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Posts Tagged ‘Blood vessel’


New Liver Tissue Implants Showing Potential

Reporter: Irina Robu,PhD

To develop new tissues, researchers at the Medical Research Council Center for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have found that stem cells transformed into 3-D liver tissue can support liver function when implanted into the mice suffering with a liver disease.

The scientists stimulated human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to mature pluripotent stem cells into liver cells, hepatocytes. Hepatocytes are the chief functional cells of the liver and perform an astonishing number of metabolic, endocrine and secretory functions. Hepatocytes are exceptionally active in synthesis of protein and lipids for export. The cells are grown in 3-D conditions as small spheres for over a year. However, keeping the stem cells as liver cells for a long time is very difficult, because the viability of hepatocytes decreases in-vitro conditions.

Succeeding the discovery, the team up with materials chemists and engineers to detect appropriate polymers that have already been approved for human use that can be developed into 3-D scaffolds. The best material to use a biodegradable polyester, called polycaprolactone (PCL).PCL is degraded by hydrolysis of its ester linkages in physiological conditions (such as in the human body) and it is especially interesting for the preparation of long term implantable devices, owing to its degradation which is even slower than that of polylactide. They spun the PCL into microscopic fibers that formed a scaffold one centimeter square and a few millimeters thick.

At the same time, hepatocytes derived from embryonic cells had been grown in culture for 20 days and were then loaded onto the scaffolds and implanted under the skin of mice.Blood vessels successfully grew on the scaffolds with the mice having human liver proteins in their blood, demonstrating that the tissue had successfully integrated with the circulatory system. The scaffolds were not rejected by the animals’ immune systems.

The scientists tested the liver tissue scaffolds in mice with tyrosinaemia,a potentially fatal genetic disorder where the enzymes in the liver that break down the amino acid tyrosine are defective, resulting in the accumulation of toxic metabolic products. The implanted liver tissue aided the mice with tyrosinaemia to break down tyrosine and the mice finally lost less weight, had less buildup of toxins in the blood and exhibited fewer signs of liver damage than the control group that received empty scaffolds.

According to Rob Buckle, PhD, Chief Science Officer at the MRC, “Showing that such stem cell-derived tissue is able to reproduce aspects of liver function in the lab also offers real potential to improve the testing of new drugs where more accurate models of human tissue are needed”. It is believed that the discovery could be the next step towards harnessing stem cell reprogramming technologies to provide renewable supplies of liver tissue products for transplantation.

SOURCE

https://www.rdmag.com/article/2018/08/new-liver-tissue-implants-showing-promise?et_cid=6438323

 

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Humacyte, Inc., a pioneer in regenerative medicine, presented the results of foundational U.S. preclinical studies of its investigational bioengineered blood vessel at the American Society of Nephrology’s ‘Kidney Week 2013’ Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

HUMACYTE

Media Contacts:

Gail Thornton

West Mill Consulting

908-392-3420

Gail@westmillconsulting.com

Jim Modica

West Mill Consulting

908-872-4919

Jim@westmillconsulting.com

Humacyte Highlights Preclinical Data

Of Its Investigational Bioengineered Blood Vessel

 

  • Humacyte investigational bioengineered blood vessel technology represents a research and development milestone in the field of vascular tissue engineering.
  • Preclinical data on the investigational bioengineered blood vessel were presented at the American Society for Nephrology ‘Kidney Week’ meeting.
  • The pre-clinical data suggest that the Humacyte technology may have the potential to be associated with lowered vessel clotting and incorporation with animal model tissues.

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., November 13, 2013Humacyte, Inc., a pioneer in regenerative medicine, presented the results of foundational U.S. preclinical studies of its investigational bioengineered blood vessel at the American Society of Nephrology’s ‘Kidney Week 2013’ Annual Meeting in Atlanta, GA.

The scientific presentation – by Shannon L. M. Dahl, Ph.D., co-founder and vice president, Technology and Pipeline Development, Humacyte – summarized U.S. preclinical data of the company’s investigational bioengineered vessel technology, which is being developed for use as the first off-the-shelf, human-derived, artificial blood vessel. The presentation’s title was ‘Preclinical Dataset Supports Initiation of Clinical Studies for Bioengineered Vascular Access Grafts.’ Co-authors were: Jeffrey H. Lawson, M.D., Ph.D.; Heather L. Prichard, Ph.D.; Roberto J. Manson, M.D.; William E.Tente, M.S.; Alan P. Kypson, M.D.; Juliana L. Blum, Ph.D.; and Laura E. Niklason, M.D., Ph.D.

Potential Of Investigational Bioengineered Vessels Explored In Pre-Clinical Studies

These U.S. preclinical data suggest that the investigational bioengineered vessel may be associated with lowered vessel clotting and incorporation with animal model tissues. This investigational technology is being developed with the goal of pursuing approval for use in patients with chronic kidney disease, a major global health problem affecting 26 million Americans[i] and around 40 million people in the European Union (EU).[ii] Individuals who progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis or kidney transplant); more than 380,000 patients currently require hemodialysis in the U.S.,[iii] and some 250,000 patients require hemodialysis or have had kidney transplants in the EU.[iv]

In ESRD patients, synthetic vascular grafts are prone to wall thickening, which results in graft clotting. Such clotting is the major cause of graft failures. As a result, ESRD patients experience frequent hospitalization and re-operation. The investigational bioengineered vessels, if successfully developed and approved by regulatory authorities, could offer the potential for significant cost savings to the healthcare system if approved for use in patients who require vascular access for ESRD. These investigational bioengineered vessels represent a research and development milestone in the field of vascular tissue engineering, as this technology could have the potential to help reduce or avoid surgical interventions and hospitalizations for patients with ESRD.

First Off-the-Shelf Investigational Bioengineered Vessel In Clinical Studies

“In the preclinical studies described, our investigational bioengineered vessels were repopulated with cells and remodeled like living tissue in the animal model,” said Dr. Dahl. “These investigational bioengineered vessels are produced using donated human vascular cells and then go through a process that is intended to decellularize the investigational vessels to remove the donor identity from the newly created vessels. This process is designed to produce investigational human grafts with the potential to be implanted into any patient at the time of medical need, enabling our investigational product to become the first truly off-the-shelf engineered graft to have moved into clinical evaluation. Demonstrating safety and performance in patients with end-stage renal disease could set the stage for follow-on development of our technology in other vascular procedures, such as replacement or bypass of diseased vessels, of vessels damaged by trauma, or for other vascular procedures.”

In 2012, Humacyte submitted an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to conduct a multi-center U.S. clinical trial, involving up to 20 patients across three sites. In this trial, which will assess safety and performance of the investigational bioengineered vessels to provide vascular access for hemodialysis in ESRD patients, the first investigational bioengineered vessel was implanted in the arm of a kidney dialysis patient at Duke University Hospital in June, 2013.

European studies are already underway; as part of a multi-center study in Poland, the first patients were implanted with the investigational vessels in December 2012 and the vessels were first used for hemodialysis in February 2013. The primary endpoints of the study in Poland are safety, tolerability, and patency, to be examined at each visit within the first six months after graft implantation (see clinicaltrials.gov).

Studies Planned in Additional Patient Populations

Humacyte also will carry out a study in Poland to test safety and performance of the investigational bioengineered vessel as an above-knee bypass graft in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The study began in October of this year.

First-in-human interim study results for the investigational bioengineered vessel technology from Humacyte will be presented on Wednesday, November 20, 2013, at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions (abstract) in Dallas, TX.

About Investigational Bioengineered Blood Vessels

The Humacyte investigational bioengineered blood vessels are manufactured in a novel bioreactor system. The investigational bioengineered vessels go through a process of decellularization, which is designed to render vessels potentially non-immunogenic and implantable into any patient. These investigational bioengineered vessels are designed to be stored for up to 12 months under standard refrigerated conditions, including, if successfully developed and approved, on-site in hospitals. Subject to receipt of regulatory approval, these properties could make the investigational bioengineered vessels readily available to surgeons and patients, and could eliminate the wait for vessel production or shipping. Data from studies of the investigational bioengineered vessels in large animal models reflect resistance to thickening for up to one year, and the early human studies that are now underway will provide safety and performance  data in patients to support a future application for regulatory approval.

About Humacyte

Humacyte, Inc., a privately held company founded in 2005, is a medical research, discovery and development company with clinical and pre-clinical stage investigational products. Humacyte is primarily focused on developing and commercializing a proprietary novel technology based on human tissue-based products for key applications in regenerative medicine and vascular surgery.  The company uses its innovative and proprietary platform technology to engineer human, extracellular matrix-based tissues that are designed be shaped into tubes, sheets, or particulate conformations, with properties similar to native tissues. These are being developed for potential use in many specific applications, with the goal to significantly improve treatment outcomes for a variety of patients, including those with vascular disease and those requiring hemodialysis. The company’s proprietary technologies are designed to result in off-the-shelf products that, once approved, can be utilized in any patient. The company web site is www.humacyte.com.

Forward-Looking Statement

Information in this news release contains “forward-looking statements” about Humacyte. These statements, including statements regarding management’s projections relating to future results and operations, are based on, among other things, management’s views, assumptions and estimates, developed in good faith, all of which are subject to known and unknown factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements, or industry results, to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

# # #


[iv]http://www.ekha.eu/usr_img/info/factsheet.pdf

SOURCE

From: Gail Thornton <gail@westmillconsulting.com>
Reply-To: Gail Thornton <gail@westmillconsulting.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2013 16:47:00 -0800 (PST)
To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>
Subject: American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week – Humacyte Press Release

 

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Prostacyclin and Nitric Oxide: Adventures in vascular biology –  a tale of two mediators

The e-Readers are encouraged to review two additional Sources on this topic on this Open Access Online Scientific Journal

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms

 and

Interaction of Nitric Oxide and Prostacyclin in Vascular Endothelium

S Moncada*

The Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
* (Email: s.moncada@ucl.ac.uk)

Prof. Moncada:

I would like to thank the Royal Society for inviting me to deliver the Croonian Lecture. In so doing, the Society is adding my name to a list of very distinguished scientists who, since 1738, have preceded me in this task. This is, indeed, a great honour.

