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Archive for the ‘3D Plotting Scaffolds’ Category


First 3D Printed Tibia Replacement

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Current advances have allowed 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Thanks to 3D printing, an Australian man got to keep his leg. The man, Reuben Lichter nearly lost his leg above the knee due to a bacterial infection. Doctors told him that he had osteomyelitis which infected his entire bone. Lichter’s bacterial disease of osteomyelitis affects 2 in every 10,000 people in the United States. He had two choices: an experimental procedure using the 3D printed bone or lose his leg. For Lichter, the choice was easy.

Michael Wagels who served as the lead surgeon performed the world’s first-ever transplant surgery using a 3D printed bone. The scaffold was initially modeled at Queensland University of Technology. Biomedical engineers designed the scaffold to promote bone growth around it and then slowly dissolve over time. To have the body successfully grow around the scaffold, the team introduced tissue and blood vessels from both of Lichter’s legs to the scaffold. The surgery itself happened over five operations at Brisbane’s Princess Alexandra Hospital.

However, the next major challenge for biomedical engineers is how to successfully 3D print organs.

SOURCE

https://interestingengineering.com/australian-man-gets-worlds-first-3d-printed-tibia-replacement

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3-D Printing in Water using Novel Hybrid Nanoparticles

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

3D printing has become an essential tool for fabricating different organic based materials, but printing structures in water has been thought-provoking due to lack of water soluble molecules known as photo initiators. The photo initiator can induce chemical reactions needed to form solid printed material by light.  However, researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have developed a new type of photo initiator for three-dimensional printing in water. This innovative nanoparticle allows the creating of bio-friendly 3D structures.

By 3D printing in water, it also opens up the digital light processing method to medical applications, leading toward a competitive response for patient specific implants and tissues because the photo initiators cause rapid solidification of a liquid material that can create faster reactions when exposed to light. 3D printing in water opens up innovative ways for tailored fabrication of medical devices and for printing hydrogels or bio-scaffolds that are typical used in tissue engineering.

The challenge of 3D printing in water is finding an initiator that is not consumed by irradiation. However, unlike regular photo initiators, the novel hybrid nanoparticles developed by Prof. Magdassi present tunable properties, wide excitation window in the UV and visible range, high light sensitivity, and their ability to split water, and absorb oxygen molecules that typically inhibit the performance of the process. The particles added as photo initiator are semi conductive hybrid nanoparticles and are used to create high resolution 3D objects at sub-microscopic scale.

Therefore, 3-D printing in water could allow personalized fabrication of joint replacements, heart valves, artificial tendons and ligaments etc.

SOURCE

  1. https://phys-org.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/phys.org/news/2017-08-rapid-d-hybrid-nanoparticles.amp
  2. Amol Ashok Pawar et al. Rapid Three-Dimensional Printing in Water Using Semiconductor–Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles as Photoinitiators, Nano Letters (2017)

 

 

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3-D Printed Ovaries Produce Healthy Offspring

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

 

Each year about 120,000 organs are transplanted from one human being to another and most of the time is a living volunteer. But lack of suitable donors, predominantly means the supply of such organs is inadequate. Countless people consequently die waiting for a transplant which has led researchers to study the question of how to build organs from scratch.

One promising approach is to print them, but “bioprinting” remains largely experimental. Nevertheless, bioprinted tissue is before now being sold for drug testing, and the first transplantable tissues are anticipated to be ready for use in a few years’ time. The first 3D printed organ includes bioprosthetic ovaries which are constructed of 3D printed scaffolds that have immature eggs and have been successful in boosting hormone production and restoring fertility was developed by Teresa K. Woodruff, a reproductive scientist and director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Feinberg School of Medicine, at Northwestern University, in Illinois.

What sets apart these bioprosthetic ovaries is the architecture of the scaffold. The material is made of gelatin made from broken-down collagen that is safe to humans which is self-supporting and can lead to building multiple layers.

The 3-D printed “scaffold” or “skeleton” is implanted into a female and its pores can be used to optimize how follicles, or immature eggs, get wedged within the scaffold. The scaffold supports the survival of the mouse’s immature egg cells and the cells that produce hormones to boost production. The open construction permits room for the egg cells to mature and ovulate, blood vessels to form within the implant enabling the hormones to circulate and trigger lactation after giving birth. The purpose of this scaffold is to recapitulate how an ovary would function.
The scientists’ only objective for developing the bioprosthetic ovaries was to help reestablish fertility and hormone production in women who have suffered adult cancer treatments and now have bigger risks of infertility and hormone-based developmental issues.

 

SOURCES

Printed human body parts could soon be available for transplant
https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21715638-how-build-organs-scratch

 

3D printed ovaries produce healthy offspring giving hope to infertile women

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/05/16/3d-printed-ovaries-produce-healthy-offspring-giving-hope-infertile/

 

Brave new world: 3D-printed ovaries produce healthy offspring

http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-05-27-brave-new-world-3-d-printed-ovaries-produce-healthy-offspring.html

 

3-D-printed scaffolds restore ovary function in infertile mice

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317485.php

 

Our Grandkids May Be Born From 3D-Printed Ovaries

http://gizmodo.com/these-mice-gave-birth-using-3d-printed-ovaries-1795237820

 

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Topical Solution for Combination Oncology Drug Therapy: Patch that delivers Drug, Gene, and Light-based Therapy to Tumor

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Self-assembled RNA-triple-helix hydrogel scaffold for microRNA modulation in the tumour microenvironment

Affiliations

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Harvard-MIT Division for Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    • João Conde,
    • Nuria Oliva,
    • Mariana Atilano,
    • Hyun Seok Song &
    • Natalie Artzi
  2. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK
    • João Conde
  3. Grup dEnginyeria de Materials, Institut Químic de Sarrià-Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona 08017, Spain
    • Mariana Atilano
  4. Division of Bioconvergence Analysis, Korea Basic Science Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 169-148, Republic of Korea
    • Hyun Seok Song
  5. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    • Natalie Artzi
  6. Department of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Division, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    • Natalie Artzi

Contributions

J.C. and N.A. conceived the project and designed the experiments. J.C., N.O., H.S.S. and M.A. performed the experiments, collected and analysed the data. J.C. and N.A. co-wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and reviewed the manuscript.

