As the DI becomes shorter, sodium channels have less time to recover. Therefore, in general, as the DI becomes shorter, the CV becomes slower. When tissue is paced rapidly, action poten­tials propagate slowly near the stimulus, and thenac-celerate downstream as the DI becomes longer. This causes heterogeneity in APD (APD is shorter near the stimulus). During the following tissue excitation, APD becomes longer and the CV becomes faster at the pacing site then gradually APD becomes shorter and the CV becomes slower. The interaction between steep APD restitution and steep CV restitution creates SDA. This mechanism applies only when the cel­lular instability is voltage driven. When the cellular instability is Ca driven, the mechanism of SDA formation is different. If the volt­age-Ca coupling is negative, SDA can form without steep APD and CV restitution. The mechanism can be understood as follows. First, when cells are uncou­pled, alternans of APD and Ca are electromechanically discordant. If two cells are alternating in opposite phases, once these cells are coupled by voltage, due to electrotonic coupling, the membrane voltage of both cells is synchronized and thus APD becomes the same. This synchronization of APD amplifies the difference of CaT between two cells (Fig. 5 in). In other words it desynchronizes CaT. This instability mechanism is also found in subcellular SDA. In the case where the instability is Ca driven and the coupling is positive, there are several interest­ing distinctive phenomena that can occur. First, the profile of SDA of Ca contains a much steeper gra­dient at the node (point in space where no alternans occurs–cells downstream of the node are alternating out of phase with those upstream of the node) com­pared to the case of voltage driven SDA. Thus, the cellular mechanism of instability can be identified by evaluating the steepness of the alternans amplitude gradient in space around the node. When the cellular instability is voltage driven, the steady-state wave­length (separation of nodes in space) depends on electrotonic coupling between cells and the steepness of APD and CV restitution, regardless of the initial conditions. However, if the cellular instability is Ca driven, the location of nodes depends on the pacing history, which includes pacing cycle length and other parameters affected by pacing frequency. In this case, once the node is formed, the location of the node may be fixed, especially when Ca instability is strong. Such an explanation may apply to recent experimen­tal results. Summary In this review, we described how the origin of alternans at the cellular level (voltage driven, Ca drive, coupling between voltage and Ca) affects the formation of spatially discordant alternans at the tissue level. Cardiac alternans is a multi-scale emergent phenomenon. Channel properties determine the instability mechanism at the cellular level. Alternans mechanisms at cellular level determine SDA patterns at the tissue level. In order to understand alternans and develop anti-arrhythmic drug and therapy, multi-scale modeling of the heart is useful, which is increasingly enabled by emerging technologies such as general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) and cloud computing.

English: Diagram of contraction of smooth musc...

English: Diagram of contraction of smooth muscle fiber (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Schematic representation of Calcium Cycling in Contractile and Proliferating VSMCs receptors voltage gated Ca(2) channel Marks-Wehrens Model and multiphosphorylation  site model ncpcardio0419-f4   calcium leak

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aprotinin-sequence.Par.0001.Image.260

aprotinin-sequence.Par.0001.Image.260 (Photo credit: redondoself)

English: Protein folding: amino-acid sequence ...

Protein folding: amino-acid sequence of bovine BPTI (basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor) in one-letter code, with its folded 3D structure represented by a stick model of the mainchain and sidechains (in gray), and the backbone and secondary structure by a ribbon colored blue to red from N- to C-terminus. 3D structure from PDB file 1BPI, visualized in Mage and rendered in Raster3D. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Effects of Aprotinin on Endothelial Cell Coagulant Biology

Demet Sag, PhD*†, Kamran Baig, MBBS, MRCS; James Jaggers, MD, Jeffrey H. Lawson, MD, PhD

Departments of Surgery and Pathology (J.H.L.) Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC  27710

Correspondence and Reprints:

                             Jeffrey H. Lawson, M.D., Ph.D.

                              Departments of Surgery & Pathology

                              DUMC Box 2622

                              Durham, NC  27710

                              (919) 681-6432 – voice

                              (919) 681-1094 – fax

                              lawso006@mc.duke.edu

*Current Address: Demet SAG, PhD

                          3830 Valley Centre Drive Suite 705-223, San Diego, CA 92130

Support:

Word Count: 4101 Journal Subject Heads:  CV surgery, endothelial cell activationAprotinin, Protease activated receptors,

Potential Conflict of Interest:         None

Abstract

Introduction:  Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which is responsible for excessive bleeding and multisystem dysfunction. Endothelial cell activation is a key pathophysiological process that underlies this response. Aprotinin, a serine protease inhibitor has been shown to be anti-inflammatory and also have significant hemostatic effects in patients undergoing CPB. We sought to investigate the effects of aprotinin at the endothelial cell level in terms of cytokine release (IL-6), tPA release, tissue factor expression, PAR1 + PAR2 expression and calcium mobilization. Methods:  Cultured Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECS) were stimulated with TNFa for 24 hours and treated with and without aprotinin (200KIU/ml + 1600KIU/ml). IL-6 and tPA production was measured using ELISA. Cellular expression of Tissue Factor, PAR1 and PAR2 was measured using flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium mobilization following stimulation with PAR specific peptides and agonists (trypsin, thrombin, Human Factor VIIa, factor Xa) was measured using fluorometry with Fluo-3AM. Results: Aprotinin at the high dose (1600kIU/mL), 183.95 ± 13.06mg/mL but not low dose (200kIU/mL) significantly reduced IL-6 production from TNFa stimulated HUVECS (p=0.043). Aprotinin treatment of TNFa activated endothelial cells significantly reduce the amount of tPA released in a dose dependent manner (A200 p=0.0018, A1600 p=0.033). Aprotinin resulted in a significant downregulation of TF expression to baseline levels. At 24 hours, we found that aprotinin treatment of TNFa stimulated cells resulted in a significant downregulation of PAR-1 expression. Aprotinin significantly inhibited the effects of the protease thrombin upon PAR1 mediated calcium release. The effects of PAR2 stimulatory proteases such as human factor Xa, human factor VIIa and trypsin on calcium release was also inhibited by aprotinin. Conclusion:  We have shown that aprotinin has direct anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cell activation and these effects may be mediated through inhibition of proteolytic activation of PAR1 and PAR2. Abstract word count: 297

INTRODUCTION   Each year it is estimated that 350,000 patients in the United States, and 650,000 worldwide undergo cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Despite advances in surgical techniques and perioperative management the morbidity and mortality of cardiac surgery related to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome(SIRS), especially in neonates is devastatingly significant. Cardiopulmonary bypass exerts an extreme challenge upon the haemostatic system as part of the systemic inflammatory syndrome predisposing to excessive bleeding as well as other multisystem dysfunction (1). Over the past decade major strides have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the inflammatory response following CPB and the role of the vascular endothelium has emerged as critical in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis (2).

CPB results in endothelial cell activation and initiation of coagulation via the Tissue Factor dependent pathway and consumption of important clotting factors. The major stimulus for thrombin generation during CPB has been shown to be through the tissue factor dependent pathway. As well as its effects on the fibrin and platelets thrombin has been found to play a role in a host of inflammatory responses in the vascular endothelium. The recent discovery of the Protease-Activated Receptors (PAR), one of which through which thrombin acts (PAR-1) has stimulated interest that they may provide a vital link between inflammation and coagulation (3).

Aprotinin is a nonspecific serine protease inhibitor that has been used for its ability to reduce blood loss and preserve platelet function during cardiac surgery procedures requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and thus the need for subsequent blood and blood product transfusions. However there have been concerns that aprotinin may be pro-thrombotic, especially in the context of coronary artery bypass grafting, which has limited its clinical use. These reservations are underlined by the fact that the mechanism of action of aprotinin has not been fully understood. Recently aprotinin has been shown to exert anti-thrombotic effects mediated by blocking the PAR-1 (4). Much less is known about its effects on endothelial cell activation, especially in terms of Tissue Factor but it has been proposed that aprotinin may also exert protective effects at the endothelial level via protease-activated receptors (PAR1 and PAR2). In this study we simulated in vitro the effects of endothelial cell activation during CPB by stimulating Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) with a proinflammatory cytokine released during CPB, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-a) and characterize the effects of aprotinin treatment on TF expression, PAR1 and PAR2 expression, cytokine release IL-6 and tPA secretion.  In order to investigate the mechanism of action of aprotinin we studied its effects on PAR activation by various agonists and ligands.