For most of my research career my main interest has been the understanding of the normal functioning of the blood vessel wall and the way this is affected in pathology. During this time, our knowledge of these subjects has grown to such an extent that many people now believe that the conquering of vascular disease is a real possibility in the foreseeable future.

My lecture concerns the discovery of two substances, prostacyclin and nitric oxide. I would like to describe the moments of insight and some of the critical experiments that contributed significantly to the uncovering of their roles in vascular biology. The process was often adventurous, hence the title of this lecture. It is the excitement of the adventure that I would like to convey in the text that follows.

Keywords: prostacyclin, aspirin, nitric oxide, oxidative stress, free radicals, cardiovascular pathology
Full article 
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2006 May 29; 361(1469): 735–759.
Published online 2006 February 8. doi:  10.1098/rstb.2005.1775
PMCID: PMC1609404

9. THE TWO STORIES CONVERGE

Although the research fields of prostacyclin/thromboxane and NO are now mature, they have developed mostly as parallel research activities with few points of contact between them. Thus, our understanding of how both might operate in relation to each other in physiology and pathophysiology remains to be developed. Table 2 shows some of the similarities between prostacyclin and NO. Both mediators, from very different biochemical pathways, play a variety of roles in the modulation and protection of the vascular wall. The release of both mediators is dependent on constitutive enzymes, the activity of which seems to be regulated locally, predominantly by the shear stress caused by the blood passing over the endothelial surface (Grabowski et al. 1985Frangos et al. 1985; for review see Boo & Jo 2003). However, while the constitutive eNOS—localized only in the vascular endothelium—is the enzyme that responds to shear stress, the generation of prostacyclin is dependent on the activity of two enzymes, COX-1 and COX-2, in relation to which several questions remain unanswered. These include whether COX-2 is a constitutive as well as an inducible enzyme, and whether COX-1 or COX-2, or both, respond to shear stress by increases in their mRNA, their activity, or both (Topper et al. 1996Okahara et al. 1998;McCormick et al. 2000Garcia-Cardena et al. 2001). Prostacyclin, unlike NO, is constitutively generated throughout the vessel wall (Moncada et al. 1977c) and at this stage we also do not know whether the ratio between COX-1 and COX-2 changes in the different layers. In addition, the similarities and differences between regulation of NO and prostacyclin by shear stress are only now being investigated (Osanai et al. 2000McAllister et al. 2000Walshe et al. 2005).

Table 2

Table 2

Comparison of the properties of nitric oxide and prostacyclin.

A clear synergism between NO and prostacyclin has been demonstrated in regard to inhibition of platelet aggregation; however, only one of them (NO) plays a role in inhibiting platelet adhesion. The significance of this difference remains to be understood. Many years ago a physiological role for platelets in repairing the vessel wall was investigated (for discussion see Higgs et al. 1978). This subject has not been re-evaluated in the light of all this new knowledge about the roles of NO and prostacyclin in platelet/vessel wall interactions. Both mediators also regulate vascular smooth muscle proliferation and white cell vessel wall interactions through similar mechanisms which include, at least in part, the activation of adenylate cyclase and the soluble guanylate cyclase. The interactions between NO and prostacyclin in the control of these functions are not fully understood.

Both mediators are further increased by inflammatory stimuli; however, while in the case of prostacyclin the same COX-2 which responds to shear stress responds to such stimuli by a further increase in its expression, NO is generated during inflammation by a specific ‘inducible’ NO synthase which is not normally present physiologically in the vessel wall. The induction of both is inhibited by anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids (Axelrod 1983Knowles et al. 1990). It is remarkable that both compounds possess antioxidant properties (Wink et al. 1995Egan et al. 2004) but are themselves affected by oxidative stress, which inhibits the synthesis of prostacyclin and decreases the bioavailability of NO. This mechanism might be relevant to the ‘malfunctioning’ of the constitutive generation of both mediators and therefore to the genesis of endothelial dysfunction. This, however, is an early phenomenon. In advanced disease the situation is far more complex, akin to chronic inflammation in other parts of the body and, as such, probably varies significantly in the different stages of the disease. A simple hypothesis would suggest that any amount of prostacyclin which is bioavailable, although pro-inflammatory, will provide anti-thrombotic protection, while in the case of NO the balance will vary between bioavailable NO which is protective and cytotoxic peroxynitrite formed from the interaction of NO with O2. Currently, however, the results are not clear and on the crucial question of the role of both mediators in the progression of atherosclerosis, the information in relation to prostacyclin is contradictory (Burleigh et al. 2002Olesen et al. 2002Rott et al. 2003). The evidence in relation to NO, on the other hand, seems to suggest that, while constitutive NO generated by eNOS is protective (e.g. Kawashima & Yokoyama 2004), NO generated by the inducible enzyme favours the development of atherosclerosis (Chyu et al. 1999). Studies of genetically manipulated animals are providing some important clues. For example, knockout of the prostacyclin receptor (IP) leads to mice with normal blood pressure but an increased tendency to thrombosis when the endothelium is damaged (Murata et al. 1997) These animals also exhibit an increased platelet activation and proliferative response to injury that can be prevented by deletion or antagonism of the TXA2 receptor (Cheng et al. 2002). Furthermore, deletion of the IP receptor in animals prone to spontaneous atherosclerosis accelerates the development of the disease (Egan et al. 2004;Kobayashi et al. 2004). On the other hand, knocking out the thromboxane receptor or the thromboxane synthase gives rise to a mild bleeding tendency and a resistance to platelet aggregation and sudden death induced by arachidonic acid infusion (Thomas et al. 1998Yu et al. 2004). Deletion of the thromboxane receptor also seems to retard atherogenesis in murine models of atherosclerosis (Cayatte et al. 2000;Egan et al. 2005).

Although the lack of either mediator has been shown to increase the risk of thrombosis and atherosclerosis, especially in animals with additional risk factors such as ApoE deficiencies (Kuhlencordtet al. 2001Belton et al. 2003), there seems to be a certain specialization in their actions, so that NO has a more significant role in the regulation of blood pressure and blood flow, while prostacyclin has a clearer role in regulating platelet/vessel wall interactions. For example, inhibition of NO generation has an immediate and dramatic effect on blood flow and blood pressure and the eNOS−/− animal exhibits a clear hypertensive phenotype. On the other hand, inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis by the coxibs leads to a slow effect on blood pressure and apparently to a more thrombotic situation (Muscara et al. 2000;FitzGerald 2003). Similarly, COX-1−/− and COX-2−/− animals show no change in blood pressure (Norwood et al. 2000Cheung et al. 2002) and manipulation of COX or IP results in a prothrombotic phenotype.

Protection against decreases in the generation of constitutive NO and prostacyclin in the vasculature may prevent the development of vascular disease. In relation to NO, the most often tried interventions relate to the use of antioxidants (see Carr & Frei 2000) and the manipulation of eNOS expression by genetic means (Von der Leyen & Dzau 2001). Each of these interventions has shown promise in both animal experiments and in humans. An unexpected and highly interesting development relates to the effects of statins which, in the last few years, have been shown to increase the production of endothelial NO in endothelial cell cultures and in animals (for review see Laufs 2003). Many mechanisms have been claimed for this action. However, of interest in the context of our discussion is the fact that statins have been claimed to reduce oxidative stress by increasing the synthesis of BH4 (Hattori et al. 2002), increasing the coupling of the eNOS (Brouet et al. 2001) or reducing the activation of NADPH oxidase (Wagner et al. 2000). Reduction of oxidative stress is likely to preserve the generation of prostacyclin, and to our knowledge there is at least one report suggesting that statins also increase prostacyclin in endothelial cell cultures of human coronary arteries (Mueck et al. 2001). Studies on the transfection of COX-1 or COX-2 into endothelial and other cells, on the other hand, are at an early stage and clear results are not conclusive (Murakami et al. 1999Shyue et al. 2001). The full consequences of overexpression of both NO and prostacyclin in the vasculature remain to be investigated.

Also relevant to this discussion are studies of the role that NO and prostacyclin play in the protection of the cardiovascular system provided by oestrogens, and therefore in the difference between genders in susceptibility to cardiovascular disease. Oestrogens increase the expression and the activity of eNOS (Weiner et al. 1994Yang et al. 2000) and the activity of the COX-2 enzyme (Akarasereenont et al. 2000;Egan et al. 2004). They could therefore reduce oxidative stress by simply increasing both mediators. Alternatively, it has been claimed that oestrogens increase the efficiency of the NO synthase, thus reducing free radical formation (Barbacanne et al. 1999).

In summary, the concept of the balance between prostacyclin and TXA2 has to be expanded to include NO. Furthermore, although not discussed in this review, the way in which these compounds interact with many other systems known to be involved in vessel wall physiology and pathophysiology requires further investigation. Both prostacyclin and NO synergize in the protection of the vessel wall. TXA2, however, lies on the negative side of this balance being responsible for, among other things, platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction. The investigation into the interplay between these three molecules is just beginning. This is a sobering thought when one is contemplating probably close to 100 000 papers and over 30 years of research! However, it is clear that the discoveries of prostacyclin and NO have transformed our comprehension of vascular physiology and opened avenues for further understanding of pathophysiological processes. This knowledge has already benefited clinical medicine and no doubt will continue providing clues that will guide future therapy and prevention of vascular disease. I have had the good fortune to be intimately involved with both discoveries. More importantly, many of the colleagues that I have interacted with in the process of doing this work have become life-long personal friends. To those with whom I have managed to combine scientific excitement with friendship I owe a double debt of gratitude.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2006 May 29; 361(1469): 735–759.
Published online 2006 February 8. doi:  10.1098/rstb.2005.1775

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Drug Eluting Stents: On MIT’s Edelman Lab’s Contributions to Vascular Biology and its Pioneering Research on DES


Drug Eluting Stents: On MIT‘s Edelman Lab’s Contributions to Vascular Biology and its Pioneering Research on DES

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

and 

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
http://PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com/2013/04/25/Contributions
-to-vascular-biology/

This is the first of a three part series on the evolution of vascular biology and the studies of the effects of biomaterials in vascular reconstruction and on drug delivery, which has embraced a collaboration of cardiologists at Harvard Medical School , Affiliated Hospitals, and MIT,
requiring cardiovascular scientists at the PhD and MD level, physicists, and computational biologists working in concert, and
an exploration of the depth of the contributions by a distinguished physician, scientist, and thinker.