Nature Materials
15,
353–363
(2016)
doi:10.1038/nmat4497
Received
22 April 2015
Accepted
26 October 2015
Published online
07 December 2015

The therapeutic potential of miRNA (miR) in cancer is limited by the lack of efficient delivery vehicles. Here, we show that a self-assembled dual-colour RNA-triple-helix structure comprising two miRNAs—a miR mimic (tumour suppressor miRNA) and an antagomiR (oncomiR inhibitor)—provides outstanding capability to synergistically abrogate tumours. Conjugation of RNA triple helices to dendrimers allows the formation of stable triplex nanoparticles, which form an RNA-triple-helix adhesive scaffold upon interaction with dextran aldehyde, the latter able to chemically interact and adhere to natural tissue amines in the tumour. We also show that the self-assembled RNA-triple-helix conjugates remain functional in vitro and in vivo, and that they lead to nearly 90% levels of tumour shrinkage two weeks post-gel implantation in a triple-negative breast cancer mouse model. Our findings suggest that the RNA-triple-helix hydrogels can be used as an efficient anticancer platform to locally modulate the expression of endogenous miRs in cancer.

SOURCE

http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v15/n3/abs/nmat4497.html#author-information

 

 

Patch that delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites shows promising results

In mice, device destroyed colorectal tumors and prevented remission after surgery.

Helen Knight | MIT News Office
July 25, 2016

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer.

The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incomplete removal of the tumor. Cancer cells can be left behind, potentially leading to recurrence and increased risk of metastasis. Indeed, while many patients remain cancer-free for months or even years after surgery, tumors are known to recur in up to 50 percent of cases.

Conventional therapies used to prevent tumors recurring after surgery do not sufficiently differentiate between healthy and cancerous cells, leading to serious side effects.

In a paper published today in the journal Nature Materials, researchers at MIT describe an adhesive patch that can stick to the tumor site, either before or after surgery, to deliver a triple-combination of drug, gene, and photo (light-based) therapy.

Releasing this triple combination therapy locally, at the tumor site, may increase the efficacy of the treatment, according to Natalie Artzi, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, who led the research.

The general approach to cancer treatment today is the use of systemic, or whole-body, therapies such as chemotherapy drugs. But the lack of specificity of anticancer drugs means they produce undesired side effects when systemically administered.

What’s more, only a small portion of the drug reaches the tumor site itself, meaning the primary tumor is not treated as effectively as it should be.

Indeed, recent research in mice has found that only 0.7 percent of nanoparticles administered systemically actually found their way to the target tumor.

“This means that we are treating both the source of the cancer — the tumor — and the metastases resulting from that source, in a suboptimal manner,” Artzi says. “That is what prompted us to think a little bit differently, to look at how we can leverage advancements in materials science, and in particular nanotechnology, to treat the primary tumor in a local and sustained manner.”

The researchers have developed a triple-therapy hydrogel patch, which can be used to treat tumors locally. This is particularly effective as it can treat not only the tumor itself but any cells left at the site after surgery, preventing the cancer from recurring or metastasizing in the future.

Firstly, the patch contains gold nanorods, which heat up when near-infrared radiation is applied to the local area. This is used to thermally ablate, or destroy, the tumor.

These nanorods are also equipped with a chemotherapy drug, which is released when they are heated, to target the tumor and its surrounding cells.

Finally, gold nanospheres that do not heat up in response to the near-infrared radiation are used to deliver RNA, or gene therapy to the site, in order to silence an important oncogene in colorectal cancer. Oncogenes are genes that can cause healthy cells to transform into tumor cells.

The researchers envision that a clinician could remove the tumor, and then apply the patch to the inner surface of the colon, to ensure that no cells that are likely to cause cancer recurrence remain at the site. As the patch degrades, it will gradually release the various therapies.

The patch can also serve as a neoadjuvant, a therapy designed to shrink tumors prior to their resection, Artzi says.

When the researchers tested the treatment in mice, they found that in 40 percent of cases where the patch was not applied after tumor removal, the cancer returned.

But when the patch was applied after surgery, the treatment resulted in complete remission.

Indeed, even when the tumor was not removed, the triple-combination therapy alone was enough to destroy it.

The technology is an extraordinary and unprecedented synergy of three concurrent modalities of treatment, according to Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, who was not involved in the research.

“What is particularly intriguing is that by delivering the treatment locally, multimodal therapy may be better than systemic therapy, at least in certain clinical situations,” Ferrari says.

Unlike existing colorectal cancer surgery, this treatment can also be applied in a minimally invasive manner. In the next phase of their work, the researchers hope to move to experiments in larger models, in order to use colonoscopy equipment not only for cancer diagnosis but also to inject the patch to the site of a tumor, when detected.

“This administration modality would enable, at least in early-stage cancer patients, the avoidance of open field surgery and colon resection,” Artzi says. “Local application of the triple therapy could thus improve patients’ quality of life and therapeutic outcome.”