These experiments provide insight into the effects of aprotinin on endothelial related coagulation mechanisms in terms of Tissue Factor expression and indicate it effects are mediated through Protease-Activated Receptors (PAR), which are seven membrane spanning proteins called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), that link coagulant and inflammatory pathways. Therefore, in this study we examine the effects of aprotinin on the human endothelial cell coagulation biology by different-dose aprotinin, 200 and 1600units.  The data demonstrates that aprotinin appears to directly alter endothelial expression of inflammatory cytokines, tPA and PAR receptor expression following treatment with TNF.  The direct mechanism of action is unknown but may act via local protease inhibition directly on endothelial cells.  It is hoped that with improved understanding of the mechanisms of action of aprotinin, especially an antithrombotic effect at the endothelial level the fears of prothrombotic tendency may be lessened and its use will become more routine.  

METHODS Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECS) used as our model to study the effects of endothelial cell activation on coagulant biology. In order to simulate the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass at the endothelial cell interface we stimulated the cells with the proinflammatory cytokine TNFa. In the study group the HUVECs were pretreated with low (200kIU/mL) and high (1600kIU/mL) dosages of aprotinin prior to stimulation with TNFa and complement activation fragments. The effects of TNFa stimulation upon endothelial Tissue Factor expression, PAR1 and PAR2 expression, and tPA and IL6 secretion were determined and compared between control and aprotinin treated cells. In order to delineate whether aprotinin blocks PAR activation via its protease inhibition properties we directly activated PAR1 and PAR2 using specific agonist ligands such thrombin (PAR1), trypsin, Factor VIIa, Factor Xa (PAR2) in the absence and presence of aprotinin.

Endothelial Cell Culture HUVECs were supplied from Clonetics. The cells were grown in EBM-2 containing 2MV bullet kit, including 5% FBS, 100-IU/ml penicillin, 0.1mg/mL streptomycin, 2mmol/L L-glutamine, 10 U/ml heparin, 30µg/mL EC growth supplement (ECGS). Before the stimulation cells were starved in 0.1%BSA depleted with FBS and growth factors for 24 hours. Cells were sedimented at 210g for 10 minutes at 4C and then resuspended in culture media. The HUVECs to be used will be between 3 and 5 passages.

Assay of IL-6 and tPA production Levels of IL-6 were measured with an ELISA based kit (RDI, MN) according to the manufacturers instructions. tPA was measured using a similar kit (American Diagnostica).

  Flow Cytometry The expression of transmembrane proteins PAR1, PAR2 and tissue factor were measured by single color assay as FITC labeling agent. Prepared suspension of cells disassociated trypsin free cell disassociation solution (Gibco) to be labeled. First well washed, and resuspended into “labeling buffer”, phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 0.5% BSA plus 0.1% NaN3, and 5% fetal bovine serum to block Fc and non-specific Ig binding sites. Followed by addition of 5mcl of antibody to approx. 1 million cells in 100µl labeling buffer and incubate at 4C for 1 hour. After washing the cells with 200µl with wash buffer, PBS + 0.1% BSA + 0.1% NaN3, the cells were pelletted at 1000rpm for 2 mins. Since the PAR1 and PAR2 were directly labeled with FITC these cells were fixed for later analysis by flow cytometry in 500µl PBS containing 1%BSA + 0.1% NaN3, then add equal volume of 4% formalin in PBS. For tissue factor raised in mouse as monoclonal primary antibody, the pellet resuspended and washed twice more as before, and incubated at 4C for 1 hour addition of 5µl donkey anti-mouse conjugated with FITC secondary antibody directly to the cell pellets at appropriate dilution in labeling buffer. After the final wash three times, the cell pellets were resuspended thoroughly in fixing solution. These fixed and labeled cells were then stored in the dark at 4C until there were analyzed. On analysis, scatter gating was used to avoid collecting data from debris and any dead cells. Logarithmic amplifiers for the fluorescence signal were used as this minimizes the effects of different sensitivities between machines for this type of data collection.  

Intracellular Calcium Measurement

Measured the intracellular calcium mobilization by Fluo-3AM. HUVECs were grown in calcium and phenol free EBM basal media containing 2MV bullet kit. Then the cell cultures were starved with the same media by 0.1% BSA without FBS for 24 hour with or without TNFa stimulation presence or absence of aprotinin (200 and 1600KIU/ml). Next the cells were loaded with Fluo-3AM 5µg/ml containing agonists, PAR1 specific peptide SFLLRN-PAR1 inhibitor, PAR2 specific peptide SLIGKV-PAR2 inhibitor, human alpha thrombin, trypsin, factor VIIa, factor Xa for an hour at 37C in the incubation chamber. Finally the media was replaced by Flou-3AM free media and incubated for another 30 minutes in the incubation chamber. The readings were taken at fluoromatic bioplate reader. For comparison purposes readings were taken before and during Fluo-3AM loading as well.  

RESULTS Aprotinin reduces IL-6 production from activated/stimulated HUVECS The effects of aprotinin analyzed on HUVEC for the anti-inflammatory effects of aprotinin at cultured HUVECS with high and low doses.  Figure 1 shows that TNF-a stimulated a considerable increase in IL-6 production, 370.95 ± 109.9 mg/mL.   If the drug is used alone the decrease of IL-6 at the low dose is 50% that is 183.95 ng/ml and with the high dose of 20% that is 338.92 from 370.95ng/ml being compared value.  TNFa-aprotinin results in reduction of the IL-6 expression from 370.95ng/ml to 58.6 (6.4fold) fro A200 and 75.85 (4.9 fold) ng/ml, for A1600.  After the treatment the cells reach to the below baseline limit of IL-6 expression. Aprotinin at the high dose (1600kIU/mL), 183.95 ± 13.06mg/mL but not low dose (200kIU/mL) significantly reduced IL-6 production from TNF-a stimulated HUVECS (p=0.043).  Therefore, the aprotinin prevents inflammation as well as loss of blood.  

Aprotinin reduces tPA production from stimulated HUVECS Whether aprotinin exerted part of its fibrinolytic effects through inhibition of tPA mediated plasmin generation examined by the effects on TNFa stimulated HUVECS. Figure 2 also demonstrates that the amount of tPA released from HUVECS under resting, non-stimulated conditions incubated with aprotinin are significantly different. Figure 2 represents that the resting level of tPA released from non-stimulated cells significantly, by 100%, increase following TNF-a stimulation for 24 hours.  After application of aprotinin alone at two doses the tPA level goes down 25% of TNFa stimulated cells.  However, aprotinin treatment of TNF-a activated endothelial cells significantly lower the amount of tPA release in a dose dependent manner that is low dose decreased 25 but high dose causes 50% decrease of tPA expression (A200 p=0.0018, A1600 p=0.033) This finding suggests that aprotinin exerts a direct inhibitory effect on endothelial cell tPA production.

Aprotinin and receptor expression on activated HUVECS

TF is expressed when the cell in under stress such as TNFa treatments. The stimulated HUVECs with TNF-a tested for the expression of PAR1, PAR2, and tissue factor by single color flow cytometry through FITC labeled detection antibodies at 1, 3, and 24hs.

 

Tissue Factor expression is reduced:

Figure 3 demonstrates that there is a fluctuation of TF expression from 1 h to 24h that the TF decreases at first hour after aprotinin application 50% and 25%, A1600 and A200 respectively.  Then at 3 h the expression come back up 50% more than the baseline.  Finally, at 24h the expression of TF becomes almost as same as baseline.  Moreover, TNFa stimulated cells remains 45% higher than baseline after at 3h as well as at 24h.

PAR1 decreased:
Figure 4 demonstrates that aprotinin reduces the PAR1 expression 80% at 24h but there is no affect at 1 and 3 h intervals for both doses.

During the treatment with aprotinin only high dose at 1 hour time interval decreases the PAR1 expression on the cells. This data explains that ECCB is affected due to the expression of PAR1 is lowered by the high dose of aprotinin.

PAR2 is decreased by aprotinin:

  Figure 5 shows the high dose of aprotinin reduces the PAR2 expression close to 25% at 1h, 50% at 3h and none at 24h.  This pattern is exact opposite of PAR1 expression.  Figure 5 demonstrates the 50% decrease at 3h interval only.  Does that mean aprotinin affecting the inflammation first and then coagulation?

This suggests that aprotinin may affect the PAR2 expression at early and switched to PAR1 reduction later time intervals.  This fluctuation can be normal because aprotinin is not a specific inhibitor for proteases.  This approach make the aprotinin work better the control bleeding and preventing the inflammation causing cytokine such as IL-6.

