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Posts Tagged ‘Acute coronary syndrome’


Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Intelligence

Early discharge using single cardiac troponin and copeptin testing in patients
with suspected 
acute coronary syndrome (ACS): a randomized, controlled
clinical process study
M Mockel, J Searle, Christian Hamm, A Slagman, S Blankenberg, et al.
EurHeartJ Apr 2014.  http://dx.doi.org:/10.1093/eurheartj/ehu178

This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated whether a process with single
combined testing of copeptin and troponin at admission in patients with low-to-
intermediate risk and suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS)  does not lead to a higher proportion of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) than
the current standard process (non-inferiority design). After clinical work-up and  single combined testing of troponin and copeptin to rule-out AMI,  early  discharge
of low- to intermediate risk patients with suspected ACS seems to be safe and has
the potential to shorten length of stay in the ED.

Diagnostic accuracy of combined cardiac troponin and copeptin
assessment for 
early rule-out of myocardial infarction: a systematic
review and meta-analysis
T Raskovalova, R Twerenbold, PO Collinson, T Keller, H Bouvaist, et al.
http://acc.sagepub.com/content/3/1/18
EurHeartJ: Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014; 3(1): 18-27.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1177/2048872613514015

This systematic review aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of combined
cardiac troponin (cTn) and  copeptin assessment in comparison to cTn alone for
early rule-out of acute myocardial infarction (AMI).  In 15  studies totalling 8740
patients (prevalence of   AMI 16%), adding copeptin improved the sensitivity
of cTn assays  (from 0.87 to 0.96, p=0.003) at the expense of lower specificity
(from 0.84 to 0.56, p<0.001).

In 12 studies providing for 6988 patients without ST-segment elevation,
the summary sensitivity and specificity  estimates were 0.95 (95% CI 0.89 to
0.98) and 0.57 (95% CI 0.49 to   0.65) for the combined assessment of cTn
and copeptin. When a high-sensitivity cTnT assay was used in combination
with copeptin,  the summary sensitivity  and specificity estimates were 0.98
(95% CI 0.96 to 1.00) and 0.50 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.58). The result indicates
that  copeptin significantly improves baseline cTn sensitivity.

Diagnostic accuracy of copeptin sensitivity and specificity in patients with
suspected non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction with troponin I below
the 
99th centile at presentation
J Duchenne, S Mestres, N Dublanchet, N Combaret, G Marceau, et al.
BMJ Open 2014;4:e004449.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004449

To our knowledge, our prospective multicentric study is the only one that includes
only patients with suspected non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and
high-sensitive cardiac troponin I below  the 99th centile  at presentation to the
emergency department, to limit spectrum bias. Our study included only patients
with negative ultrasensitive troponin at admission. However, this is the only group
of patients for which a multimarker rule-out strategy could add diagnostic value.
Serial clinical, electrographical and biochemical investigations were performed at
admission and after 2, 4, 6 and 12 h. Hs-cTnT was measured using an assay with
Dimension VISTA, Siemens. Copeptin was measured by the BRAHMS copeptin-us
assay on the KRYPTOR Compact Plus system. The follow-up period was 90 days.

The final diagnosis was adjudicated blinded to copeptin result. During 12 months,
102 patients were analysed. Final diagnosis was NSTEMI for 7.8% (n=8), unstable
angina for 3.9% (n=4), cardiac but non coronary artery disease for 8.8% (n=9),
non-cardiac chest pain for 52% (n=53) and unknown for 27.5% (n=28).

There was no statistical difference for copeptin values between patients with
NSTEMI and others (respectively 5.5 pmol/L IQR (3.1–7.9) and 6.5 pmol/L IQR
(3.9–12.1), p=0.49). Only one patient with NSTEMI had a copeptin value
above the cut-off
 of 95th centile at admission.

In this study, copeptin does not add a diagnostic value at admission to ED for patients
with suspected acute coronary syndrome without ST-
segment elevation and with hs-cTnT below the 99th centile.

Can a Second Measurement of Copeptin Improve Acute Myocardial
Infarction Rule Out?

N Marston, K Shah, C Mueller, Sean-Xavier Neath, R Christenson, J McCord, et al.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63(12_S):A202.  Presentation Number: 1226-242
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/S0735-1097(14)60202-3

Of the 494 patients analyzed, 378 (76.5%) had a persistently elevated copeptin at 2
hours and 116 patients (23.5%) had a copeptin that fell below the cutoff of 14 pmol/l.
The AMI rate was 6.1% when the second copeptin was elevated compared to 0%
when the second copeptin was not (p=.006), yielding a sensitivity of 100%. This
strategy identified 23.5% of patients with an intermediate risk who could be ruled
out for AMI while still in the ED. In contrast, a second troponin measurement had a
sensitivity of 74%. A negative second copeptin drawn 2 hours after presentation
demonstrated 100% sensitivity for AMI, allowing for effective rule out in this
intermediate risk cohort. This strategy identified nearly 25% of intermediate risk
patients who could be considered for discharge.

 The role of copeptin as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for risk
stratification in the emergency department.
Nickel CH, Bingisser R and Morgenthaler NG
BMC Medicine 2012, 10:7
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/7

Copeptin, the C-terminal part of the arginine vasopressin precursor peptide,
is a sensitive and stable surrogate marker for arginine vasopressin release.
Measurement of copeptin levels has been shown to be useful in a variety of
clinical scenarios, particularly as a prognostic marker in patients with acute
diseases such as lower respiratory tract infection, heart disease and stroke.

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Titanium-nitric-oxide-coated bioactive stents in acute coronary syndrome

Reporter: Larry Bernstein, MD, FCAP

SOURCE: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/256607204_Stent-oriented_versus_patient-oriented_outcome_in_patients_undergoing_early_percutaneous_coronary_intervention_for_acute_coronary_syndrome_2-year_report_from_the_BASE-ACS_trial

REBLOG

Titanium-nitric-oxide-coated bioactive stents in acute coronary syndrome: towards a more clear landscape!

 Assisstant Professor of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Egypt

With full interest, we read the Editorial “Nitric-oxide Coated Bioactive Titanium Stents: Safer and More Effective Than Second-generation Drug-eluting Stents?” by Sabaté et al 1. I’d like to commend the authors for publishing this interesting analysis of recently published studies – including the BASE ACS randomized controlled trial– comparing titanium-nitric-oxide-coated bioactive stents (NO-BAS) with drug-eluting stents. Yet, since I’m one of the authors of the BASE ACS trial, I’d like to clarify some points. First, the BASE ACS trial was adequately powered to detect a difference of the primary composite endpoint at 12 months (827 patients), with a formal statistical power calculation 2. Second, as the authors reported, the NO-BAS were non-inferior to cobalt-chromium-based everolimus-eluting stents (EES) for the primary composite endpoint of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) that included cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), and ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization, in patients presenting with the full spectrum of acute coronary syndrome at 12-month follow-up 2. The 12-month rates of the individual secondary endpoints of non-fatal MI and definite stent thrombosis (ST) were lower in patients who received NO-BAS versus those who received EES (2.2% versus 5.9%, and 0.7% versus 2.2%, p= 0.007 and 0.07, respectively) 3. And whereas the definition of MI adopted by the BASE ACS trial (based on CK MB or troponin ≥2 times the upper reference limit) was different from that employed in the EXAMINATION trial (extended definition of the World Health Organization), it cannot be held responsible for the difference in MI rates between NO-BAS and EES in the same BASE ACS trial, since the definition was equally applied to the two trial arms 2,3. Third, the early (within 30 days) divergence of safety endpoints between the 2 stent arms is hard to explain merely in view of peri-procedural bivalirudin monotherapy. In fact, out of 9 cases (2.2%) of definite ST in the EES arm, 3 were acute (within 24 hr); out of these 3, only 2 received peri-procedural bivalirudin as a sole anticoagulant 2. Moreover, peri-procedural bivalirudin use was comparable between the 2 stent arms: 14.1% versus 15.1% in NO-BAS versus EES arms, respectively. Furthermore, angiographic success was achieved in 99.8% in both stent arms; hence, technical issues (distal dissection, stent underexpansion) were probably similar in the 2 stent arms 2. More importantly, the rates of non-fatal MI and definite ST continued to diverge after one year: at 2-year follow-up, they were 2.9% versus 7.1%, and 1.0% versus 2.7%, p= 0.005 and 0.05, for NO-BAS versus EES, respectively 4. Since technical issues generally operate early (within 1 month) after stent implantation; therefore, they cannot fully account for the ‘very late’ events. References

1. Sabaté M, Brugaletta S. Nitric-oxide Coated Bioactive Titanium Stents: Safer and More Effective Than Second-generation Drug-eluting Stents? Rev Esp Cardiol. 2014;67:511-3. 2. Karjalainen PP, Niemela M, Airaksinen KEJ, et al. A prospective randomized comparison of titanium-nitride-oxide-coated bioactive stents with everolimus-eluting stents in acute coronary syndrome: the BASE-ACS trial. EuroIntervention. 2012;8:1769–74. 3. Sabate M, Cequier A, In˜iguez A, et al. Everolimus-eluting stent versus bare-metal stent in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (EXAMINATION): 1 year results of a randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2012;380:1482–90. 4. Romppanen H, Nammas W, Kervinen K, et al. Stent-oriented versus patient-oriented outcome in patients undergoing early percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome: 2-year report from the BASE-ACS trial. Ann Med. 2013;45:488-93.

additional:

 Pooled Analysis of Two Randomized Trials Comparing Titanium-nitride-oxide-coated Stent Versus Drug-eluting Stent in STEMI. Petri O. Tuomainenab, Jussi Siac, Wail Nammasb, Matti Niemeläd, Juhani K.E. Airaksinene, Fausto Biancarif, Pasi P. Karjalainen. Rev Esp Cardiol. 2014;67(7):531-7  http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.rec.2014.01.024

KeywordsBioactive stents. Everolimus-eluting stents. Paclitaxel-eluting stents. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Outcome.

