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Archive for the ‘Drug Development/Formulation using 3D Printing’ Category

Digital Therapeutics: A threat or opportunity to pharmaceuticals


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Digital Therapeutics (DTx) have been defined by the Digital Therapeutics Alliance (DTA) as “delivering evidence based therapeutic interventions to patients, that are driven by software to prevent, manage or treat a medical disorder or disease”. They might come in the form of a smart phone or computer tablet app, or some form of a cloud-based service connected to a wearable device. DTx tend to fall into three groups. Firstly, developers and mental health researchers have built digital solutions which typically provide a form of software delivered Cognitive-Behaviour Therapies (CBT) that help patients change behaviours and develop coping strategies around their condition. Secondly there are the group of Digital Therapeutics which target lifestyle issues, such as diet, exercise and stress, that are associated with chronic conditions, and work by offering personalized support for goal setting and target achievement. Lastly, DTx can be designed to work in combination with existing medication or treatments, helping patients manage their therapies and focus on ensuring the therapy delivers the best outcomes possible.

 

Pharmaceutical companies are clearly trying to understand what DTx will mean for them. They want to analyze whether it will be a threat or opportunity to their business. For a long time, they have been providing additional support services to patients who take relatively expensive drugs for chronic conditions. A nurse-led service might provide visits and telephone support to diabetics for example who self-inject insulin therapies. But DTx will help broaden the scope of support services because they can be delivered cost-effectively, and importantly have the ability to capture real-world evidence on patient outcomes. They will no-longer be reserved for the most expensive drugs or therapies but could apply to a whole range of common treatments to boost their efficacy. Faced with the arrival of Digital Therapeutics either replacing drugs, or playing an important role alongside therapies, pharmaceutical firms have three options. They can either ignore DTx and focus on developing drug therapies as they have done; they can partner with a growing number of DTx companies to develop software and services complimenting their drugs; or they can start to build their own Digital Therapeutics to work with their products.

 

Digital Therapeutics will have knock-on effects in health industries, which may be as great as the introduction of therapeutic apps and services themselves. Together with connected health monitoring devices, DTx will offer a near constant stream of data about an individuals’ behavior, real world context around factors affecting their treatment in their everyday lives and emotional and physiological data such as blood pressure and blood sugar levels. Analysis of the resulting data will help create support services tailored to each patient. But who stores and analyses this data is an important question. Strong data governance will be paramount to maintaining trust, and the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry may not be best-placed to handle individual patient data. Meanwhile, the health sector (payers and healthcare providers) is becoming more focused on patient outcomes, and payment for value not volume. The future will say whether pharmaceutical firms enhance the effectiveness of drugs with DTx, or in some cases replace drugs with DTx.

 

Digital Therapeutics have the potential to change what the pharmaceutical industry sells: rather than a drug it will sell a package of drugs and digital services. But they will also alter who the industry sells to. Pharmaceutical firms have traditionally marketed drugs to doctors, pharmacists and other health professionals, based on the efficacy of a specific product. Soon it could be paid on the outcome of a bundle of digital therapies, medicines and services with a closer connection to both providers and patients. Apart from a notable few, most pharmaceutical firms have taken a cautious approach towards Digital Therapeutics. Now, it is to be observed that how the pharmaceutical companies use DTx to their benefit as well as for the benefit of the general population.

 

References:

 

https://eloqua.eyeforpharma.com/LP=23674?utm_campaign=EFP%2007MAR19%20EFP%20Database&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elqTrackId=73e21ae550de49ccabbf65fce72faea0&elq=818d76a54d894491b031fa8d1cc8d05c&elqaid=43259&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=24564

 

https://www.s3connectedhealth.com/resources/white-papers/digital-therapeutics-pharmas-threat-or-opportunity/

 

http://www.pharmatimes.com/web_exclusives/digital_therapeutics_will_transform_pharma_and_healthcare_industries_in_2019._heres_how._1273671

 

https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/pharmaceuticals-and-medical-products/our-insights/exploring-the-potential-of-digital-therapeutics

 

https://player.fm/series/digital-health-today-2404448/s9-081-scaling-digital-therapeutics-the-opportunities-and-challenges

 

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Pharmacotyping Pancreatic Cancer Patients in the Future: Two Approaches – ORGANOIDS by David Tuveson and Hans Clevers and/or MICRODOSING Devices by Robert Langer

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 4/5/2018

Featured video: Magical Bob

A fascination with magic leads Institute Professor Robert Langer to solve world problems using the marvels of chemical engineering.Watch Video