Aprotinin inhibits Calcium fluxes induced by PAR1/2 specific agonists

  The specificity of aprotinin’s actions upon PAR studied the effects of the agent on calcium release following proteolytic and non-proteolytic stimulation of PAR1 and PAR2. Figure 6A (Figure 6) shows the stimulation of the cells with the PAR1 specific peptide (SFLLRN) results in release of calcium from the cells. Pretreatment of the cells with aprotinin has no significant effect on PAR1 peptide stimulated calcium release. This suggests that aprotinin has no effect upon the non-proteolytic direct activation of the PAR 1 receptor. Yet, Figure 6B (Figure 6) demonstrates human alpha thrombin does interact with the drug as a result the calcium release drops below base line after high dose (A1600) aprotinin used to zero but low dose does not show significant effect on calcium influx. Figure 7 demonstrates the direct PAR2 and indirect PAR2 stimulation by hFVIIa, hFXa, and trypsin of cells.  Similarly, at Figure 7A aprotinin has no effect upon PAR2 peptide stimulated calcium release, however, at figures 7B, C, and D shows that PAR2 stimulatory proteases Human Factor Xa, Human Factor VIIa and Trypsin decreases calcium release. These findings indicate that aprotinin’s mechanism of action is directed towards inhibiting proteolytic cleavage and hence subsequent activation of the PAR1 and PAR2 receptor complexes.  The binding site of the aprotinin on thrombin possibly is not the peptide sequence interacting with receptors.

Measurement of calcium concentration is essential to understand the mechanism of aprotinin on endothelial cell coagulation and inflammation because these mechanisms are tightly controlled by presence of calcium.  For example, activation of PAR receptors cause activation of G protein q subunit that leads to phosphoinositol to secrete calcium from endoplasmic reticulum into cytoplasm or activation of DAG to affect Phospho Lipase C (PLC). In turn, certain calcium concentration will start the serial formation of chain reaction for coagulation.  Therefore, treatment of the cells with specific factors, thrombin receptor activating peptides (TRAPs), human alpha thrombin, trypsin, human factor VIIa, and human factor Xa, would shed light into the effect of aprotinin on the formation of complexes for pro-coagulant activity.    DISCUSSION   There are two fold of outcomes to be overcome during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB):  mechanical stress and the contact of blood with artificial surfaces results in the activation of pro- and anticoagulant systems as well as the immune response leading to inflammation and systemic organ failure.  This phenomenon causes the “postperfusion-syndrome”, with leukocytosis, increased capillary permeability, accumulation of interstitial fluid, and organ dysfunction.  CPB is also associated with a significant inflammatory reaction, which has been related to complement activation, and release of various inflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes. CPB induces an inflammatory state characterized by tumor necrosis factor-alpha release. Aprotinin, a low molecular-weight peptide inhibitor of trypsin, kallikrein and plasmin has been proposed to influence whole body inflammatory response inhibiting kallikrein formation, complement activation and neutrophil activation (5, 6). But shown that aprotinin has no significant influence on the inflammatory reaction to CPB in men.  Understanding the endothelial cell responses to injury is therefore central to appreciating the role that dysfunction plays in the preoperative, operative, and postoperative course of nearly all cardiovascular surgery patients.  Whether aprotinin increases the risk of thrombotic complications remains controversial.   The anti-inflammatory properties of aprotinin in attenuating the clinical manifestations of the systemic inflammatory response following cardiopulmonary bypass are well known(15) 16)  However its mechanisms and targets of action are not fully understood. In this study we have investigated the actions of aprotinin at the endothelial cell level. Our experiments showed that aprotinin reduced TNF-a induced IL-6 release from cultured HUVECS. Thrombin mediates its effects through PAR-1 receptor and we found that aprotinin reduced the expression of PAR-1 on the surface of HUVECS after 24 hours incubation. We then demonstrated that aprotinin inhibited endothelial cell PAR proteolytic activation by thrombin (PAR-1), trypsin, factor VII and factor X (PAR-2) in terms of less release of Ca preventing the activation of coagulation.  So aprotinin made cells produce less receptor, PAR1, PAR2, and TF as a result there would be less Ca++ release.    Our findings provide evidence for anti-inflammatory as well as anti-coagulant properties of aprotinin at the endothelial cell level, which may be mediated through its inhibitory effects on proteolytic activation of PARs.   IL6   Elevated levels of IL-6 have been shown to correlate with adverse outcomes following cardiac surgery in terms of cardiac dysfunction and impaired lung function(Hennein et al 1992). Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-a.  IL-6 is produced by T-cells, endothelial cells as a result monocytes and plasma levels of this cytokine tend to increase during CPB (21, 22). In some studies aprotinin has been shown to reduce levels of IL-6 post CPB(23) Hill(5). Others have failed to demonstrate an inhibitory effect of aprotinin upon pro-inflammatory cytokines following CPB(24) (25).  Our experiments showed that aprotinin significantly reduced the release of IL-6 from TNF-a stimulated endothelial cells, which may represent an important target of its anti-inflammatory properties. Its has been shown recently that activation of HUVEC by PAR-1 and PAR-2 agonists stimulates the production of IL-6(26). Hence it is possible that the effects of aprotinin in reducing IL-6 may be through targeting activation of such receptors.   TPA   Tissue Plasminogen activator is stored, ready made, in endothelial cells and it is released at its highest levels just after commencing CPB and again after protamine administration. The increased fibrinolytic activity associated with the release of tPA can be correlated to the excessive bleeding postoperatively. Thrombin is thought to be the major stimulus for release of t-PA from endothelial cells. Aprotinin’s haemostatic properties are due to direct inhibition of plasmin, thereby reducing fibrinolytic activity as well as inhibiting fibrin degradation.  Aprotinin has not been shown to have any significant effect upon t-PA levels in patients post CPB(27), which would suggest that aprotinin reduced fibrinolytic effects are not the result of inhibition of t-PA mediated plasmin generation. Our study, however demonstrates that aprotinin inhibits the release of t-PA from activated endothelial cells, which may represent a further haemostatic mechanism at the endothelial cell level.   TF   Resting endothelial cells do not normally express tissue factor on their cell surface. Inflammatory mediators released during CPB such as complement (C5a), lipopolysaccharide, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-a, mitogens, adhesion molecules and hypoxia may induce the expression of tissue factor on endothelial cells and monocytes. The expression of TF on activated endothelial cells activates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, ultimately resulting in the generation of thrombin and fibrin. Aprotinin has been shown to reduce the expression of TF on monocytes in a simulated cardiopulmonary bypass circuit (28).

We found that treatment of activated endothelial cells with aprotinin significantly reduced the expression of TF after 24 hours. This would be expected to result in reduced thrombin generation and represent an additional possible anticoagulant effect of aprotinin. In a previous study from our laboratory we demonstrated that there were two peaks of inducible TF activity on endothelial cells, one immediately post CPB and the second at 24 hours (29). The latter peak is thought to be responsible for a shift from the initial fibrinolytic state into a procoagulant state.  In addition to its established early haemostatic and coagulant effect, aprotinin may also have a delayed anti-coagulant effect through its inhibition of TF mediated coagulation pathway. Hence its effects may counterbalance the haemostatic derangements, i.e. first bleeding then thrombosis caused by CPB. The anti-inflammatory effects of aprotinin may also be related to inhibition of TF and thrombin generation. PARs  

It has been suggested that aprotinin may target PAR on other cells types, especially endothelial cells. We investigated the role of PARs in endothelial cell activation and whether they can be the targets for aprotinin.  In recent study by Day group(30) demonstrated that endothelial cell activation by thrombin and downstream inflammatory responses can be inhibited by aprotinin in vitro through blockade of protease-activated receptor 1. Our results provide a new molecular basis to help explain the anti-inflammatory properties of aprotinin reported clinically.    The finding that PAR-2 can also be activated by the coagulation enzymes factor VII and factor X indicates that PAR may represent the link between inflammation and coagulation.  PAR-2 is believed to play an important role in inflammatory response. PAR-2 are widely expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, kidney, liver, airway, prostrate, ovary, eye of endothelial, epithelial, smooth muscle cells, T-cells and neutrophils. Activation of PAR-2 in vivo has been shown to be involved in early inflammatory processes of leucocyte recruitment, rolling, and adherence, possibly through a mechanism involving platelet-activating factor (PAF)   We investigated the effects of TNFa stimulation on PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression on endothelial cells. Through functional analysis of PAR-1 and PAR-2 by measuring intracellular calcium influx we have demonstrated that aprotinin blocks proteolytic cleavage of PAR-1 by thrombin and activation of PAR-2 by the proteases trypsin, factor VII and factor X.  This confirms the previous findings on platelets of an endothelial anti-thrombotic effect through inhibition of proteolysis of PAR-1. In addition, part of aprotinin’s anti-inflammatory effects may be mediated by the inhibition of serine proteases that activate PAR-2. There have been conflicting reports regarding the regulation of PAR-1 expression by inflammatory mediators in cultured human endothelial cells. Poullis et al first showed that thrombin induced platelet aggregation was mediated by via the PAR-1(4) and demonstrated that aprotinin inhibited the serine protease thrombin and trypsin induced platelet aggregation. Aprotinin did not block PAR-1 activation by the non-proteolytic agonist peptide, SFLLRN indicating that the mechanism of action was directed towards inhibiting proteolytic cleavage of the receptor. Nysted et al showed that TNF did not affect mRNA and cell surface protein expression of PAR-1 (35), whereas Yan et al showed downregulation of PAR-1 mRNA levels (36). Once activated PAR1 and PAR2 are rapidly internalized and then transferred to lysosomes for degradation.

