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Lessons on the Frontier of Gene & Cell Therapy – The Disruptive Dozen 12 #GCT Breakthroughs that are revolutionizing Healthcare

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Mass General Brigham Innovation

@MGBInnovation

Read key takeaways from the 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum in this report from the Bank of America Institute. #WMIF2022

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Bank of America News

@BofA_News

· May 6

What are the 12 emerging #GeneAndCellTherapy technologies with the greatest potential to transform #healthcare? Read our report for key takeaways from #WMIF2022. @MassGenBrigham

4:30 PM · May 6, 2022·Twitter Web App

Mass General Brigham Innovation

@MGBInnovation

Read key takeaways from the 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum in this report from the Bank of America Institute. #WMIF2022

Quote Tweet

Bank of America News

@BofA_News

· May 6

What are the 12 emerging #GeneAndCellTherapy technologies with the greatest potential to transform #healthcare? Read our report for key takeaways from #WMIF2022. @MassGenBrigham

4:30 PM · May 6, 2022·Twitter Web App

The Disruptive Dozen 12 #GCT Breakthroughs that are revolutionizing Healthcare

Liz Everett Krisberg, Head of the Bank of America Institute

The Disruptive Dozen 12 GCT breakthroughs that are revolutionizing healthcare 05 May 2022 Key Takeaways • Gene and cell therapy (GCT) is widely recognized as a transformational opportunity in medicine, with the potential to stop or slow the effects of disease by targeting it at the genetic level. • The “Disruptive Dozen” identifies 12 emerging GCT technologies with the greatest potential to transform healthcare over the next several years • These breakthroughs range from restoration of sight and increasing the supply of donor organs, to treating brain cancer, hearing loss and autoimmune diseases that currently lack few or any treatment alternatives. Gene and cell therapy (GCT) technologies are transforming medicine and the approach to severe diseases like cancer, hereditary conditions including Huntington Disease and Sickle Cell, as well as rare disorders that currently have no treatment alternatives. GCT has the potential to stop or slow the effects of disease by targeting it at the genetic level, either replacing, inactivating or modifying the genetic material or by transferring live or intact cells into a patient to treat or cure disease. Even in cases where the GCT approach does not fully cure a condition, GCT has the potential to be life changing. This is because GCT treatments are often “one and done,” only requiring a single administration, which may enable a patient to manage their disease without onerous ongoing treatment cycles. While some of the first GCT applications were focused on rare and orphan diseases, recent advancements show tremendous potential opportunity for use cases with more broad applications. Beyond the messenger ribonucleic acid or mRNA vaccines that protect against infectious disease including COVID-19, GCT technologies exhibit promise to address prevalent chronic diseases such as diabetes and hearing loss, as well as central nervous system (CNS) disorders and Alzheimer’s. This week, Bank of America joined Mass General Brigham to present the World Medical Innovation Forum in Boston, where over 1,000 clinical experts, industry leaders and investors explored how to advance GCT technologies that may lead to breakthrough medical advancements and solutions. We highlight the twelve emerging GCT technologies – the “Disruptive Dozen” – with the greatest potential to impact and transform healthcare in the next several years. These breakthroughs range from restoration of sight and increasing the supply of donor organs, to treating brain cancer, hearing loss and autoimmune diseases. Restoring sight by mending broken genes Roughly 200 genes are directly linked to vision disorders. In the last several years, groundbreaking new gene therapies have emerged that can compensate for faulty genes in the eye by adding new, healthy copies — a molecular fix that promises to restore sight to those who have lost it. The approach, known as CRISPR-Cas-9 gene editing, could open the door to treating genetic forms of vision loss that are not suited to conventional gene therapy, and a host of other medical conditions. A clinical trial is now underway to evaluate a CRISPR-Cas 9 gene-editing therapy for a severe form of childhood blindness for which there currently are no treatments. Although this treatment is still experimental, it is already historic — it is the first medicine based on CRISPR-Cas-9 to be delivered in vivo, or inside a patient’s body. Similar gene-editing therapies are also under development that correct genes within blood cells. A gene editing solution to increase the supply of donor organs In the U.S. alone, more than 100,000 people need a life-saving organ transplant. But the supply of donor organs is quite limited, and every day, patients die waiting for a donor organ. One way to address this crisis is xenotransplantation — harvesting organs from animals and placing them into human patients. Advances in gene editing technology make it possible to remove, insert, or replace genes with relative ease and precision. This molecular engineering can sidestep the human immune system, which is highly adept at recognizing foreign tissues and triggering rejection. Over the last 20 years, scientists have been working to devise successful gene editing strategies that will render pig organs compatible with humans. The field has taken another major step forward in the past year: transplanting gene-edited pig organs, including the heart and kidney, into humans. While extensive clinical testing is needed before xenotransplantation becomes a reality, that future now seems within reach. I NSTI TUTE Accessible version 2 05 May 2022 I NSTI TUTE Cell therapies to conquer common forms of blindness The eye has been a proving ground for pioneering gene therapies and is also fueling new cell-based therapies than can restore sight, offering a functional cure by replacing critical cells that have been lost or injured. One approach involves stem cells from the retina that can give rise to light-sensitive cells, called photoreceptors, which are required for healthy vision. Scientists are harnessing retinal stem cells to develop treatments for incurable eye diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa. Because the immune system doesn’t patrol the eye as aggressively as other parts of the body, retinal stem cells from unrelated, healthy donors can be transplanted into patients with vision disorders. Other progress includes cell therapies that harness patients’ own cells, for example, from blood or skin, that can be converted into almost any cell type in the body, including retinal cells. Another novel treatment being tested utilizes stem cells from a patient’s healthy eye to repair the affected cornea of the other eye. Harnessing the power of RNA to treat brain cancer RNA is widely known for its helper functions, carrying messages from one part of a cell to another to make proteins. But scientists now recognize that RNA plays a more central role in biology and are tapping its hidden potential to create potent new therapies for a range of diseases, including a devastating form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. This cancer is extremely challenging to treat and highly adaptable. New approaches that either target RNA or mimic its activity could hold promise, including an intriguing class of RNA molecules called microRNAs. One team identified a trio of microRNAs that plays important roles in healthy neurons but is lost when brain cancer develops. These microRNAs can be stitched together into a single unit and delivered into the brain using a virus. Initial studies in mice reveal that this therapeutic can render tumors more vulnerable to existing treatments, including chemotherapy. Another team is also exploring a microRNA called miR-10b. Blocking its activity causes tumor cells to die. Now, scientists are working to develop a targeted therapeutic against miR-10b that can be tested in clinical trials. Realizing the promise of gene therapy for brain disorders Gene therapy holds enormous promise for serious and currently untreatable diseases, including those of the brain and central nervous system. But some big obstacles remain. For example, a commonly-used vehicle for gene therapy — a virus called AAV — cannot penetrate a major biological roadblock, the blood-brain barrier. Now, researchers are engineering new versions of AAV that can cross the blood-brain barrier. Using various molecular strategies, a handful of teams have modified the protein shell that surrounds the virus so it can gain entry and become broadly distributed within the brain. These modified viral vectors are now under development and could begin clinical testing within a few years. Scientists are also tinkering with the inner machinery of AAV to sidestep potential toxicities. With a safe, effective method for accessing the brain, researchers will be able to devise gene therapies for a range of neurological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancers, and devastating rare diseases that lack any treatment. A flexible, programmable approach to fighting viruses The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the tremendous need for rapidly deployable therapies to counteract emerging viruses. Scientists are now developing a novel form of anti-viral therapy that can be programmed to target a range of different viruses — from well-known human pathogens, such as hepatitis C, to those less familiar, such as the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. This new approach harnesses a popular family of gene editing tools, known as CRISPR-Cas. While CRISPR-based systems have gained attention for their capacity to modify human genes, their original purpose in nature was to defend bacteria from viral infections. As a throwback to these early roots, scientists are now adapting CRISPR tools to tackle a variety of viruses that infect humans. Researchers are studying the potential of these programmable anti-viral agents in the context of several different viruses, including ones that pose significant threats to global health, such as SARS-CoV-2, hepatitis C, and HIV. On the move: Cell therapies to restore gut motility The human digestive tract — or “gut” — has its own nervous system. This second brain, known as the enteric nervous system, is comprised of neurons and support cells that carry out critical tasks, like moving food through the gut. When enteric neurons are missing or injured, gut motility can be impaired. Now, scientists are developing an innovative cell replacement therapy to treat diseases of gut motility. Donor cells can be isolated from a patient’s own gut or from a more readily available source, such as subcutaneous fat. These cells are then cultivated in the laboratory and coaxed to form the progenitors that give rise to enteric neurons. Researchers are also devising “off-the-shelf” approaches, which could create a supply of donor cells that are shielded from the immune system and can therefore be transplanted universally across different patients. Early research shows that transplanted enteric neurons can also take up residence in the brain. That means these forays in cell therapy for the gut could also help pave a path toward cell therapies for the brain and spinal cord. CAR-T cell therapies take aim at autoimmune diseases CAR-T cells have emerged as powerful treatments for some forms of cancer, especially blood cancers. By harnessing the same underlying concept — rewiring patients’ own T cells to endow them with therapeutic properties — scientists are working to develop novel CAR-T therapies for a variety of autoimmune diseases. Several research teams are engineering CAR-T cells so they can seek out and destroy harmful immune cells, such as those that produce auto-antibodies — immune proteins that help coordinate the attack on the body’s own tissues. For example, one team is using CAR-T cells to destroy certain immune cells, called B cells, as a potential treatment for lupus, a serious autoimmune disease that mainly affects women. Scientists are also 05 May 2022 3 I NSTI TUTE developing CAR-T therapies that take aim at other rogue members of the immune system. These efforts could yield novel treatments for multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. Regrowing cells in the inner ear to treat hearing loss In the U.S. alone, some 37 million people suffer from a hearing deficit. Currently, there are no drugs that can halt, prevent, or even reverse hearing loss. Scientists are working on a novel regenerative approach that could restore the cells in the inner ear required for normal hearing, offering hope to millions of patients who grapple with hearing loss. Healthy hearing requires specialized cells in the inner ear called hair cells, which have fine, hair-like projections. If the cells are damaged or lost, which often happens with age or after repeated exposure to loud sounds, the body cannot repair them. But researchers have discovered a potential workaround that can stimulate existing cells in the ear to proliferate and give rise to new hair cells. Scientists are now working to convert this molecular strategy, which is being studied in animal models, into a therapeutic that is safe and effective for hearing loss patients. New technologies for delivering gene therapies A formidable challenge in the field of gene therapy is delivery — getting gene-based therapeutics into the body and into the right target cells. Researchers are exploring the potential of new delivery methods that could expand the reach of gene therapy, including microneedles. When applied to the skin, a microneedle patch can penetrate the outermost layer with minimal pain and discomfort. This novel delivery method can readily access the legion of immune cells that reside in the skin — important targets for vaccines as well as for the treatment of various diseases, including cancer and autoimmune conditions. Another emerging technology involves an implantable device made of biodegradable materials. When placed inside the body, this device can provide localized, sustained release of therapeutics with few side effects. The approach is now being tested for the first time in cancer patients using standard chemotherapy drugs administered directly at tumor sites. In the future, this method could be customized for the delivery of gene therapy payloads, an advance that could revolutionize cancer treatment, particularly for difficult-to-treat forms like pancreatic cancer. Engineering cancer-killing cells that target solid tumors CAR-T cells are a revolutionary form of cell therapy that has yielded some remarkable cures of difficult-to-treat blood cancers. But the outcomes in other cancers have been lackluster. Now, scientists are enhancing this technology to enable new ways of treating solid tumors. One approach involves making CAR-T cells more like computers, relying on simple logic to decide which cells are cancer — and should be destroyed — and which cells are healthy and should be spared. By building several logic gates and combining them together, researchers are hoping to pave the way toward targeting new tumor types. Scientists are also devising other groundbreaking forms of cancer-killing cell therapy, including one that uses cancer cells themselves. This approach exploits a remarkable feature: once disseminated within the body, cancer cells can migrate back to the original tumor. Researchers are now harnessing this rehoming capability and, with the help of gene editing, turning tumor cells into potent cancer killers. An early version of this technology uses patients’ own cells. Now, the scientists are developing an off-the-shelf version that can be universally applied to patients. Reawakening the X-chromosome: a therapeutic strategy for devastating neurodevelopmental diseases The X chromosome is one of two sex-determining chromosomes in humans, and it carries hundreds of disease-causing genes. These diseases often affect males and females differently. In females, one X chromosome is naturally, and randomly, chosen and rendered inactive. Although X-inactivation was once thought to be permanent, scientists are uncovering ways to reverse it. Scientists are now exploiting this unusual biology to reawaken the dormant X chromosome — a strategy that could yield muchneeded treatments for a group of rare, yet devastating neurodevelopmental disorders, which predominantly affect females. This new approach could hold promise for females with Rett syndrome, a severe X-linked disorder. A similar strategy could also hold promise for other serious X-linked disorders, including fragile X syndrome and CDKL5 syndrome.