MIT News Office
March 27, 2018

http://news.mit.edu/2018/featured-video-magical-bob-langer-0327

 

This curation provides the resources for edification on Pharmacotyping Pancreatic Cancer Patients in the Future

 

  • Professor Hans Clevers at Clevers Group, Hubrecht University

https://www.hubrecht.eu/onderzoekers/clevers-group/

  • Prof. Robert Langer, MIT

http://web.mit.edu/langerlab/langer.html

Langer’s articles on Drug Delivery

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Langer+on+Drug+Delivery&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixsd2w88TTAhVG4iYKHRaIAvEQgQMIJDAA

organoids, which I know you’re pretty involved in with Hans Clevers. What are your plans for organoids of pancreatic cancer?

Organoids are a really terrific model of a patient’s tumour that you generate from tissue that is either removed at the time of surgery or when they get a small needle biopsy. Culturing the tissue and observing an outgrowth of it is usually successful and when you have the cells, you can perform molecular diagnostics of any type. With a patient-derived organoid, you can sequence the exome and the RNA, and you can perform drug testing, which I call ‘pharmacotyping’, where you’re evaluating compounds that by themselves or in combination show potency against the cells. A major goal of our lab is to work towards being able to use organoids to choose therapies that will work for an individual patient – personalized medicine.

Organoids could be made moot by implantable microdevices for drug delivery into tumors, developed by Bob Langer. These devices are the size of a pencil lead and contain reservoirs that release microdoses of different drugs; the device can be injected into the tumor to deliver drugs, and can then be carefully dissected out and analyzed to gain insight into the sensitivity of cancer cells to different anticancer agents. Bob and I are kind of engaged in a friendly contest to see whether organoids or microdosing devices are going to come out on top. I suspect that both approaches will be important for pharmacotyping cancer patients in the future.

From the science side, we use organoids to discover things about pancreatic cancer. They’re great models, probably the best that I know of to rapidly discover new things about cancer because you can grow normal tissue as well as malignant tissue. So, from the same patient you can do a comparison easily to find out what’s different in the tumor. Organoids are crazy interesting, and when I see other people in the pancreatic cancer field I tell them, you should stop what you’re doing and work on these because it’s the faster way of studying this disease.

SOURCE

Other related articles on Pancreatic Cancer and Drug Delivery published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Pancreatic Cancer: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/26/pancreatic-cancer-articles-of-note-pharmaceuticalintelligence-com/

Keyword Search: “Pancreatic Cancer” – 275 Article Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Pancreatic+Cancer&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

Keyword Search: Drug Delivery: 542 Articles Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Drug+Delivery&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

Keyword Search: Personalized Medicine: 597 Article Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Personalized+Medicine&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

  • Cancer Biology & Genomics for Disease Diagnosis, on Amazon since 8/11/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

 

 

VOLUME TWO WILL BE AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM ON MAY 1, 2017

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Topical Solution for Combination Oncology Drug Therapy: Patch that delivers Drug, Gene, and Light-based Therapy to Tumor

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Self-assembled RNA-triple-helix hydrogel scaffold for microRNA modulation in the tumour microenvironment

Affiliations

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Harvard-MIT Division for Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    • João Conde,
    • Nuria Oliva,
    • Mariana Atilano,
    • Hyun Seok Song &
    • Natalie Artzi
  2. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK
    • João Conde
  3. Grup dEnginyeria de Materials, Institut Químic de Sarrià-Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona 08017, Spain
    • Mariana Atilano
  4. Division of Bioconvergence Analysis, Korea Basic Science Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 169-148, Republic of Korea
    • Hyun Seok Song
  5. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    • Natalie Artzi
  6. Department of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Division, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    • Natalie Artzi

Contributions

J.C. and N.A. conceived the project and designed the experiments. J.C., N.O., H.S.S. and M.A. performed the experiments, collected and analysed the data. J.C. and N.A. co-wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and reviewed the manuscript.