Pooled Analysis of Two Randomized Trials Comparing Titanium-nitride-oxide-coated Stent Versus Drug-eluting Stent in STEMI

Petri O. Tuomainenab, Jussi Siac, Wail Nammasb, Matti Niemeläd, Juhani K.E. Airaksinene, Fausto Biancarif, Pasi P. Karjalainenb, a Department of Internal Medicine and Heart Center, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland b Department of Cardiology, Satakunta Central Hospital, Pori, Finland c Department of Cardiology, Kokkola Central Hospital, Kokkola, Finland d Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland e Department of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland f Division ofCardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Oulu, Finland

Refers to

Keywords

Bioactive stents. Everolimus-eluting stents. Paclitaxel-eluting stents. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Outcome.

Abstract

Introduction and objectivesWe performed a pooled analysis based on patient-level data from the TITAX-AMI and BASE-ACS trials to evaluate the outcome of titanium-nitride-oxide-coated bioactive stents vs drug-eluting stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction at 2-year follow-up. MethodsThe TITAX-AMI trial compared bioactive stents with paclitaxel-eluting stents in 425 patients with acute myocardial infarction. The BASE-ACS trial compared bioactive stents with everolimus-eluting stents in 827 patients with acute coronary syndrome. The primary endpoint for the pooled analysis was major adverse cardiac events: a composite of cardiac death, recurrent myocardial infarction, or ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization at 2-year follow-up. ResultsThe pooled analysis included 501 patients; 245 received bioactive stents, and 256 received drug-eluting stents. The pooled bioactive stent group was associated with a risk ratio of 0.85 for major adverse cardiac events (95% confidence interval, 0.53-1.35; P = .49) compared to the pooled drug-eluting stent group. Similarly, the pooled bioactive stent group was associated with a risk ratio of 0.71 for cardiac death (95% confidence interval, 0.26-1.95; P = .51), 0.44 for recurrent myocardial infarction (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.97; P = .04), and 1.39 for ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization (95% confidence interval, 0.74-2.59; P = .30), compared to the pooled drug-eluting stent group. These results were confirmed by propensity-score adjusted analysis of the combined datasets. ConclusionsIn patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, bioactive stents were associated with lower rates of recurrent myocardial infarction compared to drug-eluting stents at 2-year follow-up; yet, the rates of cardiac death and ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization were similar.

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Introduction to e-Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four Part 2: Regenerative Medicine


Introduction to e-Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four Part 2: Regenerative Medicine

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

This document is entirely devoted to medical and surgical therapies that have made huge strides in

  • simplification of interventional procedures,
  • reduced complexity, resulting in procedures previously requiring surgery are now done, circumstances permitting, by medical intervention.

This revolution in cardiovascular interventional therapy is regenerative medicine.  It is regenerative because it is largely driven by

  • the introduction into the impaired vasculature of an induced pleuripotent cell, called a stem cell, although
  • the level of differentiation may not be a most primitive cell line.

There is also a very closely aligned development in cell biology that extends beyond and including vascular regeneration that is called synthetic biology.  These developments have occurred at an accelerated rate in the last 15 years. The methods of interventional cardiology were already well developed in the mid 1980s.  This was at the peak of cardiothoracic bypass surgery.

Research on the endothelial cell,

  • endothelial cell proliferation,
  • shear flow in small arteries, especially at branch points, and
  • endothelial-platelet interactions

led to insights about plaque formation and vessel thrombosis.

Much was learned in biomechanics about the shear flow stresses on the luminal surface of the vasculature, and there was also

  • the concomitant discovery of nitric oxide,
  • oxidative stress, and
  • the isoenzymes of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, iNOS, and nNOS).

It became a fundamental tenet of vascular biology that

  • atherogenesis is a maladjustment to oxidative stress not only through genetic, but also
  • non-genetic nutritional factors that could be related to the balance of omega (ω)-3 and omega (ω)-6 fatty acids,
  • a pro-inflammatory state that elicits inflammatory cytokines, such as, interleukin-6 (IL6) and c-reactive protein(CRP),
  • insulin resistance with excess carbohydrate associated with type 2 diabetes and beta (β) cell stress,
  • excess trans- and saturated fats, and perhaps
  • the now plausible colonic microbial population of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT).

There is also an association of abdominal adiposity,

  • including the visceral peritoneum, with both T2DM and with arteriosclerotic vessel disease,
  • which is presenting at a young age, and has ties to
  • the effects of an adipokine, adiponectin.

Much important work has already been discussed in the domain of cardiac catheterization and research done to

  • prevent atheroembolization.and beyond that,
  • research done to implant an endothelial growth matrix.

Even then, dramatic work had already been done on

  • the platelet structure and metabolism, and
  • this has transformed our knowledge of platelet biology.

The coagulation process has been discussed in detailed in a previous document.  The result was the development of a

  • new class of platelet aggregation inhibitors designed to block the activation of protein on the platelet surface that
  • is critical in the coagulation cascade.

In addition, the term long used to describe atherosclerosis, atheroma notwithstanding, is “hardening of the arteries”.  This is particularly notable with respect to mid-size arteries and arterioles that feed the heart and kidneys. Whether it is preceded by or develops concurrently with chronic renal insufficiency and lowered glomerular filtration rate is perhaps arguable.  However, there is now a body of evidence that points to

  • a change in the vascular muscularis and vessel stiffness, in addition to the endothelial features already mentioned.

This has provided a basis for

  • targeted pharmaceutical intervention, and
  • reduction in salt intake.

So we have a  group of metabolic disorders, which may alone or in combination,

  • lead to and be associated with the long term effects of cardiovascular disease, including
  • congestive heart failure.

This has been classically broken down into forward and backward failure,

  • depending on decrease outflow through the aorta (ejection fraction), or
  • decreased venous return through the vena cava,

which involves increased pulmonary vascular resistance and decreased return into the left atrium.

This also has ties to several causes, which may be cardiac or vascular. This document, as the previous, has four pats.  They are broadly:

  1. Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Diseases
  2. Regenerative Cell and Molecular Biology
  3. Therapeutics Levels In Molecular Cardiology
  4. Research Proposals for Endogenous Augmentation of circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (cEPCs)

As in the previous section, we start with the biology of the stem cell and the degeneration in cardiovascular diseases, then proceed to regeneration, then therapeutics, and finally – proposals for augmenting therapy with circulating endogenous endothelial progenitor cells (cEPCs).

 

context

stem cells

 

theme

regeneration

 

 

 

 

theme

Therapeutics

 

theme

augmentation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key pathways involving NO

Key pathways involving NO

 

 

 

 

stem cell lin28

stem cellLlin28

1479-5876-10-175-1-l  translational research with feedback loops

Tranlational Research -Lab to Bedside

 

 

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Diagnostic Value of Cardiac Biomarkers


Diagnostic Value of Cardiac Biomarkers

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

These presentations covered several views of the utilization of cardiac markers that have evolved for over 60 years.  The first stage was the introduction of enzymatic assays and isoenzyme measurements to distinguish acute hepatitis and acute myocardial infarction, which included lactate dehydrogenase (LD isoenzymes 1, 2) at a time that late presentation of the patient in the emergency rooms were not uncommon, with the creatine kinase isoenzyme MB declining or disappeared from the circulation.  The world health organization (WHO) standard definition then was the presence of two of three:

1. Typical or atypical precordial pressure in the chest, usually with radiation to the left arm

2. Electrocardiographic changes of Q-wave, not previously seen, definitive; ST- elevation of acute myocardial injury with repolarization;
T-wave inversion.

3. The release into the circulation of myocardial derived enzymes –
creatine kinase – MB (which was adapted to measure infarct size), LD-1,
both of which were replaced with troponins T and I, which are part of the actomyosin contractile apparatus.

The research on infarct size elicited a major research goal for early diagnosis and reduction of infarct size, first with fibrinolysis of a ruptured plaque, and this proceeded into the full development of a rapidly evolving interventional cardiology as well as cardiothoracic surgery, in both cases, aimed at removal of plaque or replacement of vessel.  Surgery became more imperative for multivessel disease, even if only one vessel was severely affected.