SOURCE

https://business.bofa.com/content/dam/flagship/bank-of-america-institute/transformation/world-innovation-forum-takeaways-may-2022.pdf

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

UPDATED on 5/7/2022

Tweets at #WMIF2022 by @pharma_BI & @AVIVA1950 and All Retweets of these Tweets – 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum, GENE & CELL THERAPY • MAY 2–4, 2022 • BOSTON

Real Time coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/05/07/tweets-at-wmif2022-by-pharma_bi-aviva1950-and-all-retweets-of-these-tweets-2022-world-medical-innovation-forum-gene-cell-therapy-may-2-4-2022/

 

2022 World Medical Innovation Forum, GENE & CELL THERAPY • MAY 2–4, 2022 • BOSTON • IN-PERSON

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/05/01/2022-world-medical-innovation-forum-gene-cell-therapy-may-2-4-2022-boston-in-person/

Relevance of Twitter.com forthcoming Payment System for Scientific Content Promotion and Monetization

Highlighted Text in BLUE, BLACK, GREEN, RED by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

GIASOURCEN M. VOLPICELLI

Gian M. Volpicelli

SENIOR WRITER

Gian M. Volpicelli is a senior writer at WIRED, where he covers cryptocurrency, decentralization, politics, and technology regulation. He received a master’s degree in journalism from City University of London after studying politics and international relations in Rome. He lives in London.

SOURCE

https://www.wired.com/story/twitter-crypto-strategy/

 

BUSINESS

APR 5, 2022 7:00 AM

What Twitter Is Really Planning for Crypto

The duo behind Twitter Crypto say NFT profile pics and crypto tipping are just the beginning.

 

YOU MIGHT HAVE heard of crypto Twitter, the corner of the social network where accounts have Bored Apes as profile pictures, posts are rife with talk of tokens, blockchains, and buying the Bitcoin dip, and Elon Musk is venerated.

Then again, you might have heard of Twitter Crypto, the business unit devoted to developing the social network’s strategy for cryptocurrency, blockchains, and that grab-bag of decentralized technologies falling under the rubric of Web3. The team’s unveiling came in November 2021 via a tweet from the newly hired project lead, Tess Rinearson, a Berlin-based American computer scientist whose career includes stints at blockchain companies such as Tendermint and Interchain.

Rinearson joined Twitter at a crucial moment. Jack Dorsey, the vociferously pro-Bitcoin company CEO, would leave a few weeks later, to be replaced by CTO Parag Agrawal. Agrawal had played an instrumental role in Bluesky, a Twitter-backed project to create a protocol—possibly with blockchain components—to build decentralized social networks.

As crypto went mainstream globally and crypto Twitter burgeoned, the company tried to dominate the space. Under the stewardship of product manager Esther Crawford, in September 2021 Twitter introduced a “tipping” feature that helps creators on Twitter to receive Bitcoin contributions through Lightning—a network for fast Bitcoin payments. In January, Twitter allowed subscribers of Twitter’s premium service, Twitter Blue, to flaunt their NFTs as hexagonal profile pictures, through a partnership with NFT marketplace OpenSea.

Twitter Crypto is just getting started. While Rinearson works with people all across the company, her team is still under 10 people, although more hires are in the pipeline, judging from recent job postings. So it’s worth asking what is next. I caught up over a video call with Rinearson and Crawford to talk about where Twitter Crypto is headed. 

The conversation has been edited for clarity and brevity.

WIRED: Let’s start with the basics. Why does Twitter have a crypto unit?

Tess Rinearson: We really see crypto—and what we’re now calling Web3— as something that could be this incredibly powerful tool that would unlock a lot for our users. The whole crypto world is like an internet of money, an internet of value that our users can potentially tap into to create new ways of owning their content, monetizing their content, owning their own identity, and even relating to each other.

One of my goals is to build Twitter’s crypto unit in such a way that it caters to communities that go beyond just that core crypto community. I love the crypto Twitter space, obviously—I’m a very proud member of the crypto community. And at the same time, I recognize that people who are really deep in the crypto space may not relate to concepts, like for instance blockchain’s immutability, in the same way that someone who’s less intensely involved might feel about those things.

So a lot of what we try to think about is, what can we learn from this group of people who are super engaged and really, really, creative? And then, how can we translate some of that stuff into a format or a mechanism or a product that’s a little bit more accessible to people who don’t have that background?

How are you learning from crypto Twitter? Do you just follow a lot of accounts, do you actually talk to them? How does that learning experience play out?

Esther Crawford: It’s a combination. We have an amazing research team that sets up panel interviews and surveys. But we’re also embedded in the community itself and follow a bunch of accounts, sit on Twitter spaces, go to conferences and events, engage with customers in that way. That’s the way the research piece of it works. But we also encounter it as end users: Twitter is the discovery platform today for all things crypto.

One of the things we do differently at Twitter is we build out in the open. And so this means having dialog with customers in real time—designers will take something that is very early-stage and post it as a tweet and then get real-time feedback. They’ll hop into spaces with product managers and engineering managers, talk about it live with real customers, and then incorporate that feedback into the designs and what ultimately we end up launching.

Rinearson: One of the things I wanted to make sure of before I came to Twitter was to know that we would be able to build features in the open and solicit feedback and show rough drafts. And so this is something I asked Parag Agrawal, who’s now the CEO, and was the person who hired me. Pretty early in the job interview process, I said this was going to be really important, and he said, “If you think it’s important to the success of this work, great, do it—thumbs up.” He also shares that openness.

As you said, Tess, you come from crypto. When you were out there, what did you think Twitter was getting right? What did you think Twitter was getting wrong?

Rinearson: I had been a Twitter power user for a really long time. The thing that I saw was a lot of aesthetic alignment between how Twitter exists in the world and the way that crypto exists in the world. Twitter has decentralized user experiences in its DNA. And, this is a bit cheesy, but people use Twitter sometimes in ways that they use a public blockchain, as a public database where everything’s time stamped and people can agree on what happened.

And for most people it’s open, it is there for public conversation. And then obviously it was also the place—a place—where the crypto community really found its footing. I think it’s been a place where an enormous amount of discovery happens, and education and learning for the whole community. I joined when there were some murmurings about Twitter starting to do crypto stuff, mostly stuff Esther had led actually, and I was excited to see where it was going. And then Twitter’s investment in Bluesky also gave me a lot of confidence.

Let’s talk about the two main things you have delivered so far: The crypto tipping feature and NFT pictures. Can you give me just a potted history of how each came about and why?

Crawford: Those are our first set of early explorations, and the reason why we started there was we really wanted to make sure that what we built benefited creators, their audiences, and then all the conversations that are happening on Twitter. For creators in particular, we know that they rely on platforms like Twitter to monetize and earn a living, and not all people are able to use traditional currencies. Not everybody has a traditional banking account setup.

And so we wanted to provide an opportunity for a borderless payment solution, and that’s why we decided to go ahead and use Bitcoin Lightning as our first big integration. One of the reasons we chose Bitcoin Lightning was also because of the low transaction fees. And we have Bitcoin and Ethereum addresses that you can also put in there [on your Twitter “tipping jar”]. We noticed that people were actually adding information about their crypto wallet addresses in their profiles. And so we wanted to make a more seamless experience, so that people could just tip through the platform, so that it felt native.

With NFT profile pictures, the way that came about was, again, looking at user behavior. People were adding NFTs that they owned as avatars, but you didn’t really know whether they owned those NFTs or not. So we decided to go ahead and build out that feature so that one could actually prove ownership.

That’s similar to how other things developed on Twitter, right? The hashtag, or even even the retweet, were initially just things users invented—by adding the # sign, or by pasting other users’ tweets—and then Twitter made that a feature.

Crawford: Yeah, exactly. Many of the best ideas come from watching user behavior on the platform, and then we just productize that.

Rinearson: Sometimes I’ve heard people call that the “help wanted signs,” and like, keeping an eye out for the “help wanted signs” across the platform. The NFT profile picture was a clear example of that.

How do all these things—these two things and possibly other crypto features coming further down the line—really help Twitter’s bottom line?

Crawford: With creator monetization our goal was to help creators get paid, not Twitter. But Twitter takes a really small cut of earnings. For more successful creators, we take a larger percentage. The way we think about this is, it is part of our revenue diversification.

Twitter today is a wholly ad-based business. In the future we imagine Twitter making money from a variety of different product areas. So Twitter Blue is one of those products—you can pay $2.99 a month and you get additional features, such as the NFT profile pictures. We really think that revenue diversification sits across a variety of areas, and creator monetization is one really small component of that.

As you said, these are just early experiments. Where is Twitter Crypto going next? What’s your vision for crypto technology’s role within Twitter?

Rinearson: The real trick here is to find the right parts of Twitter to decentralize, and to not try to decentralize everything at once—or, you know, make every user suddenly responsible for taking care of some private keys or something like that.

We have to find the right ways to open up some access to a decentralized economic layer, or give people ways that they can take their identity with them, without relying on a single centralized service.

We’re really early in these explorations, and even looking at things like Bitcoin tipping or the NFT profile pictures—we view those features as experiments themselves in a lot of ways and learning experiences. We’re learning things about how our users relate to these concepts, what they understand about them, what they find confusing, and what’s most useful to them. We really want to try to use this technology to bring utility to people and you know, not just like, sprinkle a little blockchain on it for the sake of it. So creator monetization is an area that I’m really excited about because I think there’s a really clear path forward. But again, we’re looking beyond that: We’re also looking at using crypto technology in fields like [digital] identity and [digital] ownership space and also figuring out how we can better serve crypto communities on the platform.

Are you going to put Twitter verified users’ blue ticks on a blockchain, then?

[Laughter]

No?

[More laughter]

OK, moving on. How does the kind of work you do dovetail with Bluesky’s plan to create a protocol for a decentralized social media platform? Is there any synergy there?

Rinearson: I have known Jay [Graber], the Bluesky lead, for a long time, and she and I are in pretty close contact. We check in with each other regularly and talk a lot about problems we might have in common that we’ll both need to solve. There’s an overlap looking at things in the identity area, but at the end of the day, it’s a separate project. She’s pretty focused on hiring her team, and they’re very focused on building a prototype of a protocol. That is different from what Esther and I are thinking about, which is like: There are all these blockchain protocols that exist, and we need to figure out how to make them useful and accessible for real people.

