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VIDEOS: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

March 11, 2019 / Dicardiology.com

 

 

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology

 

Anthony Chang, M.D., chief intelligence and innovation officer, Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), and medical director of the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovation Institute. He is expert in artificial intelligence (AI). He spoke in several sessions at Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting on the integration of AI in healthcare.

 

 

 

 

RELATED LINKS

Applications for Artificial Intelligence in Cardiovascular Imaging

 

VIDEO: How Artificial Intelligence Can Detect Brain Bleeds

 

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Cardiac Imaging

 

Artificial Intelligence Detects AFib Using Apple Watch Heart Rate Sensor

 

VIDEO: Example of How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Patient Care

 

VIDEO: Use of Artificial Intelligence To Speed Cardiac Clinical Research

 

Use of Artificial Intelligence to Locate Standard Echo Heart Views

 

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Cardiac Ultrasound

 

VIDEO: Examples of Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging Diagnostics

 

VIDEO: Ultrasound’s Integration of Artificial Intelligence and Robotic Echo

 

 

 

SOURCE

From: Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology <mail@sgc-ecms.com>

Reply-To: <DoNotReply@sgc-ecms.com>

Date: Monday, March 11, 2019 at 10:06 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: VIDEO: Artificial intelligence applications for cardiology

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At California Central District Court Juno Therapeutics, Inc. et al v. Kite Pharma, Inc. – Multi-party Patent Infringement

Curator and Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Infringement of Patent: US7446190B2 – which is exclusively licensed to Juno Therapeutics, Inc.

United States

Inventor
Michel Sadelain
Renier Brentjens
John Maher
Current Assignee
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research

Worldwide applications
2003  US

Application US10/448,256 events
2002-05-28
Priority to US38387202P
2008-11-04
Application granted
Application status is Active
Adjusted expiration
Show all events

 

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The present invention provides chimeric TCR’s, nucleic acid polymer encoding the chimeric TCR’s and methods of using the chimeric TCR’s to facilitate T cell response to a specific target. The chimeric TCR’s of the invention combine, in a single chimeric species, the intracellular domain of CD3 ζ-chain (“zeta chain portion”), a signaling region from a costimulatory protein such as CD28 and a binding element that specifically interacts with a selected target. Thus, in accordance with a first aspect of the invention, there is provided a nucleic acid encoding a chimeric T cell receptor, said chimeric T cell receptor comprising a zeta chain, a CD28 signaling region and a binding element that specifically interacts with a selected target. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, there is provided a chimeric T cell receptor comprising a zeta chain portion, a CD28 signaling region and a binding element.

In accordance with the method of the invention a chimeric TCR is provided which comprises a zeta chain portion, a co-stimulatory signaling element and a binding element which specifically interacts with a cellular marker associated with target cells. T-lymphocytes from the individual to be treated, for example a human individual, are transduced with the chimeric TCR. This transduction may occur ex vivo, after which the transduced cells are reintroduced into the individual. As a result, T cell immune response is stimulated in the individual to the target cells.

SOURCE

https://patents.google.com/patent/US7446190B2/en

  • Prior Art Search results: (cells) (nucleic acid) (acid polymer) (cell) (cd28) before:priority:2002-05-28

Assignees Inventors include:

C12P21
C12P21/00
C12P
C12P21/02
C07K14/52
C07K14/715
C07K14/54
C07K14/521
C07K14/47
C07K14/46
C12N9/6432
C12Y304/21006
C07K14/47
C07K14/46
C07K14/475
C07K14/435
A01K2217
A01K2217/00
A01K
A01K2217/075
C12N2533/00
C12N2533/14
C12N2533/18
C12N2533/30
G01N33/502
G01N33/5041
Y10S435/973
G01N33/5008
B01J2219/00648
B01J2219/00306
B82Y15/00
B01J2219/00646
C07K14/70532
C07K14/70503
C07K16/2827
A61K2039/5158
A61K38/1774
A61K31/33
A61K45
A61K45/06
C07K14/70532
C12N2795
C12N2795/00
C12N2795/00011
C07K14/47
C07K14/46
A61K48/00
C07K14/435
C12N2510/00
C12N2502/99
C12N2501/515
C12N2501/51
C07K14/70503
A61K38/00
A61K
C07K14/705
G01N33/6878
G01N33/68
C07K1/047
C07K1/04
C07K14/70503
A01K2217/05
C07K14/705
A01K2217
Y02A50/38
A61K2039/6068
A61K2039/6025
C07K2319/21
C07K14/47
C07K14/46
A61K48/00
C07K14/435
C07K14/4747
C07K14/70575
A61K45/06
A61K45

SOURCE

https://patents.google.com/?q=cells&q=nucleic+acid&q=acid+polymer&q=cell&q=cd28&before=priority:20020528&scholar

 

IRELL & MANELLA LLP Morgan Chu (SBN 70446) Alan J. Heinrich (SBN 212782) Elizabeth C. Tuan (SBN 295020) 1800 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 900 Los Angeles, California 90067-4276 Telephone: (310) 277-1010 Facsimile: (310) 203-7199 Attorneys for

Plaintiffs JUNO THERAPEUTICS, INC., MEMORIAL SLOAN KETTERING CANCER CENTER, and SLOAN KETTERING INSTITUTE FOR CANCER RESEARCH UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research,,

Plaintiffs, v. Kite Pharma, Inc., Defendant. ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

CASE NO.: 2:17-CV-07639

COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT

DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL

Case 2:17-cv-07639 Document 1 Filed 10/18/17 Page 1 of 14 Page ID #:1

Knowing that it infringes the ’190 Patent, Kite challenged the validity of all claims of the ’190 Patent in an inter partes review (“IPR”) in the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“PTO” or “Office”) before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (“PTAB” or “Board”). The PTAB instituted the IPR and then upheld all claims of the ’190 Patent in a Final Written Decision issued December 16, 2016. The PTAB concluded that Kite did not even show “by a preponderance of the evidence”—the lower standard applicable to validity challenges in an IPR—that any claim of the ’190 Patent was unpatentable.