Artzi is joined on the paper by João Conde, Nuria Oliva, and Yi Zhang, of IMES. Conde is also at Queen Mary University in London.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2016/patch-delivers-drug-gene-light-based-therapy-tumor-0725

Other related articles published in thie Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

The Development of siRNA-Based Therapies for Cancer

Author: Ziv Raviv, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/09/the-development-of-sirna-based-therapies-for-cancer/

 

Targeted Liposome Based Delivery System to Present HLA Class I Antigens to Tumor Cells: Two papers

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/20/targeted-liposome-based-delivery-system-to-present-hla-class-i-antigens-to-tumor-cells-two-papers/

 

Blast Crisis in Myeloid Leukemia and the Activation of a microRNA-editing Enzyme called ADAR1

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/10/blast-crisis-in-myeloid-leukemia-and-the-activation-of-a-microrna-editing-enzyme-called-adar1/

 

First challenge to make use of the new NCI Cloud Pilots – Somatic Mutation Challenge – RNA: Best algorithms for detecting all of the abnormal RNA molecules in a cancer cell

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/17/first-challenge-to-make-use-of-the-new-nci-cloud-pilots-somatic-mutation-challenge-rna-best-algorithms-for-detecting-all-of-the-abnormal-rna-molecules-in-a-cancer-cell/

 

miRNA Therapeutic Promise

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/01/mirna-therapeutic-promise/

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3-D Printed Organs

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

 

The Future of 3-D Printing in Medicine

Today’s 3-D printed plastic models of hearts may one day translate into on-demand printed, functional replacement organs
http://www.dicardiology.com/article/future-3-d-printing-medicine?eid=333021707&bid=1408765#sthash.M7AYV16i.dpuf

http://www.dicardiology.com/sites/daic/files/styles/content_feed_large_new/public/field/image/3-D%20printed%20blood%20vessel%20like%20tube%20made%20of%20living%20cells.jpg

A 3-D printed vessel-like lumen made from living cells as part of the research at The South Carolina Project for Organ Biofabrication.

Science fiction offers a lot of ideas for creating new body parts on demand, and the advancement of 3-D printing (also called additive manufacturing) is slowly translating this idea into science fact. Today, the 3-D printed anatomic models created from patient computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or 3-D ultrasound imaging datasets are used for education and to plan and navigate complex procedures. These models are used to teach about complex or rare cardiac or congenital conditions that up until recently could only be seen using examples extracted from cadavers. Today, anatomical models of rare cardiac anatomy can be printed on demand from CT scans of surviving patients.  That concept can now be translated into 3-D printing of implantable devices customized to a specific patient using their imaging. Experts at several medical conferences are also saying printing functional biological replacement tissues is already in development.

Video interview with Dee Dee Wang, M.D., FACC, FASE, Henry Ford Hospital, explaining the use of 3-D printing to aid procedural planning and guidance in complex structural heart cases.

See video examples of 3-D printed hearts as part of the editor’s choice of the most innovative new teachnology at ACC.16. – See more at: http://www.dicardiology.com/article/future-3-d-printing-medicine?eid=333021707&bid=1408765#sthash.M7AYV16i.dpuf

Early Experience Printing Implantable Devices Printed 3-D models are currently used for surgical planning in complex cases, especially in pediatric congenital heart procedures, said Richard G. Ohye, M.D., professor of cardiac surgery, head, section of pediatric cardiovascular surgery, surgical director, pediatric cardiovascular transplant program, co-director, Michigan Congenital Heart Center, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. However, he explained 3-D printing will soon allow the creation of customized implantable medical devices, including actual tissue or vessel replacements.  In fact, 3-D printed devices are already being used on a small scale.

He presented a case of a three-month-old patient whose airway was underdeveloped and required a splint to hold it open. The patient underwent a CT scan and a 3-D reconstruction of the airway allowed doctors to create a virtual airway splint implant customized to fit into the small anatomy. The design included a “C”-shaped tube that had numerous holes to use as suture anchor points. The shape was designed to allow it to expand outward as the patient grew. They then 3-D printed the splint from bioresorbable plastic and implanted it in the patient. He said the material it was made from is expected to dissolve within three to four years.

The Finnish dental equipment maker Planmeca recently introduced a 3-D printer that allows dental laboratories and large clinics to create dental splints, models and surgical guides. In the near future, the Planmeca Creo printer will also support the creation of intricate, customized temporary fillings. The jump to printing full organs to transplant is much more complex, but the groundwork is being laid today. Ohye said engineered heart tissue created using cardiac stem cells has already been created, but it is limited to a size of about 200 microns. Anything larger requires blood vessels to keep the cells alive, he explained.

3-D Printing of Biological Tissue Implants Research is being conducted to enable 3-D printing of blood vessels, where cells are deposited by the robotically driven printer in patterns that build up layer-by-layer to create a lumen. That same concept is being tested at a few centers to create 3-D print heart valves. Ohye said the process currently being investigated used a printed matrix of biocompatible material, in which stem cells can then be deposited. If the process can be worked out to create engineered, printed organs, these might be used to create benchtop model organs for new drug testing in the next few years. Implantable 3-D printed living organs for transplant into human patients are also a very real possibility.

“Bioprinting is likely to be a huge field for the future of medicine,” said Roger Markwald, Ph.D., director, Cardiovascular Developmental Biology Center, Medical University of South Carolina. He is involved with The South Carolina Project for Organ Biofabrication, one of the groups at the forefront of 3-D bioprinting research. He explained there are too few organ donors to meet demand and there is an even greater need for soft tissues for reconstructive surgeries for things such as injuries, burns, infections, tumor resections and congenital malformations.  “There are too few organ donors to meet the needs,” Markwald said. “At least 21 people die each day because of the lack of implants.”  This organ shortage might be solved in the future by bioprinting organs on demand.