Endothelial cells contain large intracellular pools of preformed receptors that can replace the cleaved receptors over a period of approximately 2 hours, thus restoring the capacity of the cells to respond to thrombin. In this study we found that after 1-hour stimulation with TNF there was a significant upregulation in PAR-1 expression. However after 3 hours and 24 hours there was no significant change in PAR-1 expression suggesting that cleaved receptors had been internalized and replenished. Aprotinin was interestingly shown to downregulate PAR-1 expression on endothelial cells at 1 hour and increasingly more so after 24 hours TNF stimulation. These findings may suggest an effect of aprotinin on inhibiting intracellular cycling and synthesis of PAR-1.    

Conclusions   Our study has identified the anti-inflammatory and coagulant effects of aprotinin at the endothelial cell level. All together aprotinin affects the ECCB by reducing the t-PA, IL-6, PAR1, PAR 2, TF expressions. Our data correlates with the previous foundlings in production of tPA (7, (8) 9) 10), and  decreased IL-6 levels (11) during coronary artery bypass graft surgery (12-14). We have importantly demonstrated that aprotinin may target proteolytic activation of endothelial cell associated PAR-1 to exert a possible anti-inflammatory effect. This evidence should lessen the concerns of a possible prothrombotic effect and increased incidence of graft occlusion in coronary artery bypass patients treated with aprotinin. Aprotinin may also inhibit PAR-2 proteolytic activation, which may represent a key mechanism for attenuating the inflammatory response at the critical endothelial cell level. Although aprotinin has always been known as a non-specific protease inhibitor we would suggest that there is growing evidence for a PAR-ticular mechanism of action.  

REFERENCES

1.         Levy, J. H., and Tanaka, K. A. Inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. Ann Thorac Surg. 75: S715-720, 2003.

2.         Verrier, E. D., and Morgan, E. N. Endothelial response to cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Ann Thorac Surg. 66: S17-19; discussion S25-18, 1998.

3.         Cirino, G., Napoli, C., Bucci, M., and Cicala, C. Inflammation-coagulation network: are serine protease receptors the knot? Trends Pharmacol Sci. 21: 170-172, 2000. 4.         Poullis, M., Manning, R., Laffan, M., Haskard, D. O., Taylor, K. M., and Landis, R. C. The antithrombotic effect of aprotinin: actions mediated via the proteaseactivated receptor 1. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 120: 370-378, 2000.

5.         Hill, G. E., Alonso, A., Spurzem, J. R., Stammers, A. H., and Robbins, R. A. Aprotinin and methylprednisolone equally blunt cardiopulmonary bypass-induced inflammation in humans. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 110: 1658-1662, 1995.

6.         Hill, G. E., Pohorecki, R., Alonso, A., Rennard, S. I., and Robbins, R. A. Aprotinin reduces interleukin-8 production and lung neutrophil accumulation after cardiopulmonary bypass. Anesth Analg. 83: 696-700, 1996. 7.         Lu, H., Du Buit, C., Soria, J., Touchot, B., Chollet, B., Commin, P. L., Conseiller, C., Echter, E., and Soria, C. Postoperative hemostasis and fibrinolysis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass with or without aprotinin therapy. Thromb Haemost. 72: 438-443, 1994.

8.         de Haan, J., and van Oeveren, W. Platelets and soluble fibrin promote plasminogen activation causing downregulation of platelet glycoprotein Ib/IX complexes: protection by aprotinin. Thromb Res. 92: 171-179, 1998.

9.         Erhardtsen, E., Bregengaard, C., Hedner, U., Diness, V., Halkjaer, E., and Petersen, L. C. The effect of recombinant aprotinin on t-PA-induced bleeding in rats. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 5: 707-712, 1994.

10.       Orchard, M. A., Goodchild, C. S., Prentice, C. R., Davies, J. A., Benoit, S. E., Creighton-Kemsford, L. J., Gaffney, P. J., and Michelson, A. D. Aprotinin reduces cardiopulmonary bypass-induced blood loss and inhibits fibrinolysis without influencing platelets. Br J Haematol. 85: 533-541, 1993.

11.       Tassani, P., Augustin, N., Barankay, A., Braun, S. L., Zaccaria, F., and Richter, J. A. High-dose aprotinin modulates the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses during coronary artery bypass graft surgery. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth.14: 682-686, 2000.

12.       Asehnoune, K., Dehoux, M., Lecon-Malas, V., Toueg, M. L., Gonieaux, M. H., Omnes, L., Desmonts, J. M., Durand, G., and Philip, I. Differential effects of aprotinin and tranexamic acid on endotoxin desensitization of blood cells induced by circulation through an isolated extracorporeal circuit. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 16: 447-451, 2002.

13.       Dehoux, M. S., Hernot, S., Asehnoune, K., Boutten, A., Paquin, S., Lecon-Malas, V., Toueg, M. L., Desmonts, J. M., Durand, G., and Philip, I. Cardiopulmonary bypass decreases cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood cells: roles of interleukin-10 and the extracorporeal circuit. Crit Care Med. 28: 1721-1727, 2000.

14.       Greilich, P. E., Brouse, C. F., Rinder, C. S., Smith, B. R., Sandoval, B. A., Rinder, H. M., Eberhart, R. C., and Jessen, M. E. Effects of epsilon-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin on leukocyte-platelet adhesion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Anesthesiology. 100: 225-233, 2004.

15.       Mojcik, C. F., and Levy, J. H. Aprotinin and the systemic inflammatory response after cardiopulmonary bypass. Ann Thorac Surg. 71: 745-754, 2001.

16.       Landis, R. C., Asimakopoulos, G., Poullis, M., Haskard, D. O., and Taylor, K. M. The antithrombotic and antiinflammatory mechanisms of action of aprotinin. Ann Thorac Surg. 72: 2169-2175, 2001.

17.       Asimakopoulos, G., Kohn, A., Stefanou, D. C., Haskard, D. O., Landis, R. C., and Taylor, K. M. Leukocyte integrin expression in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. Ann Thorac Surg. 69: 1192-1197, 2000.

18.       Landis, R. C., Asimakopoulos, G., Poullis, M., Thompson, R., Nourshargh, S., Haskard, D. O., and Taylor, K. M. Effect of aprotinin (trasylol) on the inflammatory and thrombotic complications of conventional cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Heart Surg Forum. 4 Suppl 1: S35-39, 2001.

19.       Asimakopoulos, G., Thompson, R., Nourshargh, S., Lidington, E. A., Mason, J. C., Ratnatunga, C. P., Haskard, D. O., Taylor, K. M., and Landis, R. C. An anti-inflammatory property of aprotinin detected at the level of leukocyte extravasation. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 120: 361-369, 2000.

20.       Asimakopoulos, G., Lidington, E. A., Mason, J., Haskard, D. O., Taylor, K. M., and Landis, R. C. Effect of aprotinin on endothelial cell activation. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 122: 123-128, 2001.

21.       Butler, J., Chong, G. L., Baigrie, R. J., Pillai, R., Westaby, S., and Rocker, G. M. Cytokine responses to cardiopulmonary bypass with membrane and bubble oxygenation. Ann Thorac Surg. 53: 833-838, 1992.

22.       Hennein, H. A., Ebba, H., Rodriguez, J. L., Merrick, S. H., Keith, F. M., Bronstein, M. H., Leung, J. M., Mangano, D. T., Greenfield, L. J., and Rankin, J. S. Relationship of the proinflammatory cytokines to myocardial ischemia and dysfunction after uncomplicated coronary revascularization. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 108: 626-635, 1994.

23.       Diego, R. P., Mihalakakos, P. J., Hexum, T. D., and Hill, G. E. Methylprednisolone and full-dose aprotinin reduce reperfusion injury after cardiopulmonary bypass. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 11: 29-31, 1997.