And when I say “real people,” I mean that in a sort of tongue-in-cheek contrast to hardcore crypto nerds like me. Jay is thinking much more about building for people who are creating decentralized networks. That is a very different focus area. Beyond that, I would just say it’s too early to say what Bluesky will mean for Twitter as a product. We are in touch, we have aligned values. But at the end of the day—separate teams.

Why is a centralized Silicon Valley company like Twitter the right place to start to bring more decentralization to internet users? Don’t we have just to start from scratch, build a new platform that is already decentralized?

Rinearson: I started in crypto in 2015, and I have a very vivid memory from those years of watching some of my coworkers—crypto engineers—trying to figure out how to secure some of their Bitcoin like before one of the Bitcoin forks [in which the Bitcoin blockchain split, creating new currencies], and they were panicking and freaking out. I thought there was no way that a normal person would be able to handle this in a way that would be safe. And so I was a little bit disillusioned with crypto, especially from a consumer perspective.

And then last year, I started seeing more interest from people whom I’ve known for a long time and weren’t crypto people. They were just starting to perk their heads up and take notice and start creating NFTs or start talking about DAOs. And I thought that that was interesting, that we were coming around a corner, and it might be time to start thinking about what this could mean for people beyond that hardcore crypto group.

And that was when Twitter reached out. You know, I don’t think that just any centralized platform would be able to bring crypto to the masses, so to speak. But I think Twitter has the right stuff. I think you have to meet people where they are with new technologies: find ways to onboard them and bring them along and show them what this might mean for them. make things accessible. And it’s really, really hard to do that with just a protocol. You need to have some kind of community, you need to have some kind of user base, you need to have some kind of platform. And Twitter’s just right there.

I don’t think I would say that a centralized platform is definitely the way to “bring crypto to the masses.” I do think that Twitter is the way to do it.

But why do the masses need crypto right now?

Rinearson: I don’t know that anyone  needs crypto, and our goal is not to get everyone into crypto. Let’s be clear about that. But I do think that crypto is a potentially very powerful tool for people. And so I think what we are trying to do is show people how powerful it is and unlock those possibilities. It’s also possible that we create some products and features, where people actually don’t even really know what’s happening under the hood.

Like maybe we’re using crypto as a payment rail or again as an identity layer—users don’t necessarily need to know all of those implementation details. And that’s actually something we come back to a lot: What level of abstraction are we talking about with users? What story are we telling them about what’s happening under the hood? But yeah, I would just like to reiterate that the goal is not to just shovel everyone into crypto. We want to provide value for people.

Do you think there is a case for Twitter to launch its own cryptocurrency— a Twittercoin?

Rinearson: I think there’s a case for a lot of things—honestly, there’s a case for a lot of things. We’re trying to think really, really broadly about it.

Crawford: We’re actively exploring a lot of things. It’s not it’s not something we would be making an announcement about.

Rinearson: I think it is really important to stress that when you say “Twittercoin” you probably have a slightly different idea of what it is than we do. And are we exploring those ideas? Yes, we want to think about all of them. Do we have road maps for them? No. But are we trying to think about things really creatively and be really, really open-minded? Yes. We have this new economic technology that we think could unlock a lot of things for people. And we want to go down a bunch of rabbit holes and see what we come up with.

Gian M. Volpicelli is a senior writer at WIRED, where he covers cryptocurrency, decentralization, politics, and technology regulation. He received a master’s degree in journalism from City University of London after studying politics and international relations in Rome. He lives in London.

 

Highlighted Text in BLUE, BLACK, GREEN, RED by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

SOURCE

https://www.wired.com/story/twitter-crypto-strategy/

Tweets at #WMIF2022 by @pharma_BI & @AVIVA1950 and All Retweets of these Tweets – 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum, GENE & CELL THERAPY • MAY 2–4, 2022 • BOSTON

Real Time coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Updated on 5/9/2022

Lessons on the Frontier of Gene & Cell Therapy – The Disruptive Dozen 12 #GCT Breakthroughs that are revolutionizing Healthcare

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/05/09/lessons-on-the-frontier-of-gene-cell-therapy-the-disruptive-dozen-12-gct-breakthroughs-that-are-revolutionizing-healthcare/

2022 World Medical Innovation Forum, GENE & CELL THERAPY • MAY 2–4, 2022 • BOSTON • IN-PERSON

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/05/01/2022-world-medical-innovation-forum-gene-cell-therapy-may-2-4-2022-boston-in-person/

Liked Tweets by Conference Organizers

UPDATED on 5/11/2022

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by Mass General Brigham Innovation

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#genetherapy for tuberous sclerosis complex tested on mice found effective in combination with drug in use longer survival to 150 days 10,000 cases in US per year, gene therapy most promising for this gene malfunction #WMIF2022

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Mass General Brigham Innovation
@MGBInnovation
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Take a First Look at Dr. Vijaya Ramesh’s research demonstrating preclinical efficacy of an #AAV-based #genetherapy for tuberous sclerosis complex, setting the stage for future IND-enabling studies & clinical translation. #WMIF2022 @MGH_RI @MGHNeurology youtube.com/watch?v=-I_XiS

Top 6 #WMIF2022 #GCT #CARTTherapy #DisruptiveDozen @MGBInnovation @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 1 Restoring sight by edit genes 2 A gene editing solution supply of donor organs 3 Cell therapies for blindness 4 RNA to treat brain cancer 5 #GCT for brain disorders 6 fighting viruses

liked 2 of your Tweets

7 to 12 #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation #GCT #DisruptiveDozen @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 7 Cell therapies restore gut motility 8 CAR-T at autoimmune diseases 9 Regrowing cells in the inner ear hearing loss 10 tech delivering gene therapies 11 target solid tumors 12 X-chromosome neurodegen

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by Tracy Doyle

#KOL on #Cell therapies: #CAR-T cells and #stem-cell-based approaches is moderator for Cell Therapy Landscape: Marcela Maus, MD, PhD Director, Cellular #Immunotherapy Program, #Cancer Center, MGH Associate Professor, Medicine, HMS @MGBInnovation @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 #WMIF2022

Global views #GCT Christine Fox, Novartis Gene Therapies C. Baum, MD, Berlin Institute of Health Nicholas Galakatos, PhD, Blackstone Luigi Naldini, MD, PhD Telethon Institute, Kendra Rose, PhD, Bayer #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation @MassGenBrigham @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

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#Chronic #Neuroinflammation #MS, #AD, #Parkinsons #GCT #genomics Ole Isacson, MD, PhD @McLean Colin Hill CEO, GNS Spyros P., MD, PhD Vigil, Ransohoff, MD, Abata & Third Rock, B. Stevens, PhD, Boston Children’s R. Tanzi, PhD @MGH #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

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#fundraising #GCT #startups Panelists: Shelley Chu, MD, PhD Partner, Lightspeed Stephen Knight, MD President, F-Prime Capital Adam Koppel, MD, PhD, Bain Capital Life Sciences Daniel Krizek Portfolio Manager, Citadel #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation @MassGenBrigham @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

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#fundraising #GCT #startups Panelists: Shelley Chu, MD, PhD Partner, Lightspeed Stephen Knight, MD President, F-Prime Capital Adam Koppel, MD, PhD, Bain Capital Life Sciences Daniel Krizek Portfolio Manager, Citadel #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation @MassGenBrigham @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

Jean-François Formela, MD, Partner @atlasventure on stage with profound #insights on the #interface and seam line between #Medical applications #investment in #health #innovations #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation @MassGenBrigham @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 #vision and #inspirations

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#1 #global #conference #CGT #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation World Medical Innovation Forum #translation and #regenerative #medicine #gene #editing #gene #therapy @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 Therapeutics Promise #CGT for #Cardiovascular #Diseases since 12/26/2015 lnkd.in/dwqM3K3

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Mass General Brigham Innovation
@MGBInnovation
·
Someone in the US is diagnosed with #Alzheimers roughly every 60 seconds. Dr. Stephen Haggarty @neuro_mgh shares a First Look at his work to prevent the accumulation of toxic proteins that cause age-dependent #neurodegeneration at #WMIF2022. worldmedicalinnovation.org/wp-content/upl
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Breakthrough in ophthalmic drug delivery new #gel delivery system for eye diseases like #retinitis #pigmentosa #WMIF2022

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Tracy Doyle
@doylet
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Michael Young, PhD, Schepens Eye Research Institute @MassEyeAndEar, shares preview of new gel delivery system for eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa at FirstLook research updates @MGBInnovation #WMIF2022

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#1 #global #conference #CGT #WMIF2022 @MGBInnovation World Medical Innovation Forum #translation and #regenerative #medicine #gene #editing #gene #therapy @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 Therapeutics Promise #CGT for #Cardiovascular #Diseases since 12/26/2015 lnkd.in/dwqM3K3

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

Breakthrough in ophthalmic drug delivery new #gel delivery system for eye diseases like #retinitis #pigmentosa #WMIF2022

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Tracy Doyle
@doylet
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Michael Young, PhD, Schepens Eye Research Institute @MassEyeAndEar, shares preview of new gel delivery system for eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa at FirstLook research updates @MGBInnovation #WMIF2022

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Tweets at #WMIF2022 by

@pharma_BI & @AVIVA1950

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

Geoff Meacham, PhD BofA Securities w/Panelist: Robert Bradway CEO, Amgen strategies in #drug #design #development addressing #chronic aspects of #cancer and #cardiovascular #WMIF2022

amazon.com
Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases
Visit Amazon’s Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases Page and shop for all Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases books. Check out pictures, author information, and reviews of Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases
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Mass General Brigham Innovation
@MGBInnovation

#ICYMI – Yesterday, Dr. Robert Califf

, Commissioner Food and Drugs

, joined us at #WMIF2022 for a Fireside Chat. Watch the full session online NOW on the World Medical Innovation Forum YouTube channel.

youtube.com
2022 WMIF | 1:1 Fireside Chat: Robert Califf, MD, Commissioner Food…
1:1 Fireside Chat: Robert Califf, MD, Commissioner Food and Drugs, FDATazeen Ahmad, Managing Director, Global Research, BofA SecuritiesJ. Keith Joung, MD, Ph…
3

James Beck, PhD
@jbeck_PhD

Looking forward to joining panel on patient perspective on gene & cell therapies @ #WMIF2022. People with #Parkinsons may benefit greatly.

is doing a great job of quickly posting sessions YouTube channel for those who cannot attend.

youtube.com
World Medical Innovation Forum
The World Medical Innovation Forum is a global gathering of more than 1,200 senior health care leaders hosted by Mass General Brigham in the heart of Boston. It was established to respond to the…
4

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

Geoff Meacham, PhD BofA Securities w/Panelist: Robert Bradway CEO, Amgen strategies in #drug #design #development addressing #chronic aspects of #cancer and #cardiovascular #WMIF2022

amazon.com
Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases
Visit Amazon’s Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases Page and shop for all Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases books. Check out pictures, author information, and reviews of Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases
2

Mass General Brigham Innovation
@MGBInnovation

Dr. Rosana Kapeller

will be shining a light on the #darkgenome in today’s Dr. Is In session “The Mysterious Dark Genome” at #WMIF2022. Join her and experts from

,

,

,

and

at 11:45 AM in the St. George room.

