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Posts Tagged ‘fertility’


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Research about marijuana and fertility is limited but some previous studies suggested that it might harm semen quality. Smoking of any type is also known to be a risk factor for male infertility. So, men who have smoked cannabis are expected to have worse measures of fertility but the data from a recent study suggested the opposite. The finding contradicts all conventional knowledge on how weed affects sperm. This may be because previous research typically focused on men with drug abuse history but this present study simply asked men if they had smoked more than two joints in their life.

 

Analysis of 1,143 semen samples from 662 men collected between 2000 and 2017 at the Fertility Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital showed that those who had smoked weed at some point in their life had a mean sperm concentration of 62.7 million sperm per milliliter (mL) of ejaculate, while men who avoided marijuana entirely had mean concentrations of 45.4 million/mL. Added to this only 5% of weed smokers had sperm concentrations below the 15 million/mL threshold the World Health Organization has set for a “normal” sperm count, versus 12% of men who never smoked marijuana.

 

The study has some imperfections such as the participants are not necessarily representative of the general population. They were predominantly college educated men with a mean age of 36, and were all seeking treatment at a fertility center. Further research is needed to support the findings. Two possibilities are put forward by the researchers as the reason behind such data. The first is that low levels of marijuana could have a positive effect on the endocannabinoid system, the neurotransmitters in the nervous system that bind to cannabinoid receptors, and are known to regulate fertility. The second is that may be weed-smokers are just bigger risk takers and men with higher testosterone levels and thus have better sperm count.

 

But, there’s certainly no medical recommendation to smoke weed as a fertility treatment but this study, at least, suggests that a little marijuana doesn’t hurt and might benefit sperm production in some way. But, the researchers specified that their finding does not necessarily mean that smoking cannabis increases the chances of fatherhood.

 

References:

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30726923

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2019-02-06/cannabis-smoking-associated-with-higher-sperm-count-study-finds?__twitter_impression=true

 

https://qz.com/1543564/smoking-weed-linked-to-higher-sperm-count-in-a-harvard-study/

 

https://www.thestar.com.my/news/world/2019/02/06/cannabis-smoking-associated-with-higher-sperm-count-study-finds/

 

http://time.com/5520421/smoking-marijuana-sperm-fertility/

 

https://www.health.com/infertility/marijuana-sperm-count

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Lifelong Contraceptive Device for Men: Mechanical Switch to Control Fertility on Wish

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

There aren’t many options for long-term birth control for men. The most common kinds of male contraception include

  • condoms,
  • withdrawal / pulling out,
  • outercourse, and
  • vasectomy.

But, other than vasectomy none of the processes are fully secured, comfortable and user friendly. Another solution may be

  • RISUG (Reversible Inhibition of Sperm Under Guidance, or Vasalgel)

which is said to last for ten years and no birth control pill for men is available till date.

VIEW VIDEO

http://www.mdtmag.com/blog/2016/01/implanted-sperm-switch-turns-mens-fertility-and?et_cid=5050638&et_rid=461755519&type=cta

Recently a German inventor, Clemens Bimek, developed a novel, reversible, hormone free, uncomplicated and lifelong contraceptive device for controlling male fertility. His invention is named as Bimek SLV, which is basically a valve that stops the flow of sperm through the vas deferens with the literal flip of a mechanical switch inside the scortum, rendering its user temporarily sterile. Toggled through the skin of the scrotum, the device stays closed for three months to prevent accidental switching. Moreover, the switch can’t open on its own. The tiny valves are less than an inch long and weigh is less than a tenth of an ounce. They are surgically implanted on the vas deferens, the ducts which carry sperm from the testicles, through a simple half-hour operation.

The valves are made of PEEK OPTIMA, a medical-grade polymer that has long been employed as a material for implants. The device is patented back in 2000 and is scheduled to undergo clinical trials at the beginning of this year. The inventor claims that Bimek SLV’s efficacy is similar to that of vasectomy, it does not impact the ability to gain and maintain an erection and ejaculation will be normal devoid of the sperm cells. The valve’s design enables sperm to exit the side of the vas deferens when it’s closed without any semen blockage. Leaked sperm cells will be broken down by the immune system. The switch to stop sperm flow can be kept working for three months or 30 ejaculations. After switching on the sperm flow the inventor suggested consulting urologist to ensure that all the blocked sperms are cleared off the device. The recovery time after switching on the sperm flow is only one day, according to Bimek SLV. However, men are encouraged to wait one week before resuming sexual activities.