Biomaterials can be printed using current technology, but there is a fatal flaw. “The Achilles heel of tissue engineering today is the need to create vascularity in the structure, and that has been the focus of what we have been trying to do,” Markwald said.   The key to printing vascularizable micro-organs may involve chemical modifications of alginate hydrogels. Markwald’s lab created an oxidized alginate, which is biodegradable and provides stability for 3-D bioprinting. It also is bioactive, allowing cells to migrate and remodel. They created “plug and play” molds to prepare micro-organ constructs for surgical implantation. These are made with the biodegradable alginate, which contain small molecules to promote host vascular in-growth and suppress inflammatory responses.

Bioprinting is enabled using a “biopaper” made of bioresorbable hydrogels. These allow printing of the cells against gravity and allow the cells to grow, interact and function physiologically. Markwald said research is leading to the development of hydrogels specific to each type of organ tissue.  The “bioink” is made from 300 micron diameter spheroids that contain between 8,000-12,000 autologous adipose-derived stem cells. He said it takes about 7 million cells to make 840 spheroids, and it takes thousands of these spheroids to print a 1 mm cube.

Just as 3-D printing allows simultaneous printing of several different colors of materials to build a color 3-D model, bioprinting is being developed to allow use of several different cell types to create complex tissue units.  “Eventually we will be able to make functional hearts or livers,” Markwald said. “What we can print right now are cardiac patches and small- to medium-sized blood vessels, skin tissue, soft tissue (adipose, muscle) for reconstructive surgery, and vascularized micro-organs that can be grown in a bioreactor and used to supplement the function of a diseased organ like the liver.”

Creating 3-D Printable Files Creating files for 3-D printing from medical imaging datasets starts with good imaging, said Shuai Leng, Ph.D., associate professor of medical physics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. “If you start with garbage in, you get garbage out, so you need good image quality,” he stressed.   To create a usable 3-D file, he suggests using 0.6 mm thin imaging slices. This allows for very smooth surfaces. By comparison, he said use of 6 mm slices will make the printed object very rough and textured, appearing pixelated, when it is printed in 3-D.  He said dual-energy CT is great for 3-D printing because it can easily exclude bone so only blood vessels or soft tissue remain in the image area.

Metal implants commonly cause problems when creating 3-D printing files, but dual-energy systems have metal artifact reduction software to separate the metal and artifacts from the anatomy to allow creation of better models.  When using 3-D models for procedural planning and navigation, you need to ensure the precision of the model by using U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared 3-D printing software, such as programs offered by Stratasys or Materialise. The resulting printed models also should be compared to the original images to ensure quality control. Before printing, images should be checked in three planes and approved by a radiologist or the ordering physician.  The final imaging files are converted into STL/CAD files that can be read by the 3-D printers and translated into the final 3-D object.

Legal Considerations Regarding 3-D printing The field of 3-D printing comes with a new set of legal questions hospitals using the technology will need to consider, said Bruce Kline, a technology licensing manager who oversees patents for new technology developed at Mayo Clinic. For starters, he said the STL files printers use are a lot like MP3 music files, in that they can be protected under copyright and require licensing to use. Copyright violations can occur if a purchased STL anatomical model file for rare disease is illegally shared with another institution that did not purchase the file from the vendor that created the file. Under the law, if a device has a functional use it falls under patent law. If it is not functional, it falls under copyright law. Kline said most medical 3-D printing for educational models and complex anatomy evaluation currently falls under copyright. But, he said that will rapidly change in the coming years as customizable 3-D printable medical devices see wider use. Additive manufacturing allows the creation of patient-specific devices at the point of care. Kline said an interesting fact is that these devices are FDA 510(k)-exempt if produced by a hospital instead of a medical device vendor. He said this blurs the lines between traditional vendor relationships, since the hospital can now become the manufacturer. However, if a hospital makes a device, it also becomes liable for it.

He advised that it might be better for a commercial vendor to make the device for the hospital so the vendor assumes the liability of the device.   Custom-made medical devices are also exempt under FDA regulations, Kline said. So, if a physician creates or modifies a device to meet the clinical needs of a specific patient’s anatomy, he said it is acceptable to use under current FDA rules. This may leave the door wide open for use of 3-D printed devices that are customized for each patient using their own 3-D imaging datasets.  It is possible printable device files may become available in the next few years to customize and print on demand. However, Kline said it will be much more difficult to enforce patents on these types of devices. He explained if someone makes one or two devices, there is no economical way for the creator of those device files to go after the user/maker of unlicensed copies of the device to claim lost profits. Currently, Kline said surgical planning models created with 3-D printing are not reimbursable. No CPT code exists for their use, because he said CPT codes are based on clinical trial data showing clinical efficacy to justify reimbursement.

Proposed FDA Guidance for 3-D Printing   In May, the FDA released the draft guidance “Technical Considerations for Additive Manufactured Devices,” for public comment. It is a leapfrog guidance document to provide FDA’s initial thoughts on technical considerations specific to 3-D printed devices. Specifically, this draft guidance outlines technical considerations associated with additive manufacturing processes, and the testing and characterization for final finished devices fabricated using 3-D printing. It is intended to serve as a mechanism by which the agency can share initial thoughts regarding the content of premarket submissions for emerging technologies and new clinical applications that are likely to be of public health importance very early in product development. The draft document was created following a fall 2014 workshop where 3-D printing experts discussed all the facets of 3-D printing and attempted to anticipate the issues and questions that will be raised as 3-D printable devices begin to come before the FDA for review in the coming years. 