So we have clinical history, physical examination, and emerging biomarkers playing a large role for more than half a century.  However, the role of biomarkers broadened.  Patients were treated with antiplatelet agents, and a hypercoagulable state coexisted with myocardial ischemic injury.  This made the management of the patient reliant on long term followup for Warfarin with the international normalized ratio (INR) for a standardized prothrombin time (PT), and reversal of the PT required transfusion with thawed fresh frozen plasma (FFP).  The partial thromboplastin test (PPT) was necessary in hospitalization to monitor the heparin effect.

Thus, we have identified the use of traditional cardiac biomarkers for:

1. Diagnosis
2. Therapeutic monitoring

The story is only the beginning.  Many patients who were atypical in presentation, or had cardiovascular ischemia without plaque rupture were problematic.  This led to a concerted effort to redesign the troponin assays for high sensitivity with the concern that the circulation should normally be free of a leaked structural marker of myocardial damage. But of course, there can be a slow leak or a decreased rate of removal of such protein from the circulation, and the best example of this would be the patient with significant renal insufficiency, as TnT is clear only through the kidney, and TNI is clear both by the kidney and by vascular endothelium.  The introduction of the high sensitivity assay has been met with considerable confusion, and highlights the complexity of diagnosis in heart disease.  Another test that is used for the diagnosis of heart failure is in the class of natriuretic peptides (BNP, pro NT-BNP, and ANP), the last of which has been under development.

While there is an exponential increase in the improvement of cardiac devices and discovery of pharmaceutical targets, the laboratory support for clinical management is not mature.  There are miRNAs that may prove valuable, matrix metalloprotein(s), and potential endothelial and blood cell surface markers, they require

1. codevelopment with new medications
2. standardization across the IVD industry
3. proficiency testing applied to all laboratories that provide testing
4. the measurement  on multitest automated analyzers with high capability in proteomic measurement  (MS, time of flight, MS-MS)

nejmra1216063_f1   Atherosclerotic Plaques Associated with Various Presentations               nejmra1216063_f2     Inflammatory Pathways Predisposing Coronary Arteries to Rupture and Thrombosis.        atherosclerosis progression

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G Protein–Coupled Receptor and S-Nitrosylation in Cardiac Ischemia

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

This recently published article delineates a role of G-protein-coupled receptor with S-nitrosylation in outcomes for acute coronary syndrome.

Convergence of G Protein–Coupled Receptor and S-Nitrosylation Signaling Determines the Outcome to Cardiac Ischemic Injury

Z. Maggie Huang1, Erhe Gao1, Fabio Vasconcelos Fonseca2,3, Hiroki Hayashi2,3, Xiying Shang1, Nicholas E. Hoffman1, J. Kurt Chuprun1, Xufan Tian4, Doug G. Tilley1, Muniswamy Madesh1, David J. Lefer5, Jonathan S. Stamler2,3,6, and Walter J. Koch1*
1 Center for Translational Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
2 Institute for Transformative Molecular Medicine, Case Western Reserve Univ SOM, Cleveland, OH
3 Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
4 Department of Biochemistry, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
5 Department  Surgery, Div of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
6 University Hospitals Harrington Discovery Institute, Cleveland, OH

Sci. Signal., 29 Oct 2013; 6(299), p. ra95         http:dx.doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2004225

Abstract

Heart failure caused by ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death in the developed world. Treatment is currently centered on regimens involving

  • G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) or nitric oxide (NO).

These regimens are thought to target distinct molecular pathways. We showed that

  • these pathways are interdependent and converge on the effector GRK2 (GPCR kinase 2) to regulate myocyte survival and function.

Ischemic injury coupled to

  • GPCR activation, including GPCR desensitization and myocyte loss,
  • required GRK2 activation,

and we found that cardioprotection mediated by inhibition of GRK2 depended on

  • endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and
  • was associated with S-nitrosylation of GRK2.

Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of NO bioactivity were absent in a knock-in mouse with a form of GRK2 that cannot be S-nitrosylated. Because GRK2 and eNOS inhibit each other,

the balance of the activities of these enzymes in the myocardium determined the outcome to ischemic injury. Our findings suggest new insights into

  • the mechanism of action of classic drugs used to treat heart failure and
  • new therapeutic approaches to ischemic heart disease.

* Corresponding author. E-mail: walter.koch@temple.edu
Citation: Z. M. Huang, E. Gao, F. V. Fonseca, H. Hayashi, X. Shang, N. E. Hoffman, J. K. Chuprun, X. Tian, D. G. Tilley, M. Madesh, D. J. Lefer, J. S. Stamler, W. J. Koch, Convergence of G Protein–Coupled Receptor and S-Nitrosylation Signaling Determines the Outcome t

 Editor’s Summary

Sci. Signal., 29 Oct 2013; 6(299), p. ra95 [DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2004225]

NO More Heart Damage

Damage caused by the lack of oxygen and nutrients that occurs during myocardial ischemia can result in heart failure. A therapeutic strategy that helps to limit the effects of heart failure is to

  • increase signaling through G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs)
  • by inhibiting GRK2 (GPCR kinase 2), a kinase that
    • desensitizes GPCRs.

Another therapeutic strategy provides S-nitrosothiols, such as nitric oxide, which can be

  • added to proteins in a posttranslational modification called S-nitrosylation.

Huang et al. found that the ability of S-nitrosothiols to enhance cardiomyocyte survival after ischemic injury required the S-nitrosylation of GRK2, a modification that inhibits this kinase. Mice bearing a form of GRK2 that could not be S-nitrosylated 

  • were more susceptible to cardiac damage after ischemia.

These results suggest that therapeutic strategies that promote the S-nitrosylation of GRK2 could be used to treat heart failure after myocardial ischemia.

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Inhibition of the Cardiomyocyte-Specific Kinase TNNI3K

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

This report from Science Translational Medicine is about the finding that a cardiomyocyte-specific kinase limits reperfusion injury in acute coronary syndrome, a phenomenon driven by oxidative stress, protecting cardiac cells from further damage.

Inhibition of the Cardiomyocyte-Specific Kinase TNNI3K Limits Oxidative Stress, Injury, and Adverse Remodeling in the Ischemic Heart

Ronald J. Vagnozzi1,2,  Gregory J. Gatto Jr.3, Lara S. Kallander3, Nicholas E. Hoffman2, Karthik Mallilankaraman2, Victoria L. T. Ballard3, Brian G. Lawhorn3, …, and Thomas Force2,6,*
+ Author Affiliations
1Program in Cell and Developmental Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
2Center for Translational Medicine, and 6Cardiology Division, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
3Heart Failure Discovery Performance Unit, Metabolic Pathways and Cardiovascular Therapeutic Area Unit, GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA
4Platform Technology and Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA
5Cardiovascular Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya 663-8131, Japan.

Sci Transl Med 16 Oct 2013; 
5(207), p. 207ra141     http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3006479
Percutaneous coronary intervention is first-line therapy for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) but can promote cardiomyocyte death and cardiac dysfunction via reperfusion injury, a phenomenon driven in large part by oxidative stress. Therapies to limit this progression have proven elusive, with no major classes of new agents since the development of anti-platelets/anti-thrombotics. We report that cardiac troponin I–interacting kinase (TNNI3K), a cardiomyocyte-specific kinase,
  1. promotes ischemia/reperfusion injury,
  2. oxidative stress,
  3. and myocyte death.
TNNI3K-mediated injury occurs
  • through increased mitochondrial superoxide production and
  • impaired mitochondrial function and is largely
  • dependent on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation.

We developed a series of small-molecule TNNI3K inhibitors that

  1. reduce mitochondrial-derived superoxide generation,
  2. p38 activation, and
  3. infarct size
when delivered at reperfusion to mimic clinical intervention.
TNNI3K inhibition also preserves cardiac function and limits chronic adverse remodeling.
Our findings demonstrate that TNNI3K modulates reperfusion injury in the ischemic heart and is a tractable therapeutic target for ACS.  Pharmacologic TNNI3K inhibition would be cardiac-selective,
  • preventing potential adverse effects of systemic kinase inhibition.
Citation: R. J. Vagnozzi, G. J. Gatto, L. S. Kallander, N. E. Hoffman, K. Mallilankaraman, V. L. T. Ballard, B. G. Lawhorn, P. Stoy, J. Philp, A. P. Graves, Y. Naito, J. J. Lepore, E. Gao, M. Madesh, T. Force, Inhibition of the Cardiomyocyte-Specific Kinase TNNI3K Limits Oxidative Stress, Injury, and Adverse Remodeling in the Ischemic Heart. Sci. Transl. Med. 5, 207ra141 (2013).