The first part – Vascular Biology and Disease – will cover the advances in the research on

  • vascular biology,
  • signaling pathways,
  • drug diffusion across the endothelium and
  • the interactions with the underlying muscularis (media),
  • with additional considerations for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

The second part – Stents and Drug Delivery – will cover the

  • purposes,
  • properties and
  • evolution of stent technology with
  • the acquired knowledge of the pharmacodynamics of drug interactions and drug distribution.

The third part – Problems and Promise of Biomaterials Technology – will cover the shortcomings of the cardiovascular devices, and opportunities for improvement

Vascular Biology and Cardiovascular Disease

Early work on endothelial injury and drug release principles

The insertion of a catheter for the administration of heparin is not an innocuous procedure. Heparin is infused to block coagulation, lowering the risk of a dangerous

  • clot formation and
  • dissemination.

It was shown experimentally that the continuous infusion of heparin

  • suppresses smooth muscle proliferation after endothelial injury. It may lead to
  • hemorrhage as a primary effect.

The anticoagulant property of heparin was removed by chemical modification without loss of the anti-proliferative effect.

In this study, MIT researches placed ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer matrices containing standard and modified heparin adjacent to rat carotid arteries at the time of balloon deendothelialization.

Matrix delivery of both heparin compounds effectively diminished this proliferation in comparison to controls without producing systemic anticoagulation or side effects.

This mode of therapy appeared more effective than administering the agents by either

  • intravenous pumps or
  • heparin/polymer matrices placed in a subcutaneous site distant from the injured carotid artery

This indicated that the site of placement at the site of injury is a factor in the microenvironment, and is a preference for avoiding restenosis after angioplasty and other interventions.

This raised the question of why the proliferation of vascular muscle occurs in the first place.
 Edelman, Nugent and Karnovsky  (1) showed that the proliferation required first the denudation of vascular surface endothelium. This exposed the underlayer to the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor, which stimulates mitogenesis of the exposed cell, explained by the endothelium as a barrier from circulating bFGF.

To answer this question, they compared the effect of

  • 125I-labelled bFGF intravenously given with perivascular controlled bFGF release.
  • Polymeric controlled release devices delivered bFGF to the extravascular space without transendothelial transport. 
Deposition within the blood vessel wall was rapidly distributed circumferentially and was substantially greater than that observed following intravenous injection.

The amount of bFGF deposited in arteries adjacent to the release devices was 40 times that deposited in similar arteries in animals who received a single intravenous bolus of bFGF.

The presence of intimal hyperplasia increased deposition of perivascularly released bFGF 2.4-fold but decreased the deposition of intravenously injected bFGF by 67%.

  • bFGF was 5- to 30-fold more abundant in solid organs after intravenous injection than it was following perivascular release, and
  • bFGF deposition was greatest in the kidney, liver, and spleen and was substantially lower in the heart and lung.

This result indicated that vascular deposition of bFGF is independent of endothelium, and

  • bFGF delivery is effectively perivascular. (2)

Drug activity studies have to be done in well controlled and representative conditions.
 Edelsman’s Lab researchers studied the

  • dose response of injured arteries to exogenous heparin in vivo by providing steady and predictable arterial levels of drug.
  • Controlled-release devices were fabricated to direct heparin uniformly and at a steady rate to the adventitial surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries.

Researchers predicted the distribution of heparin throughout the arterial wall using computational simulations and correlated these concentrations with the biologic response of the tissues.

Researchers determined from this process that an in vivo arterial concentration of 0.3 mg/ml of heparin is required to maximallyinhibit intimal hyperplasia after injury.

This estimation of the required tissue concentration of a drug is

  • independent of the route of administration and
  • applies to all forms of drug release.

In this way the Team was able to

  • evaluate the potential of  widely disparate forms of drug release and, to finally
  • create some rigorous criteria by which to guide the development of particular delivery strategies for local diseases. (3)

Chiefly, the following three effects:

(1) Effect of controlled adventitial heparin delivery on smooth muscle cell proliferation following endothelial injury. ER Edelman, DH Adams, and MJ Karnovsky. PNAS May 1990; 87: 3773-3777.


(2) Perivascular and intravenous administration of basic fibroblast growth factor: Vascular and solid organ deposition. ER Edelman, MA Nugent, and MJ Karnovsky. PNAS Feb 1993; 90: 1513-1517.


(3) Tissue concentration of heparin, not administered dose, correlates with the biological response of injured arteries in vivo. MA Lovich and ER Edelman. PNAS Sep 1999; 96: 11111–11116.

Vascular Injury and Repair

Perlecan is a heparin-sulfate proteoglycan that might be critical for regulation of vascular repair by inhibiting the binding and mitogenic activity of basic fibroblast growth factor-2 (bFGF-2) in vascular smooth muscle cells .

The Team generated

  • Clones of endothelial cells expressing an antisense vector targeting domain III of perlecan. The transfected cells produced significantly less perlecan than parent cells, and they had reduced bFGF in vascular smooth muscle cells.
  • Endothelial cells were seeded onto three-dimensional polymeric matrices and implanted adjacent to porcine carotid arteries subjected to deep injury.
  • The parent endothelial cells prevented thrombosis, but perlecan deficient cells were ineffective.

The ability of endothelial cells to inhibit intimal hyperplasia, however, was only in part suppressed by perlecan. The differential regulation by perlecan of these aspects of vascular repair may clarify why control of clinical clot formation does not lead to full control of intimal hyperplasia.

The use of genetically modified tissue engineered cells provides a new approach for dissecting the role of specific factors within the blood vessel wall.(1) Successful implementation of local arterial drug delivery requires transmural distribution of drug. The physicochemical properties of the applied compound govern its transport and tissue binding.

  • Hydrophilic compounds are cleared rapidly.
  • Hydrophobic drugs bind to fixed tissue elements, potentially prolonging tissue residence and biological effect.

Local vascular drug delivery provides

  • elevated concentrations of drug in the target tissue while
  • minimizing systemic side effects.

To better characterize local pharmacokinetics the Team examined the arterial transport of locally applied dextran and dextran derivatives in vivo.

Using a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model to correct

  • The measured transmural flux of these compounds for systemic
  • Redistribution and elimination as delivered from a photo-polymerizable hydrogel.
  • The diffusivities and the transendothelial permeabilities were strongly dependent on molecular weight and charge
  • For neutral dextrans, the diffusive resistance increased with molecular weightapproximately 4.1-fold between the molecular weights of 10 and 282 kDa.
  • Endothelial resistance increased 28-fold over the same molecular weight range.
  • The effective medial diffusive resistance was unaffected by cationic charge as such molecules moved identically to neutral compounds, but increased approximately 40% when dextrans were negatively charged.

Transendothelial resistance was 20-fold lower for the cationic dextrans, and 11-fold higher for the anionic dextrans, when both were compared to neutral counterparts.

These results suggest that, while

  • low molecular weight drugs will rapidly traverse the arterial wall with the endothelium posing a minimal barrier,
  • the reverse is true for high molecular weight agents.

The deposition and distribution of locally released vascular therapeutic compounds might be predicted based upon chemical properties, such as molecular weight and charge. (2)

Paclitaxel is hydrophobic and has therapeutic potential against proliferative vascular disease.
 The favorable preclinical data with this compound may, in part, result from preferential tissue binding.
 The complexity of Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics required in-depth investigation if this drug is to reach its full clinical potential in proliferative vascular diseases.

Equilibrium distribution of Paclitaxel reveals partitioning above and beyond perfusate concentration and a spatial gradient of drug across the arterial wall.

The effective diffusivity (Deff) was estimated from the Paclitaxel distribution data to

  • facilitate comparison of transport of Paclitaxel through arterial parenchyma with that of other vasoactive agents and to
  • characterize the disparity between endovascular and perivascular application of drug.

This transport parameter described the motion of drug in tissues given an applied concentration gradient and includes, in addition to diffusion,

  • the impact of steric hindrance within the arterial interstitium;
  • nonspecific binding to arterial elements; and, in the preparation used here,
  • convective effects from the applied transmural pressure gradient.

At all times, the effective diffusivity for endovascular delivery exceeded that of perivascular delivery. The arterial transport of Paclitaxel was quantified through application ex vivo and measurement of the subsequent transmural distribution.

  • Arterial Paclitaxel deposition at equilibrium varied across the arterial wall.
  • Permeation into the wall increased with time, from 15 minutes to 4 hours, and
  • varied with the origin of delivery.

In contrast to hydrophilic compounds, the concentration in tissue exceeded the applied concentration and the rate of transport was markedly slower. Furthermore, endovascular and perivascular Paclitaxel application led to differences in deposition across the blood vessel wall.

This leads to a conclusion that Paclitaxel interacts with arterial tissue elements  as it moves under the forces of

  • diffusion and
  • convection and
  • can establish substantial partitioning and spatial gradients across the tissue. (3)

Endovascular drug-eluting stents have changed the practice of  cardiovascular vascularization, and yet it is unclear how they so dramatically reduce restenosis

We don’t know how to distinguish between the different formulations available.
 Researchers are now questioning whether individual properties of different drugs beyond lipid avidity effect arterial transport and distribution.

In bovine internal carotid segments, tissue-loading profiles for

  • Hydrophobic Paclitaxel and Rapamycin are indistinguishable, reaching load steady state after 2 days.
  • Hydrophilic dextran reaches equilibrium in hours.

Paclitaxel and Rapamycin bind to the artery at 30–40 times bulk concentration, and bind to specific tissue elements.

Transmural drug distribution profiles are markedly different for the two compounds.

  • Rapamycin binds specifically to FKBP12 binding protein and it distributes evenly through the artery,
  • Paclitaxel binds specifically to microtubules, and remains primarily in the subintimal space.

The binding of Rapamycin and Paclitaxel to specific intracellular proteins plays an essential role in

  • determining arterial transport and distribution and in
  • distinguishing one compound from another.