The FDA notes that in medical device applications, 3-D printing has the advantage of facilitating the creation of anatomically matched devices and surgical instrumentation by using a patient’s own medical imaging. The FDA said another advantage is the ease in fabricating complex geometric structures, allowing the creation of engineered open lattice structures, tortuous internal channels and internal support structures that would not be easily made or possible using traditional manufacturing approaches.  However, the FDA stated the unique aspects of the printing process, such as the layer-wise fabrication and the relative lack of history of medical devices manufactured using 3-D printing techniques, pose challenges in determining optimal characterization and assessment methods for the final finished device. There are also questions as to the optimal process validation and verification methods for these devices. The FDA is gathering public feedback on the draft document through August, 2016. The draft document can be found online at www.fda.gov/ucm/groups/fdagov-public/@fdagov-meddev-gen/documents/document/ucm499809.pdf

Partnerships Make 3-D More Accessible The setup and maintenance costs for 3-D printing are more involved than many hospitals want to get involved with. This is especially true at centers where there is very limited application. This has led to partnerships between advanced imaging vendors and 3-D printer vendors to create contract services for one-off printing projects.  Advanced visualization software company Vital Images announced a partnership with 3-D printer company Stratasys at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015 annual meeting. They created the industry’s first print-on-demand service using Vital’s Vitrea advanced visualization software and Stratasys’ 3-D printing services. Vital Images’ software takes patient scans and converts them into STL files that can be sent directly to a 3-D printer, improving workflow efficiency and 3-D printing accessibility.

GE Healthcare is working with 3-D printer vendor Materialise to develop a software package that will allow the easy creation of 3-D printable files from GE 3-D ultrasound sound systems. GE hopes to have commercial product launch for this technology later in 2016.  Materialise already offers its Mimics Innovation Suite software to create 3-D printer files from medical imaging. Its latest version includes the ability to create images not only from MRI and CT datasets, but also from fluoroscopic imaging from C-arms. It also includes a virtual X-ray tool to allow engineers to create projects to find the optimal angle for 2-D/3-D registration. This allows for an evaluation of the 3-D position of bones and implants without a post-operative CT or MRI scan. It has an automated heart segmentation tool to easily separate the cardiovascular anatomy for advanced research and analyses. The vendor said on a good quality dataset, segmentation now requires only a few mouse clicks rather than several hours of tedious work.

Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative Trends and Technologies ACC.16 – See more at: http://www.dicardiology.com/article/future-3-d-printing-medicine?eid=333021707&bid=1408765#sthash.M7AYV16i.dpuf

Stratasys to Present Power of 3-D Printing at HIMSS 2016 – See more at: http://www.dicardiology.com/article/future-3-d-printing-medicine?eid=333021707&bid=1408765#sthash.M7AYV16i.dpuf

 

Selecting the Right Material for 3D Printing

This industrial 3D printing white paper explores the properties of thermoplastic and metal materials available with direct metal laser sintering, selective laser sintering and stereolithography technologies. It also includes a quick-reference guide of material attributes that can steer you toward the proper grade.

http://whitepapers.ecnmag.com/20160517_proto_3d

http://www.ecnmag.com/sites/ecnmag.com/files/3D-Printing-Materials-WP-US-Final.pdf

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New method for 3D imaging of brain tumors

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

 

Third-Harmonic Generation Microscopy Provides In Situ Brain Tumor Imaging

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands, April 25, 2015 — A technique involving third-harmonic generation microscopy could allow neurosurgeons to image and assess brain tumor boundaries during surgery, providing optical biopsies in near-real time and increasing the accuracy of tissue removal.

Pathologists typically use staining methods, in which chemicals like hematoxylin and eosin turn different tissue components blue and red, revealing its structure and whether there are any tumor cells. A definitive diagnosis can take up to 24 hours, meaning surgeons may not realize some cancerous tissue has escaped from their attention until after surgery — requiring a second operation and more risk.

Tissue from a patient diagnosed with low-grade glioma.

Tissue from a patient diagnosed with low-grade glioma. The green image is taken with the new method, while the pink uses conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining. From the upper left to the lower right, both images show increasing cell density due to more tumor tissue. The insets reveal the high density of tumor cells. Courtesy of N.V. Kuzmin et al./VU University Amsterdam.

Brain tumors — specifically glial brain tumors — are often spread out and mixed in with the healthy tissue, presenting a particular challenge. Surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy often cause substantial collateral damage to the surrounding brain tissue.

Now researchers from VU University Amsterdam, led by professor Marloes Groot, have demonstrated a label-free optical method for imaging cancerous brain tissue. They were able to produce most images in under a minute; smaller ones took <1 s, while larger images of a few square millimeters took 5 min.

The study involved firing short, 200-fs, 1200-nm laser pulses into the tissue. When three photons converged at the same time and place, the photons interacted with the nonlinear optical properties of the tissue. Through the phenomena of third harmonic generation, the interactions produced a single 400- or 600-nm photon (in the case of third or second harmonic generation, respectively).

The shorter-wavelength photon scatters in the tissue, and when it reaches a detector — in this case a high-sensitivity GaAsP photomultiplier tube — it reveals what the tissue looks like inside. The resulting images enabled clear recognition of cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism and rarefaction of neuropil in the tissue.

While this technique has been used in other applications — to image insects and fish embryos, for example — the researchers said this is the first time it’s been used to analyze glial brain tumors.

Groot and her team are now developing a handheld device for tumor border detection during surgery. The incoming laser pulses can only reach a depth of about 100 μm into the tissue currently; to reach further, Groot envisions attaching a needle that can pierce the tissue and deliver photons deeper.

The research was published in Biomedical Optics Express, a publication of The Optical Society (OSA) (doi: 10.1364/boe.7.001889).

 

Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

Biomedical Optics Express 2016  7(5):1889-1904    doi: 10.1364/BOE.7.001889

In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies.