Erica Robinson
@eleighrobs

May is Brain Tumor Awareness Month. This is my brilliant neurosurgeon

who has been named the new Chief Medical Officer of

. Congratulations! I was blessed to get connected with you in 2010. #BTSM #BTAM

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@MassGeneralMDs
·
Congratulations to William Curry, MD, @WTCNeuroscience the new chief medical officer of #MassGeneral and the MGPO, effective 6/1. We know he will continue his work to improve the outcomes for patients and train the next generation of leaders. @MGHNeurosurg

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Aviva Lev-Ari
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#WMIF2022 #glioblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor, and one of the most treatment-resistant and fatal human diseases

Read the full abstract here: worldmedicalinnovation.org/wp-content/upl

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@MGBInnovation
·
Dr. Anna Krichevsky shares a First Look at her work developing #RNA-targeting therapies for #glioblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor, and one of the most treatment-resistant and fatal human diseases. #WMIF2022 Read the full abstract here: worldmedicalinnovation.org/wp-content/upl

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Aviva Lev-Ari
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·
Great way to start the week. @MGBInnovation World Medical Innovation Forum. 3 days of #CGT talks! #WMIF2022 @MassGenBrigham #worldclass #PatientDriven TY @ChrisMarkCOBURN and team for all you do for patients! @JLL #lifesciencebroker

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Data Science: Step by Step – A Resource for LPBI Group One-Year Internship in IT, IS, DS

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

9 free Harvard courses: learning Data Science

In this article, I will list 9 free Harvard courses that you can take to learn data science from scratch. Feel free to skip any of these courses if you already possess knowledge of that subject.

Step 1: Programming

The first step you should take when learning data science is to learn to code. You can choose to do this with your choice of programming language?—?ideally Python or R.

If you’d like to learn R, Harvard offers an introductory R course created specifically for data science learners, called Data Science: R Basics.

This program will take you through R concepts like variables, data types, vector arithmetic, and indexing. You will also learn to wrangle data with libraries like dplyr and create plots to visualize data.

If you prefer Python, you can choose to take CS50’s Introduction to Programming with Python offered for free by Harvard. In this course, you will learn concepts like functions, arguments, variables, data types, conditional statements, loops, objects, methods, and more.

Both programs above are self-paced. However, the Python course is more detailed than the R program, and requires a longer time commitment to complete. Also, the rest of the courses in this roadmap are taught in R, so it might be worth learning R to be able to follow along easily.

Step 2: Data Visualization

Visualization is one of the most powerful techniques with which you can translate your findings in data to another person.

With Harvard’s Data Visualization program, you will learn to build visualizations using the ggplot2 library in R, along with the principles of communicating data-driven insights.

Step 3: Probability

In this course, you will learn essential probability concepts that are fundamental to conducting statistical tests on data. The topics taught include random variables, independence, Monte Carlo simulations, expected values, standard errors, and the Central Limit Theorem.

The concepts above will be introduced with the help of a case study, which means that you will be able to apply everything you learned to an actual real-world dataset.

Step 4: Statistics

After learning probability, you can take this course to learn the fundamentals of statistical inference and modelling.
This program will teach you to define population estimates and margin of errors, introduce you to Bayesian statistics, and provide you with the fundamentals of predictive modeling.

Step 5: Productivity Tools (Optional)

I’ve included this project management course as optional since it isn’t directly related to learning data science. Rather, you will be taught to use Unix/Linux for file management, Github, version control, and creating reports in R.

The ability to do the above will save you a lot of time and help you better manage end-to-end data science projects.

Step 6: Data Pre-Processing

The next course in this list is called Data Wrangling, and will teach you to prepare data and convert it into a format that is easily digestible by machine learning models.

You will learn to import data into R, tidy data, process string data, parse HTML, work with date-time objects, and mine text.

As a data scientist, you often need to extract data that is publicly available on the Internet in the form of a PDF document, HTML webpage, or a Tweet. You will not always be presented with clean, formatted data in a CSV file or Excel sheet.

By the end of this course, you will learn to wrangle and clean data to come up with critical insights from it.

Step 7: Linear Regression

Linear regression is a machine learning technique that is used to model a linear relationship between two or more variables. It can also be used to identify and adjust the effect of confounding variables.

This course will teach you the theory behind linear regression models, how to examine the relationship between two variables, and how confounding variables can be detected and removed before building a machine learning algorithm.

Step 8: Machine Learning

Finally, the course you’ve probably been waiting for! Harvard’s machine learning program will teach you the basics of machine learning, techniques to mitigate overfitting, supervised and unsupervised modelling approaches, and recommendation systems.

Step 9: Capstone Project

After completing all the above courses, you can take Harvard’s data science capstone project, where your skills in data visualization, probability, statistics, data wrangling, data organization, regression, and machine learning will be assessed.

With this final project, you will get the opportunity to put together all the knowledge learnt from the above courses and gain the ability to complete a hands-on data science project from scratch.

Note: All the courses above are available on an online learning platform from edX and can be audited for free. If you want a course certificate, however, you will have to pay for one.

Building a data science learning roadmap with free courses offered by MIT.

8 Free MIT Courses to Learn Data Science Online

 enrolled into an undergraduate computer science program and decided to major in data science. I spent over $25K in tuition fees over the span of three years, only to graduate and realize that I wasn’t equipped with the skills necessary to land a job in the field.

I barely knew how to code, and was unclear about the most basic machine learning concepts.

I took some time out to try and learn data science myself — with the help of YouTube videos, online courses, and tutorials. I realized that all of this knowledge was publicly available on the Internet and could be accessed for free.

It came as a surprise that even Ivy League universities started making many of their courses accessible to students worldwide, for little to no charge. This meant that people like me could learn these skills from some of the best institutions in the world, instead of spending thousands of dollars on a subpar degree program.

In this article, I will provide you with a data science roadmap I created using only freely available MIT online courses.

Step 1: Learn to code

I highly recommend learning a programming language before going deep into the math and theory behind data science models. Once you learn to code, you will be able to work with real-world datasets and get a feel of how predictive algorithms function.

MIT Open Courseware offers a beginner-friendly Python program for beginners, called Introduction to Computer Science and Programming.

This course is designed to help people with no prior coding experience to write programs to tackle useful problems.

Step 2: Statistics

Statistics is at the core of every data science workflow — it is required when building a predictive model, analyzing trends in large amounts of data, or selecting useful features to feed into your model.

MIT Open Courseware offers a beginner-friendly course called Introduction to Probability and Statistics. After taking this course, you will learn the basic principles of statistical inference and probability. Some concepts covered include conditional probability, Bayes theorem, covariance, central limit theorem, resampling, and linear regression.

This course will also walk you through statistical analysis using the R programming language, which is useful as it adds on to your tool stack as a data scientist.

Another useful program offered by MIT for free is called Statistical Thinking and Data Analysis. This is another elementary course in the subject that will take you through different data analysis techniques in Excel, R, and Matlab.

You will learn about data collection, analysis, different types of sampling distributions, statistical inference, linear regression, multiple linear regression, and nonparametric statistical methods.

Step 3: Foundational Math Skills

Calculus and linear algebra are two other branches of math that are used in the field of machine learning. Taking a course or two in these subjects will give you a different perspective of how predictive models function, and the working behind the underlying algorithm.

To learn calculus, you can take Single Variable Calculus offered by MIT for free, followed by Multivariable Calculus.

Then, you can take this Linear Algebra class by Prof. Gilbert Strang to get a strong grasp of the subject.

All of the above courses are offered by MIT Open Courseware, and are paired with lecture notes, problem sets, exam questions, and solutions.

Step 4: Machine Learning

Finally, you can use the knowledge gained in the courses above to take MIT’s Introduction to Machine Learning course. This program will walk you through the implementation of predictive models in Python.

The core focus of this course is in supervised and reinforcement learning problems, and you will be taught concepts such as generalization and how overfitting can be mitigated. Apart from just working with structured datasets, you will also learn to process image and sequential data.

MIT’s machine learning program cites three pre-requisites — Python, linear algebra, and calculus, which is why it is advisable to take the courses above before starting this one.

Are These Courses Beginner-Friendly?

Even if you have no prior knowledge of programming, statistics, or mathematics, you can take all the courses listed above.

MIT has designed these programs to take you through the subject from scratch. However, unlike many MOOCs out there, the pace does build up pretty quickly and the courses cover a large depth of information.

Due to this, it is advisable to do all the exercises that come with the lectures and work through all the reading material provided.

SOURCE

Natassha Selvaraj is a self-taught data scientist with a passion for writing. You can connect with her on LinkedIn.

https://www.kdnuggets.com/2022/03/8-free-mit-courses-learn-data-science-online.html

2022 World Medical Innovation Forum, GENE & CELL THERAPY • MAY 2–4, 2022 • BOSTON • IN-PERSON

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

World Medical Innovation Forum as we bring together global leaders to assess the latest opportunities and challenges, from the investment landscape to key technology developments to manufacturing and regulatory barriers. Gain first-hand insights on medicine’s ultimate game changer.

https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/

View all videos on youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCauKpbsS_hUqQaPp8EVGYOg

View all tweets on Twitter.com

#WMIF2022

@MGBInnovation

@MassGenBrigham

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

Mass General Brigham Innovation Discovery Grants Program

https://innovation.massgeneralbrigham.org/about/special-programs/partners-innovation-development-grants-program

World Medical Innovation Forum Videos

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCauKpbsS_hUqQaPp8EVGYOg

World Medical Innovation Forum will be held June 12 – 14 in Boston, MA. We hope you’ll join us for #WMIF2023!

From: “Rieck, Lucy (BOS-WSW)” <LRieck@webershandwick.com>
Date: Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 10:25 AM
To: Aviva Lev-Ari <avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu>
Subject: You’re Invited: Mass General Brigham’s World Medical Innovation Forum

Hi Aviva,

I’m reaching out to extend free registration for you or a colleague to the 8th annual World Medical Innovation Forum (WMIF), taking place May 2-4 at the Westin Copley Place in Boston. This year’s event, co-sponsored with Bank of America, will explore gene and cell therapies (GCT), including the latest opportunities and challenges – from the investment landscape to key technology developments to manufacturing and regulatory barriers.

The event will feature 200 speakers – including CEOs of leading companies in the GCT and biotech fields, investors, entrepreneurs, Harvard clinicians and scientists, government officials and other key influencers – who discover, invest in, and cultivate GCT breakthroughs. Notable speakers include:

  • Peter Marks: Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the FDA
  • Brian Moynihan: CEO, Bank of America
  • Anne Klibansky: President & CEO, Mass General Brigham
  • Senior executives from biopharma and academic institutions of all sizes (including Novartis, BMS, Takeda, Verve, UPenn)

 

You can view the full list of speakers here and the program agenda here.

WMIF is hosted by the Mass General Brigham health system, which comprises 14 hospitals, including two world-renowned medical centers: Mass General and Brigham & Women’s. Since 2015, the Forum has brought together global leaders to assess medical breakthroughs, the investment landscape and technology developments that have the potential to transform the industry.

In addition to a packed agenda, the 2022 “Disruptive Dozen” – 12 breakthrough technologies most likely to have significant impact on gene and cell therapy in the next 18 months – will also be announced.

Please let me know if you would be interested in attending.