24.       Ashraf, S., Tian, Y., Cowan, D., Nair, U., Chatrath, R., Saunders, N. R., Watterson, K. G., and Martin, P. G. “Low-dose” aprotinin modifies hemostasis but not proinflammatory cytokine release. Ann Thorac Surg. 63: 68-73, 1997.

25.       Schmartz, D., Tabardel, Y., Preiser, J. C., Barvais, L., d’Hollander, A., Duchateau, J., and Vincent, J. L. Does aprotinin influence the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients? J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 125: 184-190, 2003.

26.       Chi, L., Li, Y., Stehno-Bittel, L., Gao, J., Morrison, D. C., Stechschulte, D. J., and Dileepan, K. N. Interleukin-6 production by endothelial cells via stimulation of protease-activated receptors is amplified by endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. J Interferon Cytokine Res. 21: 231-240, 2001.

27.       Ray, M. J., and Marsh, N. A. Aprotinin reduces blood loss after cardiopulmonary bypass by direct inhibition of plasmin. Thromb Haemost. 78: 1021-1026, 1997.

28.       Khan, M. M., Gikakis, N., Miyamoto, S., Rao, A. K., Cooper, S. L., Edmunds, L. H., Jr., and Colman, R. W. Aprotinin inhibits thrombin formation and monocyte tissue factor in simulated cardiopulmonary bypass. Ann Thorac Surg. 68: 473-478, 1999.

29.       Jaggers, J. J., Neal, M. C., Smith, P. K., Ungerleider, R. M., and Lawson, J. H. Infant cardiopulmonary bypass: a procoagulant state. Ann Thorac Surg. 68: 513-520, 1999.

30.       Day, J. R., Taylor, K. M., Lidington, E. A., Mason, J. C., Haskard, D. O., Randi, A. M., and Landis, R. C. Aprotinin inhibits proinflammatory activation of endothelial cells by thrombin through the protease-activated receptor 1. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 131: 21-27, 2006.

31.       Vergnolle, N. Proteinase-activated receptor-2-activating peptides induce leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and extravasation in vivo. J Immunol. 163: 5064-5069, 1999.

32.       Vergnolle, N., Hollenberg, M. D., Sharkey, K. A., and Wallace, J. L. Characterization of the inflammatory response to proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2)-activating peptides in the rat paw. Br J Pharmacol. 127: 1083-1090, 1999.

33.       McLean, P. G., Aston, D., Sarkar, D., and Ahluwalia, A. Protease-activated receptor-2 activation causes EDHF-like coronary vasodilation: selective preservation in ischemia/reperfusion injury: involvement of lipoxygenase products, VR1 receptors, and C-fibers. Circ Res. 90: 465-472, 2002.

34.       Maree, A., and Fitzgerald, D. PAR2 is partout and now in the heart. Circ Res. 90: 366-368, 2002.

35.       Nystedt, S., Ramakrishnan, V., and Sundelin, J. The proteinase-activated receptor 2 is induced by inflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells. Comparison with the thrombin receptor. J Biol Chem. 271: 14910-14915, 1996.

36.       Yan, W., Tiruppathi, C., Lum, H., Qiao, R., and Malik, A. B. Protein kinase C beta regulates heterologous desensitization of thrombin receptor (PAR-1) in endothelial cells. Am J Physiol. 274: C387-395, 1998.

37.       Shinohara, T., Suzuki, K., Takada, K., Okada, M., and Ohsuzu, F. Regulation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 by inflammatory mediators in human vascular endothelial cells. Cytokine. 19: 66-75, 2002.

FIGURES

Figure 1: IL-6 production following TNF-a stimulation Figure 1

Figure 2:  tPA production following TNF-a stimulation Figure 2

Figure 3:  Tissue Factor Expression on TNF-a stimulated HUVECS Figure 3

Figure 4:  PAR-1 Expression on TNF-a stimulated HUVECS Figure 4

Figure 5:  PAR-2 Expression on TNF-a stimulated HUVECS Figure 5

Figure 6:  Calcium Fluxes following PAR1 Activation Figure 6

Figure 7:  Calcium Fluxes following PAR2 Activation Figure 7

 

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Nanotechnology and Heart Disease

Author and Curator:  Tilda Barliya PhD

Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death worldwide and will become even more prevalent as the population ages. New therapeutic targets are being identified as a result of emerging insights into disease mechanisms, and new strategies are also being tested, possibly leading to new treatment options. Improving diagnosis is also crucial, because by detecting disease early, the focus could be shifted from treatment to prevention (1).

Mortality rates for cardiovascular disease have improved, but there are inequalities across the UK

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 17 million people died from cardiovascular diseases in 2008. In the U.S., about 785,000 people will have new heart attacks this year and 470,000 will suffer recurrent ones. While more patients are surviving such events, about two-thirds don’t make complete recoveries and are vulnerable to heart failure (2).

Heart and vascular disease is the number one killer in most industrialized nations, and costs countries billions in health care, and lost wages. Nanotechnology, biotechnology, robotics, and stem cells are reinvigorating the development of artificial components of the cardiovascular system. We’ve seen hearts grown from stem cells in labs, artificial mechanical hearts, companies spending millions to develop artificial blood, and now even artificial vascular tubes which act more like the real thing. Combined with upcoming advances in robotic and micro-surgery, medicine could be on the path to conquering its public enemy number one.

Nanotechnology offers several tools and advantages in cardiovascular science which are in the areas of diagnosis, imaging, and tissue engineering.

including:

  • treating defective heart valves
  • detecting and treat arterial plaque
  • understanding at a sub-cellular level how heart tissue functions in both healthy  and damaged organs, which can help researchers design better treatments

Examples:

Robert Langer, Omid Farokhzad and colleagues have developed nanoparticles that can cling to artery walls and slowly release medicine, an advance that potentially provides an alternative to drug-releasing stents in some patients with cardiovascular disease. The particles, dubbed “nanoburrs” because they are coated with tiny protein fragments that allow them to stick to target proteins, can be designed to release their drug payload over several days (3, 4). The nanoburrs are targeted to a specific structure, known as the basement membrane, which lines the arterial walls and is only exposed when those walls are damaged. Therefore, the nanoburrs could be used to deliver drugs to treat atherosclerosis and other inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. In the current study, the team used paclitaxel, a drug that inhibits cell division and helps prevent the growth of scar tissue that can clog arteries

Prof. Erkki Ruoslahti and other researchers from UC Santa Barbara have developed a nanoparticle that can attack plaque –– a major cause of cardiovascular disease (5).  These lipid-based micelles target the p32 receptors known to overexpress in plaques. To accomplish the research, the team induced atherosclerotic plaques in mice by keeping them on a high-fat diet. They then intravenously injected these mice with the micelles, which were allowed to circulate for three hours.

Clinical Trials:

Nanotechnology creates artificial artery for clinical trials

Researchers at London Royal Free Hospital are hoping to save limbs and lives with the creation of their new artificial artery. Unlike current artery replacements, this grafting substance was created using nanotechnology and can pulse with the natural movements of the body. That pulsing will allow the polymer tube to be used in very small grafts (<8mm), giving hope that damaged arteries which would normally lead to amputations or heart attacks can now be treated (6). The clinical study should have started by the end of 2010. No further information is currently available on this clinical trial.

The new artificial artery material was developed by Professors George Hamilton (vascular surgery) and Alexander Seifalian (nanotechnology and tissue repair). The substance is a polymer which has been embedded with different types of special molecules. Some of these molecules aid circulation, others encourage stem cells to coat its walls. That coating is very important and may allow the artificial tissue to bond better with the body and promote long term health. Most importantly though, the design of the artificial vascular tissue is resistant to clotting and can pulse.

Summary:

Research of heart disease is progressing on several levels simultaniously. It is believed that nanotechnology may offer several advantages in detecting and treating several heart conditions, however, they have yet to progressed into the clinical trials.

Quoting Dr. Tal Dvir: ” Many current experimental approaches to heart attack involve supplying growth factors, drugs, stem cells and other therapeutic agents to the scarred, dying tissue. Some of these compounds, such as periostin and neuregulin, have been shown in animal models to enhance heart regeneration and improve cardiac function. But the existing delivery approaches are all invasive, involving direct injections into the heart, catheter procedures, or surgical placement of implants that release the necessary factors.