 

Glial tumors (gliomas) account for almost 80% of the tumors originating from brain tissue. The vast majority of these tumors are so-called ‘diffuse gliomas’ as they show very extensive (‘diffuse’) growth into the surrounding brain parenchyma. With surgical resection, irradiation, and/or chemotherapy it is impossible to eliminate all glioma cells without serious damage to the brain tissue. As a consequence, until now, patients with a diffuse glioma have had a poor prognosis, a situation which strongly contributes to the fact that brain tumor patients experience more years of life lost than patients with any other type of cancer [1,2].

Meanwhile it has also been demonstrated that the prognosis of patients with a diffuse glioma correlates with the extent of resection [3–5]. During brain surgery, however, it is extremely difficult for the neurosurgeon to determine the boundary of the tumor, i.e. whether a brain area contains tumor cells or not. If the neurosurgeon could have histopathological information on the tumor boundaries during brain surgery, then recognition of these tumor boundaries and with that, the surgical resection, could be significantly improved.

Occasionally, intra-operative analysis using hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) stained sections of snap-frozen material or smear preparations is performed by the pathologist to help establish brain tumor boundaries, but this procedure only allows analysis of small, selected regions, can only be performed on tissue fragments that are already resected, and is rather time consuming (frozen section diagnosis) or does not allow analysis of tumor in the histological context (smear preparations). Fluorescence imaging techniques are increasingly used during surgery [6,7] but are associated with several drawbacks, such as heterogeneous delivery and nonspecific staining [8,9]. In particular, low-grade gliomas and normal brain tissue have an intact blood-brain barrier and take up little circulating dye [10–12]. Alternative techniques are therefore required, that can detect the presence of tumor cells in tissue without fluorescent labels and with a speed that enables ‘live’ feedback to the surgeon while he/she operates.

The past year has seen exciting new developments in which optical coherence tomography [13] and stimulated Raman microscopy [14,15] were reported to reliably detect tumor tissue in the brain of human glioma patients, and a handheld Raman spectroscopy device was even implemented intra-surgical to assess brain tissue prior to excision [16]. These techniques are especially sensitive in densely tumor-infiltrated areas, and for the Raman spectroscopy device study a sensitivity limit of 17 tumor cells in an area of 150 × 150 μm2 was reported. The discriminating power of the Raman techniques is based on subtle differences in the vibrational spectra of tumor tissue and healthy tissue, and they require extensive comparison of experimental spectra against libraries of reference spectra. A technique capable of directly visualizing the classical histopathological hallmark criteria currently used by pathologists for classification of tumor tissue could potentially be even more reliable and make the transition from the current practice—histopathological analysis of fixated tissue—to in situ optical biopsy easier. Diffuse gliomas are histopathologically characterized by variably increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism and—especially in higher-grade neoplasms—brisk mitotic activity, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis. To visualize these features in live tissue, a technique that elucidates the morphology of tissue is required. In this context, third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy is a promising tool because of its capacity to visualize almost the full morphology of tissue. THG is a nonlinear optical process that relies on spatial variations of the third-order non-linear susceptibility χ(3) intrinsic to the tissue and (in the case of brain tissue) mainly arises from interfaces with lipid-rich molecules [17–27]. SHG signals arise from an optical nonlinear process involving non-centrosymmetric molecules present in, for example, microtubules and collagen. THG has been successfully applied to image unstained samples such as insect embryos, plant seeds and intact mammalian tissue [28], epithelial tissues [29–31], zebra fish embryos [32], and the zebra fish nervous system [33]. In brain tissue of mice, augmented by co-recording of SHG signals, THG was shown to visualize cells, nuclei, the inner and outer contours of axons, blood cells, and vessels, resulting in the visualization of both gray and white matter (GM and WM) as well as vascularization, up to a depth of 350 μm [24,26]. Here, we explore the potential of THG and SHG imaging for real time analysis of ex-vivo human brain tissue in the challenging cases of diffuse tumor invasion in low-grade brain tumors as well as of high-grade gliomas and structurally normal brain tissues.

 

Multiphoton imaging

THG and SHG are nonlinear optical processes that may occur in tissue depending on the nonlinear susceptibility coefficients χ(3) and χ(2) of the tissue and upon satisfying phase matching conditions [17–19,21,23–27]. In the THG process, three incident photons are converted into one photon with triple energy and one third of the wavelength (Fig. 1(A)). In the SHG process, signals result from the conversion of an incident photon pair into one photon with twice the energy and half the wavelength. Two- and three photon excited fluorescence signals (2PF, 3PF) may simultaneously be generated by intrinsic proteins (Fig. 1(B)). As a result, a set of distinct (harmonic) and broadband (autofluorescence) spectral peaks is generated in the visible range. The imaging setup (Fig. 1(C)) to generate and collect these signals consisted of a commercial two-photon laser-scanning microscope (TriMScope I, LaVision BioTec GmbH) and a femtosecond laser source. The laser source was an optical parametric oscillator (Mira-OPO, APE) pumped at 810 nm by a Ti-sapphire oscillator (Coherent Chameleon Ultra II). The OPO generates 200 fs pulses at 1200 nm with a repetition rate of 80 MHz. We selected this wavelength as it falls in the tissue transparency window, providing deeper penetration and reduced photodamage compared to the 700–1000 nm range, as well as harmonic signals generated in the visible wavelength range, facilitating their collection and detection with conventional objectives and detectors. We focused the OPO beam on the sample using a 25 × /1.10 (Nikon APO LWD) water-dipping objective (MO). The 1200 nm beam focal spot size on the sample was dlateral ~0.7 μm and daxial ~4.1 μm. It was measured with 0.175 μm fluorescent microspheres (see Section 3.4) yielding two- and three-photon resolution values Δ2P,lateral ~0.5 μm, Δ2P,axial ~2.9 μm, Δ3P,lateral ~0.4 μm, and Δ3P,axial ~2.4 μm. Two high-sensitivity GaAsP photomultiplier tubes (PMT, Hamamatsu H7422-40) equipped with narrowband filters at 400 nm and 600 nm were used to collect the THG and SHG signals, respectively, as a function of position of the focus in the sample. The signals were filtered from the 1200 nm fundamental photons by a dichroic mirror (Chroma T800LPXRXT, DM1), split into SHG and THG channels by a dichroic mirror (Chroma T425LPXR, DM2), and passed through narrow-band interference filters (F) for SHG (Chroma D600/10X) and THG (Chroma Z400/10X) detection. The efficient back-scattering of the harmonic signals allowed for their detection in epi-direction. The laser beam was transversely scanned over the sample by a pair of galvo mirrors (GM). THG and SHG modalities are intrinsically confocal and therefore provide direct depth sectioning. We obtained a full 3D image of the tissue volume by scanning the microscope objective with a stepper motor in the vertical (z) direction. The mosaic imaging of the sample was performed by transverse (xy) scanning of the motorized translation stage. Imaging data was acquired with the TriMScope I software (“Imspector Pro”); image stacks were stored in 16-bit tiff-format and further processed and analyzed with “ImageJ” software (ver. 1.49m, NIH, USA). All images were processed with logarithmic contrast enhancement.