These results offer further insight into the

  • mechanism of local drug delivery and the
  • specific use of existing drug-eluting stent formulations. (4)

The Role of Amyloid beta (A) in Creation of Vascular Toxic Plaque

Amyloid beta (A) is a peptide family produced and deposited in neurons and endothelial cells (EC).
It is found at subnanomolar concentrations in the plasma of healthy individuals.
 Simple conformational changes produce a form of A-beta , A-beta 42, which creates toxic plaque in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

Oxidative stress induced blood brain barrier degeneration has been proposed as a key factor for A-beta 42 toxicity.

This cannot account for lack of injury from the same peptide in healthy tissues.
Researchers hypothesized that cell state mediates A-beta’s effect.
 They examined the viability in the presence of A-beta secreted from transfected
Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) of

  • aortic Endothelial Cells (EC),
  • vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and
  • epithelial cells (EPI) in different states

A-beta was more toxic to all cell types when they were subconfluent.
 Subconfluent EC sprouted and SMC and EPI were inhibited by A-beta.
Confluent EC were virtually resistant to A-beta and suppressed A-beta production by A-beta +CHO.

Products of subconfluent EC overcame this resistant state, stimulating the production and toxicity of A-beta 42. Confluent EC overgrew >35% beyond their quiescent state in the presence of A-beta conditioned in media from subconfluent EC.

These findings imply that A-beta 42 may well be even more cytotoxic to cells in injured or growth states and potentially explain the variable and potent effects of this protein.

One may now need to consider tissue and cell state in addition to local concentration of and exposure duration to A-beta.

The specific interactions of A-beta and EC in a state-dependent fashion may help understand further the common and divergent forms of vascular and cerebral toxicity of A-beta and the spectrum of AD. (5)

(1) Perlecan is required to inhibit thrombosis after deep vascular injury and contributes
to endothelial cell-mediated inhibition of intimal hyperplasia. MA Nugent, HM Nugent,
RV Iozzoi, K Sanchack, and ER Edelman. PNAS Jun 2000; 97(12): 6722-6727


(2) Correlation of transarterial transport of various dextrans with their physicochemical properties.
O Elmalak, MA Lovich, E Edelman. Biomaterials 2000; 21: 2263-2272


(3) Arterial Paclitaxel Distribution and Deposition. CJ Creel, MA Lovich, ER Edelman. Circ Res. 2000;86:879-884


(4) Specific binding to intracellular proteins determines arterial transport properties for rapamycin and Paclitaxel.
AD Levin, N Vukmirovic, Chao-Wei Hwang, and ER Edelman. PNAS Jun 2004; 101(25): 9463–9467.
www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.0400918101

(5) Amyloid beta toxicity dependent upon endothelial cell state. M Balcells, JS Wallins, ER Edelman.
Neuroscience Letters 441 (2008) 319–322

Endothelial Damage as an Inflammatory State

Autoimmunity may drive vascular disease through anti-endothelial cell (EC) antibodies. This raises a question about whether an increased morbidity of cardiovascular diseases in concert with systemic illnesses may involve these antibodies.

Matrix-embedded ECs act as powerful regulators of vascular repair accompanied by significant reduction in expected systemic and local inflammation.

The Lab researchers compared the immune response against free and matrix-embedded ECs in naive mice and mice with heightened EC immune reactivity. Mice were presensitized to EC with repeated subcutaneous injections of saline-suspended porcine EC (PAE) (5*10^5 cells).

On day 42, both naive mice (controls) and mice with heightened EC immune reactivity received 5*10^5 matrix-embedded or free PAEs. Circulating PAE-specific antibodies and effector T-cells were analyzed 90 days after implantation for –

  • PAE-specific antibody-titers,
  • frequency of CD4+-effector cells, and
  • xenoreactive splenocytes

These were 2- to 4-fold lower (P<0.0001) when naıve mice were injected with matrix-embedded instead of saline-suspended PAEs.

Though basal levels of circulating antibodies were significantly elevated after serial PAE injections (2210+341 mean fluorescence intensity, day 42) and almost doubled again 90 days after injection of a fourth set of free PAEs, antibody levels declined by half in recipients of matrix-embedded PAEs at day 42 (P<0.0001), as did levels of CD4+-effector cells and xenoreactive splenocytes.

A significant immune response to implantation of free PAE is elicited in naıve mice, that is even more pronounced in mice with pre-developed anti-endothelial immunity.

Matrix-embedding protects xenogeneic ECs against immune reaction in naive mice and in mice with heightened immune reactivity.

Matrix-embedded EC might offer a promising approach for treatment of advanced cardiovascular disease. (1)

Researchers examined the molecular mechanisms through which

mechanical force and hypertension modulate

endothelial cell regulation of vascular homeostasis.

Exposure to mechanical strain increased the paracrine inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by endothelial cells.

Mechanical strain stimulated the production by endothelial cells of perlecan and heparan-sulfate glycosaminoglycans. By inhibiting the expression of perlecan with an antisense vector researchers demonstrated that perlecan was essential to the strain-mediated effects on endothelial cell growth control.

Mechanical regulation of perlecan expression in endothelial cells was

  • governed by a mechano-transduction pathway
  • requiring transforming growth factor (TGF-β) signaling and
  • intracellular signaling through the ERK pathway.

Immunohistochemical staining of the aortae of spontaneously hypertensive rats
demonstrated strong correlations between

  • endothelial TGF-β,
  • phosphorylated signaling intermediates, and
  • arterial thickening.

Studies on ex vivo arteries exposed to varying levels of pressure demonstrated that

ERK and TGF-beta signaling were required for pressure-induced upregulation of endothelial HSPG.

The Team’s findings suggest a novel feedback control mechanism in which

  • net arterial remodeling to hemodynamic forces is controlled by a dynamic interplay between growth stimulatory signals from vSMCs and
  • growth inhibitory signals from endothelial cells. (2)

Heparan-sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are potent regulators of vascular remodeling and repair.
 The major enzyme capable of degrading HSPGs is heparanase, which led us to examine
the role of heparanase in controlling

  • arterial structure,
  • mechanics, and
  • remodeling.

In vitro studies suggested heparanase expression in endothelial cells serves as a negative regulator of endothelial inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) proliferation.

ECs inhibit vSMC proliferation through the interplay between

  • growth stimulatory signals from vSMCs and
  • growth inhibitory signals from ECs.

This would be expected if ECs had HSPGs that are degraded by heparanase.
Arterial structure and remodeling to injury is modified by heparanase expression.
Transgenic mice overexpressing heparanase had

  • increased arterial thickness,
  • cellular density, and
  • mechanical compliance.

Endovascular stenting studies in Zucker rats demonstrated increased heparanase expression in the neointima of obese, hyperlipidemic rats in comparison to lean rats.

The extent of heparanase expression within the neointima strongly correlated with the neointimal thickness following injury. To test the effects of heparanase overexpression on arterial repair, researchers developed a novel murine model of stent injury using small diameter self-expanding stents.

Using this model, researchers found that increased

  • neointimal formation and
  • macrophage recruitment occurs in transgenic mice overexpressing heparanase.
  • Taken together, these results support a role for heparanase in the regulation of arterial structure, mechanics, and repair. (3)

The first host–donor reaction in transplantation occurs at the blood–tissue interface.
When the primary component of the implant (donor) is the endothelial cells, it incites an immunologic reaction. Injections of free endothelial cell implants elicit a profound major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II dominated immune response.

Endothelial cells embedded within three-dimensional matrices behave like quiescent endothelial cells.

Perivascular implants of such embedded ECs cells are the most potent inhibitor of intimal hyperplasia and thrombosis following controlled vascular injury, but without any immune reactivity.

Allo- and even exenogenic endothelial cells evoke no significant humoral or
cellular immune response in immune-competent hosts when embedded within matrices.
 Moreover,  endothelial implants are immune-modulatory, reducing the extent of the memory response to previous free cell implants.

Attenuated immunogenicity results in muted activation of adaptive and innate immune cells. These findings point toward a pivotal role of matrix–cell-interconnectivity for

  • the cellular immune phenotype and might therefore assist in the design  of
  • extracellular matrix components for successful tissue engineering. (4)

Because changes in subendothelial matrix composition are associated with alterations of the endothelial immune phenotype, researchers sought to understand if

  • cytokine-induced NF-κB activity and
  • downstream effects depend on substrate adherence of endothelial cells (EC).

The team compared the upstream

  • phosphorylation cascade,
  • activation of NF-ĸβ, and
  • expression/secretion

of downstream effects of EC grown on tissue culture polystyrene plates (TCPS) with EC embedded within collagen-based matrices (MEEC).

Adhesion of natural killer (NK) cells was quantified in vitro and in vivo.

  • NF-κβ subunit p65 nuclear levels were significantly lower and
  • p50 significantly higher in cytokine-stimulated MEEC than in EC-TCPS.

Despite similar surface expression of TNF-α receptors, MEEC had significantly decreased secretion and expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1.

Attenuated fractalkine expression and secretion in MEEC (two to threefold lower than in EC-TCPS; p < 0.0002) correlated with 3.7-fold lower NK cell adhesion to EC (6,335 ± 420 vs. 1,735 ± 135 cpm; p < 0.0002).

Furthermore, NK cell infiltration into sites of EC implantation in vivo was significantly reduced when EC were embedded within matrix.

Matrix embedding enables control of EC substratum interaction.

This in turn regulates chemokine and surface molecule expression and secretion, in particular – of those compounds within NF-κβ pathways,

  • chemoattraction of NK cells,
  • local inflammation, and
  • tissue repair. (5)

Monocyte recruitment and interaction with the endothelium is imperative to vascular recovery.

Tie2 plays a key role in endothelial health and vascular remodeling.
Researchers studied monocyte-mediated Tie2/angiopoietin signaling following interaction of primary monocytes with endothelial cells and its role in endothelial cell survival.

The direct interaction of primary monocytes with subconfluent endothelial cells

resulted in transient secretion of angiopoietin-1 from monocytes and

the activation of endothelial Tie2. This effect was abolished by preactivation of monocytes with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα).

Although primary monocytes contained high levels of

  • both angiopoietin 1 and 2,
  • endothelial cells contained primarily angiopoietin 2.