The ultimate goal is to have the particles release compounds that promote regeneration. One approach is to release factors that attract the patient’s own stem cells, avoiding the need for tissue-engineered patches. But to date, no one’s gotten stem cells to differentiate efficiently into cardiomyocytes”

REFERENCES

1. http://www.nature.com/nature/supplements/insights/cardiovascular/index.html

2. Novel Cure for Ailing Hearts. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390443537404577577002440205144.html

3. Chan JM., Zhang L., Tong R., Ghosh D., Gao W., Liao G., Yuet KP., Gray D., Rhee JW., Cheng J., Golomb G., Libby P, Langer R and Farokhzad OC. Spatiotemporal controlled delivery of nanoparticles to injured vasculature. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 2;107(5):2213-8.  http://www.pnas.org/content/107/5/2213.long

4. Chan JM., Rhee JW., Drum CL., Bronson RT., Golomb G., Langer R and Farokhzad OC. In vivo prevention of arterial restenosis with paclitaxel-encapsulated targeted lipid-polymeric nanoparticles. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Nov 29;108(48):19347-52.

http://www.pnas.org/content/108/48/19347.long

5. Hamzah J., Kotamraju VR., Seo JW., Agemy L., Fogel V., Mahakian LM., Peters D., Roth L., Gagnon MK., Ferrara KW and Ruoslahti E. Specific penetration and accumulation of a homing peptide within atherosclerotic plaques of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26;108(17):7154-9http://www.pnas.org/content/108/17/7154.long

6. Written By: http://singularityhub.com/2010/01/05/nanotechnology-creates-artificial-artery-for-clinical-trials/

7. Ikaria® Commences Global Registration Trial for Bioabsorbable Cardiac Matrix. http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ikaria-commences-global-registration-trial-for-bioabsorbable-cardiac-matrix-136581753.html.

8. Posted by: Prof. Lev-Ari :”Arteriogenesis and Cardiac Repair: Two Biomaterials – Injectable Thymosin beta4 and Myocardial Matrix Hydrogel” https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/27/arteriogenesis-and-cardiac-repair-two-biomaterials-injectable-thymosin-beta4-and-myocardial-matrix-hydrogel/

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Nitric Oxide and it’s impact on Cardiothoracic Surgery

Author, curator: Tilda Barliya PhD

 

In the past few weeks we’ve had extensive in-depth series about nitric oxide (NO) and it’s role in renal function and donors in renal disorders, coagulation, endothelium and hemostasis. This inspired this new post regarding the impact of NO on cardiothoratic surgery.  You can read and follow up on these posts here: https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/category/nitric-oxide-in-health-and-disease/

Atherosclerosis in the form of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects approximately eight million Americans, which includes 12 to 20% of individuals over the age of 65.  Approximately 20% of patients with PAD have typical symptoms of lower extremity claudication, rest pain, ulceration, or gangrene, and one-third have atypical exertional symptoms. Persons with PAD have impaired function and quality of life even if they do not report symptoms and experience a decline in lower extremity function over time. Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in patients with intermittent claudication; the annual rate of cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes) is 5 to 7%.  Thus, PAD represents a significant source of morbidity and mortality. (1) (http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/569812).

Several options exist for treating atherosclerotic lesions, including:

  • percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with and without stenting,
  • endarterectomy
  • bypass grafting

Unfortunately, patency rates for each of these procedures continue to be suboptimal secondary to the development of neointimal hyperplasia. A universal feature of all vascular surgical procedures is the removal of or damage to the endothelial cell monolayer that occurs whether the procedure performed is endovascular or open. This endothelial damage leads to a decreased or absent production of nitric oxide (NO) at the site of injury.

noendoschematic

he relationship between NO and the cardiovascular system has proven to be a landmark discovery, and the scientists credited for its discovery were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1998. Since its discovery, NO has proven to be one of the most important molecules in vascular homeostasis. In fact, the term endothelial dysfunction has now become synonymous with the reduced biologic activity of NO.

NO produced by endothelial cells has been shown to have many beneficial effects on the vasculature.

As described above,

  • NO stimulates vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) relaxation, which leads to vessel vasodilatation.  
  • NO has opposite beneficial affects on endothelial cells compared with VSMCs.
  • Whereas NO stimulates endothelial cell proliferation and prevents endothelial cell apoptosis,  it inhibits VSMC growth and migration  and stimulates VSMC apoptosis.  
  • NO also has many thromboresistant properties, such as inhibition of platelet aggregation, adhesion, and activation;  inhibition of leukocyte adhesion and migration;  and inhibition of matrix formation

 As stated before, the endothelial cell monolayer is often removed or damaged during the time of vascular procedures, which leads to a local decrease in the production of NO. It is now understood that this loss of local NO synthesis by endothelial cells at the site of vascular injury is one of the inciting events that allows platelet aggregation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and VSMC proliferation and migration to occur in excess, which, taken together, leads to neointimal hyperplasia.

Reendothelialization of the injured artery can restore proper function to the artery and potentially halt the restenotic process. Many studies have attempted to improve the patency of bypass grafts and stents by coating them with endothelial cells in the hope that this would restore the thromboresistant nature of native blood vessels.

Unfortunately, although it has been possible to coat these devices with endothelial cells, these cells do not behave like normal endothelial cells and their NO production is often diminished or absent. Because the vasoprotective properties of endothelial cells are largely carried out by NO alone, investigators are engaged in research to improve the bioavailability of NO at the site of vascular injury in an attempt to reduce the risk of thrombosis and restenosis after successful revascularization. The overall goal of using a NO-based approach is to reproduce the same thromboresistive moiety observed with normal NO production.

Why of delivering NO to the injured site:

  • Systemic delivery
  • Local delivery

Systemic Delivery

One simple mechanism by which to deliver NO to the body is via inhalational therapy. Inhaled NO has been used clinically in the past to selectively reduce pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with pulmonary hypertension, as well as a potential therapy for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Because the gas is delivered only to the pulmonary system and has a very short half-life, it was thought that there would be no systemic effects of the drug. Subsequently, studies in the mid- to late 1990s suggested that inhaled NO had beneficial antiplatelet and antileukocyte properties without adverse systemic side effects (2,3)

To test if inhaled NO had any beneficial systemic properties specifically on the vasculature, Lee and colleagues evaluated the effect of inhaled NO on neointimal hyperplasia in rats undergoing carotid balloon injury, Unfortunately, the treatment was required for the full 2 weeks to see any difference between the treatment and the control group, thereby limiting its clinical utility.

Despite some of the early animal studies, investigations with healthy human volunteers failed to reproduce these findings.I t was speculated that despite the obvious effects of inhaled NO on the pulmonary vasculature, systemic bioavailability could not be reliably achieved because of the immediate binding and depletion of NO by hemoglobin as soon as it entered the systemic circulation.

Hamon and colleagues tested the ability of orally supplementing l-arginine (2.25%), the precursor to NO, in the drinking water of rabbits to reduce the formation of neointimal hyperplasia after injuring the iliac arteries with a balloon.  This amount of l-arginine is approximately sixfold higher than normal daily intake. When the arteries were studied 4 weeks after injury, the l-arginine-fed group exhibited less neointimal hyperplasia and greater acetylcholine-induced relaxation compared with the control animals. The authors speculated that the improved outcomes were due to increased bioavailability of NO secondary to the l-arginine-supplemented diets. To test the ability of this supplemented diet to reduce neointimal hyperplasia in a vein bypass graft model, Davies and colleagues fed rabbits l-arginine (2.25%) 7 days prior to and 28 days after common carotid vein bypass grafts. A 51% decrease in the formation of neointimal hyperplasia was demonstrated in the l-arginine-fed groups, and their vein grafts exhibited preserved NO-mediated relaxation.

Despite some of the positive findings in animals, similar studies in humans have failed to show any benefit with l-arginine supplementation. Shiraki and colleagues studied the effects of short-term high-dose l-arginine on restenosis after PTCA.  Thirty-four patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and PTCA for angina pectoris received 500 mg of l-arginine administered through the cardiac catheter immediately prior to PTCA and 30 g per day of l-arginine administered via the peripheral vein for 5 days after PTCA. No significant statistical differences in restenosis were observed between the two groups (34% vs 44%). The authors speculated that the lack of effect was secondary to the fact that although the levels of l-arginine in the plasma increased significantly, NO and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) did not. (4)

Table 1.  Comparison of Different Nitric Oxide Donor Drugs Currently Used for Clinical or Research Purposes
Drug Mechanism of NO Release Unique Properties
Diazeniumdiolates Spontaneous when in contact with physiologic fluidsNO release follows first-order kinetics Stable as solidsVarious reliable half-lives depending on the structure of the nucleophile it is attached to
Nitrosamines can form as by-products
S-Nitrosothiols Copper ion-mediated decomposition Stable as a solid
Direct reaction with ascorbate Must be protected from light
Homeolytic cleavage by light Present in circulating blood
Potential for unlimited NO release
Sydnonimines Requires enzymatic cleavage by liver esterases to form active metabolite Stable as a solidMust be protected from light
Requires molecular oxygen as an electron acceptor Requires alkaline pHReleases superoxide as a by-product, which may have negative effects
l-Arginine Substrate for NOS genes Stable as a solid
Ease of administration
Dependent on presence of NOS for NO production
Sodium nitroprusside Requires a one-electron reduction to release NO Stable as a solid
Must be protected from light
Light can induce NO release Must be given intravenously
Releases cyanide as a by-product
Organic nitrates Either by enzymatic cleavage or nonenzymatic bioactivation with sulfhydryl or thiol groups Stable as a solid
Must be protected from light
Ease of administration
Development of tolerance limits efficacy
NO-releasing aspirin Require enzymatic cleavage to break the covalent bond between the aspirin and the NO moiety Stable as a solid
Ease of administration
Inherent benefits of aspirin also
Does not affect systemic blood pressure

Despite the ease of administration, the reliability of drug delivery, and the relative safety of these NO-donating drugs, there are limitations associated with systemic administration. One such limitation is that NO is rapidly inactivated by hemoglobin in the circulating blood, resulting in limited bioavailability. Furthermore, in attempts to increase the amount of drug delivered to obtain the desired clinical effect, unwanted systemic circulatory effects (eg, vasodilation) and unwanted hemostatic effects (eg, bleeding) often preclude administration of biologically effective doses of NO.