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Platelets in Translational Research – Part 2

Subtitle: Discovery of Potential Anti-platelet Targets

Reviewer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

 

This presentation is the the second of a series on Platelets in Translational Medicine: Part I:  Platelet structure, interactions between platelets and endothelium, and intracellular transcription

Part II: Discovery of Potential Anti-platelet Targets

Endothelium-dependent vasodilator effects of platelet activating factor on rat resistance vessels

1Katsuo Kamata, Tatsuya Mori, *Koki Shigenobu & Yutaka Kasuya Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Hoshi University, Tokyo and *Department of Pharmacology, Toho University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Funabashi, Chiba, Jp Br. J. Pharmacol. (1989), 98, 1360-1364 To elucidate the mechanisms of the powerful and long-lasting hypotension produced by platelet activating factor (PAF), its effects on perfusion pressure in the perfused mesenteric arterial bed of the rat were examined. 2 Infusion of PAF (10-11 to 3 x 10-10M; EC50 = 4.0 x 10′ m; 95%CL = 1.6 x 10-11 — 9.4 x 10-11 M) and acetylcholine (ACh) (10′ to 10-6m; EC50 = 3.0 ± 0.1 x 10-9m) produced marked concentration-dependent vasodilatations which were significantly inhibited by treatment with detergents (0.1% Triton X-100 for 30 s or 0.3% CHAPS for 90 s). 3 Pretreatment with CV-6209, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF- but not ACh-induced vasodila­tation. 4 Treatment with indomethacin (10-6m) had no effect on PAF- or ACh-induced vasodilatation. 5

 

These results demonstrate that extremely low concentrations of PAF produce vasodilatation of resistance vessels through the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). This may account for the strong hypotension produced by PAF in vivo. Platelet activating factor (PAF, acetyl glyceryl ether phosphorylcholine) has been shown to produce strong and long-lasting hypotension in various animal species, e.g. normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats, rabbits, guinea-pigs, and dogs (Tanaka et al., 1983). This action of PAF is thought to be endothelium-dependent (Kamitani et al., 1984; Kasuya et al., 1984a,b; Shigenobu et al., 1985; 1987). In a previous study (Shigenobu et al., 1987), we found that relatively low concentrations of PAF (10-9-10-7m) produced endothelium-dependent relaxation of the rat aorta in the presence of bovine serum albumin. This vasodilator action of PAF at low concentrations might be the cause of its hypo­tensive action in vivo. While the aorta will offer a resistance to flow, it is obvious that the contribution of vessels of smaller diameter to peripheral vascular resistance is much greater. In this regard, the mesen­teric circulation of the rat receives approximately one-fifth of the cardiac output (Nichols et al., 1985) and, thus, regulation of this bed may make a signifi­cant contribution towards systemic blood pressure and circulating blood volume.  Therefore, we examined the effect of PAF on the resistance vessels of the rat mesenteric vascular bed and found that extremely low concentrations (10 -11 to 3 x 10-16 m) can produce endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Figure 1 Effects of PAF on the perfusion pressure of the methoxamine (10-3N)-constricted mesenteric vascu­lar bed. (a) Upper panel: relaxation induced by PAF (3 x 10-10 M). Lower panel: effects of the PAF-antagonist, CV-6209 (3 x 10-914), on the relaxation induced by PAF (3 x 10“N). (b) Concentration-response curve for the relaxation produced by PAF (10-11 to 3 x 10-10N) in the methoxamine (10-51)-constricted mesenteric vascular bed. Each point is the mean and vertical bars represent the s.e.mean from 5 experiments. Figure 2 Effects of detergents on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation of the methoxamine (10-5M)-con­stricted mesenteric vascular bed. Concentration-response curves are shown for ACh-induced vasodilatation before (0) and after treatment with 0.3% CHAPS (❑) or 0.1% Triton X-100 (0). Each point is the mean and vertical bars represent the s.e.mean from 5 experiments. Infusions of extremely low concentrations of PAF (10-11 to 3.1 x 10-1° m) produced a marked and long-lasting vasodilatation which was significantly suppressed by treatment with detergents ar bed. Concentration-response curves are shown for ACh-induced vasodilatation before (0) and after treatment with 0.3% CHAPS (❑) or 0.1% Triton X-100 (0). Each point is the mean and vertical bars represent the s.e.mean from 5 experiments. Since Furchgott & Zawadzki (1980) demonstrated the obligatory role of endothelium in vascular relax­ation by ACh, many studies have suggested that endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) is re­leased from endothelial cells in response to a large number of agonists (Furchgott, 1984). In the present study with perfused resistance vessels, ACh produced vasodilatation in a concentration-dependent manner and the vasorelaxant responses were significantly suppressed by perfusion with detergents such as CHAPS or Triton X-100.  These data strongly suggest the pos­sible involvement of the endothelium in the relax­ation induced by PAF. CV-6209, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-induced but not ACh-induced vasodilatation in a concentration-dependent manner. Specific antago­nism by CV-6209 has already been obtained with respect to PAF-induced hypotension or platelet aggregation (Terashita et al., 1987). An accumulating body of evidence suggests that hypotension resulting from endotoxin challenge is due to the endogenous release of PAF from endothelial cells (Camussi et al., 1983), leukocytes (Demopoules et al., 1979), macro­phages (Mencia-Huerta & Benveniste, 1979; Camussi et al., 1983) and platelets (Chingard et al., 1979). Indeed, PAF antagonists can reverse estab­lished endotoxin-induced hypotension (Terashita et al., 1985; Handley et al., 1985a,b). From the above data and the results of the present study, one pos­sible explanation for endotoxin-induced hypotension may be that the release of PAF occurs, which then binds to its receptors located on the endothelial cells, stimulating production of EDRF. In conclusion, we demonstrated that extremely low concentrations of PAF produce long-lasting vasodilatation in a resistance vessel of the mesenteric vasculature. Moreover, we showed that this PAF-induced vasodilatation is mediated by a vasodilator substance released from endothelial cells (EDRF) which is not a prostaglandin. Since the PAF-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation observed in the present study was elicited at low concentrations and was long-lasting, it may be the main mechanism by which PAF induces hypotension in vivo.

Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

Andreas C Eriksson*1, Lena Jonasson2, Tomas L Lindahl3, Bo Hedbäck2 and Per A Whiss1 1Divisions of Drug Research/Pharmacology and 2Cardiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköpin, Sw, and 3Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital, Linköping, Sw Journal of Translational Medicine 2009, 7:42     http:/dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5876-7-42   http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/7/1/42

Abstract

Background: Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment.

Methods: With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2)-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis.

Results: The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49). In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN-induced activation measured by flow cytometry were lower for clopidogrel compared to ASA. Furthermore, adhesion to collagen was lower for ASA and clopidogrel combined compared with either drug alone. Conclusion: The indirect pharmacodynamic measures of the effects of ASA and clopidogrel might be used together with ADP-induced activation and serum TXB2 for evaluation of anti-platelet treatment. This should be further evaluated in future clinical studies where screening opportunities with the adhesion assay will be optimised towards increased sensitivity to anti-platelet treatment. The benefits of ASA have been clearly demonstrated by the Anti-platelet Trialists’ Collaboration. They found that ASA therapy reduces the risk by 25% of myocardial infarction, stroke or vascular death in “high-risk” patients. When using the same outcomes as the Anti-platelet Trialists’ Collaboration on a comparable set of “high-risk” patients, the CAPRIE-study showed a slight benefit of clopidogrel over ASA. Furthermore, the combination of clopidogrel and ASA has been shown to be more effective than ASA alone for preventing vascu­lar events in patients with unstable angina and myo­cardial infarction as well as in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Despite the obvious benefits from anti-platelet therapy in coro­nary disease, low response to clopidogrel has been described by several investigators. A lot of attention has also been drawn towards low response to ASA, often called “ASA resistance”. The concept of ASA resistance is complicated for several reasons. First of all, different stud­ies have defined ASA resistance in different ways. In its broadest sense, ASA resistance can be defined either as the inability of ASA to inhibit platelets in one or more platelet function tests (laboratory resistance) or as the inability of ASA to prevent recurrent thrombosis (i.e. treatment fail­ure, here denoted clinical resistance). The lack of a general definition of ASA resistance results in difficulties when trying to measure the prevalence of this phenome­non. Estimates of laboratory resistance range from approximately 5 to 60% depending on the assay used, the patients studied and the way of defining ASA resistance. Likewise, lack of a standardized definition of low response to clopidogrel makes it difficult to estimate the prevalence of this phenomenon as well. The principles of existing platelet assays, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, have been described elsewhere. In short, assays potentially useful for monitoring treatment effects include those commonly used in research such as platelet aggregometry and flow cytometry as well as immunoassays for measuring metabolites of thromboxane A2 (TXA2). Also, the PFA-100TM, MultiplateTM and the VerifyNowTM are examples of instruments commercially developed for evaluation of anti-platelet therapy. How­ever, no studies have investigated the usefulness of alter­ing treatment based on laboratory findings of ASA resistance. Regarding clopidogrel, there are recent studies showing that adjustment of clopidogrel loading doses according to vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation index measured utilising flow cytometry decrease major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with clopidogrel resistance. Static adhesion is an aspect of platelet function that has not been investigated in earlier studies of the effects of platelet inhibiting drugs. Consequently, static platelet adhesion is not measured by any of the current candidate assays for clinical evaluation of platelet function. The static platelet adhesion assay offers an opportunity for simultaneous measurements of the combined effects of several different platelet activators on platelet function. In this study, platelet adhesion to albumin, collagen and fibrinogen was investigated in the presence of soluble platelet activators including adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), adrenaline, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and ris-tocetin. Collagen, fibrinogen, ADP and adrenaline are physiological agents that are well-known for their interac­tions with platelets. Ristocetin is a compound derived from bacteria that facilitates the interaction between von Willebrand factor (vWf) and glycoprotein (GP)-Ib-IX-V on platelets, which otherwise occurs only at flow condi­tions. The static nature of the assay therefore prompted us to include ristocetin in order to get a rough estimate on GPIb-IX-V dependent events. LPA is a phospholipid that is produced and released by activated platelets and that also can be generated through mild oxi­dation of LDL. It was included in the present study since it is present in atherosclerotic vessels and suggested to be important for platelet activation after plaque rup­ture. Finally, albumin was included as a surface since the platelet activating effect of LPA can be detected when measuring adhesion to such a surface. Thus, by the use of different platelet activators, several measures of platelet adhesion were obtained simultaneously This means that the possibilities to screen for conditions potentially important for detecting effects of platelet-inhibiting drugs far exceeds the screening abilities of other platelet function tests. Consequently, the static platelet adhesion assay is very well suited for development into a clinically useful device for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment. Also, it has earlier been proposed that investi­gating the combined effects of two activators on platelet activity might be necessary in order to detect effects of ASA and other antiplatelet agents [26]. This is a criterion that can easily be met by the static platelet adhesion assay. Through the screening procedure we found different con­ditions where the static adhesion was influenced by the drug given.