Best,

Lucy 

Lucy Rieck

Senior Associate, Healthcare

C: +1 203-331-7894

33 Arch Street

Boston, MA, 02109

webershandwick.com

Ad Age Agency A-List (2020)

Ad Age Best Place to Work (2019)

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www.linkedin.com/in/lucyrieck

AGENDA

7:00 AM – 5:00 PMAmerica Foyer
7:00 AM – 8:00 AMAmerica Foyer
8:00 AM – 9:30 AMAmerica Ballroom

FIRST LOOK

First Look: 8 rapid fire presentations on Mass General Brigham’s new GCT technologies

New Gene and Cell Therapy technologies

Moderators:
Meredith Fisher, PhD
  • Partner, Mass General Brigham Ventures
Roger Kitterman
  • VP, Mass General Brigham Ventures
Presenters:
Bakhos Tannous, PhD
  • Director, Experimental Therapeutics Unit, Director, Viral Vector Core, MGH
  • Professor of Neurology, HMS
Vijaya Ramesh, PhD
  • Co-Director of Neuroscience, Associate Geneticist in Neurology, MGH
  • Professor of Neurology, HMS
Anna Krichevsky, PhD
  • Associate Professor of Neurology, BWH, HMS
Nerea Zabaleta, PhD
  • Principal Investigator, Grousbeck Gene Therapy Center, Mass Eye and Ear
  • Instructor in Ophthalmology, HMS
Francisco Quintana, PhD
  • Professor, Neurology, Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, BWH
  • Kuchroo Weiner Distinguished Professor of Neuroimmunology, BWH
Stephen Haggarty, PhD
  • Director, Chemical Neurobiology Laboratory, Center for Genomic Medicine, MGH
  • Associate Professor of Neurology, HMS
Michael Young, PhD
  • Director, Minda de Gunzburg Center for Retinal Regeneration, Associate Scientist, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Mass Eye and Ear
  • Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Co-Director, Ocular Regenerative Medicine Institute, HMS
Max Jan, MD, PhD
  • Principal Investigator, Center for Cancer Research, MGH
  • Assistant Professor of Pathology, HMS
9:30 AM – 9:45 AM
9:45 AM – 11:15 AMAmerica Ballroom

FIRST LOOK

First Look: 8 rapid fire presentations on Mass General Brigham’s new GCT technologies

New Gene and Cell Therapy technologies

Moderators:
Meredith Fisher, PhD
  • Partner, Mass General Brigham Ventures
Roger Kitterman
  • VP, Mass General Brigham Ventures
Presenters:
Choi-Fong Cho, PhD
  • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, BWH, HMS
Yulia Grishchuk, PhD
  • Assistant Investigator, Center for Genomic Medicine, MGH
  • Assistant Professor of Neurology, HMS
Lynn Bry, MD, PhD
  • Director, Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center, BWH
  • Associate Professor of Pathology, HMS
David Corey, PhD
  • Bertarelli Professor of Translational Medical Science, Neurobiology, HMS
Anil Chandraker, MD
  • Medical Director of Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation, BWH
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, HMS
Ole Isacson, MD, PhD
  • Director, Neuroregeneration Research Institute, McLean
  • Professor of Neurology & Neuroscience, HMS
Marco Mineo, PhD
  • Instructor in Neurosurgery, BWH, HMS
Susan Cotman, PhD
  • Assistant in Neuroscience, Center for Genomic Medicine, MGH
  • Assistant Professor of Neurology, HMS
11:15 AM – 11:45 AM
11:45 AM – 12:45 PM3rd Floor and 7th Floor

DR. IS IN

Dr. Is In Sessions

Understanding long-term Gene and Cell Therapy investment complexities requires a keen awareness of where the science and the markets are headed. That’s why “The Doctor is In” in these updates on the latest GCT technologies. Presented by Mass General Brigham clinicians and innovators from the front lines of care, the sessions are co-hosted by expert analysts from Bank of America and include interactive discussion and Q&A.

1:00 PM – 1:30 PMAmerica Ballroom

Opening Remarks

Introducer:
Scott Sperling
  • Co-Chief Executive Officer, Thomas H. Lee Partners
  • Chairman of the Board of Directors, Mass General Brigham
Panelists:
Anne Klibanski, MD
  • President & CEO, Mass General Brigham
  • Laurie Carrol Guthart Professor of Medicine, HMS
Brian Moynihan
  • Chair & CEO, Bank of America
1:30 PM – 2:00 PMAmerica Ballroom

Co-Chair Kick Off

Moderator:
Susan Hockfield, PhD
  • President Emerita, MIT
Panelists:
Miceal Chamberlain
  • President of Massachusetts, Northeast Region Executive, Bank of America
Marcela Maus, MD, PhD
  • Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, Cancer Center, MGH
  • Associate Professor, Medicine, HMS
Geoff Meacham, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
Ravi Thadhani, MD
  • Chief Academic Officer, Mass General Brigham
2:00 PM – 2:40 PMAmerica Ballroom

GCT’s Historic Potential | Priorities and Trade Offs

This panel features industry leaders who will discuss what the future may hold for gene and cell therapy. Which applications are likely to have the greatest impact? What are the key hurdles to be overcome? What specific platforms and technologies may enable optimal solutions? In what disease areas? Learn more about these and other questions as the panelists discuss the future potential of GCT.

Moderator:
Jean-François Formela, MD
  • Partner, Atlas Venture
Panelists:
Pablo Cagnoni, MD
  • CEO, Rubius Therapeutics
Kristen Hege, MD
  • Senior Vice President, Early Clinical Development, Hematology/Oncology & Cell Therapy, Bristol Myers Squibb
Andrew Plump, MD, PhD
  • President, R&D, Takeda
Catherine Stehman-Breen, MD
  • CEO, Chroma Medicine
2:40 PM – 3:20 PMAmerica Ballroom

Manufacturing | Process Control

Manufacturing quality and cost are critical for enabling rapid growth in GCT. Panelists will explore a variety of critical questions in this space. For example, are there historic parallels that can be drawn between GCT manufacturing and other groundbreaking technologies? How do key manufacturing concerns in GCT differ from those for more conventional pharmaceutical? What are the long-term opportunities for non-viral vectors? Will manufacturing capacity be a limiting factor in GCT growth over the next 5 to 10 years?

Moderator:
John Bishai, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Investment Banking, BofA Securities
Panelists:
Christopher Murphy
  • Vice President Viral Vector Services, Thermo Fisher
Michael Paglia
  • COO, ElevateBio BaseCamp, ElevateBio
Rahul Singhvi, ScD
  • CEO, National Resilience, Inc.
Ran Zheng
  • CEO, Landmark Bio
3:20 PM – 3:40 PM
3:40 PM – 4:05 PMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

Regulatory Perspectives on Gene and Cell Therapy: Past Lessons, Current Challenges, Future Directions

At the end of 2021, roughly 410 novel drugs had been approved in the past decade. On average, there were 40 approvals per year with over 150 of them being between 2018 and 2020. What has changed in the approval process and what is the vision of the future state? What will happen over the next 1–3 years? What does the new iteration of the Prescription Drug User Fees Act (PDUFA) need to do in this area and which fields show the greatest potential for innovation in CGT?

Moderator:
Luk Vandenberghe, PhD
  • Grousbeck Associate Professor in Gene Therapy, Mass General Brigham (on leave)
Panelist:
Peter Marks, MD, PhD
  • Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA
4:10 PM – 4:50 PMAmerica Ballroom

Clinical GCT Trial Design | Regulatory | Strategy, Innovation and Future Direction | Risk vs Hype

This panel will delve into clinical trials for GCT. How do these trials differ from those for conventional therapeutics? What are the key lessons learned from completed GCT trials? How is the regulatory landscape shifting and what will that mean for the future of GCT?

Moderator:
Angela Shen, MD
  • Vice President, Strategic Innovation Leaders, Mass General Brigham Innovation
Panelists:
Laura Aguilar, MD, PhD
  • Co-Founder, Candel Therapeutics
Matthew Frigault, MD
  • Clinical Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, MGH
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine, HMS
Arati Rao, MD
  • Senior Vice President, Clinical Development, PACT Pharma
John Rossi
  • VP Head of Translational Medicine, Syncopation Life Sciences
4:50 PM – 5:15 PMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

mRNA Opportunities: Lessons Learned, Priorities, and the Future of GCT

Dr. Bourla will share what Pfizer has learned from its leadership on mRNA and the development of the Covid vaccine that can be extrapolated to other R&D.

Moderator:
Geoff Meacham, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
Panelist:
Albert Bourla, PhD
  • CEO, Pfizer Inc.
5:15 PM – 6:15 PMAmerica Foyer

#WMIF2022

@MGBInnovation

@MassGenBrigham

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

7:00 AM – 5:00 PMAmerica Foyer
7:00 AM – 8:00 AMAmerica Foyer

Breakfast

Sponsored by Bayer

7:45 AM – 8:00 AMAmerica Ballroom

Opening Remarks

Introducer:
Chris Coburn
  • Chief Innovation Officer, Mass General Brigham
8:00 AM – 8:25 AMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

1:1 Fireside Chat: Robert Califf, MD, Commissioner Food and Drugs, FDA

Moderators:
Tazeen Ahmad
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD
  • Robert B. Colvin, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pathology & Pathologist, MGH
  • Professor of Pathology, HMS
Panelist:
Robert Califf, MD
  • Commissioner of Food and Drugs, US Food and Drug Administration
8:25 AM – 9:05 AMAmerica Ballroom

Living with COVID | Lessons Learned and Looking Ahead

As we enter the third year of the coronavirus pandemic, the world is shifting to a new strategy: living with and managing COVID as a part of our everyday lives. What will the coming year look like? How will mitigation measures differ in this new phase? What about treatment strategies? Should we be bracing for another surge?

Introducer:
Jonathan Kraft
  • President, The Kraft Group
  • Chairman of the Board of Trustees, MGH
Moderator:
David Brown, MD
  • President, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Executive Vice President, Mass General Brigham
Panelists:
Paul Biddinger, MD
  • Chief Preparedness and Continuity Officer, Mass General Brigham
  • Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS
Helen Branswell
  • Senior Writer, STAT
Daniel Kuritzkes, MD
  • Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, BWH
  • Harriet Ryan Albee Professor of Medicine, HMS
Erica Shenoy, MD, PhD
  • Associate Chief, Infection Control Unit, MGH
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, HMS
9:05 AM – 9:45 AMAmerica Ballroom

The Global Biotech Epicenter | New England Now and in 2030

This panel will feature a discussion of global biotech clusters with a deep dive into the New England/Boston area. How does the capital availability, scale, and density of New England drive local growth in GCT? Also, the influx of large biopharmaceutical companies into the region has fueled global outcomes. What is the future impact of these investments and when will they peak? How will the biopharmaceutical landscape in New England appear in 2030?

Moderator:
Anne Finucane
  • Chairman of the Board, Bank of America Europe
Panelists:
Seth Ettenberg, PhD
  • President & CEO, BlueRock Therapeutics
Joel Marcus
  • Executive Chairman & Founder, Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc.
Terry McGuire
  • Founding Partner, Polaris Partners
Vicki Sato, PhD
  • Chairman of the Board, Vir Biotechnology
  • Chairman, Denali Therapeutics
Phillip Sharp, PhD
  • Institute Professor and Professor of Biology, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT
  • Co-Founder, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
9:45 AM – 10:05 AM
10:10 AM – 10:50 AMAmerica Ballroom

The Patient Experience

The role of patients and their experiences are critical as the promise of GCT unfolds. This panel will discuss the patient experience and explore the challenges different patient populations face, both in rare diseases and more common conditions. Panelists will also discuss financial considerations, clinical trial access, and the role of advocacy groups in GCT.

Moderator:
Merit Cudkowicz, MD
  • Chair, Dept of Neurology, MGH
  • Julieanne Dorn Professor of Neurology, HMS
Panelist:
James Beck, PhD
  • CSO, Parkinson’s Foundation
Monica Coenraads
  • CEO, Rett Syndrome Research Trust
Annie Ganot
  • VP, Head of Patient Advocacy, Solid Biosciences
Staci Kallish, DO
  • President, Board of Directors, National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases
  • Medical Geneticist, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Penn Medicine
Rebecca Oberman, PhD
  • Executive Director, Mucolipidosis Type IV (ML4) Foundation
10:50 AM – 11:15 AMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

Meeting the Moment: The Next Wave of Innovation in Cancer and Cardiology

As many countries begin to turn the corner on COVID-19, they face a resurgence of chronic illnesses, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, that were not adequately addressed during the pandemic, and for which new treatments are urgently needed. Population aging – and the resulting increase in chronic diseases associated with aging – has compounded the challenge. There’s never been a greater need for biopharmaceutical innovation – or, fortunately, a greater ability to innovate. Amgen is investing in new discovery research capabilities that portend a revolution in drug design and development.