Because NO produces systemic side effects, lower doses of NO have been used in many of the human studies. One of the reasons for the differences observed between the animal studies and the human studies was the 10- to 50-fold lower doses of drugs used in the human studies compared with the animal studies. Thus, local delivery of NO may achieve improved results.

Local Delivery

The local delivery of drugs allows for the administration of the maximally effective dose of a drug without the unwanted systemic side effects. Because the target vessels are easily accessible during most vascular procedures, a local pharmacologic approach to administer a drug during the intervention can be easily performed.

Suzuki and colleagues performed a prospective, randomized, single-center clinical trial. (7)

The study population consisted of patients with symptomatic ischemic heart disease who were undergoing coronary artery stent placement. After stent deployment, l-arginine (600 mg/6 mL) or saline (6 mL) was locally delivered via a catheter over 15 minutes. The patients were followed with serial angiography and intravascular ultrasonography to assess for neointimal thickness for up to 6 months. The authors found that in the l-arginine-treated groups, there was slightly less neointimal volume, but this was not statistically significant.

Because it was not known if the addition of l-arginine actually translated to increased NO production, several studies have focused on the addition of NO donors directly to the site of injury.However, Critics of some of the highlighted animal studies point out that the evaluation of neointimal hyperplasia was performed radiographically, which could be subjectively biased. Furthermore, infusing the drug through a catheter for an extended period of time during the procedure to achieve an effect is not clinically feasible. Because of this, other studies have aimed to develop a clinically applicable approach to deliver NO locally to the site of injury.

  • Hydrogels
  • Vascular grafts
  • Gene therapy

represents another method by which to locally increase the level of NO at the site of vascular injury, tested in different multiple creative animal models. Thought, most of this studies shown great preliminary results, only the gene therapy moved forward into randomized clinical trial in humans using gene therapy to reduce neointimal hyperplasia.

In December 2000, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee at the National Institutes of Health voted unanimously to proceed with the first phase of clinical evaluation of iNOS lipoplex-mediated gene transfer, called REGENT-1: Restenosis Gene Therapy Trial. (8). The primary objective of this multicenter, prospective, single-blind, dose escalation study was to obtain safety and tolerability information of iNOS-lipoplex gene therapy for reducing restenosis following coronary angioplasty. As of 2002, 27 patients had been enrolled overseas and the process had been determined to be safe. To date, no results have been published as it appears that this trial lost its funding and closed. On April 5, 2002, a notification was issued that the trial had been closed without enrolling any individuals in the United States.

Unfortunately, despite the promising findings shown with NOS therapy, the field of gene therapy has been mottled by two widely known complications. One case occurred as the result of administering a large viral load that led to the death of a patient. In addition, in France, there were at least two cases of malignancy following retroviral gene therapy.  (9)

Summary

Atherosclerosis in the form of coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the procedures and materials that are currently used to alleviate these disease states are temporary at best because of the inevitable injury to the native endothelium and the subsequent impairment of NO release. Since the discovery of NO and its role in vascular biology, a main focus in vascular research has been to create novel mechanisms to use NO to combat neointimal hyperplasia. To date, numerous animal studies have restored NO production to the vasculature and have shown that this inhibits neointimal hyperplasia, improves patency rates, and is safe to the animal. Clinical studies using these novel NO-releasing compounds in humans are on the horizon.

Ref:

1. Daniel A. Popowich, Vinit Varu, Melina R. Kibbe. Nitric Oxide: What a Vascular Surgeon Needs to Know. Vascular. 2007;15(6):324-335. (http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/569812).

2.  Gries A, Bode C, Peter K, et al. Inhaled nitric oxide inhibits human platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, and fibrinogen binding in vitro and in vivo Circulation 1998;97:1481-7.

3.  Lee JS, Adrie C, Jacob HJ, et al. Chronic inhalation of nitric oxide inhibits neointimal formation after balloon-induced arterial injury Circ Res 1996;78:337-42.

4.  Shiraki T, Takamura T, Kajiyama A, et al. Effect of short-term administration of high dose l-arginine on restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty J Cardiol 2004;44:13-20.

5. David A. Fullerton, MD, Robert C. McIntyre, Jr, MD. Inhaled Nitric Oxide: Therapeutic Applications in Cardiothoracic Surgery. Ann Thorac Surg 1996;61:1856-1864. http://ats.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/61/6/1856

6. Owen I.Miller,Swee Fong Tang, Anthony Keech,Nicholas B.Pigott, Elaine Beller and David S. Celemajer.  Inhaled nitric oxide and prevention of pulmonary hypertension after congenital heart surgery: a randomised double-blind study. The Lancet,2000:356; 9240 Pages 1464 – 1469,  http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(00)02869-5/abstract

7. Suzuki T, Hayase M, Hibi K, et al. Effect of local delivery of l-arginine on in-stent restenosis in humans Am J Cardiol 2002;89:363-7.

8. von der Leyen HE, Chew N. Nitric oxide synthase gene transfer and treatment of restenosis: from bench to bedside Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2006;62:83-89

9.  Barbato JE, Tzeng E. iNOS gene transfer for graft disease Trends Cardiovasc Med 2004;14:267-72.

10. E. Matevossian, A. Novotny, C. Knebel, T. Brill, M. Werner, I. Sinicina, M. Kriner, M. Stangl, S. Thorban, and N. Hüser. The Effect of Selective Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase on Cytochrome P450 After Liver Transplantation in a Rat Model. Transplantation Proceedings 2008, 40, 983–985. http://211.144.68.84:9998/91keshi/Public/File/29/40-4/pdf/1-s2.0-S0041134508004181-main.pdf

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Mitochondrial Dynamics and Cardiovascular Diseases

Author and Curator: Ritu Saxena, Ph.D.

 

Morphological changes in mitochondria have been observed in several human diseases including myopathies, diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Ong et al (2010) studied neonatal rat ventricular myocytes as an experimental model of aging and concluded that the interplay between mitochondrial fission and autophagy controls the rate of mitochondrial turnover. A disturbance in the balance is observed in aging heart cells resulting in giant mitochondria. This observation is an indication that mitochondrial morphology is connected to pathogenesis of cardiac disease. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20631158 Thus, it is important to understand the mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics in order to correlate it with the development of cardiovascular diseases.

Mitochondrial dynamics

The shape of mitochondria is very dynamic in living cells, constantly interchanging between thread-like and grain-like morphology through what we know now as the fusion and fission processes, respectively. The fusion and fission processes together with the mitochondrial movement have been termed “mitochondrial dynamics”.  Nucleoids, the assemblies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with its associated proteins, are distributed during fission in such a way that each mitochondrion contains at least one nucleoid.

Mitochondrial fusion is a complex process that involves the fusing together of four lipid bilayers. Proteins involved in the mitochondrial fission and fusion have been discussed in an earlier post published on October 31, 2012. Mitochondrial fusion requires two 85kD-GTPase isoforms mitofusin1 (Mfn1) and mitofusin2 (Mfn2). Mfn1 and Mfn1 are both anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane. They contain – two transmembrane domains connected by a small intermembrane-space loop, a cytosolic N-terminal GTPase domain and two cytosolic hydrophobic heptad-repeat coiled-coil domains. The coiled-coil domains of Mfn1 and Mfn2 help in tethering adjacent mitochondria in both homo-oligomeric and hetero-oligomeic fashion. The fusion process requires GTP hydrolysis and the cells where Mfn2 had a GTPase mutation; mitochondria were not able to undergo fusion even after tethering. Mitochondrial fission and fusion have been illustrated in Figure 1.