Before the patented technology can be brought to market, it must undergo a rigorous series of clinical trials. Bimek and his business partners are currently looking for men interested in testing the device. If the clinical trials are successful then this will be the first invention of its kind that gives men the ability to control their fertility and obviously this method will be preferred over vasectomy.

 

References:

 

https://www.bimek.com/this-is-how-the-bimek-slv-works/

 

http://www.mdtmag.com/blog/2016/01/implanted-sperm-switch-turns-mens-fertility-and?et_cid=5050638&et_rid=461755519&type=cta

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/12083673/German-carpenter-invents-on-off-contraception-switch-for-sperm.html

 

http://www.discovery.com/dscovrd/tech/you-can-now-turn-off-your-sperm-flow-with-the-flip-of-a-switch/

 

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

An estimated 10 to 15% of couples suffer from infertility, and many treatment decisions rely on trial and error. A team of international scientists has found a common genetic variant which may explain why some men with normal sperm counts and good quality sperm are affected by infertility.

The study findings suggested that men with a variation in a gene which codes for a sperm-coating protein called beta defensin 126 (DEFB126) have a reduction in the protein coat on the outside of the sperm which makes it difficult for the sperm to ‘swim’ to the egg.

Dr Edward Hollox of the University of Leicester and co-author of the study said: ‘If you’ve got this gene variant you should allow that little bit longer if your partner’s planning to get pregnant’. The researchers, including scientists from the University of California and the Anhui Medical University in China, carried out the study on over 500 newly-wed Chinese couples who were trying for a baby.

They found that when men’s sperm lacked a coat of the DEFB126 protein, their wives were significantly less likely than expected to become pregnant.

Previous studies have shown that two copies of the genetic variant may be found in up to one quarter of men around the world, with about half of all men having one copy. The DEFB126 protein coat helps sperm to swim through cervical mucus and evade the woman’s immune system, as well as enabling it to attach to the walls of fallopian tubes.

The study showed, however, that men with two copies of the variant produced sperm that were less able to swim through a substitute to cervical mucus, hyaluronic acid gel. In macaques, it has already been shown that this protein is important in evading the immune system and the researchers believe the protein coat plays the same role in humans. Commenting on the study, Dr Allan Pacey, senior lecturer in Andrology at the University of Sheffield, said: ‘We actually understand very little about the subtle molecular events which occur in sperm as they make their journey through the woman’s body to fertilise an egg’. The research was published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. If replicated in future studies, these findings promise to guide choices about the timing and type of assisted reproduction interventions—and further hint at the possibility of treating sperm from del/del homozygotes to promote fertility.

A gene which helps sperm bind to an egg has been identified by scientists. Sperm-to-egg binding is an essential process during fertilization and although the preliminary studies were performed on mice, the gene may represent a new target for infertility treatments. Sperm from mice that had the gene switched off were only able to fertilise eggs from female mice three percent of the time compared to 80 percent fertilisation success in normal mice.

The gene codes for a protein called PDILT which helps another gene product to form and assemble correctly and then to reach the surface of a sperm. Once this happens the sperm is able to navigate the uterus and oviduct and penetrate the sticky outer layers of an egg. The study, which is published in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences), also demonstrates the importance of cumulus cells, a cluster of cells that surround and protect the egg, as their presence allows sperm to bind to their target. Sperm from mice that had their PDILT gene switched off would not bind to a bare egg, but would bind to an egg surrounded by cumulus cells.

Co-author Dr Adam Benham from Durham University in the UK said that the PDILT protein is ‘an essential part of the navigation system of sperm. Like any navigation system, you have to programme where it is that you want to go and this protein plays an essential role in getting sperm to the right destination, in good shape, and in good time’. A question now for the scientists is whether the PDILT gene has as much importance in human fertility as it does in mice. ‘Mutations in the gene may be responsible for unexplained male fertility problems and further research may aid more effective IVF treatment‘, said Dr Benham.

Source References:

http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/3/92/92ps31.abstract

http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_142955.asp

http://www.itv.com/news/update/2012-05-01/scientists-discover-new-gene-key-to-fertility/

http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_102705.asp

 

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