Moderator:
Geoff Meacham, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
Panelist:
Robert Bradway
  • CEO, Amgen
11:15 AM – 11:20 AMAmerica Ballroom

First Look Award Presentation

Presenters:
Miceal Chamberlain
  • President of Massachusetts, Northeast Region Executive, Bank of America
Nino Chiocca, MD, PhD
  • Neurosurgeon-in-Chief and Chairman, Neurosurgery, BWH
  • Harvey W. Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
11:20 AM – 11:30 AMAmerica Ballroom
11:30 AM – 11:45 AM
11:45 AM – 12:45 PM3rd Floor and 7th Floor

DR. IS IN

Dr. Is In Sessions

Lunch Sponsored by Astellas

Understanding long-term Gene and Cell Therapy investment complexities requires a keen awareness of where the science and the markets are headed. That’s why “The Doctor is In” in these updates on the latest GCT technologies. Presented by Mass General Brigham clinicians and innovators from the front lines of care, the sessions are co-hosted by expert analysts from Bank of America and include interactive discussion and Q&A.

  • Personalizing Cancer Care through RNA Therapies

    11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

    In this session, Dr. Peruzzi will discuss how RNA for cancer therapy is a versatile of a tool for a protean problem.

    Moderator:
    Jason Gerberry
    • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
    Panelist:
    Pierpaolo Peruzzi, MD, PhD
    • Neurosurgeon and Principal Investigator, BWH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
  • Designing for Success: Clinical Trial Approaches for Rare and Ultra-Rare Diseases

    11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

    In this session, Dr. Vavvas will discuss examples of clinical trials in rare diseases and share insights into how clinical trials should be approached for rare and ultra-rare diseases and how study design is not a one-size fits all.

    Moderator:
    Tazeen Ahmad
    • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
    Panelist:
    Demetrios Vavvas, MD, PhD
    • Associate Director of the Retina Service, Mass Eye and Ear
    • Solman and Libe Friedman Professor of Ophthalmology, Co-Director Ocular Regenerative Medical Institute, HMS
  • A New Hope: Cell Therapy and Transplantation for Parkinson’s Disease

    11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

    In this session, hear experts weigh in on the possibilities of cell therapy development and transplantation for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. What does the futures hold and how do we get there?

    Moderator:
    Greg Harrison
    • Vice President, Global Research, BofA Securities
    Panelist:
    Bob Carter, MD, PhD
    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    Todd Herrington, MD, PhD
    • Director, Deep Brain Stimulation Program, MGH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurology, HMS
    Kwang-Soo Kim, PhD
    • Director, Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, McLean
    • Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry, HMS
    Jeffrey Schweitzer, MD, PhD
    • Neurosurgeon, MGH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
  • The Inner Workings of Gene Therapy Manufacturing

    11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

    In this session, Dr. Nikiforow will provide insights into the world of gene therapy manufacturing and the complexities of scaling, costs and insurance reimbursement.

    Moderator:
    Michael Ryskin
    • Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
    Panelist:
    Sarah Nikiforow, MD, PhD
    • Medical Director, Cell Manipulation Core Facility, Technical Director, Immune Effector Cell Therapy Program, DFCI
    • Assistant Professor, HMS
  • The Road Ahead: Regulatory Challenges for Gene and Cell Therapy

    11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

    In this session, Dr. Marks will discuss the ins and outs of regulatory challenges for biological products and therapies in gene and cell therapy and the responsibility to assure safety and effectiveness.

    Moderator:
    Geoff Meacham, PhD
    • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
    Panelist:
    Peter Marks, MD, PhD
    • Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA
  • The Mysterious Dark Genome

    11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

    Dark genome, accounting for ~98.5% of the human genome and containing the non-coding part, offers unprecedented opportunity to look for novel elements that could play a role in human health. This non-coding region consists of repeat elements, enhancers, regulatory sequences and non-coding RNAs. This session will explore this exciting new frontier in biology and how to translate this so called “junk” and previously ignored genome into potential novel therapeutics.

    Moderators:
    Angela Shen, MD
    • Vice President, Strategic Innovation Leaders, Mass General Brigham Innovation
    Richard Young, PhD
    • Professor, Whitehead Institute, MIT
    Panelists:
    Rosana Kapeller, MD, PhD
    • Co-Founder, President & CEO, ROME Therapeutics
    Josh Mandel-Brehm
    • President & CEO, CAMP4 Therapeutics
    Amir Nashat, PhD
    • Managing Partner, Polaris Ventures
    Issi Rozen
    • Venture Partner, GV
1:00 PM – 1:40 PMAmerica Ballroom

Capital Formation | Shaping Innovation

Panelists will discuss the life sciences capital markets environment with particular emphasis on private and public fundraising for GCT companies. What trends do panelists observe that will impact the availability and cost of capital for GCT? Are there novel fundraising structures that will serve GCT in the future?

Moderator:
Greg Butz
  • Managing Director, Head of Life Sciences Investment Banking, BofA Securities
Sumit Mukherjee
  • Managing Director & Head of Healthcare in Equity Capital Markets, BofA Securities
Panelists:
Shelley Chu, MD, PhD
  • Partner, Lightspeed
Stephen Knight, MD
  • President & Managing Partner, F-Prime Capital
Adam Koppel, MD, PhD
  • Managing Director, Bain Capital Life Sciences
Daniel Krizek
  • Portfolio Manager, Citadel
1:40 PM – 2:05 PMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

Ending Cancer as We Know It: The Game Changing Potential of GCT

50 years after the nation’s War on Cancer was launched, do new treatment innovations have us at a turning point to end cancer “as we know it”.

Moderator:
Erin Harris
  • Chief Editor, Cell & Gene
Panelists:
David Scadden, MD
  • Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine, MGH
  • Gerald and Darlene Jordan Professor of Medicine, HMS
Norman Sharpless, MD
  • Former Director, National Cancer Institute
2:05 PM – 2:30 PMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

Vision and Execution: Curing Disease with Cell Therapies

As one of the foremost researchers of CAR-T cancer treatments, Dr. June will share what he believes is the next wave of cell-and-gene based oncology research and how his work set the stage for breakthrough developments in cancer.

Moderators:
Marcela Maus, MD, PhD
  • Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, Cancer Center, MGH
  • Associate Professor, Medicine, HMS
Ravi Thadhani, MD
  • Chief Academic Officer, Mass General Brigham
Panelist:
Carl June, MD
  • Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy, Director, Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Director, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
2:30 PM – 3:10 PMAmerica Ballroom

GCT Development Centers | Academia’s Unique Contribution

This panel will examine the role of academia in driving the promise of GCT. How does academic innovation contribute to the success of GCT? What are the risks and opportunities? Which models have proven most successful and what is the impact on clinical translation? How can these partnerships be accelerated?

Moderator:
Ravi Thadhani, MD
  • Chief Academic Officer, Mass General Brigham
Panelists:
Carl June, MD
  • Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy, Director, Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, Director, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
Maria Millan, MD
  • President & CEO, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine
Richard Mulligan, PhD
  • Mallinckrodt Professor of Genetics, Emeritus, HMS
  • Executive Vice Chairman, Sana Biotechnology, Inc
Norman Sharpless, MD
  • Former Director, National Cancer Institute
3:10 PM – 3:30 PM
3:30 PM – 3:55 PMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

1:1 Fireside Chat: Marc Casper

Moderator:
Derik de Bruin, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
Panelist:
Marc Casper
  • CEO, ThermoFisher
3:55 PM – 4:35 PMAmerica Ballroom

Gene and Cell Therapy | The World Speaks

This panel will bring together gene and cell therapy leaders from across the world to discuss the latest opportunities and challenges in the field, from the investment landscape to key technology developments to manufacturing and regulatory barriers. These global experts will offer first-hand insights on the systemic complexity of this advancing field and its therapeutic promise.

Moderator:
Christine Fox
  • President, Novartis Gene Therapies
Panelists:
Christopher Baum, MD
  • Chairman of the Board of Directors, Berlin Institute of Health
Nicholas Galakatos, PhD
  • Global Head of Life Sciences, Blackstone
Luigi Naldini, MD, PhD
  • Director, San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy
Kendra Rose, PhD
  • VP, Head of New Platforms, Ophthalmology and Hemophilia, Bayer
4:35 PM – 5:15 PMAmerica Ballroom

Control or Mitigation of the Effects of Chronic Neuroinflammation

Chronic inflammation in the brain is now recognized as a contributor to many neurodegenerative diseases, ranging from Parkinson’s disease to multiple sclerosis to Alzheimer’s disease. Are solutions to these historically intractable neurological diseases imminent or several years away? Are market-making platforms identifiable for neurological diseases? Are there novel genetic targets that can be explored? What are the prospects for cell therapies?

Moderator:
Ole Isacson, MD, PhD
  • Director, Neuroregeneration Research Institute, McLean
  • Professor of Neurology & Neuroscience, HMS
Panelists:
Colin Hill
  • CEO, GNS Healthcare
Spyros Papapetropoulos, MD, PhD
  • CMO, Vigil Neuroscience
Richard Ransohoff, MD
  • CMO, Abata Therapeutics
  • Venture Partner, Third Rock Ventures
Beth Stevens, PhD
  • HHMI Investigator, F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Research Program, Boston Children’s Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Neurology, HMS
Rudolph Tanzi, PhD
  • Vice-Chair, Neurology, Director, Genetics and Aging Research Unit, MGH
  • Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology, HMS
5:15 PM – 6:15 PMAmerica Foyer

Attendee Networking Reception

Sponsored by Novartis

#WMIF2022

@MGBInnovation

@MassGenBrigham

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

7:00 AM – 12:00 PMAmerica Foyer
7:00 AM – 8:00 AMAmerica Foyer
8:05 AM – 8:45 AMAmerica Ballroom

The Cell Therapy Landscape | CAR-T to Stem Cells

Cell therapies, ranging from CAR-T cells to stem-cell-based approaches, are emerging as a transformative therapeutic modality. Panelists will examine this emerging landscape and discuss a range of key topics. What drives differentiation in this space given the high number of competing technologies? How will the uptake of autologous cell therapies and allogeneic versions evolve? When will the regenerative medicine market mature?

Moderator:
Marcela Maus, MD, PhD
  • Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, Cancer Center, MGH
  • Associate Professor, Medicine, HMS
Panelists:
Christina Coughlin, MD, PhD
  • CEO, Cytoimmune
Rachel Haurwitz, PhD
  • President & CEO, Caribou Biosciences
Nick Leschly
  • CEO, 2seventy bio
Dhvanit Shah, PhD
  • President & CEO, Garuda Therapeutics
Rusty Williams, MD, PhD
  • Chairman & CEO, Walking Fish Therapeutics
8:50 AM – 9:30 AMAmerica Ballroom

Disrupting Interventions

This panel will explore how GCT technology could lead to disruptions in other areas of medicine, including surgery and medical devices, over the next several years. Could cell replacement therapy in diabetes advance enough to reduce the need for diabetes pumps or insulin? Will stem-cell-based methods for regenerating cartilage advance rapidly enough to disrupt the number of patients seeking hip and knee replacements? How is GCT driving innovations in surgical techniques?