The inclusion of patients and controls. Patients and controls were included consecutively. Blood samples from controls were drawn at two different occasions separated by 2–5.5 months. All patients entering the study received ASA combined with clopidogrel and blood sampling was performed 1.5–6.5 months after initiating the treatment. This was followed by a randomised cross-over enabling all patients to receive monotherapy with both ASA and clopidogrel. The patients received monotherapy for at least 3 weeks and for a maximum of 4.5 months before performing blood sampling. A total of 33 patients and 30 controls entered the study. In the end, 29 patients and 29 controls completed the study. Blood was drawn from patients at three different occa­sions (Figure 1). The first sample was drawn after all patients had received combined treatment with ASA (75 mg/day) and clopidogrel (75 mg/day) for 1.5–6.5 months after the index event. The study then used a randomised cross-over design meaning that half of the patients received ASA as monotherapy while half received only clopidogrel (75 mg/day for both monotherapies). The monotherapy was then switched for every patient so that all patients in total received all three therapies. Samples for evaluation of the monotherapies were drawn after therapy for at least 3 weeks and at the most for 4.5 months. Most of the differences in treatment length can be ascribed to the fact that the national recommendations for treatment in this patient group were changed during the course of the study. The allocation to monotherapy was blinded for the laboratory personnel. In general, the use of three different treatments for intra-individual com­parisons in a cross-over design is different from previous studies on ASA and clopidogrel, which have mainly been concerned with only two treatment alternatives.

Intra-individual variation in healthy controls

Measurements of platelet adhesion and serum TXB2-levels were performed on healthy controls on two separate occa­sions (2–5.5 months interval) in order to investigate the presence of intraindividual variation in platelet reactivity and clotting-induced TXB2-production. The standardised Z-scores from the simplified factors were used for analysis by Repeated Measures ANOVA of the data from the healthy controls. We found significantly decreased plate­let adhesion at the second compared to the first visit for ADP-induced adhesion (Factor 1, p = 0.012) and for adhe­sion to fibrinogen (Factor 5, p = 0.012). This intra-indi-vidual variability over time makes it difficult to draw any conclusions regarding effects of anti-platelet treatment. We therefore further analysed the individual variables constituting Factors 1 and 5 with Repeated Measures ANOVA in order to distinguish the variables that varied significantly over time. Variables being significantly dif­ferent between visit 1 and visit 2 were then excluded and a new Repeated Measures ANOVA was performed on the new factors. After this modification, none of the factors corresponding to adhesion showed variation over time and these factors were then used for analysis on patients. Serum levels of TXB2, which constituted a separate factor, varied significantly in healthy controls at two separate occasions (Figure 2). flow chart of patients and controls_Image_1 Effect of platelet inhibiting treatment on serum TXB2-levels (Factor 13). Serum TXB2-levels (Factor 13) for patients (n = 29) and healthy controls (n = 29) are presented as mean + SEM. ASA alone or in combination with clopidogrel was signif­icantly different from clopidogrel alone and compared to the mean of the controls (p < 0.001). Also, the difference between controls at visit 1 and visit 2 was significant. ***p < 0.001, ns = not significant. When investigating possible effects of platelet-inhibiting treatment with Repeated Measures ANOVA, significant effects were seen for four of the factors corresponding to platelet adhesion. The factors that were not able to detect significant treatment effects were adrenaline-induced adhesion (Factor 3), ristocetin-induced adhesion (Factor 4) and adhesion to fibrinogen (Factor 5). Regarding adhe­sion factors detecting treatment effects, ADP-induced adhesion (Factor 1, Figure 3A inset) was significantly decreased by clopidogrel alone or by clopidogrel plus ASA compared with ASA alone. Surprisingly, platelet adhesion induced by ADP was lower for the monotherapy with clopidogrel compared to dual therapy. ADP-induced adhesion to albumin is shown as a representative example of the variables of Factor 1 (Figure 3A). Ristocetin-induced adhesion to albumin (Factor 6, Figure 3B inset) was signif­icantly decreased by clopidogrel alone compared with ASA alone. This difference was also seen for ristocetin combined with LPA, which is shown as an example of a variable belonging to Factor 6 (Figure 3B). In Factor 7 (Figure 3C inset), corresponding to LPA-induced adhe­sion to albumin, we found clopidogrel to decrease adhe­sion compared with ASA and compared with ASA plus clopidogrel. These differences were reflected by the com­bined activation through LPA and adrenaline, which was a variable included in Factor 7 (Figure 3C). Finally, adhe­sion to collagen (Factor 8, Figure 3D) was significantly decreased by dual therapy compared with ASA alone or clopidogrel alone. As can be seen from the above descrip­tion, monotherapy with clopidogrel resulted in signifi­cantly decreased adhesion compared to clopidogrel combined with ASA for Factors 1 and 7. This was also observed for the variable shown as a representative exam­ple of Factor 6 (Figure 3B). The two factors corresponding to flow cytometric measurements (Factors 14 and 15, Fig­ure 4) both showed that ASA-treated platelets were more active than platelets treated with clopidogrel alone or clopidogrel plus ASA. Furthermore, serum TXB2-levels (Figure 2) was significantly decreased by ASA alone or by ASA plus clopidogrel compared with clopidogrel alone. Regarding the other measurements not directly measuring platelet function, significant differences were found for Factor 10 including HDL and for platelet count (Factor 12) but neither for the factor corresponding to inflamma­tion (Factor 9) nor for Factor 11 including LDL. Factor 10 including HDL was found to be elevated by both ASA and clopidogrel monotherapies compared with dual therapy (p = 0.003 for ASA, p = 0.019 for clopidogrel, data not shown). Platelet count were found to be increased after dual therapy compared with both monotherapies (p < 0.001, data not shown). flow chart of patients and controls_Image_2 The influence of ASA and clopidogrel on platelet adhesion. The main figures are representative examples of the varia­bles constituting the respective factors. The insets show the Z-scores for each factor. Also shown in the insets are the compar­isons between the control means of visit 1 and 2 and treatment with ASA (A), clopidogrel (C) and the combination of ASA and clopidogrel (A+C). The respective figures show the effect of platelet inhibiting treatment on ADP-induced adhesion (Factor 1, Fig A), ristocetin-induced adhesion to albumin (Factor 6, Fig B), LPA-induced adhesion to albumin (Factor 7, Fig C) and adhe­sion to collagen (Factor 8, Fig D) for patients (n = 29) and healthy controls (n = 29). All values are presented as mean + SEM. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001, ns = not significant. flow chart of patients and controls_Image_4 The influence of ASA and clopidogrel on platelet activity measured by flow cytometry. The effects of platelet inhibiting treatment on platelet activation detected by flow cytometry induced by ADP (Factor 14, Fig A) and SFLLRN (Factor 15, Fig B) on patients (n = 29). The main figures are representative examples of the variables constituting the respective fac­tors. The insets show the Z-scores for each factor. All values are presented as mean + SEM. ***p < 0.001, ns = not significant. Platelets from patients (n = 29) were activated in vitro with adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP; 0.1 and 0.6 μmol/L) or SFLLRN (5.3 μmol/L) followed by flow cytometric measurements of fibrinogen-binding or expression of P-selectin. Presented results are the mean-% of fibrinogen-binding and P-selectin expression ± SEM. Reference values (obtained earlier during routine analysis at the accredited Dept. of Clinical Chemistry at the University hospital in Linköping) are shown as mean with reference interval within parenthesis. Stars indicate significant differences for patients compared to reference values. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001, ns = not significant.  (Table not shown)

Discussion

With the aim of finding variables sensitive to clopidogrel and ASA-treatment, this study used a screening approach and measured several different variables simultaneously. To reduce the complexity of the material we performed PCA in order to find correlating variables that measured the same property. In this way the 54 measurements of platelet adhesion were reduced to 8 factors. Visual inspec­tion revealed that each factor represented a separate entity of platelet adhesion and the factors could therefore be renamed according to the aspect they measured. We thus conclude that future studies must not involve all 54 adhe­sion variables, but instead, one variable from each factor should be enough to cover 8 different aspects of platelet adhesion. In addition to the adhesion data, the remaining 15 variables also formed distinct factors that were possible to rename according to measured property. It is notable that serum TXB2 formed a distinct group not correlated to any of the other measurements.