Seeding of monocytes on serum-starved endothelial cells reduced caspase-3 activity by 46+5.1%, and 52+5.8% after TNFα treatment, and it decreased single-stranded DNA levels by 41+4.2% and 40+ 3.5%, respectively.

This protective effect of monocytes on endothelial cells was reversed by Tie2 silencing with specific short interfering RNA.

The antiapoptotic effect of monocytes was further supported by the

  • activation of cell survival signaling pathways involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase,
  • STAT3, and
  • AKT.

Monocytes and endothelial cells form a unique Tie2/angiopoietin-1 signaling system that affects endothelial cell survival and may play critical a role in vascular remodeling and homeostasis. (6)

(1) Cell–Matrix Contact Prevents Recognition and Damage of Endothelial Cells in States of Heightened Immunity.
H Methe, ER Edelman. Circulation. 2006;114[suppl I]:I-233–I-238.
http://www.circulationaha.org/DOI/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.000687

(2) Endothelial Cells Provide Feedback Control for Vascular Remodeling Through a Mechanosensitive Autocrine
TGFβ Signaling Pathway. AB Baker, DS Ettenson, M Jonas, MA Nugent, RV Iozzo, ER Edelman.
Circ. Res. 2008;103;289-297   http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.108.179465http://circres.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/103/3/289

(3) Heparanase Alters Arterial Structure, Mechanics, and Repair Following Endovascular Stenting in Mice.
AB Baker, A Groothuis, M Jonas, DS Ettenson…ER Edelman.   Circ. Res. 2009;104;380-387;
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.108.180695  http://circres.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/104/3/380

(4) The effect of three-dimensional matrix-embedding of endothelial cells on the humoral and cellular immune response.
H Methe, S Hess, ER Edelman. Seminars in Immunology 20 (2008) 117–122. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.smim.2007.12.005

(5) NF-kB Activity in Endothelial Cells Is Modulated by Cell Substratum Inter-actions and Influences Chemokine-Mediated
Adhesion of Natural Killer Cells.  S Hess, H Methe, Jong-Oh Kim, ER Edelman.
Cell Transplantation 2009; 18: 261–273


(6) Primary Monocytes Regulate Endothelial Cell Survival Through Secretion of Angiopoietin-1 and Activation of Endothelial Tie2.
SY Schubert, A Benarroch, J Monter-Solans and ER Edelman. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2011;31;870-875
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.110.218255

Neointimal Formation, Shear Stress, and Remodelling with Reference to Diabetes

Innate immunity is of major importance in vascular repair. The present study evaluated whether

  • systemic and transient depletion of monocytes and macrophages with
  • liposome-encapsulated bisphosphonates inhibits experimental in-stent neointimal formation.

The Experiment

Rabbits fed on a hypercholesterolemic diet underwent bilateral iliac artery balloon denudation and stent deployment.

Liposomal alendronate (3 or 6 mg/kg) was given concurrently with stenting.

  • Monocyte counts were reduced by 90% 24 to 48 hours aftera single injection of liposomal alendronate, returning to basal levels at 6 days.

This treatment significantly reduced

  • intimal area at 28 days, from 3.88+0.93 to 2.08+0.58 and 2.16 +0.62 mm2.
  • Lumen area was increased from 2.87+0.44 to 3.57­+0.65 and 3.45+0.58 mm2, and
  • arterial stenosis was reduced from 58 11% to 37 8% and 38 7% in controls, in rabbits treated with 3 mg/kg, and with 6 mg/kg, respectively (mean+SD, n=8 rabbits/group, P< 0.01 for all 3 parameters).

No drug-related adverse effects were observed.
Reduction in neointimal formation was associated with

  • reduced arterial macrophage infiltration and proliferation at 6 days and with an
  • equal reduction in intimal macrophage and smooth muscle cell content at 28 days after injury.

Conversely, drug regimens ineffective in reducing monocyte levels did not inhibit neointimal formation.
Researchers have shown that a

  • single liposomal bisphosphonates injection concurrent with injury reduces in-stent neointimal formation and
  • arterial stenosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits, accompanied by systemic transient depletion of monocytes and macrophages. (1)

Diabetes and insulin resistance are associated with increased disease risk and poor outcomes from cardiovascular interventions.

Even drug-eluting stents exhibit reduced efficacy in patients with diabetes.
Researchers reported the first study of vascular response to stent injury in insulin-resistant and diabetic animal models.

Endovascular stents were expanded in the aortae of

  • obese insulin-resistant and
  • type 2 diabetic Zucker rats,
  • in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats, and
  • in matched controls.

Insulin-resistant rats developed thicker neointima (0.46+0.08 versus 0.37+0.06 mm2, P 0.05), with  decreased lumen area (2.95+0.26 versus 3.29+0.15 mm2, P 0.03) 14 days after stenting compared with controls, but without increased vascular inflammation (tissue macrophages).

Insulin-resistant and diabetic rat vessels did exhibit markedly altered signaling pathway activation 1 and 2 weeks after stenting, with up to a 98% increase in p-ERK (anti-phospho ERK) and a 54% reduction in p-Akt (anti-phospho Akt) stained cells. Western blotting confirmed a profound effect of insulin resistance and diabetes on Akt and ERK signaling in stented segments. p-ERK/p-Akt ratio in stented segments uniquely correlated with neointimal response (R2 = 0.888, P< 0.04) , but not in lean controls.

Transfemoral aortic stenting in rats provides insight into vascular responses in insulin resistance and diabetes.

Shifts in ERK and Akt signaling related to insulin resistance may reflect altered tissue repair in diabetes accompanied by a

  • shift in metabolic : proliferative balance.

These findings may help explain the increased vascular morbidity in diabetes and suggest specific therapies for patients with insulin resistance and diabetes. (2)

Researchers investigated the role of Valsartan (V) alone or in combination with Simvastatin (S) on coronary atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling, and tested the hypothesis that V or V/S attenuate the pro-inflammatory effect of low endothelial shear stress (ESS).

Twenty-four diabetic, hyperlipidemic swine were allocated into Early (n = 12) and Late (n=12) groups.
Diabetic swine in each group were treated with Placebo (n=4), V (n = 4) and V/S (n = 4) and  followed for 8 weeks in the Early group and 30 weeks in the Late group.

Blood pressure, serum cholesterol and glucose were similar across the treatment subgroups.
ESS was calculated in plaque-free subsegments of interest (n = 109) in the Late group at week 23.
Coronary arteries of this group were harvested at week 30, and the subsegments of interest were identified, and analyzed histopathologically.

Intravascular geometrically correct 3-dimensional reconstruction of the coronary arteries of 12 swine was performed 23 weeks after initiation of diabetes mellitus and a hyperlipidemic diet. Local endothelial shear stress was calculated

  • in plaque-free subsegments of interest (n=142) with computational fluid dynamics, and
  • the coronary arteries (n=31) were harvested and the same subsegments were identified at 30 weeks.

V alone or with S

  • reduced the severity of inflammation in high-risk plaques.
Both regimens attenuated the severity of enzymatic degradation of the arterial wall, reducing the severity of expansive remodeling.
  • attenuated the pro-inflammatory effect of low ESS.
V alone or with S
  • exerts a beneficial effect of reducing and stabilizing high-risk plaque characteristics independent of a blood pressure- and lipid-lowering effect. (3)

This study tested the hypothesis that low endothelial shear stress  augments the

  • expression of matrix-degrading proteases, promoting the
  • formation of thin-capped atheromata.

Researchers assessed the messenger RNA and protein expression, and elastolytic activity of selected elastases and their endogenous inhibitors.

Subsegments with low endothelial shear stress at week 23 showed

  • reduced endothelial coverage,
  • enhanced lipid accumulation, and
  • intense infiltration of activated inflammatory cells at week 30.

These lesions showed increased expression of messenger RNAs encoding

  • matrix metalloproteinase-2, -9, and -12, and cathepsins K and S
  • relative to their endogenous inhibitors and
  • increased elastolytic activity.

Expression of these enzymes correlated positively with the severity of internal elastic lamina fragmentation.

Thin-capped atheromata in regions with

  • lower preceding endothelial shear stress had
  • reduced endothelial coverage,
  • intense lipid and inflammatory cell accumulation,
  • enhanced messenger RNA expression and
  • elastolytic activity of MMPs and cathepsins with
  • severe internal elastic lamina fragmentation.

Low endothelial shear stress induces endothelial discontinuity and

  • accumulation of activated inflammatory cells, thereby
  • augmenting the expression and activity of elastases in the intima and
  • shifting the balance with their inhibitors toward matrix breakdown.

Team’s results provide new insight into the mechanisms of regional formation of plaques with thin fibrous caps. (4)

Elevated CRP levels predict increased incidence of cardiovascular events and poor outcomes following interventions. There is the suggestion that CRP is also a mediator of vascular injury.

Transgenic mice carrying the human CRP gene (CRPtg) are predisposed to arterial thrombosis post-injury.

Researchers examined whether CRP similarly modulates the proliferative and hyperplastic phases of vascular repair in CRPtg when thrombosis is controlled with daily aspirin and heparin at the time of trans-femoral arterial wire-injury.

Complete thrombotic arterial occlusion at 28 days was comparable for wild-type and CRPtg mice (14 and 19%, respectively). Neointimal area at 28d was 2.5 fold lower in CRPtg (4190±3134 m2, n = 12) compared to wild-types (10,157±8890 m2, n = 11, p < 0.05).

Likewise, neointimal/media area ratio was 1.10±0.87 in wild-types and 0.45±0.24 in CRPtg (p < 0.05).

  • Seven days post-injury, cellular proliferation and apoptotic cell number in the intima were both less pronounced in CRPtg than wild-type.
  • No differences were seen in leukocyte infiltration or endothelial coverage.
CRPtg mice had significantly reduced p38 MAPK signaling pathway activation following injury.

The pro-thrombotic phenotype of CRPtg mice was suppressed by aspirin/heparin, revealing CRP’s influence on neointimal growth after trans-femoral arterial wire-injury.