Introducer:
John Fish
  • Chairman & CEO, Suffolk
  • Chair, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Moderator:
Robert Higgins, MD
  • President, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Executive Vice President, Mass General Brigham
Panelists:
Irina Antonijevic, MD, PhD
  • CMO and Head of R&D, Triplet Therapeutics, Inc.
Rachel McMinn, PhD
  • Founder & CEO, Neurogene
Harith Rajagopalan, MD, PhD
  • CEO & Co-Founder, Fractyl Health
Bastiano Sanna, PhD
  • EVP, Chief of Cell & Gene Therapies and VCGT Site Head, Vertex Pharmaceuticals
Jeffrey Schweitzer, MD, PhD
  • Neurosurgeon, MGH
  • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
9:30 AM – 9:55 AMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

1:1 Fireside Chat: Dan Skovronsky

Moderator:
Geoff Meacham, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
Panelist:
Daniel Skovronsky, MD, PhD
  • Chief Scientific and Medical Officer, Eli Lilly and Company
9:55 AM – 10:20 AMAmerica Ballroom

FIRESIDE

Reimagining GCT Production

What is the new generation of approaches to gene therapy manufacturing and delivery? What are the lessons learned from Covid and how can it be applied to custom disease response and the ability to custom design biologic organisms?

Moderator:
Derik de Bruin, PhD
  • Managing Director, Global Research, BofA Securities
Panelist:
Jason Kelly, PhD
  • Co-Founder & CEO, Ginkgo Bioworks
10:20 AM – 11:00 AMAmerica Ballroom

Gene and Cell Therapy Safety | Enduring Framework Required

This panel will feature an in-depth discussion of the safety of gene and cell therapies. What are the unique safety concerns in this field, both acute and potential long-term risks? Which of these concerns are supported by clinical data versus the presumption of theoretical risk? What are the key issues for AAV-based gene therapies? Will redosing become feasible? What are the predominant safety concerns for in vivo versus ex vivo GCT modalities, including base editing?

Moderator:
Christine Seidman, MD
  • Director, Cardiovascular Genetics Center, BWH
  • Smith Professor of Medicine & Genetics, HMS
Panelists:
Rick Fair
  • President & CEO, Bellicum
Alexandria Forbes, PhD
  • President & CEO, MeiraGTx
Sekar Kathiresan, MD
  • CEO, Verve Therapeutics
Rick Modi
  • CEO, Affinia Therapeutics
11:00 AM – 11:40 AMAmerica Ballroom

RNA Therapeutics | Lessons Learned

The label “RNA” encompasses a wide array of biologically active agents spanning therapeutic modalities, vaccines, non-coding controls, and other forms. In this panel we will discuss a number of these forms, discuss examples of recent developments and illustrate why RNA developments represent a promising source of novel therapies and therapeutic approaches.

Moderator:
Janet Wu
  • Anchor/Reporter, Bloomberg
Panelists:
Sarah Boyce
  • President & CEO, Avidity Biosciences, Inc.
Jim Burns, PhD
  • CEO, Locanabio
Jeannie Lee, MD, PhD
  • Molecular Biologist, MGH
  • Professor of Genetics, HMS
Laura Sepp-Lorenzino, PhD
  • Chief Scientific Officer, Executive Vice President, Intellia Therapeutics
11:40 AM – 12:40 PMAmerica Ballroom

Disruptive Dozen: 12 Technologies That Will Reinvent GCT in the Next Five Years

The Disruptive Dozen identifies and ranks the GCT technologies that Mass General Brigham faculty feel will break through over the next one to five years to significantly improve health care.

Moderators:
Nino Chiocca, MD, PhD
  • Neurosurgeon-in-Chief and Chairman, Neurosurgery, BWH
  • Harvey W. Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
Susan Slaugenhaupt, PhD
  • Scientific Director and Elizabeth G. Riley and Daniel E. Smith Jr. Endowed Chair, Mass General Research Institute
  • Professor, Neurology, HMS
Ravi Thadhani, MD
  • Chief Academic Officer, Mass General Brigham
Panelists:
Galit Alter, PhD
  • Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute, MGH
  • Professor of Medicine, HMS
Natalie Artzi, PhD
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine, HMS
Fengfeng Bei, PhD
  • Principal Investigator, Department of Neurosurgery, BWH
  • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
Zheng-Yi Chen, DPhil
  • Associate Scientist, Eaton-Peabody Laboratories, Mass Eye and Ear
  • Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, HMS
Matthew Frigault, MD
  • Clinical Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, MGH
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine, HMS
Michael Gilmore, PhD
  • Chief Scientific Officer, Mass Eye and Ear
  • Sir William Osler Professor of Ophthalmology, HMS
Allan Goldstein, MD
  • Chief of Pediatric Surgery, MGH
  • Surgeon-in-Chief, MassGeneral for Children
Anna Krichevsky, PhD
  • Associate Professor of Neurology, BWH, HMS
Jeannie Lee, MD, PhD
  • Molecular Biologist, MGH
  • Professor of Genetics, HMS
James Markmann, MD, PhD
  • Chief, Division of Transplant Surgery, MGH
  • Claude E. Welch Professor of Surgery, HMS
Khalid Shah, PhD
  • Vice Chairman of Research, Department of Neurosurgery, BWH
  • Professor, HMS
Demetrios Vavvas, MD, PhD
  • Associate Director of the Retina Service, Mass Eye and Ear
  • Solman and Libe Friedman Professor of Ophthalmology, Co-Director Ocular Regenerative Medical Institute, HMS

We Celebrate TEN Years of Excellence, LPBI Group: 4/2012 – 4/2022

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, LPBI Group Founder

  • 1.0 LPBI: 4/2012 – 12/2022
  • 2.0 LPBI: 1/2021 – Present to 2025

See as well,

2022 Update from LPBI Group 

This article has five parts:

Part 1: Web Site Statistics

Part 2: 2.0 LPBI Group’s Four Missions: The Pipelines for 2021-2025

Part 3: Portfolio of IP Assets

Part 4: Certificates – One Year Academic Internships in six Disciplines

Part 5: Top 14 Articles by Views, All Time

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/02/21/update-from-lpbi-group/

For ten years, now, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston, MA – flagship Journal had amassed +2.1 MM views

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

2022 Update from LPBI Group

Author & Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/02/21/update-from-lpbi-group/

The Founder has  8,148 followers  on LinkedIn.com

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/knowledge-portals-system-kps/aviva-lev-ari-phd-rn-founder-lpbi-group-1-0-2-0/

Analytics of e-Reputation

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/04/04/analytics-for-e-reputation-based-on-linkedin-1st-degree-connections-7500-of-lpbi-groups-founder-2012-2022-an-intangible-asset-connections-position-seniority-biotech-pharma-focus/

The Founder is the Editor-in-Chief for the Journal and for the BioMed e-Series – an eighteen volume series of electronic Books in Medicine

https://lnkd.in/ekWGNqA

Page downloads on 4-6-2022

N = 147,069 (till end of Feb. 2022)

Equivalent to 74 Books

Abbreviated electronic Table of Contents (eTOCs) of each Volume in the EIGHTEEN-Volume BioMed e-Series

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/12/12/biomed-e-series-16-volumes-electronic-table-of-contents-of-each-volume/

The Team that produced 18 books in Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/knowledge-portals-system-kps/

LPBI Group’s CSO, 2012-2017: Dr. Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/contributors-biographies/members-of-the-board/larry-bernstein/

The Founder is a UC, Berkeley PhD’83 who had worked at Director Level for SRI Int’l, MITRE, PSC, McGraw Hill. Other employer organizations includes: Monitor Company (now Deloitte), Amdahl Corporation (now Fujitsu), PSC (now Dell Technologies).  Positions in Healthcare are described in this link: http://Scientific and Medical Affairs Chronological CV

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Director & Founder

https://lnkd.in/eEyn69r

Picture date: 2/6/2022

While you are reviewing LPBI Group’s Portfolio of IP assets

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/portfolio-of-ip-assets/

you will note that LPBI Group is venturing into Scientific NFT Marketplaces

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/nft-redefined-format-of-ip-assets/

We plan to MINT as NFTs several of LPBI Group’s IP Asset Classes, such as

  • Curations among our +6,100 Journal articles – IP Asset Class I
  • eTOCs – Electronic Table of Contents of our 18 Books – IP Asset Class II
  • Gallery of +6200 Biological Images embedded in our Journal articles – IP Asset Class V
  • E-Proceedings of +100 Medical and Biotech Conferences we had covered in Real Time, 2013 – 2022 – IP Asset Class III
  • Tweet Collections of the latest 40 Medical and Biotech Conferences we had covered in Real Time, 2013 – 2022 – IP Asset Class III

Examples:

Tweet Collection of 2022 #EmTechDigital @MIT, March 29-30, 2022

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/04/02/tweet-collection-of-2022-emtechdigital-mit-march-29-30-2022/

Analytics for @AVIVA1950 Tweeting at #EmTechDigital

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/04/11/analytics-for-aviva1950-tweeting-at-emtechdigital/

Review our Testimonials

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/praising-lpbi/

Our PAST is here

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/home-website-front-page/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019-vista/

 

Our FUTURE is here

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/vision/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/blockchain-transactions-network/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/synthetic-biology-in-drug-discovery/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2021-medical-text-analysis-nlp/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2021/07/24/proposal-for-new-e-book-architecture-combining-a-bi-lingual-etocs-english-spanish-with-nlps-results-of-medical-text-analysis-series-b-genomics-volume-1-2-and-series-c-cancer-volume-1/

Podcast of our Leaders are here

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/audio-podcasts/

A stream of Ten INNOVATIONS in the Life of LPBI since

inception in 2012 to 2022

  1. 4/2012 – LPBI was the Launcher of a novel Scientific Curation Methodology for scientific findings in published primary research in the Global e-Scientific Publishing industry https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/
  2. As late as 2016, no big publisher, not even one, i.e., Elsevier, John Wiley had curation-based publications: Journals, Books, e-Proceedings or Gallery of thousands of Biological Images as an IP asset class
  3. At LPBI, Curation of scientific findings was performed in +6,000 articles with +2MM e-Views by Global e-Readers
  4. 6/2013 – LPBI was the Publisher of the 1st e-book in Medicine in Kindle Store on the Life Sciences & Medicine Shelf – Upload to this shelf by Amazon.com
  5. 2/2021 – Completion of the 18 volumes, BioMed e-Series in five Specialties in Medicine: each article in each volume is a curation-based publication.
  6. On Amazon.com on 7/2021 – LPBI’s e-books in Medicine enjoy +128,100 PAGE DOWNLOADS – the ONE and ONLY publisher in that range of page downloads. The record is the equivalent of 64 books at an average of 2,000 pages a volume !!!! LPBI smallest book is 1,000 pages and its biggest is +3,700 pages
  7. LPBI launched its Natural Language Processing (NLP) Practice in 1/2020 as Mission #1. NLP is one method of Machine Learning (ML). ML is a family of methods in Artificial Intelligence (AI) which is a field in the Computer Science Academic discipline since the early 60s.
  8. In 4/2021 Linguamatics/IQVIA performed NLP on LPBI’s 33 articles and 20 Biological Images. RESULTS:  +670 entity relations DISCOVERED by Linguamatics and unknown to Pharma and to Insurers, entity relations between:
  • Gene-Disease
  • Gene-Drug
  • Disease-Drug

These results were jointly presented to a Healthcare Insurer, SLC, UT on 7/13/2021, forthcoming meeting in 9/2021.

LPBI and BurstIQ are architecting NOW the first Natural Language Processing – Blockchain Information Technology infrastructure in existence, This statement is TRUE.