It is important that laboratory assays used for clinical pur­poses are reproducible and that they measure parameters that are not confounded by other variables. Some of the measurements performed in this study (clinical chemistry variables and platelet function measured by flow cytome-try) are used for clinical analysis at accredited laboratories at the University hospital in Linköping. However, the reproducibility of the platelet adhesion assay was mostly unknown before this study. Our initial results suggested that the factors corresponding to ADP-induced adhesion and adhesion to fibrinogen were not reproduci­ble. We therefore excluded the most varied variables con­stituting these factors, which resulted in no intra-individual effects for healthy controls in the platelet adhe­sion assay. From this we conclude that many, but not all, measures of platelet adhesion are reproducible. Moreover, the static condition might limit the possibilities for trans­lating the results from the adhesion assay into in vivo platelet adhesion occurring during flow conditions. How­ever, platelet adhesion to collagen and fibrinogen is dependent on α2131– and αIIb133-receptors respectively in the current assay. This suggests that the static platelet adhesion assay can measure important aspects of platelet function despite its simplicity. Furthermore, vWf depend­ent adhesion is not directly covered in the present assay although ristocetin-induced adhesion appears to be dependent on GPIb-IX-V and vWf . From this discussion it is evident that the adhesion assay as well as flow cytometry can measure effects of clopidog-rel when using ADP as activating stimuli. It is also evident that serum-TXB2 levels measure the effects of ASA. How­ever, these measures focus on the primary interaction between the drugs and the platelets, which could be prob­lematic when trying to evaluate the complex in vivo treat­ment effect. It has previously been found that only 12 of 682 ASA-treated patients (≈ 2%) had residual TXB2 serum levels higher than 2 standard deviations from the popula­tion mean. Measurements of the effect of arachidonic acid on platelet aggregometry have also led to the conclu­sion that ASA resistance is a very rare phenomenon. Thus, our study supports these previous findings that assays measuring the pharmacodynamic activity of ASA (to inhibit the COX-enzyme) seldom recognizes patients as ASA-resistant. This suggests that the cause of ASA-resistance is not due to an inability of ASA to act as a COX-inhibitor.

We suggest that direct measurements of ADP and TXA2-effects (in our case ADP-induced activation measured by adhesion or flow cytometry and serum TXB2-levels) must be combined with measures that are only partly dependent on ADP and TXA2 respectively. For instance, an adhesion variable partly dependent on TXA2 might be able to detect ASA resistance caused by increased signalling through other activating pathways. Such a scenario would be character­ized by serum TXB2 values showing normal COX-inhibi­tion while platelet adhesion is increased. This study employed a screening procedure in order to find such indirect measures of the effects of ASA and clopidogrel. Our results show inhibiting effects of clopidogrel com­pared to ASA on adhesion to albumin in the presence of LPA or ristocetin. This was also observed for our flow cytometric measurements with SFLLRN as activator, which confirms that SFLLRN is able to induce release of granule contents in platelets. SFLLRN- and ADP-induced platelet activation, as measured by flow cytometry, was moderately correlated to each other and adhesion induced by LPA as well as ristocetin showed weak correla­tions with ADP-induced adhesion. These results further confirm that these measures of platelet activity are partly dependent on ADP. We have earlier shown that adhesion to albumin induced by simultaneous stimulation by LPA and adrenaline (a variable belonging to the LPA-factor in the present study) can be inhibited by inhibition of ADP-signalling in vitro. This strengthens our conclusion that the effect on LPA-induced adhesion observed for clopidogrel is caused by inhibition of ADP-signalling. Also, the presence of LPA in atherosclerotic plaques and its possible role in thrombus formation after plaque rup­ture makes it especially interesting for the in vivo set­ting of myocardial infarction. Assays of static platelet adhesion that have been used in previous studies aimed at investigating treatment effects of platelet inhibiting drugs. Importantly, this study shows that the static platelet adhesion assay is reproducible over time. We also showed that the static platelet adhesion assay as well as flow cytometry detected the ability of clopidogrel to inhibit platelet activation induced by ADP. Our results further suggest that other measures of platelet adhesion and platelet activation measured by flow cytometry are indirectly dependent on secreted ADP or TXA2. One such measure is adhesion to a collagen surface, which should be more thoroughly investigated for its ability to detect effects of clopidogrel and ASA. Likewise, due to its connection to atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, the LPA-induced effect should be further evaluated for its ability to detect effects of clopidogrel. In conclusion, the screening procedure undertaken in this study has revealed suggestions on which measures of platelet activity to com­bine in order to evaluate platelet function.

Effect of protein kinase C and phospholipase A2 inhibitors on the impaired ability of human platelets to cause vasodilation

*,1Helgi J. Oskarsson, 1Timothy G. Hofmeyer, 1Lawrence Coppey & 1Mark A. Yorek 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa and VA Medical Center, Iowa City, IA British Journal of Pharmacology (1999) 127, 903-908   http://www.stockton-press.co.uk/bjp

1   The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism of impaired platelet-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation in diabetes. Exposure of human platelets to high glucose in vivo or in vitro impairs their ability to cause endothelium-dependent vasodilation. While previous data suggest that the mechanism for this involves increased activity of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway, the signal transduction pathway mediating this effect is unknown. 2 Platelets from diabetic patients as well as normal platelets and normal platelets exposed to high glucose concentrations were used to determine the role of the polyol pathway, diacylglycerol (DAG) production, protein kinase C (PKC) activity and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity on vasodilation in rabbit carotid arteries. 3 We found that two aldose-reductase inhibitors, tolrestat and sorbinil, caused only a modest improvement in the impairment of vasodilation by glucose exposed platelets. However, sorbitol and fructose could not be detected in the platelets, at either normal or hyperglycaemic conditions. We found that incubation in 17 mM glucose caused a significant increase in DAG levels in platelets. Furthermore, the DAG analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) caused significant impairment of platelet-mediated vasodilation. The PKC inhibitors calphostin C and H7 as well as inhibitors of PLA2 activity normalized the ability of platelets from diabetic patients to cause vasodilation and prevented glucose-induced impairment of platelet-mediated vasodilation in vitro. 4 These results suggest that the impairment of platelet-mediated vasodilation caused by high glucose concentrations is mediated by increased DAG levels and stimulation of PKC and PLA2 activity. Keywords: Glucose; signal-transduction; platelet; vasodilation; diabetes Abbreviations: ADP, adenosine diphosphate; DAG, diacyglycerol; DEDA, dimethyleicosadienoic acid; EDNO, endothelium-derived nitric oxide; OAG, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol; PKC, protein kinase C; PLA2, phospholipase A2; PMA, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

Introduction

Activated normal platelets produce vasodilation via release of platelet-derived adenosine diphosphate (ADP), which in turn stimulates the release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) . EDNO causes vascular smooth muscle relaxation and inhibits platelet aggregation and excessive thrombus formation. Recent reports suggest that platelets from patients with diabetes mellitus lack the ability to produce EDNO-dependent vasodilation. This platelet defect can be reproduced in vitro by exposure of normal human platelets to high glucose concentrations, in a time and concentration dependent manner. This glucose-induced platelet defect appears to involve activation of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway, including thromboxane synthase. However, it remains unknown how exposure of platelets to high concentrations of glucose in vivo or in vitro, leads to increased activity of these enzymes. Previous studies indicate that high glucose concentrations mediate some of their adverse biologic effects via the polyol pathway high glucose increases intracellular diacylglycer-ol (DAG) levels, upregulates protein kinase C (PKC) activity and can lead to increased arachidonic acid release via PKC-mediated increase in phospholipase A2 activity, which in turn increases activity of cyclo-oxygenase. In this study we explore the possible role of these metabolic pathways in mediating the inability of diabetic and hyperglycaemia-induced platelets to produce vasodilation. In this study we show that in vitro incubation of normal human platelets in high glucose causes a significant increase in platelet DAG levels, which is evident after 30 min.