Fig. 1 THG/SHG microscopy for brain tissue imaging. (A) Energy level diagram of the second (SHG) and third (THG) harmonic generation process. (B) Energy level diagram of the two- (2PF) and three-photon (3PF) excited auto-fluorescence process. (C) Multiphoton microscope setup: Laser producing 200 fs pulses at 1200 nm; GM – X-Y galvo-scanner mirrors; SL – scan lens; TL – tube lens; MO – microscope objective; DM1 – dichroic mirror reflecting back-scattered THG/SHG photons to the PMT detectors; DM2 – dichroic mirror splitting SHG and THG channels; F – narrow-band SHG and THG interference filters; L – focusing lenses; PMT – photomultiplier tube detectors. (D) Infrared photons (white arrow) are focused deep in the brain tissue, converted to THG (green) and SHG (red) photons, scattered back (green/red arrows) and epi-detected. The nonlinear optical processes result in label-free contrast images with sub-cellular resolution and intrinsic depth sectioning. (E and F) Freshly-excised low-grade (E) and high-grade (F) glioma tissue samples in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in a Petri dish with a millimeter paper underneath for scale. (G) An agar-embedded tumor tissue sample under 0.17 mm glass cover slip with the microscope objective (MO) on top.   Download Full Size | PPT Slide

Endomicroscopy imaging

For endomicroscopic imaging we used a commercial high-numerical-aperture (NA) multi-element micro-objective lens (GT-MO-080-018-810, GRINTECH) composed of a plano-convex lens and two GRaded INdex (GRIN) lenses with aberration compensation, object NA = 0.80 and object working distance 200 µm (in water), image NA = 0.18 and image working distance 200 µm (in air), magnification × 4.8 and field-of-view diameter of 200 μm. The GRIN lenses and the plano-convex lens were mounted in a waterproof stainless steel housing with an outer diameter of 1.4 mm and a total length of 7.5 mm. Originally designed for a wavelength range of 800–900 nm [36–41], this micro-objective lens was used for focusing of 1200 nm femtosecond pulses and collection of back-scattered harmonic and fluorescence photons. A coupling lens with f = 40 mm (NA = 0.19, Qioptiq, ARB2 NIR, dia. 25 mm) focused the scanned laser beam in the image plane of the micro-objective lens and forwarded the epi-detected harmonic and fluorescence photons to the PMTs.

We characterized the lateral (x) and axial (z) resolution of the micro-objective lens by 3D imaging of fluorescence microspheres (PS-Speck Microscope Point Source Kit, P7220, Molecular Probes). We used “blue” and “deep red” microspheres, 0.175 ± 0.005 μm in diameter, with excitation/emission maxima at 360/440 nm and 630/660 nm to obtain three-photon (3P) and two-photon (2P) point spread function (PSF) profiles. The excitation wavelength was 1200 nm, and fluorescence signals were detected in the 400 ± 5 nm (3P) and 600 ± 5 nm (2P) spectral windows, just as in the brain tissue imaging experiments. 1 μL of “blue” and “deep red” sphere suspensions were applied to a propanol-cleaned 75 × 26 × 1 mm3 glass slide. The mixed microsphere suspension was left to dry for 20 min and was then imaged with the micro-objective lens via a water immersion layer. The assembly of the coupling lens and the micro-objective lens was vertically (z) scanned with a step of 0.5 μm, and stacks of two-/three-photon images were recorded. The line profiles were then taken over the lateral (xy) images of the fluorescent spheres with maximal intensity (in focus), and fluorescence counts were plotted as function of the lateral coordinate (x). The axial (z) scan values of the two- and three-photon fluorescence signals were acquired by averaging of the total fluorescence counts of the corresponding spheres and were plotted as function of the axial coordinate (z). Lateral (x) and axial (z) 2P/3P points were then fitted with Gaussian functions and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values were measured.