  • Updated on 7/28/2021:Fluree Flur.ee, the Web3 Data Platform Open source semantic graph database & LeadSemantics.com presented their solution for NLP and Blockchain on 7/28/2021. Erich G. was lured as Chief architect for LPBI’s Mission #2: NLP & Blockchain
  • Linguamatics, the leader in NLP did not hear of Blockchain and BurstIQ did not have a request for NLP – LPBI PUT THESE TWO TECHNOLOGIES AND PARTIES TOGETHER

See IMAGES SOURCE: BurstIQ image for LPBI

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2021/03/02/2-0-lpbi-is-a-very-unique-organization/

  • On 7/19/2021 – LPBI had launched LPBI India for Synthetic Biology Software for Drug Discovery targeting Galectins – Collaboration with Dr. Raphael Nir, President and CSO, SBH Sciences, Inc., Natick, MA
  • On 7/25/2021 – LPBI announced that it will have the NEWLY to be published BioMed e-Books As Mission #3:
  • A NEW Publishing GENRE of SCIENTIFIC BOOKS

o    Bi-Lingual electronic Table Of Contents (eTOCs), English & Spanish with Montero Language Services, Madrid as the Translator of eighteen Books’ Cover Pages and the 18 books electronic Table of Contents.

o    The Content promotion in the Spanish speaking Countries with GTO, Madrid as AD Agency.

o    NLPs results of Medical Text Analysis with domain knowledge expert Interpretations in Foreign Languages and in Audio: in Spanish and in other languages, forthcoming

o    Original English Book – Only Editorials (Preface, Introductions, Summaries and Epilogue) because the Bi-Lingual part has the eTOCs of the e-Book

o    This is a new genre and a new architecture of 18 MULTIMEDIA SCIENTIFIC e-Books with (a) NLP results of the Medical Text analysis with machine learning, (b) Expert Interpretation of the Visualization Results. Bi-Lingual Podcasts: (c) eTOCs and (d) Bi-Lingual Expert Interpretation in English and Spanish Text and audio Podcasts, and (e) Books’ Editorials in English Audio Podcast

Content promotion proposal by GTO, Madrid

See IMAGES SOURCE: Rendition by GTO, Madrid of BurstIQ Image, above

2.0 LPBI is a Very Unique Organization 

9. The Content Monetization effort includes the Price List for LPBI 1.0 digital products and of LPBI 2.0 – NLP Products

Under development

  • IP Valuation Model per IP asset class is needed to be compared with Master_Financials and to supplement it
  • Pricing Model and Product Mix Models for the digital products to be generated by the process of Text Analysis with NLP are using a Product Price List already developed.
  • The scenarios for a Probabilistic Product Mix for the B2B sector are work-in-progress. Scenarios of Product Mix for $500,000 B2B engagements with NLP scaling up with NLP Alliances. The Alliances are the Labor component and LPBI represent Materials (Content) as 25% of the contract price, on top of total, to be paid by the B2B customer as materials in use for the engagement.
  • B2C Customers on Blockchain will use the Price List for all Digital Products of LPBI 1.0 and LPBI 2.0 – Pay per Use

10. LPBI Group runs FIVE ACADEMIC INTERNSHIPS as Certificate Programs: a One Year long or a One Semester long: Volunteer base offering Verifiable Certificates, as described in https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/certificate-1-year/

 

 

The durability of T cells versus the triggered of high levels of antibodies: Rationale for the development of T cells focused vaccines

Reporters and Curators: Stephen J. Williams, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Scientists to FDA: Don’t forget about T cells

In the face of waning antibody immunity to the coronavirus, scientists demand more attention on T cell immunity which may be more durable

 

A group of nearly 70 academic scientists, doctors, and biotech leaders sent a letter with an unusual request to the US Food and Drug Administration on Thursday: Please pay more attention to T cells, an overlooked part of the immune system that helps clear up viral infections.

The Framingham Study: Across 6 Decades, Cardiovascular Disease Among Middle-Aged Adults – mean life expectancy increased and the RLR of ASCVD decreased. Effective primary prevention efforts and better screening increased.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Temporal Trends in the Remaining Lifetime Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Among Middle-Aged Adults Across 6 Decades: The Framingham Study

Ramachandran S. Vasan

Danielle M Enserro

Vanessa Xanthakis

Alexa S Beiser

 and 

Sudha Seshadri

Originally published 18 Apr 2022

https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.121.057889 Circulation. 2022;0

Background: The remaining lifetime risk (RLR) is the probability of developing an outcome over the remainder of one’s lifespan at any given age. The RLR for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in three 20-year periods were assessed using data from a single community-based cohort study of predominantly White participants

Methods: Longitudinal data from the Framingham study in 3 epochs (epoch 1, 1960-1979; epoch 2, 1980-1999; epoch 3, 2000-2018) were evaluated. The RLR of a first ASCVD event (myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or stroke) from 45 years of age (adjusting for competing risk of death) in the 3 epochs were compared overall, and according to the following strata: sex, body mass index, blood pressure and cholesterol categories, diabetes, smoking, and Framingham risk score groups.

Results: There were 317 849 person-years of observations during the 3 epochs (56% women; 94% White) and 4855 deaths occurred. Life expectancy rose by 10.1 years (men) to 11.9 years (women) across the 3 epochs. There were 1085 ASCVD events over the course of 91 330 person-years in epoch 1, 1330 ASCVD events over the course of 107 450 person years in epoch 2, and 775 ASCVD events over the course of 119 069 person-years in epoch 3. The mean age at onset of first ASCVD event was greater in the third epoch by 8.1 years (men) to 10.3 years (women) compared with the first epoch. The RLR of ASCVD from 45 years of age declined from 43.7% in epoch 1 to 28.1% in epoch 3 (P<0.0001), a finding that was consistent in both sexes (RLR [epoch 1 versus epoch 3], 36.3% versus 26.5% [women]; 52.5% versus 30.1% [men]; P<0.001 for both). The lower RLR of ASCVD in the last 2 epochs was observed consistently across body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, and Framingham risk score strata (P<0.001 for all). The RLR of coronary heart disease events and stroke declined in both sexes (P<0.001).

Conclusions: Over the past 6 decades, mean life expectancy increased and the RLR of ASCVD decreased in the community based, predominantly White Framingham study. The residual burden of ASCVD underscores the importance of continued and effective primary prevention efforts with better screening for risk factors and their effective treatment.

TricValve Transcatheter Bicaval Valves System – Interventional cardiologists at Cleveland Clinic have successfully completed the first implantation in North America

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 7/22/2022

Cardiothoracic surgeons at UC San Francisco performed the first robotically assisted mitral valve prolapse surgery in San Francisco.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/07/22/cardiothoracic-surgeons-at-uc-san-francisco-performed-the-first-robotically-assisted-mitral-valve-prolapse-surgery-in-san-francisco/

 

The Patient for this historic procedure:

An 82-year-old man presenting with severe symptomatic tricuspid regurgitation (TR) and right heart failure (RHF).

Expert Opinion: The Voice of Dr. Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

The TricValve addresses the problem of severe ìncompetance of the tricuspid valve with a relatively simple procedure.

Instead of the challenge of replacing the defective valve, a catheter procedùre places valves at the two venous intake locations, the superior and ìnferior vena cava. A valve at the superior vena cava entrance to the right atrium occurs occasionally in nature, but is usually absent or fenestrated, covering the medial end if the crista supraventricularis.

A similar termed valve is occasionally found in nature on the inferior vena cava. These supernumerary valves can arrest back flow of pressure and volume from the right atrium to the upper and lower venous systems, and alleviate in particular congestion of the liver.

Normally the right atrial pressure is low, in which case this would offer no significant advantage for reproductive success natural selection to offset potential interference with blood flow into the right atrium that might promote thrombosis [Folia Morphology Morphology 66(4):303-6, MRuso].

However, in a setting of right heart failure, such as occurs from pulmonary hypertension, the tricuspid valve often becomes incompetent, and placement of the pair of vena cava valves can alleviate upstream consequences, albeit at the cost of risk of thrombosis and future impediment to other future procedures such as ablation of supraventricular arrhythmia.

The vena cava valves placed by catheter at the Cleveland Clinic helped an 80 year old man alleviate his pressing issue of hepatic congestion. Unlike a replacement tricuspid valve this procedure does not alleviate high pressures dilatìng the right atrium. Instead, it can worsen that problem.

The CLASP II TR trial is investigating the Edwards PASCAL transcatheter repair system [CLASP II TR, Edwards Lifesciences Corp, NIH NCT 0497145]

Survival data for surgìcal tricuspid valve replacements reported 37+-10 percent ten year survival, with average all cause survival of just 8.5 years [Z HIscan, Euro J CT Surgery 32(2) Aug 2007]. None-the‐less,  comparison of patients with vs without intervention for incompetance of the trìcuspid valve favored mechanical intervention [G Dreyfus Ann Thorac Surg 49:706-11,1990, D Adams, JACC 65:1931-8, 2015]. Time will tell which interventìon will prevail, and when these catheter alternatives to open chest surgery should be deployed.

The first implantation in North America: TricValve Transcatheter Bicaval Valves System

The structural heart procedure occurred in February 2022.

Rishi Puri, MD, PhD, an interventional cardiologist with Cleveland Clinic, and Samir Kapadia, MD, chair of cardiovascular medicine at Cleveland Clinic, performed the procedure. Puri has years of experience with the TricValve system, participating in a thorough analysis of its safety and effectiveness in 2021.

The TricValve system features two biological valves designed to be implanted via femoral vein access into the patient’s superior vena cava and inferior vena cava. This allows a therapy without impacting the patient’s native tricuspid valve. It is available in multiple sizes, allowing cardiologists to choose the best option for each individual patient.

Cleveland Clinic’s statement detailing the successful procedure notes that patients with severe TR and RHF have typically had limited treatment options. Tricuspid valve surgery is associated with significant risks, for instance, and prescribing diuretics is problematic when the patient also presents with kidney problems.

“TricValve can potentially provide an effective and low-risk solution for many patients who currently have no treatment options,” Puri said, adding that the workflow is quite similar to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

The TricValve Transcatheter Bicaval Valves System was developed by P+F Products + Features GmbH, a healthcare technology company based out of Vienna, Austria. The solution was granted the FDA’s Breakthrough Device designation in December 2020, but it has still not gained full FDA approval.

This procedure was completed under a compassionate-use clearance from the FDA.

Image Source:

https://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/structural-heart-disease/interventional-cardiologists-complete-first-heart-procedure-its?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=cvb_news

Related Structural Heart Disease Content:

The latest data on mitral valve infective endocarditis after TAVR

VIDEO: TAVR durability outperforms surgical valves

How the continued rise of TAVR has impacted SAVR outcomes

VIDEO: Pascal effective in transcatheter repair of tricuspid valve regurgitation

VIDEO: MitraClip vs. surgical mitral valve replacement

Older LAAO patients, especially women, face a higher risk of complications

RELATED ARTICLES ON TAVR, STRUCTURAL HEART DISEASE, CATH LAB

SOURCE

https://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/structural-heart-disease/interventional-cardiologists-complete-first-heart-procedure-its?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=cvb_news

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Valve

The LINK, above will take the e-Reader to:

  • 247 articles on HUMAN HEART VALVE-RELATED REPAIR Procedures

 

Our book on Cardiac Repair Procedures

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MKHDBHF

 

Analytics for @AVIVA1950 Tweeting at #EmTechDigital

Reporter and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Data SOURCE

https://analytics.twitter.com/user/aviva1950/tweets

See also

Tweet Collection of 2022 EmTechDigital @MIT, March 29-30, 2022

Tweet Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Selective Tweet Retweets for The Technology Review: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2022/04/02/tweet-collection-of-2022-emtechdigital-mit-march-29-30-2022/

TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Tweet earned 122 impressions

Prem Natarajan Vice President Alexa AI device and broadly decisions what stay on edge vs cloud physical obstacles to learn language less constrained Alexa5 more creative
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