  • Signaling pathway activation,
  • cellular proliferation, and
  • neointimal formation

were all reduced in CRPtg following vascular injury.
 Increasingly the Team was aware of CRP multipotent effects.
 Once considered only a risk factor, and recently a harmful agent, CRP is a far more complex regulator of vascular biology. (5)

(1) Liposomal Alendronate Inhibits Systemic Innate Immunity and Reduces In-Stent Neointimal
Hyperplasia in Rabbits. HD Danenberg, G Golomb, A Groothuis, J Gao…, ER Edelman.
Circulation. 2003;108:2798-2804


(2) Vascular Neointimal Formation and Signaling Pathway Activation in Response to Stent Injury
in Insulin-Resistant and Diabetic Animals. M Jonas, ER Edelman, A Groothuis, AB Baker, P Seifert, C Rogers.
Circ. Res. 2005;97;725-733.        http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000183730.52908.C6
http://circres.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/97/7/725

(3) Attenuation of inflammation and expansive remodeling by Valsartan alone or in combination with
Simvastatin in high-risk coronary atherosclerotic plaques. YS Chatzizisis, M Jonas, R Beigel, AU Coskun…
ER Edelman, CL Feldman, PH Stone.  Atherosclerosis 203 (2009) 387–394


(4) Augmented Expression and Activity of Extracellular Matrix-Degrading Enzymes in Regions of Low
Endothelial Shear Stress Colocalize With Coronary Atheromata With Thin Fibrous Caps in Pigs.
YS Chatzizisis, AB Baker, GK Sukhova,…P Libby, CL Feldman, ER Edelman, PH Stone
Circulation 2011;123;621-630     http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.970038
http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/123/6/621


(5) Neointimal formation is reduced after arterial injury in human crp transgenic mice
HD Danenberg, E Grad, RV Swaminathan, Z Chenc,…ER Edelman
Atherosclerosis 201 (2008) 85–91

A Rattle Bag of Science and the Art of Translation

Science Translational Medicine – A rattle bag of science and the art of translation
E. R. Edelman, G. A. FitzGerald.
Sci.Transl. Med. 3, 104ed3 (2011). http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3002131

Elazer R. Edelman is the Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at MIT,
Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a coronary care unit cardiologist at the Brigham and Women’s
Hospital, and Director of the Harvard-MIT Biomedical Engineering Center. E-mail: ere@mit.edu

Garret A. FitzGerald is the McNeil Professor in Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Chair of the Department of
Pharmacology, and Director of the Institute for Translational Medicine & Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania.
E-mail: garret@upenn.edu

In 2011, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  founded Science Translational Medicine (STM)
to disseminate interdisciplinary science integrating basic and clinical research that defines and fosters new therapeutics, devices, and diagnostics.

Conceived and nourished under the creative vision of Elias Zerhouni and Katrina Kelner, the journal has attracted widespread attention.
Now, as we assume the mantle of co-chief scientific advisors, we look back on the journal’s early accomplishments, restate our mission, and make clear the kinds of manuscripts we seek and accept for publication.

STM’s mission, as articulated by Elias and Katrina, was to

“promote human health by providing a forum for communication and cross-fertilization among basic, translational, and clinical research practitioners and trainees from all relevant established and emerging disciplines.”

This statement remains relevant and accurate today.
 With this mission on our masthead, STM now receives ~25 manuscripts (full-length research articles) per week and publishes ~10% of them. Roughly half of the submissions are deemed inappropriate for the journal and are returned without review within 8 to 10 days of receipt.

Of those papers that undergo full peer review,

decisions to reject are made within 48 days and

the mean time to acceptance (including the revision period) is 125 days.

There is now an average wait of only 24 days between acceptance and publication.

Defining TRANSLATIONAL Medicine

In accord with the journal’s broad readership, the ideal manuscript meets five criteria: It
(i) reports a discovery of translational relevance with high-impact potential;
(ii) has a conceptual focus with interdisciplinary appeal;
(iii) elucidates a biological mechanism;
(iv) is innovative and novel; and
(v) is presented in clear, broadly accessible language.
 STM seeks to publish research that describes

  • how innovative concepts drive the creative biomedical science
  • that ultimately improves the quality of people’s lives—

This is the broadest of our journal’s criteria but is the one that sets us apart as well.
Translational relevance does not require demonstration of benefit in humans but does require the evident potential to advance clinical medicine, thus impacting the direction of our culture and the welfare of our communities. Conceptual focus and mechanistic emphasis discriminate our papers from those that contain observational descriptions of technical findings for which value is restricted to a specific discipline.

However, innovation and novelty may apply to a fundamental scientific discovery or to the nature of its application and relevance to the translational process. Criteria enable the journal to consider versatile technological advances that apply new and creative thinking but may not necessarily offer fresh insights into biological mechanisms. Finally, while the subsequent additional efforts of the STM editorial staff are not to be discounted, the clarity of writing and coherence of argument presented within a submitted manuscript are likely to facilitate its progress through the challenge of peer review.

On Causes – Hippocrates, Aristotle, Robert Koch, and the Dread Pirate Roberts

Elazer R. Edelman
Circulation 2001;104:2509-2512

The idea of risk factors for vascular disease has evolved

  • from a dichotomous to continuous hazard analysis and
  • from the consideration of a few factors to
  • mechanistic investigation of many interrelated risks.

However, confusion still abounds regarding issues of association and causation. Originally, the simple presence of

  • tobacco abuse, hypertension, and/or hypercholesterolemia were tallied, and
  • the cumulative score was predictive of subsequent coronary artery disease.

Since then, dose responses have been defined for these and other factors and it has been suggested that almost 300 factors place patients at risk; these factors include elevations in plasma homocysteine.
 Recent studies shed interesting light on the mechanism of this potentially causal relationship, which was first noted in 1969.

Aside from putative effects on vessel wall dynamics, there is now direct evidence that homocysteine is atherogenic. Twenty-fold increases in plasma homocysteine achieved by dietary manipulation of apoE–/– mice increased aortic root lesion size 2-fold and produced a prolonged chronic inflammatory mural response accompanied by elevations in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a).

In long term followup, homocysteine levels elevated by

  • dietary supplementation with methionine or homocysteine
  • promoted lesion size and plaque fibrosis in these
  • atherosclerosis-prone mice early in life, but without influencing ultimate plaque burden as the animals aged.

A number of mechanisms were proposed by which homocysteine achieved this effect, including

  • promotion of inflammation,
  • regulation of lipoprotein metabolism, and
  • modification of critical biochemical pathways and
  • metabolites including nitric oxide (NO).

See p 2569
In the present issue of Circulation,

Stühlinger et al 7 advance these mechanistic insights one critical step further by defining homocysteine’s effects at an enzymatic level.

The group led by Lentz published an association between levels of the

  • endogenous inhibitor of Nirtic Oxide synthase,
  • asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), and
  • homocysteine in cultured endothelial cells and in the serum of cynomolgus monkeys.

Such an association is interesting because the L-arginine–NO synthase pathway seems to be a critical component in the full range of endothelial cell biology and vascular dysfunction.

Stühlinger et al 7  now show that increased cultured endothelial cell elaboration of ADMA by homocysteine and its precursor L-methionine is associated with a dose-dependent impairment of the activity of endothelial dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), the enzyme that degrades ADMA. Homocysteine directly inhibited DDAH activity in a cell-free system by targeting a critical sulfhydryl group on this enzyme.

Thus, one could envision that the balance of cardiovascular health and disease could well be determined by the ability of an intact Nirtic Oxide synthase system to overcome environmental, dietary, and even genetic factors.

In patients with altered enzymatic defense systems,

  • elevated homocysteine,
  • oxidized lipoproteins,
  • inflammation, and other
  • vasotoxins

may dominate even the most potent defense mechanisms.
These studies raise a number of issues.
Do we need to add to our list of established cardiovascular risk factors to accommodate new findings and associations?
Is there a final common pathway for all risk factors or perhaps even a unified factor theory into which all potential risks can be grouped?
And, as always, should we consider Nirtic Oxide at the core of this universality?
Finally, should we change our focus altogether and speak not of risk factors but of

  • genetic predisposition,
  • extent of biochemical aberration, and
  • degree of physical damage?

Some would view these remarkable success stories and the repeated association of hyperhomocyst(e)inemia with coronary, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease and simply advocate for increased folic acid intake for all.

Indeed, this intervention of negligible cost and

  • insignificant side effect is already partially in place;
  • many foods are fortified with folate to prevent congenital neural tube defects.

This reader considers the seminal work by Vernon Young and Yves Ingenbleek on the relationship between

  • S8 and regions distant from lava flows in Asia and Indian subcontinents,
  • where they have determined hyperhomocysteinemia and the consequence associated with:
  • veganism (not voluntary)
  • impaired methyl donor reactions and transsulfuration pathways (not corrected by B12, folate)
  • loss of lean body mass due to the constant relationship of S:N (insufficient from plant sources)

What happens, when we fail to continue to pursue causality,

  • the linkage of biological significance or scientific plausibility with
  • epidemiologically or statistically significant association?

In medicine, risk becomes the likelihood that people without a disease will acquire the disease through contact with factors thought to increase disease risk.

All of these risk factors are then, by nature, imprecise and nonspecific.
 They are stochastic measures of what will happen to normal people who fall into particular measures of these parameters.

The daring may be willing to accept these risks, citing friend and foe who live well beyond or for far lesser times than anticipated by risk alone. Such concerns may well become moot if we can simultaneously identify patients at risk

  • by linking phenotype with genotype,
  • gene expression with protein elaboration, and
  • environmental exposures with the biochemical consequences and
  • direct anatomic aberrations they induce.

This kind of characterization may well replace a family history of arterial disease as a rough estimate of

  • genotype,
  • serum cholesterol as an indirect measure of the health of lipoprotein metabolism,
  • serum glucose as a crude determinant of the ravages of diabetes mellitus,
  • blood pressure measurement as a marker of long-standing endogenous exposure to altered flow, and
  • tobacco abuse as a maker of long-standing exposure to exogenous toxins.

Rather than identifying patients on the basis of their serum cholesterol, we will have a direct measure of their

  • LDL receptor number,
  • internalization rate,
  • macrophage content in the blood vessel wall,
  • metalloproteinase activity, etc.
  • insulin receptor metabolism,
  • oxidative state, and
  • glycated burden.
  • Serum glucose will similarly give way to these tests

Evaluating a new way to open clogged arteries: Computational model offers insight into mechanisms of drug-coated balloons.