Mitochondrial fission is opposite of the fusion process. Mammalian mitochondria undergo fission by the interaction of two proteins: dynamin-like protein 1 or dynamin-related protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1), an 80–85-kD cytosolic GTPase, and human fission protein 1 (hFis1), a 17-kD outer mitochondrial membrane anchored protein. Mitochondrial fission too requires GTP hydrolysis. DLP1 mainly localizes in the cytosol and with the help of hFis1, DLP1 is recruited to the constriction sites of the membrane. DLP1 translocation depends on actin and microtubules and once inside, DLP1 oligomerizes into a ring around the mitochondrion. The self-assembly of DLP1 stimulates the final step of fission which is disassembly and it requires GTP hydrolysis.

Figure 1: Model of mammalian mitochondrial fission and fusion (Hom et al, J Mol Cell Cardiol, 2009)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=19281816

Additional information on different aspects of mitochondria could be found articles published earlier in the Pharmaceutical Intelligence webpage.

Mitochondrial dynamics in the heart

In cultured cardiovascular cell line the mitochondria are arranged in a filamentous network and are highly dynamic, constantly undergoing fusion and fission. Similar mitochondrial network is observed in vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiac stem cells, and neonatal cardiomyocytes. Thus, these cell types have been used to study mitochondrial dynamics.

However, in the adult cardiomyocyte, there are three distinct populations of mitochondria:

(i)           peri-nuclear mitochondria,

(ii)         subsarcolemmal (SSC) mitochondria, and

(iii)       interfibrillar (IF) mitochondria

Electron micrographs of adult cardiac muscle cells, especially ventricular myocytes, show that mitochondria are numerous, making up about 35% of the cell volume, and that mitochondria are highly organized and compacted between contractile filaments and next to T-tubules. This crystal-like pattern of mitochondria in adult ventricular myocytes raises an interesting question- Do the mitochondria in these cells also undergo physiological fission, fusion, and movement just like other cell types? Whether the crystal-like lattice arrangement restricts their movements and prevents them from undergoing fusion or fission is unclear. It has been speculated that the fission and fusion processes might occur at a slower rate because of the tight packing. A four-dimensional (x, y, z axis and time) live-cell imaging is needed to detect possible movements like mitochondria winding slowly through the myofibrils in the third dimension.

Figure 2. Representative electron micrograph of adult murine heart depicting the three subpopulations of mitochondria: perinuclear (PN) mitochondria; interfibrillar (IF) mitochondria; and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM). Photo credit: Ong et al, Cardiovascular Research (2010).

Expression of fission/fusion proteins in adult heart: Interestingly, it has been observed that proteins required for mitochondrial dynamics including fission and fusion proteins is abundantly present in the adult heart and would have been active during cardiomyocyte differentiation to ensure the unique spatial organization of the three different subpopulations of cardiac mitochondria.

Several studies suggest the existence of fission and fusion proteins in the adult heart.

  • Mfn1 and Mfn2 fusion proteins have been found to be expressed in highest amounts in the heart compared to that in human tissues of pancreas, skeletal muscle, brain, liver, placenta, lung, and kidney using both Northern and Western blot analysis. Infact, Mfn2 mRNA was found to be abundantly expressed in heart and muscle tissue but expressed only at low levels in other tissues. Mfn1 and Mfn2 expression has also been confirmed in heart tissue of rat and mouse by RT-PCR.
  • hFis1, a fission protein, has been shown to be ubiquitously expressed in isolated rat mitochondria in heart tissue apart from several other tissues.
  • DLP1 mRNA, coding for a fusion protein, have been detected in high levels in several adult tissues including heart, skeletal muscle, kidney and brain.
  • OPA1 codes for another fusion protein and four transcripts of OPA1 have been detected in adult mouse hearts.

Mitochondria in cardiac diseases:

Morphological changes in mitochondria have been observed in several human diseases including myopathies, diabetes mellitus, liver diseases, neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Ong et al (2010) studied neonatal rat ventricular myocytes as an experimental model of aging and concluded that the interplay between mitochondrial fission and autophagy controls the rate of mitochondrial turnover. A disturbance in the balance is observed in aging heart cells resulting in giant mitochondria. This observation is an indication that mitochondrial morphology is connected to pathogenesis of cardiac disease. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20631158

Abnormal mitochondrial morphology corresponding to various cardiac diseases has been listed as follows:

  • Abnormally small and disorganized mitochondria – observed in endstage dilated cardiomyopathy, myocardial hibernation, cardiac rhabdomyoma, and ventricular-associated congenital heart diseases.
  • Disorganized clusters of fragmented mitochondria – observed in Tetralogy of Fallot and are located away from contractile filaments, along with having a very small diameter measured to be 0.1 μm as observed in the electron micrographs.
  • Big and defective mitochondria – observed in senescent cardiomyocytes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=19281816

 

Condition Cell type Change in mitochondrial morphology Other findings Study
Ischemia-perfusion injury HL-1 cells Fission P38 inhibition at reperfusion allows mitochondrial re-fusion Brady et al
β – Adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol or exercise Adult murine heart Not investigated Phosphorylation and inhibiton of Drp1 at Ser656 Cribbs and Strack et al
Cardiac differentiation Embryonic stem cells Fusion Fusion is required to support Oxidative phosphorylation Chung et al
Hyperglycemia H9C2 rat myoblast Fission Yu et al
Post-MI heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy Adult rat and human heart Fragmentation Decrease in OPA1 Chen et al
Diabetes Murine coronary endothelial cell Fission Decreased OPA1, increased Drp1 Makino et al
Diabetes Adult murine diabetic heart Fission Lower mitochondrial membrane potential Williamson et al
Ischaemia-reperfusion injury and cardioprotection HL-1 cells, adult heart Fission Inhibiting fission cardioprotective Ong et al
Cytosolic calcium overload Neonatal cardiomyocytes and adult heart Fission Hom et al

Table 1: Studies implicating changes in mitochondrial morphology in cardiovascular diseases, Adapted from Ong et al, Cardiovascular Research (2010).

Mitochondrial dynamics in heart failure

Fission and Fusion in Heart Failure

Mutation or abnormal expression of fission and fusion proteins have been implicated in several diseases including neuropathies, Parkinson’s disease, type 2 diabetes and so on. However, few studies have addressed the involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in heart failure. Research groups have used cardiac-like cell lines, neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes, and animal models to demonstrate the importance of fission and fusion proteins. Observations from some studies have been listed below:

  • Mitochondria are highly organized and compacted between contractile filaments (interfibrillar) or adjacent to the sarcolemma (subsarcolemmal) in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes. However, during heart failure, interfibrillar mitochondria may lose their normal organization.
  • There is also a reduction in size and density of interfibrillar mitochondria in rodent models of heart failure.
  • It was recently reported that OPA1 is decreased in both human and rat heart failure.
  • Electron microscopic data showed an increase in the number and decrease in the size of the mitochondria in a coronary artery ligation rat heart failure model.
  • Inhibition of fission in cultured neonatal ventricular myocytes by overexpression of dominant negative mutant form of Drp1, Drp1-K38A, prevents overproduction of ROS, mitochondrial permeability transient pore formation and ultimately cell death under high glucose conditions.
  • In cultured neonatal and adult cardiomyocytes, cytosolic Ca2+ overload induced by thapsigargin (Tg) or potassium chloride (KCl) resulted in rapid mitochondrial fragmentation. Calcium overload is a common feature in heart failure, which might lead to increase in fission contributing to decrease in energy production in the failing heart.
  • In H9c2 cells, reduction in OPA1 increased apoptosis both at baseline and after simulated ischemia, via cytochrome c release from mitochondria.
  • Drosophila heart tube-specific silencing of OPA1 and mitochondrial assembly regulatory factor (MARF) increased mitochondrial morphometric heterogeneity and induced heart tube dilation with profound contractile impairment. In this model, human MFN1/2 was rescued MARF RNAi induced cardiomyopathy.
  • MFN-2-deficient mice have mild cardiac hypertrophy and mild depression of cardiac function. Also, mitochondria of cardiac myocytes lacking MFN-2 are pleiotropic and larger.
  • In rat hearts, decreased MFN2, increased Fis1 and no change in OPA1 expression was observed 12–18 weeks after myocardial infarction. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22848903

However, further research is needed to accurately and fully define the role of abnormal mitochondrial morphology in heart failure. Those researches might lead to developing new interventions for treating abnormal mitochondrial function based diseases.

Reference:

Related reading:

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