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Posts Tagged ‘anticancer platform to locally modulate the expression of endogenous miRs in cancer’


Topical Solution for Combination Oncology Drug Therapy: Patch that delivers Drug, Gene, and Light-based Therapy to Tumor

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Self-assembled RNA-triple-helix hydrogel scaffold for microRNA modulation in the tumour microenvironment

Affiliations

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Harvard-MIT Division for Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    • João Conde,
    • Nuria Oliva,
    • Mariana Atilano,
    • Hyun Seok Song &
    • Natalie Artzi
  2. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK
    • João Conde
  3. Grup dEnginyeria de Materials, Institut Químic de Sarrià-Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona 08017, Spain
    • Mariana Atilano
  4. Division of Bioconvergence Analysis, Korea Basic Science Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 169-148, Republic of Korea
    • Hyun Seok Song
  5. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    • Natalie Artzi
  6. Department of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Division, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    • Natalie Artzi

Contributions

J.C. and N.A. conceived the project and designed the experiments. J.C., N.O., H.S.S. and M.A. performed the experiments, collected and analysed the data. J.C. and N.A. co-wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and reviewed the manuscript.

Nature Materials
15,
353–363
(2016)
doi:10.1038/nmat4497
Received
22 April 2015
Accepted
26 October 2015
Published online
07 December 2015

The therapeutic potential of miRNA (miR) in cancer is limited by the lack of efficient delivery vehicles. Here, we show that a self-assembled dual-colour RNA-triple-helix structure comprising two miRNAs—a miR mimic (tumour suppressor miRNA) and an antagomiR (oncomiR inhibitor)—provides outstanding capability to synergistically abrogate tumours. Conjugation of RNA triple helices to dendrimers allows the formation of stable triplex nanoparticles, which form an RNA-triple-helix adhesive scaffold upon interaction with dextran aldehyde, the latter able to chemically interact and adhere to natural tissue amines in the tumour. We also show that the self-assembled RNA-triple-helix conjugates remain functional in vitro and in vivo, and that they lead to nearly 90% levels of tumour shrinkage two weeks post-gel implantation in a triple-negative breast cancer mouse model. Our findings suggest that the RNA-triple-helix hydrogels can be used as an efficient anticancer platform to locally modulate the expression of endogenous miRs in cancer.

SOURCE

http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v15/n3/abs/nmat4497.html#author-information

 

 

Patch that delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites shows promising results

In mice, device destroyed colorectal tumors and prevented remission after surgery.

Helen Knight | MIT News Office
July 25, 2016

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer.

The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incomplete removal of the tumor. Cancer cells can be left behind, potentially leading to recurrence and increased risk of metastasis. Indeed, while many patients remain cancer-free for months or even years after surgery, tumors are known to recur in up to 50 percent of cases.

Conventional therapies used to prevent tumors recurring after surgery do not sufficiently differentiate between healthy and cancerous cells, leading to serious side effects.

In a paper published today in the journal Nature Materials, researchers at MIT describe an adhesive patch that can stick to the tumor site, either before or after surgery, to deliver a triple-combination of drug, gene, and photo (light-based) therapy.

Releasing this triple combination therapy locally, at the tumor site, may increase the efficacy of the treatment, according to Natalie Artzi, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, who led the research.

The general approach to cancer treatment today is the use of systemic, or whole-body, therapies such as chemotherapy drugs. But the lack of specificity of anticancer drugs means they produce undesired side effects when systemically administered.

What’s more, only a small portion of the drug reaches the tumor site itself, meaning the primary tumor is not treated as effectively as it should be.

Indeed, recent research in mice has found that only 0.7 percent of nanoparticles administered systemically actually found their way to the target tumor.

“This means that we are treating both the source of the cancer — the tumor — and the metastases resulting from that source, in a suboptimal manner,” Artzi says. “That is what prompted us to think a little bit differently, to look at how we can leverage advancements in materials science, and in particular nanotechnology, to treat the primary tumor in a local and sustained manner.”

The researchers have developed a triple-therapy hydrogel patch, which can be used to treat tumors locally. This is particularly effective as it can treat not only the tumor itself but any cells left at the site after surgery, preventing the cancer from recurring or metastasizing in the future.

Firstly, the patch contains gold nanorods, which heat up when near-infrared radiation is applied to the local area. This is used to thermally ablate, or destroy, the tumor.

These nanorods are also equipped with a chemotherapy drug, which is released when they are heated, to target the tumor and its surrounding cells.

Finally, gold nanospheres that do not heat up in response to the near-infrared radiation are used to deliver RNA, or gene therapy to the site, in order to silence an important oncogene in colorectal cancer. Oncogenes are genes that can cause healthy cells to transform into tumor cells.

The researchers envision that a clinician could remove the tumor, and then apply the patch to the inner surface of the colon, to ensure that no cells that are likely to cause cancer recurrence remain at the site. As the patch degrades, it will gradually release the various therapies.

The patch can also serve as a neoadjuvant, a therapy designed to shrink tumors prior to their resection, Artzi says.

When the researchers tested the treatment in mice, they found that in 40 percent of cases where the patch was not applied after tumor removal, the cancer returned.

But when the patch was applied after surgery, the treatment resulted in complete remission.

Indeed, even when the tumor was not removed, the triple-combination therapy alone was enough to destroy it.

The technology is an extraordinary and unprecedented synergy of three concurrent modalities of treatment, according to Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, who was not involved in the research.

“What is particularly intriguing is that by delivering the treatment locally, multimodal therapy may be better than systemic therapy, at least in certain clinical situations,” Ferrari says.

Unlike existing colorectal cancer surgery, this treatment can also be applied in a minimally invasive manner. In the next phase of their work, the researchers hope to move to experiments in larger models, in order to use colonoscopy equipment not only for cancer diagnosis but also to inject the patch to the site of a tumor, when detected.

“This administration modality would enable, at least in early-stage cancer patients, the avoidance of open field surgery and colon resection,” Artzi says. “Local application of the triple therapy could thus improve patients’ quality of life and therapeutic outcome.”

Artzi is joined on the paper by João Conde, Nuria Oliva, and Yi Zhang, of IMES. Conde is also at Queen Mary University in London.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2016/patch-delivers-drug-gene-light-based-therapy-tumor-0725

Other related articles published in thie Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

The Development of siRNA-Based Therapies for Cancer

Author: Ziv Raviv, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/09/the-development-of-sirna-based-therapies-for-cancer/

 

Targeted Liposome Based Delivery System to Present HLA Class I Antigens to Tumor Cells: Two papers

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/20/targeted-liposome-based-delivery-system-to-present-hla-class-i-antigens-to-tumor-cells-two-papers/

 

Blast Crisis in Myeloid Leukemia and the Activation of a microRNA-editing Enzyme called ADAR1

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/10/blast-crisis-in-myeloid-leukemia-and-the-activation-of-a-microrna-editing-enzyme-called-adar1/

 

First challenge to make use of the new NCI Cloud Pilots – Somatic Mutation Challenge – RNA: Best algorithms for detecting all of the abnormal RNA molecules in a cancer cell

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/17/first-challenge-to-make-use-of-the-new-nci-cloud-pilots-somatic-mutation-challenge-rna-best-algorithms-for-detecting-all-of-the-abnormal-rna-molecules-in-a-cancer-cell/

 

miRNA Therapeutic Promise

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/01/mirna-therapeutic-promise/

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