Nature Materials
15,
353–363
(2016)
doi:10.1038/nmat4497
Received
22 April 2015
Accepted
26 October 2015
Published online
07 December 2015

The therapeutic potential of miRNA (miR) in cancer is limited by the lack of efficient delivery vehicles. Here, we show that a self-assembled dual-colour RNA-triple-helix structure comprising two miRNAs—a miR mimic (tumour suppressor miRNA) and an antagomiR (oncomiR inhibitor)—provides outstanding capability to synergistically abrogate tumours. Conjugation of RNA triple helices to dendrimers allows the formation of stable triplex nanoparticles, which form an RNA-triple-helix adhesive scaffold upon interaction with dextran aldehyde, the latter able to chemically interact and adhere to natural tissue amines in the tumour. We also show that the self-assembled RNA-triple-helix conjugates remain functional in vitro and in vivo, and that they lead to nearly 90% levels of tumour shrinkage two weeks post-gel implantation in a triple-negative breast cancer mouse model. Our findings suggest that the RNA-triple-helix hydrogels can be used as an efficient anticancer platform to locally modulate the expression of endogenous miRs in cancer.

SOURCE

http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v15/n3/abs/nmat4497.html#author-information

 

 

Patch that delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites shows promising results

In mice, device destroyed colorectal tumors and prevented remission after surgery.

Helen Knight | MIT News Office
July 25, 2016

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer.

The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incomplete removal of the tumor. Cancer cells can be left behind, potentially leading to recurrence and increased risk of metastasis. Indeed, while many patients remain cancer-free for months or even years after surgery, tumors are known to recur in up to 50 percent of cases.

Conventional therapies used to prevent tumors recurring after surgery do not sufficiently differentiate between healthy and cancerous cells, leading to serious side effects.

In a paper published today in the journal Nature Materials, researchers at MIT describe an adhesive patch that can stick to the tumor site, either before or after surgery, to deliver a triple-combination of drug, gene, and photo (light-based) therapy.

Releasing this triple combination therapy locally, at the tumor site, may increase the efficacy of the treatment, according to Natalie Artzi, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, who led the research.

The general approach to cancer treatment today is the use of systemic, or whole-body, therapies such as chemotherapy drugs. But the lack of specificity of anticancer drugs means they produce undesired side effects when systemically administered.

What’s more, only a small portion of the drug reaches the tumor site itself, meaning the primary tumor is not treated as effectively as it should be.

Indeed, recent research in mice has found that only 0.7 percent of nanoparticles administered systemically actually found their way to the target tumor.

“This means that we are treating both the source of the cancer — the tumor — and the metastases resulting from that source, in a suboptimal manner,” Artzi says. “That is what prompted us to think a little bit differently, to look at how we can leverage advancements in materials science, and in particular nanotechnology, to treat the primary tumor in a local and sustained manner.”

The researchers have developed a triple-therapy hydrogel patch, which can be used to treat tumors locally. This is particularly effective as it can treat not only the tumor itself but any cells left at the site after surgery, preventing the cancer from recurring or metastasizing in the future.

Firstly, the patch contains gold nanorods, which heat up when near-infrared radiation is applied to the local area. This is used to thermally ablate, or destroy, the tumor.

These nanorods are also equipped with a chemotherapy drug, which is released when they are heated, to target the tumor and its surrounding cells.

Finally, gold nanospheres that do not heat up in response to the near-infrared radiation are used to deliver RNA, or gene therapy to the site, in order to silence an important oncogene in colorectal cancer. Oncogenes are genes that can cause healthy cells to transform into tumor cells.

The researchers envision that a clinician could remove the tumor, and then apply the patch to the inner surface of the colon, to ensure that no cells that are likely to cause cancer recurrence remain at the site. As the patch degrades, it will gradually release the various therapies.

The patch can also serve as a neoadjuvant, a therapy designed to shrink tumors prior to their resection, Artzi says.

When the researchers tested the treatment in mice, they found that in 40 percent of cases where the patch was not applied after tumor removal, the cancer returned.

But when the patch was applied after surgery, the treatment resulted in complete remission.

Indeed, even when the tumor was not removed, the triple-combination therapy alone was enough to destroy it.

The technology is an extraordinary and unprecedented synergy of three concurrent modalities of treatment, according to Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, who was not involved in the research.

“What is particularly intriguing is that by delivering the treatment locally, multimodal therapy may be better than systemic therapy, at least in certain clinical situations,” Ferrari says.

Unlike existing colorectal cancer surgery, this treatment can also be applied in a minimally invasive manner. In the next phase of their work, the researchers hope to move to experiments in larger models, in order to use colonoscopy equipment not only for cancer diagnosis but also to inject the patch to the site of a tumor, when detected.

“This administration modality would enable, at least in early-stage cancer patients, the avoidance of open field surgery and colon resection,” Artzi says. “Local application of the triple therapy could thus improve patients’ quality of life and therapeutic outcome.”