The role of protein kinase-C (PKC)

DAG and OAG are known activators of PKC. Data in Figure 2 show that normal human platelets incubated with the DAG analogue, (OAG), in order to mimic the effect of increased intracellular DAG, lost their ability to cause vasodilation.  Next we tested whether enhanced PKC activity plays a role in the signalling pathway leading to impaired ability of diabetic platelets to cause vasodilation. We found that platelets from patients with diabetes mellitus that were treated with the PKC-inhibitor calphostin-C produced normal vasodilation, while untreated platelets from the same patients lacked the ability to cause vasorelaxation (Figure 3A). Similarly, while normal platelets incubated in high glucose lost their ability to cause vasorelaxation, co-incubation with calphostin-C prevented the glucose-mediated impairment of platelet-mediated vasodila-tion (Figure 3B). Calphostin-C did not affect the ability of normal platelets to mediate vasodilation: 35±3 vs 37±4% increase in vessel diameter, with or without the inhibitor (n=5), respectively. Similar results were obtained with the PKC-inhibitor H7 (50 ILM) (results not shown).  In addition, normal platelets  `primed’ by a 20 min incubation in Tyrode’s buffer containing PMA (80 nM) completely lost their ability to produce vasorelaxation (Figure 4). Figure 3 (A) Platelets were isolated from patients with diabetes mellitus (n=6). Platelets were incubated in Tyrode’s buffer for 2 h with or without calphostin-C (50 nM). Subsequently the platelets were thrombin (0.1 U ml1) activated and perfused through a phenylephrine (10 jIM) preconstricted normal rabbit carotid artery, and the change in vessel diameter measured. *P<0.01. (B) Platelets isolated from healthy donors (n=6) were incubated in Tyrode’s buffer containing either 6.6 mM (118 mg dl1) [NL Plts] or 17 mM (300 mg dl1) [Glucose Plts] glucose for 4 h. For the last 2 h the PKC-inhibitor calphostin-C (50 nM) was added to some of the high glucose treated platelets. Subsequently the three groups of platelets were thrombin (0.1 U ml1) activated and perfused through a phenylephrine (10 jIM) preconstricted normal rabbit carotid artery, and the change in vessel diameter measured. *P<0.01 vs NL-Plts and Gluc-Plts+Calp-C. (noy shown) Figure 4 Platelets from healthy donors (n=8) were isolated separated into two groups and treated with or without phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (80 nM) for 20 min. After a washout period, treated and untreated platelets were thrombin (0.1 U ml1) activated and perfused through a phenylephrine (10 jIM) precon-stricted rabbit carotid artery, and the change in vessel diameter measured. *P<0.01 for PMA-Plts vs NL-Plts. (not shown)

Conclusions

In summary, the results of this study along with recently published data (Oskarsson & Hofmeyer 1997; Oskarsson et al., 1997) suggest that high glucose levels cause an increase in platelet DAG that upregulates the activity of PKC, which in turn increases the activity of phospholipase A2 that causes release of arachidonic acid which leads to increased activity of cyclo-oxygenase and thromboxane synthase in platelets (Oskarsson et al., 1997). From a clinical perspective this pathway is of considerable interest since it lends itself to therapeutic interventions with inhibitors both at the level of cyclo-oxygenase and the thromboxane-synthase.

References

OSKARSSON, H.J. & HOFMEYER, T.G. (1996). Platelet-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired by platelets from patients with diabetes mellitus. J. Am. Coll. Cardiol., 27, 1464 – 1470. OSKARSSON, H.J. & HOFMEYER, T.G. (1997). Diabetic human platelets release a substance which inhibits platelet-mediated vasodilation. Am. J. Phys., 273, H371 – H379. OSKARSSON, H.J., HOFMEYER, T.G. & KNAPP, H.R. (1997). Malondialdehyde inhibits platelet-mediated vasodilation by interfering with platelet-derived ADP. JACC, 29 (Suppl A): 304A.

G-Protein−Coupled Receptors as Signaling Targets for Antiplatele t Therapy

Susan S. Smyth, Donna S. Woulfe, Jeffrey I. Weitz, Christian Gachet, Pamela B. Conley, et al. Participants in the 2008 Platelet Colloquium Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2009;29:449-457.     http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.108.176388    Online ISSN: 1524-4636    http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/29/4/449

Abstract

Platelet G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiate and reinforce platelet activation and thrombus formation. The clinical utility of antagonists of the P2Y12 receptor for ADP suggests that other GPCRs and their intracellular signaling pathways may represent viable targets for novel antiplatelet agents. For example, thrombin stimulation of platelets is mediated by 2 protease-activated receptors (PARs), PAR-1 and PAR-4. Signaling downstream of PAR-1 or PAR-4 activates phospholipase C and protein kinase C and causes autoamplification by production of thromboxane A2, release of ADP, and generation of more thrombin. In addition to ADP receptors, thrombin and thromboxane A2 receptors and their downstream effectors—including phosphoinositol-3 kinase, Rap1b, talin, and kindlin—are promising targets for new antiplatelet agents. The mechanistic rationale and available clinical data for drugs targeting disruption of these signaling pathways are discussed. The identification and development of new agents directed against specific platelet signaling pathways may offer an advantage in preventing thrombotic events while minimizing bleeding risk. (Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2009;29:449-457.) Key Words: platelets . signaling . G proteins . receptors . thrombosis

Introduction

Since the first observations of agonist-induced platelet aggregation in 1962, remarkable progress has been made in identifying cell surface receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate platelet function. These discoveries have translated into estab­lished, new, and emerging therapeutics to treat and prevent acute ischemic events by targeting platelet signal transduction.  Indeed, antiplatelet therapy is a mainstay of initial management of patients with ACS and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Evidence-based refinements in anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies have played an important role in the progressive decline in the death rate from coronary disease observed from 1994 to 2004. Despite these therapeutic advances, however, ACS patients receiving “optimal” antithrombotic therapy still suf­fer cardiovascular events. Platelet Signaling Pathways

Vascular injury—whether caused by spontaneous rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, plaque erosion, or PCI-related or other trauma—exposes adhesive proteins, tissue factor, and lipids promoting platelet tethering, adhesion, and activation. Once bound and activated, platelets release soluble mediators such as ADP, thromboxane A2, and serotonin and facilitate throm­bin generation. These mediators, in turn, stimulate GPCRs on the platelet surface that are critical to initiation of various intracellular signaling pathways, including activa­tion of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC), and phosphoinositide (PI)-3 kinase. Both calcium and PKC con­tribute to activation of the small G protein,  Recently, members of the kindlin family of focal adhesion proteins have been identified as integrin activators, perhaps functioning to facilitate talin–integrin interactions. Platelet signaling pathways Figure. Role of G protein–coupled receptors in the thrombotic process. In humans, protease-activated receptors (PAR)-1 and PAR-4 are coupled to intracellular signaling pathways through molecular switches from the Gq, G12, and Gi protein families. When thrombin (scissors) cleaves the amino-terminal of PAR-l and PAR-4, several signaling pathways are activated, one result of which is ADP secretion. By binding to its receptor, P2Y12, ADP activates additional Gi-mediated pathways. In the absence of wounding, platelet activation is counteracted by signaling from PG I2 (PGI2). Adapted from references 26–28 with permission. Ca2 indicates calcium; CalDAG-GEF1, calcium and diacylglcerol-regulated guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 1; GP, glycoprotein; IP, prostacyclin; PKC, pro­tein kinase C; PLC, phospholipase C; RIAM, Rap1-GTP–interacting adapter molecule.

Future Directions: P2Y1 and P2X Inhibition

Given the clinical success of the P2Y12 antagonists, it is worthwhile to investigate other purinergic signaling pathways in platelets. Although platelets have 2 P2Y receptors acting synergistically through different signaling pathways, the overall platelet response to ADP is relatively modest. For example, ADP alone elicits only reversible responses and does not promote platelet secretion. The low number of ADP receptors on the platelet surface also may limit signal­ing.

Thrombin Signaling in Platelets

Thrombin, the most potent platelet agonist, has diverse effects on various vascular cells. For example, thrombin promotes chemotaxis, adhesion, and inflammation through its effects on neutrophils and monocytes. Thrombin also influ­ences vascular permeability through its effects on endothelial cells and triggers smooth muscle vasoconstriction and mitogenesis.54 Thrombin interacts with 2 protease-activated receptors (PARs) on the surface of human platelets—PAR-1 and PAR-4. Signaling through the PARs is triggered by thrombin-mediated cleavage of the extracellular domain of the receptor and exposure of a “tethered ligand” at the new end of the receptor (Figure 1). Signaling through either PAR can activate PLC and PKC and cause autoamplification through the production of thromboxane A2, the release of ADP, and generation of more thrombin on the platelet surface.