A new study from MIT analyzes the potential usefulness of a new treatment that combines the benefits of angioplasty balloons and drug-releasing stents, but may pose fewer risks. With this new approach, a balloon is inflated in the artery for only a brief period, during which it releases a drug that prevents cells from accumulating and clogging the arteries over time.
While approved for limited use in Europe, these drug-coated balloons are still in development in the United States and have not received FDA approval. The MIT study, which models the behavior of the balloons, should help scientists optimize their performance and aid regulators in evaluating their effectiveness and safety.
“Until now, people who evaluate such technology could not distinguish hype from promise,” says Elazer Edelman, the Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and senior author of the paper describing the study, which appeared online recently in the journal Circulation.
Lead author of the paper is Vijaya Kolachalama, a former MIT postdoc who is now a principal member of the technical staff at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory.
Edelman’s lab is investigating a possible alternative to the current treatments: drug-coated balloons. “We’re trying to understand how and when this therapy could work and identify the conditions in which it may not,” Kolachalama says. “It has its merits; it has some disadvantages.”

Modeling drug release

The drug-coated balloons are delivered by a catheter and inflated at the narrowed artery for about 30 seconds, sometimes longer. During that time, the balloon coating, containing a drug such as Zotarolimus, is released from the balloon. The properties of the coating allow the drug to be absorbed in the body’s tissues. Once the drug is released, the balloon is removed.
In their new study, Kolachalama, Edelman and colleagues set out to rigorously characterize the properties of the drug-coated balloons. After performing experiments in tissue grown in the lab and in pigs, they developed a computer model that explains the dynamics of drug release and distribution. They found that factors such as the size of the balloon, the duration of delivery time, and the composition of the drug coating all influence how long the drug stays at the injury site and how effectively it clears the arteries.
One significant finding is that when the drug is released, some of it sticks to the lining of the blood vessels. Over time, that drug is slowly released back into the tissue, which explains why the drug’s effects last much longer than the initial 30-second release period.
“This is the first time we can explain the reasons why drug-coated balloons can work,” Kolachalama says. “The study also offers areas where people can consider thinking about optimizing drug transfer and delivery.”

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/127/20/2047.short  
http://www.mit.edu/people/vbk/Circulation_2013.pdf 
http://www.sciencedaily.com/…13/05/130521121513.ht…    
Circulation, 2013; 127 (20): 2047 – 2055
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.002051;

 

Conclusion

MIT’s Edelman’s Lab conducted the pioneering work in Vascular biology, animal models of drug eluting stents and was at the forefront of Empirical Molecular Cardiology in its studies in vascular physiology, biology and biomaterials for medical devices.

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Author and Reporter: Anamika Sarkar, Ph.D.

Among many important roles of Nitric oxide (NO), one of the key actions is to act as a vasodilator and maintain cardiovascular health. Induction of NO is regulated by signals in tissue as well as endothelium.

Importance of NO has been nicely reviewed in the article  “Discovery of NO and its effects of vascular biology”. Other articles which are good readings for the importance of NO are  – a) regulation of glycolysis b) NO in cardiovascular disease c) NO and Immune responses Part I and Part II d) NO signaling pathways (Also, please see Source for more articles on NO and its significance).

The rate of production of NO has been established to be dependent on Wall Shear Stress (WSS) (Mashour and Broock, Brain Res., 1999) . Many mathematical models have been developed as 2D diffusion models to predict distribution of NO transport in single vessels, eg. arterioles (Please see Sources for references ).

Chen et. al. (Med. Biol. Eng. Comp., 2011) developed a 3-D model consisting of two branched arterioles and nine capillaries surrounding the vessels. Their model not only takes into account of the 3-D volume, but also branching effects on blood flow (Please see Fig 1 and Fig 2 from Chen et. al. 2011 ).

Image

Fig. 1 Blood phase separation with vascular branching. RBC
fractional flow in daughter branch alpha is not necessarily equal
to that in branch beta

Image

The mathematical model considers dynamic characteristics related to blood flow, blood vessel structures and transport mechanism in the wall. The authors have considered effects of branching and ratio of diameters between blood vessels of parent and children to determine the fractional blood flow which gets distributed in the network. These branching effects of the vessels will also affect the blood volume or RBC (Red Blood Cell), hence NO consumption in the blood. Parameters in the model are either obtained or fitted with experimental results from literature. Their model assumes a linear relationship of NO production with wall shear stress which in turn will be regulated by blood flow determined by branching characteristics of blood vessels. Moreover, the mathematical model includes transport of NO through the blood vessels in the tissue (in the defined volume of the model) as diffusion model,. The model was solved using Finite Elements method using the software COMSOL.

Their model results show that wall shear stress changes depending upon the distribution of RBC in the microcirculations of blood vessels, which leads to differential production of NO along the vascular network. Levels of NO at vascular walls can be less in branches which receive more blood flow, due to the balance between higher consumption of NO by RBC and production of NO due to high wall stress.  Their 3-D simulations showed the importance of capillaries such that NO can be concentrated in tissues far away in distance from arterioles facilitating much controlled NO regulation.

Though, the 3-D model developed by Chen et. al., (2011) is an idealized mathematical model of blood flow with production and consumption of NO, depending upon WSS, yet it shows importance of structure of blood vessels in distributions of NO in vessels and tissues. Such a model with proper extension to larger network can give more insights into differential distributions of NO as a function of blood flow and wall shear stress. As nano-medicine become sophisticated in years to come, information of distribution of NO in tissues and blood vessels can help the medicine to be more targeted.

Sources:

Chen et.al. (2011) : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21431938

Mashour and Broock, Brain Res., 1999: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=10526117

Mathematical Modes of NO Distribution in 2-D

Other research on Nitric Oxide and Vascular Biology on this Scientific Web Site include the following:

Nitric Oxide and Immune Responses: Part 1

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https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/18/nitric-oxide-and-immune-responses-part-1/

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Nitric Oxide and Sepsis, Hemodynamic Collapse, and the Search for Therapeutic Options

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https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/20/nitric-oxide-and-sepsis-hemodynamic-collapse-and-the-search-for-therapeutic-options/

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https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/mitochondrial-damage-and-repair-under-oxidative-stress/

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https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/nitric-oxide-and-immune-responses-part-2/

Differential Distribution of Nitric Oxide – A 3-D Mathematical Model

Author: Anamika Sarkar, PhD, 10/28/2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/differential-distribution-of-nitric-oxide-a-3-d-mathematical-model/

Statins’ Nonlipid Effects on Vascular Endothelium through eNOS Activation

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https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/08/statins-nonlipid-effects-on-vascular-endothelium-through-enos-activation/

Nitric Oxide Nutritional remedies for hypertension and atherosclerosis. It’s 12 am: do you know where your electrons are?

Author and Reporter: Meg Baker, 10/7/2012.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/07/no-nutritional-remedies-for-hypertension-and-atherosclerosis-its-12-am-do-you-know-where-your-electrons-are/

Inhibition of ET-1, ETA and ETA-ETB, Induction of NO production, stimulation of eNOS and Treatment Regime with PPAR-gamma agonists (TZD): cEPCs Endogenous Augmentation for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction – A Bibliography

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, 10/4/2012.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/04/inhibition-of-et-1-eta-and-eta-etb-induction-of-no-production-and-stimulation-of-enos-and-treatment-regime-with-ppar-gamma-agonists-tzd-cepcs-endogenous-augmentation-for-cardiovascular-risk-reduc/

Coronary Artery Disease – Medical Devices Solutions: From First-In-Man Stent Implantation, via Medical Ethical Dilemmas to Drug Eluting Stents August 13, 2012

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, 8/13/2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/13/coronary-artery-disease-medical-devices-solutions-from-first-in-man-stent-implantation-via-medical-ethical-dilemmas-to-drug-eluting-stents/

Vascular Medicine and Biology: CLASSIFICATION OF FAST ACTING THERAPY FOR PATIENTS AT HIGH RISK FOR MACROVASCULAR EVENTS Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs

Curator; Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, 8/24/2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/24/vascular-medicine-and-biology-classification-of-fast-acting-therapy-for-patients-at-high-risk-for-macrovascular-events-macrovascular-disease-therapeutic-potential-of-cepcs/

 

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Image

Author and Reporter: Ritu Saxena, Ph.D.

Introduction

Blood vessels arise from endothelial precursors that are thin, flat cells lining the inside of blood vessels forming a monolayer throughout the circulatory system. ECs are defined by specific cell surface markers including CD31, CD34, CD105, VE-cadherin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 [VEGFR-1], VEGFR-2, Tie-1, Tie-2) that characterize their phenotype. Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from preexisting ones and is required for growth and repair. Malignancy is a pathological scenario that requires angiogenesis. The definite cellular origin of adult blood vessel-forming cells necessary for neoangiogenesis has been unknown. Weissman and fellow coworkers in their previous work indicated that the address of these cells might be local, residing in non-circulating tissue. Also, very low numbers of cells with endothelial characteristics and high proliferative potential have been reported in umbilical cord blood or in peripheral blood. The function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and pharmacotherapy targeted at the      endogenous augmentation of these cells for their use in cardiovascular repair has been discussed in detail in a post authored by Aviva Lev-Ari on August 28, 2012.

Research

Scientists at the University of Helsinki, Finland, wanted to find out if there exists a rare vascular endothelial stem cell (VESC) population that is capable of producing very high numbers of endothelial daughter cells, and can lead to neovascular growth in adults.  They were not only able to define the characteristic cells responsible for giving rise of blood vessels in adults, but took a leap forward by generating blood vessels from a single cells from the VESC population. (Figure:  VESCs discovered that reside at the blood vessel wall endothelium. These are a small population of CD117+ ECs capable of self-renewal.  Image Courtesy: Fang et al, 2012).