Artzi is joined on the paper by João Conde, Nuria Oliva, and Yi Zhang, of IMES. Conde is also at Queen Mary University in London.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2016/patch-delivers-drug-gene-light-based-therapy-tumor-0725

Other related articles published in thie Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

The Development of siRNA-Based Therapies for Cancer

Author: Ziv Raviv, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/09/the-development-of-sirna-based-therapies-for-cancer/

 

Targeted Liposome Based Delivery System to Present HLA Class I Antigens to Tumor Cells: Two papers

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/20/targeted-liposome-based-delivery-system-to-present-hla-class-i-antigens-to-tumor-cells-two-papers/

 

Blast Crisis in Myeloid Leukemia and the Activation of a microRNA-editing Enzyme called ADAR1

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/10/blast-crisis-in-myeloid-leukemia-and-the-activation-of-a-microrna-editing-enzyme-called-adar1/

 

First challenge to make use of the new NCI Cloud Pilots – Somatic Mutation Challenge – RNA: Best algorithms for detecting all of the abnormal RNA molecules in a cancer cell

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/17/first-challenge-to-make-use-of-the-new-nci-cloud-pilots-somatic-mutation-challenge-rna-best-algorithms-for-detecting-all-of-the-abnormal-rna-molecules-in-a-cancer-cell/

 

miRNA Therapeutic Promise

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/01/mirna-therapeutic-promise/

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Hercules Capital Secures up to $30 Million for Aprecia’s proprietary ZipDose(®) technology platform, that utilizes three dimensional printing (3DP) to formulate fast melt pharmaceutical products

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Secures up to $30 Million from Hercules Capital

LANGHORNE, Pa., July 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Company (Aprecia), a commercial stage pharmaceutical company developing, manufacturing and marketing fast melt formulations of high dose pharmaceuticals, today announced that it has entered into an up to $30 million debt financing agreement with Hercules Capital, Inc.. Aprecia manufactures its products using its proprietary ZipDose(®) technology platform, that utilizes three dimensional printing (3DP) to formulate fast melt pharmaceutical products, which incorporates significantly higher amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredient than any other fast melt technology on the market.

Aprecia has received initial funding of $20 million under the debt financing agreement. The proceeds will be used to purchase additional manufacturing equipment, fund the development and approval of Aprecia’s pipeline product candidates and continue to advance its ZipDose technology platform. Under the terms of the agreement, Aprecia has the option to draw up to an additional $10 million tranche upon achievement of a certain performance milestone. Armentum Partners acted as financial advisor and Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP acted as legal advisor to Aprecia for this transaction.

About Aprecia

Aprecia is a commercial stage pharmaceutical company developing, manufacturing and marketing fast melt formulations of high dose pharmaceuticals, initially focused on epilepsy and other central nervous system disorders. Aprecia manufactures its products using its proprietary ZipDose technology platform, which utilizes 3DP, to formulate fast melt pharmaceutical products. We launched our first commercial product, SPRITAM(®), in the United States in March 2016. SPRITAM is the only fast melt formulation of levetiracetam and the first pharmaceutical product formulated using 3DP that is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Aprecia is privately owned, with affiliates of Prasco, LLC and the Arington family holding a controlling interest. The company’s largest institutional investors are Deerfield Management Company and Great American Insurance Company. For more information visit http://www.aprecia.com.

About Hercules Capital

Hercules Capital, Inc. (NYSE: HTGC) (“Hercules”) is the leading and largest specialty finance company focused on providing senior secured venture growth loans to high-growth, innovative venture capital-backed companies in a broadly diversified variety of technology, life sciences and sustainable and renewable technology industries. Since inception (December 2003), Hercules has committed more than $6.0 billion to over 350 companies and is the lender of choice for entrepreneurs and venture capital firms seeking growth capital financing. Companies interested in learning more about financing opportunities should contact info@htgc.com, or call 650.289.3060.

Forward Looking Statements

Statements in this press release that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements and are subject to risks, assumptions and uncertainties that could cause actual future events or results to differ materially from such statements.

SOURCE Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Company

Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Company

CONTACT: Jennifer.Zieverink@Aprecia.com, 513.864.4114

Web Site: http://www.aprecia.com

SOURCE

From: “Dr. Katie Katie Siafaca” <info@newmedinc.com>

Reply-To: “Dr. Katie Katie Siafaca” <info@newmedinc.com>

Date: Tuesday, July 5, 2016 at 11:40 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: fw: Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Secures up to $30 Million from Hercules Capital

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