PAR-1 Antagonists as Antithrombotic Therapy

The expression profiles of PARs on platelets differ between humans and nonprimates. Mouse platelets lack PAR-1 and largely signal through PAR-4 in response to thrombin, with PAR-3 serving a cofactor function. Platelets from cynomol-gus monkeys contain primarily PAR-1 and PAR-4, and a peptide-mimetic PAR-1 antagonist extends the time to throm­bosis after carotid artery injury. The nonpeptide antagonist SCH 530348 (described below) inhibits thrombin- and PAR-1 agonist peptide (TRAP)-induced platelet aggregation (inhibitory concentrations of 47 nmol/L and 25 nmol/L, respectively), but it has no effect on ADP, collagen, U46619, or PAR-4 agonist peptide stimulation of platelets. SCH 530348 has excellent bioavailability in rodents and monkeys (82%; 1 mg/kg) and completely inhibits ex vivo platelet aggregation in response to TRAP within 1 hour of oral administration in monkeys with no effect on prothrombin or activated partial thromboplastin times. Of the PAR-1 antagonists, SCH 530348 and E5555 are the compounds farthest along in development and clinical testing. SCH 530348 is an oral reversible PAR-1 antagonist de­rived from himbacine, a compound found in the bark of the Australian magnolia tree. In clinical trials, 68% of patients showed ~80% inhibition of platelet aggregation in response to thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 15 mol/L) 60 minutes after receiving a 40-mg loading dose of SCH 530348. By 120 minutes, the proportion had risen to 96%. In a Phase 2 trial of SCH 530348, 1031 patients scheduled for angiography and possible stenting were randomized to re­ceive SCH 530348 or placebo plus aspirin, clopidogrel, and antithrombin therapy (heparin or bivalirudin). Major and minor bleeding did not differ substantially between the placebo and individual or combined SCH 530348 groups.

Future Directions: PAR-4 Inhibition

Activation and signaling of PAR-1 and PAR-4 provoke a biphasic “spike and prolonged” response, with PAR-1 acti­vated at thrombin concentrations 50% lower than those required to activate PAR-4. A 4-amino acid segment, YEPF, on the extracellular domain of PAR-1 appears to account for the receptor’s high-affinity interactions with thrombin. The YEPF sequence has homology to the COOH-terminal of hirudin and its synthetic GEPF analog, bivaliru-din, which can interact with exosite-1 on thrombin. Thus, thrombin may interact in tandem with PAR-1 and PAR-4, with the initial interactions involving exosite-1 and PAR-1, and subsequent docking at PAR-4 via the thrombin active site.56 PAR-1 and PAR-4 may form a stable heterodimer that enables thrombin to act as a bivalent functional agonist, rendering the PAR-1–PAR-4 heterodimer complex a unique target for novel antithrombotic therapies. Pepducins, or cell-permeable peptides derived from the third intracellular loop of either PAR-1 or PAR-4, disrupt signaling between the receptors and G proteins and inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. In mice, a PAR-4 pepducin has been shown to prolong bleeding times and attenuate platelet activation. Combining bivalirudin with a PAR-4 pepducin (P4pal-i1) inhibited aggregation of human platelets from 15 healthy volunteers, even in response to high concentrations of thrombin. In addition, although bivaliru-din and P4pal-i1 each delayed the time to carotid artery occlusion after ferric chloride-induced injury in guinea pigs, their combination prolonged the time to occlusion more than did bivalirudin alone. Additional blockade of the PAR-4 receptor may confer a benefit beyond that achieved by inhibition of thrombin activity.

Targeting Thromboxane Signaling

Thromboxane A2 acts on the thromboxane A2/prostaglandin (PG) H2 (TP) receptor, causing PLC signaling and platelet activation. Several drugs have been tested and developed that prevent thromboxane synthesis—most notably, aspirin. Be­yond the documented success of aspirin, however, results have been uniformly disappointing with a wide variety of thromboxane synthase inhibitors.  Likewise, a multitude of TP receptor antagonists have been developed, but few have progressed beyond Phase 2 trials because of safety concerns. More recently, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist terutroban (S18886) showed rapid, potent inhibition of platelet aggregation in a porcine model of in-stent thrombosis that was comparable to the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel but with a more favorable bleeding profile. Ramatroban, another TP inhibitor approved in Japan for treatment of allergic rhinitis, has shown antiaggre-gatory effects in vitro comparable to those of aspirin and cilostazol.

Novel Downstream Signaling Targets

Signaling pathways stimulated by GPCR activation are es­sential for thrombus formation and may represent potential targets for drug development. One pathway involved in platelet activation is signaling through lipid kinases. PI-3 kinases transduce signals by generating lipid second­ary messengers, which then recruit signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. A principal target for PI-3K signaling is the protein kinase Akt (Figure 1). Platelets contain both the Akt1 and Akt2 isoforms.28 In mice, both Akt1 and Akt2 are required for thrombus formation. Mice lacking Akt2 have aggregation defects in response to low concentrations of thrombin or thromboxane A2 and corresponding defects in dense and a-granule secretion. The Akt isoforms have multiple substrates in platelets. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3(3 is phosphorylated by Akt in platelets and sup­presses platelet function and thrombosis in mice. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3(3 inhibits the kinase activity of the enzyme, and with it, its suppression of platelet function. Akt activation also stimulates nitric oxide produc­tion in platelets, which results in protein kinase G–dependent degranulation. Finally, Akt has been implicated in activa­tion of cAMP-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE3A), which plays a role in reducing platelet cAMP levels after thrombin stimulation.67 Each of these Akt-mediated events is expected to contribute to platelet activation. Rap1 members of the Ras family of small G proteins have been implicated in GPCR signaling and integrin activation. Rap1b, the most abundant Ras GTPase in platelets, is activated rapidly after GPCR stimulation and plays a key role in the activation of integrin aIIb(3) Stimulation of Gq-linked receptors, such as PAR-4 or PAR-1, activates PLC and, with consequent increases in intracellular calcium, PKC. These signals in turn activate calcium and diacylglcerol-regulated guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 1 (CalDAG-GEF1), which has been implicated in activation of Rap1 in plate-lets. Experiments in CalDAG-GEF1-deficient platelets indicate that PKC- and CalDAG-GEF1–dependent events represent independent synergistic pathways leading to Rap1-mediated integrin aIIb(33 activation. Consistent with this concept, ADP can stimulate Rap1b activation in a P2Y12– and PI-3K-dependent, but calcium-independent, manner. A final common step in integrin activation involves bind­ing of the cytoskeletal protein talin to the integrin-(33-subunit cytoplasmic tail. Rap1 appears to be required to form an activation complex with talin and the Rap effector RIAM, which redistributes to the plasma membrane and unmasks the talin binding site, resulting in integrin activation. Mice that lack Rap1b or platelet talin have a bleeding disorder with impaired platelet aggregation because of the lack of integrin aIIb( (3activation. In contrast, mice with a integrin-(33 subunit mutation that prevents talin binding have impaired agonist-induced platelet aggregation and are protected from throm­bosis, but do not display pathological bleeding, suggest­ing that this interaction may be an attractive therapeutic target. Recently, members of the kindlin family of focal adhesion proteins, kindlin-2 and kindlin-3, have been identi­fied as coactivators of integrins, required for talin activation of integrins. Kindlin-2 binds and synergistically en­hances talin activation of aIIb. Of note, deficiency in kindlin-3, the predominant kindlin family member found in hematopoietic cells, results in severe bleeding and protection from thrombosis in mice.

Conclusions

Antiplatelet therapy targeting thromboxane production, ADP effects, and fibrinogen binding to integrin aIIb(33 have proven benefit in preventing or treating acute arterial thrombosis. New agents that provide greater inhibition of ADP signaling and agents that impede thrombin’s actions on platelets are currently in clinical trials. Emerging strategies to inhibit platelet function include blocking alternative platelet GPCRs and their intracellular signaling pathways. The challenge remains to determine how to best combine the various current and pending antiplatelet therapies to maximize benefit and minimize harm. It is well documented that aspirin therapy increases bleeding compared with pla­cebo; that when clopidogrel is added to aspirin therapy, bleeding increases relative to the use of aspirin therapy alone; and that when even greater P2Y12 inhibition with prasugrel is added to aspirin therapy, bleeding is further increased com­pared with the use of clopidogrel and aspirin combination therapy. Does this mean that improved antiplatelet efficacy is mandated to come at the price of increased bleeding? Not necessarily, but it will require a far better understanding of platelet signaling pathways and what aspects of platelet function must be blocked to minimize arterial thrombosis. One of the best clinical examples of the disconnect between antiplatelet-related bleeding and antithrombotic ef­ficacy is the case of the oral platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antagonists. The use of these agents uniformly led to significantly greater bleeding compared with aspirin but no greater efficacy; in fact, mortality was increased among patients receiving the oral glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors.77 Through an improved understanding of platelet signaling pathways, antiplatelet therapies likely can be developed not based on their ability to inhibit platelets from aggregating, as current therapies are, but rather based on their ability to prevent the clinically meaningful consequences of platelet activation. What exactly these are remains the greatest obstacle.

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