……. Results….  Conclusions

The results shown here provide the first evidence that—by applying the same microscopic criteria that are used by the pathologist, i.e. increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil—THG/SHG ex-vivo microscopy can be used to recognize the presence of diffuse infiltrative glioma in fresh, unstained human brain tissue. Images and a first diagnosis can be provided in seconds, with the ‘inspection mode’, by moving the sample under the scanning microscope (see Visualization 4 and Visualization 5), or in about 5 minutes if an area has to be inspected with sub-cellular detail. The sensitivity of THG to interfaces provides images with excellent contrast in which cell-by-cell variations are visualized. The quality of the images and the speed with which they can be recorded make THG a promising tool for quick assessment of the nature of excised tissue. Importantly, because THG/SHG images are very close to those of histological slides, we expect that the surgeon (or pathologist) will need very little additional training for adequate interpretation of the images. We are planning to construct a THG/SHG ex-vivo tabletop device consisting of a compact laser source and a laser-scanning microscope requiring a physical footprint of only 1 m2, to be placed in an operating room, enabling immediate feedback to the surgeon on the nature of excised tissue, during the operation. With this device, we will perform a quantitative study of the added value of rapid THG/SHG pathological feedback during surgery for the final success of the neurosurgery. Finally, we note that THG/SHG imaging does not induce artifacts associated with fixation, freezing, and staining; therefore, tissue fragments examined ex-vivo can still be used for subsequent immunochemical and/or molecular analysis.

The microendoscopy THG/SHG imaging results represent an important step toward the development of a THG/SHG-based bioptic needle, and show that the use of such a needle for in situ optical sampling for optimal resection of gliomas is indeed a viable prospect, as has been demonstrated also before for multi-photon microscopies [38,49–54]. Although there are several issues associated with the operation of a needle-like optical device, such as the fact that blood in the surgical cavity may obscure the view, and the fact that only small areas can be biopsied with a needle, it may be a valuable tool in cases where sparing healthy tissue is of such vital importance as in brain surgery. Therefore, the reasonably good quality of the THG images taken with the GRIN micro-objective shown here, together with the developments in the field of microendoscopy, warrant further development of THG/SHG into a true handheld device. This next step, a true handheld bioptic needle, requires an optical fiber to transport the light from a small footprint laser to the GRIN micro-objective, and a small 2D scanner unit, to enable placing the laser at a sufficient distance from the patient. Patient-safe irradiation levels for THG imaging will have to be determined but are expected to lie in the 10–50 mW range [55–58]. This implies that only minor optimization of signal collection efficiency needs to be achieved, because the images of Fig. 10 were measured with 50 mW incident power.

THG/SHG imaging thus holds great promise for improving surgical procedures, thereby reducing the need for second surgeries and the loss of function by excising non-infiltrated brain tissue, as well as improving survival and quality of life of the patients. In addition, the success in the challenging case of diffuse gliomas promises great potential of THG/SHG-based histological analysis for a much wider spectrum of diagnostic applications.

References and links

1. N. G. Burnet, S. J. Jefferies, R. J. Benson, D. P. Hunt, and F. P. Treasure, “Years of life lost (YLL) from cancer is an important measure of population burden–and should be considered when allocating research funds,” Br. J. Cancer 92(2), 241–245 (2005). [PubMed]  

2. J. A. Schwartzbaum, J. L. Fisher, K. D. Aldape, and M. Wrensch, “Epidemiology and molecular pathology of glioma,” Nat. Clin. Pract. Neurol. 2(9), 494–516 (2006). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

3. J. S. Smith, E. F. Chang, K. R. Lamborn, S. M. Chang, M. D. Prados, S. Cha, T. Tihan, S. Vandenberg, M. W. McDermott, and M. S. Berger, “Role of extent of resection in the long-term outcome of low-grade hemispheric gliomas,” J. Clin. Oncol. 26(8), 1338–1345 (2008). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

4. N. Sanai and M. S. Berger, “Glioma extent of resection and its impact on patient outcome,” Neurosurgery 62(4), 753–766 (2008). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

5. I. Y. Eyüpoglu, M. Buchfelder, and N. E. Savaskan, “Surgical resection of malignant gliomas-role in optimizing patient outcome,” Nat. Rev. Neurol. 9(3), 141–151 (2013). [CrossRef]  [PubMed]  

6. U. Pichlmeier, A. Bink, G. Schackert, and W. Stummer, “Resection and survival in glioblastoma multiforme: An RTOG recursive partitioning analysis of ALA study patients,” Neuro-oncol. 10(6), 1025–1034 (2008). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

7. W. Stummer, J. C. Tonn, C. Goetz, W. Ullrich, H. Stepp, A. Bink, T. Pietsch, and U. Pichlmeier, “5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Derived Tumor Fluorescence: The Diagnostic Accuracy of Visible Fluorescence Qualities as Corroborated by Spectrometry and Histology and Postoperative Imaging,” Neurosurgery 74(3), 310–320 (2014). [CrossRef]   [PubMed]  

….. more

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Pre-operative diagnoses and cell densities observed in the studied brain tissue samples by THG imaging and corresponding H&E histopathology.

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Mid Atlantic LRIG 22nd Annual Technology Showcase: Agenda on 3D Bioprinting on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at Holiday Inn, 195 Davidson Avenue, Somerset, NJ

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

Symposium Speakers and Topics:

Human Organoids
Hatem E. Sabaawy-Director, Production GMP Facility for Cell and Gene Therapy, RBHS-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Intestinal Organoids for Drug Discovery
Richard Visconti-Associate Principal Scientist, Cellular Pharmacology, Merck Research Laboratories, Kenilworth,  New Jersey

3D Bioprinting
Elizabeth Wu-President, WuZenTech, Edison, New Jersey

Building  Your Brand  Through LinkedIn
Stan Robinson, Jr., LinkedIn Consultant, Helping Professionals with Social Selling, Personal Branding

Register at EventBrite here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mid-atlantic-22nd-annual-technology-and-exhibition-tickets-21359945171 

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Hoping to see you on May 11th.
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