The VESCs, as explained by the Fang and coworkers, reside in the blood vessel wall endothelium and constitute a small subpopulation within CD117+ (c-kit+) endothelial cells (ECs). These cells are capable of undergoing clonal expansion unlike the surrounding ECs that bear limited proliferating potential. VESC discovered in this study were found to a have a certain characteristic phenotype defined by the presence of a few surface proteins. The authors utilized the technique of FACS (Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting) to isolate the cells capable of undergoing clonal expansion. The sorting was performed against endothelial-specific protein markers CD31 and CD15, and against CD117 and Sca-1 molecules that are expressed by many adult stem cell types including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and prostate and mammary gland stem cells. The experimental results defined the surface characteristics or the phenotype of the isolated cells to be lin2CD31+CD105+Sca1+CD117+A.  A single VESC cell isolated from the endothelial population was able to generate functional blood vessels that connected to host circulation after transplantation in mouse. In cell culture, these cells were shown to generate tens of millions of daughter endothelial cells. Also, within cell culture, the isolated VESCs showed long-term self-renewal properties, bearing similarity to adult stem cells. The self-renewal capacity of VESCs was evident even in vivo, when the ‘isolated’ ECs containing VESCs retained the capacity to generate functional blood vessels during serial transplantations. The transplanted ECs were monitored with the help of Green Fluorescent protein (GFP). Fluorescent blood vessels were observed in secondary, tertiary, and quaternary transplants providing direct evidence that the GFP-tagged ECs contained VESCs with self-renewal capacity.

Furthermore, the cell culture and animal experiment results were supported by the observation that abundant CD117+ ECs were discovered in human malignant melanomas and invasive breast cancer samples.

Research relevance

The discovery of VESCs is seminal and could be of tremendous therapeutic potential. It could be useful in the following ways leading way for related research endeavors including-

  • Cell-based therapies: VESCs could be used in cell-based therapies for cardiovascular repair to restore tissue vascularization i.e., the daughter cells arising from VESCs at the target site could assist in repair by generation of  neoangiogenic ECs required for the formation of blood vessels.
  • Therapeutic target: VESCs could serve as a possible cellular and molecular target to restrain angiogenesis by inhibiting endothelial-cell proliferation thereby blocking cancer progression.

Sources:

Fang S et al, Generation of Functional Blood Vessels from a Single c- kit + Adult Vascular Endothelial Stem Cell. PLoS Biol. 2012;10(10):e1001407. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23091420

News Brief: http://www.business-standard.com/generalnews/news/scientists-discover-new-blood-vessel-generating-cells/69329/

Related reading:

Cardiovascular and endothelial cells

Statins’ Nonlipid Effects on Vascular Endothelium through eNOS Activation Curator, Author,Writer, Reporter: Larry Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Cardiovascular Outcomes: Function of circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (cEPCs): Exploring Pharmaco-therapy targeted at Endogenous Augmentation of cEPCs Author and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Vascular Medicine and Biology: Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs Curator and Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Repair damaged blood vessels in heart disease, stroke, diabetes and trauma: Cellular Reprogramming amniotic fluid-derived cells into Endothelial Cells Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Stem cells in therapy

A possible light by Stem cell therapy in painful dark of Osteoarthritis” – Kartogenin, a small molecule, differentiates stem cells to chondrocyte, healthy cartilage cells Author and Reporter: Anamika Sarkar, Ph.D and Ritu Saxena, Ph.D.

Human embryonic pluripotent stem cells and healing post-myocardial infarction Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD

Stem cells create new heart cells in baby mice, but not in adults, study shows Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Stem cells for the rescue of mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease Reporter: Ritu Saxena, Ph.D.

Stem Cell Research — The Frontier is at the Technion in Israel Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Research articles by MA Gaballa, PhD

Harris DT, Badowski M, Nafees A, Gaballa MA. The potential of Cord Blood Stem Cells for Use in Regenerative Medicine. Expert Opinion in Biological Therapy 2007. Sept 7(9): 1131-22.

Furfaro E, Gaballa MA. Do adult stem cells ameliorate the damaged myocardium?. Human cord blood as a potential source of stem cells. Current Vascular Pharmacology 2007, 5; 27-44.

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Curated/reported by : Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

Based on : S Moncada et al

It was in 1980 that Furchgott & Zawadzki first described endothelium- dependent relaxation of the blood vessels by acetylcholine. Further studies in 1984 revealed that other factors such as bradykinin, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine release endothelium derived relaxing factor (EDRF), which can modulate vessel tone. EDRF was shown to stimulate soluble guanylate cyclase and was inhibited by haemoglobin. In 1986 it was demonstrated that superoxide (O2) anions mediated EDRF inactivation and that the inhibitors of EDRF generated superoxide (O2) anions in solution as a mean to inhibit EDRF. It was later established that all compounds that inhibit EDRF have one property in common, redox activity, which accounted for their inhibitory action on EDRF. One exception was haemoglobin, which inactivates EDRF by binding to it. In 1987 Furchgott proposed that EDRF might be nitric oxide (NO) based on a study of the transient relaxations of endothelium-denuded rings of rabbit aorta to ‘acidified’ inorganic nitrite (NO) solutions and the observations that superoxide dismutase (SOD, which removes O2) protected EDRF. Till then NO was not known to be produced in mammalian cells. In 1988 Palmer et al could detect NO production both biologically and chemically by chemiluminescence. The following year in 1989 the enzyme responsible for NO production, NO synthase, was discovered and L-arginine:NO pathway was proposed.

Roles of L-arginine:NO pathway

By 1987 it was proposed that NO is generated in tissues other than endothelium. Hibbs et al and Marletta et al proposed that NO was generated by macrophages. Moreover release of EDRF was demonstrated in cerebellar cells following activation with N-methyl-D- aspartate (NMDA ). Both noradrenergic and cholinergic responses are ‘controlled’ by the nitrergic system so that the release of NO (e.g., during electrical field stimulation) counteracts and dominates the response to the noradrenergic or cholinergic stimulus (Cellek & Moncada, 1997). Mechanism of penile erection was unveiled by the studies on nitrergic neurotransmission that led to therapeutic intervention. Selective damage of nitrergic nerves in disease states was proposed as a potent mechanism of pathophysiology. Broadly three areas of research based on three isoforms of NOS came into being;

  • cardiovascular
  • nervous
  • immunology

Identification of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) as an inhibitor of the synthesis of NO lay the basis of future research into investigating the role of NO in biological systems. In 1989 it was demonstrated that intravenous infusion of L-NMMA resulted in increase in blood pressure that was reversible by infusing L-arginine. NO was thus implicated in constantly maintaining blood vessel tone. eNOS knockout studies showed a hypertensive phenotypes in the animal models and over expression of eNOS led to lowering of the blood pressure. Furthermore, eNOS activation was attributed to phosphorylation of a specific tyrosine residue in the enzyme.

NO and Mitochondria 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/16/nitric-oxide-has-a-ubiquitous-role-in-the-regulation-of-glycolysis-with-a-concomitant-influence-on-mitochondrial-function/

NO reacts with some of the complexes of the respiratory chain, and inhibits mitochondrial respiration – this is a well accepted notion. Initially it was believed that the target for NO was soluble guanylate cyclase, which in vasculature would lead to elevation of cGMP that eventually results in NO mediated vasodilatation and platelet aggregation inhibition. In 1994, another potential target, cytochrome c oxidase, for inhibitory effects of NO was discovered. This was a reversible effect, in competition with oxygen concentrations. Increases in NO production were also shown to inhibit cellular respiration irreversibly by selectively inhibiting complex I . Hence in 2002 it was proposed that this might be a mechanism through which cell pathology was initiated in certain conditions. Furthermore, NO was proposed to be implicated in the activation of the grp78-dependent stress response , via modulating calcium-related interaction between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum . This host defence mechanism might also have role in vasculature. Further evidence was provided in 2003 to link the role of NO in mitochondrogenesis and thus indicating that NO might be involved in the regulation of the balance between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in cells.

NO and Pathophysiology

Lack of NO: By 2000, NO was established as a haemostatic regulator in the vasculature. Its absence was implicated in pathological states such as hypertension and vasospasm. These pathophysiological states share a common beginning of endothelial dysfunction, which has low NO production as one of its characterstic features. This dysfunction has been observed prior to the appearance of cardiovascular disease in predisposed subjects with family history of essential hypertension and atherosclerosis. The most likely mechanism for endothelial dysfunction is that of a reduced bioavailability of NO . The mechanism of this aspect is discussed elsewhere on this site. Protection against reduction of NO bio-availability in the vasculature is a vital therapeutic target and is extensively explored. This can be achieved by the use of antioxidants and/or augmentation of eNOS expression. In 2003 statins were shown to increase the production of endothelial NO in endothelial cell cultures and in animals by the reduction of oxidative stress or by increasing the coupling of the eNOS. It was way back in 1994 that oestrogen was shown to increase both the activity and expression of eNOS. In addition, more recently in 2003, oestrogen was shown to reduce the breakdown of available NO.

Excess of NO: In 2000 it was shown that NO produced from iNOS in vasculature is involved in extensive vasodilatation in septic shock. Later it was demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is an important component of the NO-induced tissue damage. This inhibition of respiration, which is initially NO-dependent and reversible, becomes persistent with time as a result of oxidative stress . Such metabolic hypoxic states where in tissues cannot utilise available oxygen due to NO, could also contribute to other inflammatory and degenerative conditions. An obvious therapeutic target for reducing NO production in such conditions would be L-NMMA. L-NMM was tested in a clinical trial for septic shock in 2004. The results were however disappointing probably due to the blanket reduction in NO production from other NOS enzymes there by having deleterious effects on the treatment group. More specific inhibitors for NOS forms are being investigated for in different disease states.

In conclusion, the L-arginine: NO pathway has had a major impact in many areas of research, specially vascular biology. A lot has been understood about this pathway and its interactions, therapeutic targets are being aggressively investigated, but further investigations are required to delineate further the role of NO in human health and disease.

Further Reading

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1760731/?tool=pubmed

Nitric Oxide and Platelet Aggregation

Inhaled NO in Pulmonary Artery Hypertension and Right Sided Heart Failure

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and the Role of agent alternatives in endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Activation and Nitric Oxide Production

Nitric Oxide in bone metabolism

Nitric oxide and signalling pathways

Rationale of NO use in hypertension and heart failure

Interaction of Nitric Oxide and Prostacyclin in Vascular Endothelium

Nitric Oxide has a ubiquitous role in the regulation of glycolysis -with a concomitant influence on mitochondrial function

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