Kite recently received marketing approval from the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) for its Yescarta™ product (axicabtagene ciloleucel) (“axicel” or “Yescarta,” also known as “KTE-C19”) on October 18, 2017. Plaintiffs accordingly bring suit against Kite for infringement based on Kite’s making, using, offering to sell, and selling of its chimeric antigen receptor products that comprise the claimed nucleic acid polymers of the ’190 Patent. 35 U.S.C. § 271(a). Plaintiffs hereby allege for their Complaint against Defendant Kite, on personal knowledge as to their own actions and on information and belief as to the actions of others,

26. Indeed, the DNA sequence of Kite’s retroviral vector demonstrates that Kite’s anti-CD19 chimeric TCR falls within the scope of the ’190 Patent claims. In a document Kite filed with the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (“RAC”), a federal committee that reviews clinical trial protocols that are either directly funded by the National Institutes of Health (“NIH”) or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding, Kite provided the DNA sequence of KTE-C19’s anti-CD19 chimeric TCR vector. Exhibit 10 (KTE-C19 DNA Sequence). The RAC filing described the retroviral vector used as

encoding a chimeric antigen receptor directed against the B cell antigen, CD19 . . . The retroviral vector utilizes the MSGV1 (murine stem cell virus-based splice-gag vector 1) retroviral vector backbone and consists of 7026 bps including the 5’ long terminal repeat (LTR) from the murine stem cell virus (promoter), packaging signal including the splicing donor (SD) and splicing acceptor sites, FMC63- based (anti-CD19 FMC63-28) CAR protein containing a signal peptide (human GM-CSF receptor), FMC63 light chain variable region (FMC63 VL), linker peptide, FMC63 heavy chain variable region (FMC63 VH), CD28 (hinge, transmembrane and cytoplasmic region), and TCR-zeta (cytoplasmic region), followed by the murine stem cell virus 3’LTR. This particular vector was provided by Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg from the Surgery Branch/NCI and is the same vector used in an ongoing RAC-approved clinical trial of which Dr. Stephen A. Rosenberg is the Principal Investigator (OBA/RAC submission 0809-940). . . . [T]he complete nucleotide sequence as determined by the standard nucleotide sequencing protocol is shown in Appendix 2 of this application.

27. During the IPR Kite initiated against the ’190 Patent, Sloan Kettering’s expert, Prof. Thomas Brocker, the Director of the Institute for Immunology at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, compared the chimeric TCR used by Kite’s scientific collaborators to the claims of the ’190 Patent, demonstrating that Kite’s collaborators’ chimeric TCR construct, and thus, Kite’s own KTE-C19 product, falls within the scope of at least claims 1-3 and 5 of the ’190 Patent. Exhibit 12 (Brocker Declaration), ¶ 224. The NCI chimeric TCR analyzed by Prof. Brocker contains the same nucleotide sequence as KTE-C19’s chimeric TCR. See Exhibit 11 (RAC Filing).

28. On October 18, 2017, Kite received approval for the FDA to market and sell Yescarta (axicabtagene ciloleucel) in the United States.

COUNT 1:

INFRINGEMENT OF THE ’190 PATENT UNDER 35 U.S.C. § 271(a)

29. Plaintiffs re-allege and incorporate by reference the allegations contained in paragraphs 1-28 above.

30. to 40. are Plaintiffs’ description of Defendant Infringement on claims of the Patent

MAIN SOURCE for Filings by Plaintiffs

http://litigationtools.maxval-ip.com/UnifiedPatentViewDocument/home/index?caseid=128416

 

 

Plaintiffs:

  • Juno Therapeutics, Inc.,
  • Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center,
  • Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research

Defendant and Counterclaimant

  • Kite Pharma, Inc.

 

Effective April 17, 2018, Magistrate Judge Rozella A. Oliver will be located at the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, COURTROOM 590 on the 5th floor, located at 255 East Temple Street, Los Angeles, California 90012. All Court appearances shall be made in Courtroom 590 of the Roybal Federal Building,

100

Oct 9, 2018

MINUTE IN CHAMBERS CLAIM CONSTRUCTION ORDER by Judge S. James Otero: The Court finds that a POSITA encountering the 190 Patent prior to the CoC would have understood SEQ ID NO:6 to begin with nucleotide 336 of the CD28 protein. The Court construes the disputed claim terms as follows: 1. The amino acid sequence encoded by SEQ ID NO:6 before the Certificate of Correction means Amino Acids 113-220 of CD28 (starting with lysine (K)) and after the Certificate of Correction means Amino Acids 114-220 of CD28 (starting with isoleucine (I)). 2. nucleic acid polymer encoding… a binding element that specifically interacts with a selected target is given its plain and ordinary meaning. (shb) (Entered: 10/10/2018)

 

Main Doc

 

Juno Therapeutics, Inc. et al v. Kite Pharma, Inc. (2:17-cv-07639), California Central District Court

California Central District Court
Judge: S James Otero
Referred: Jacqueline Chooljian
Case #: 2:17-cv-07639
Nature of Suit 830 Property Rights – Patent
Cause 35:271 Patent Infringement
Case Filed: Oct 18, 2017
Docket last updated: 03/08/2019 11:59 PM PST 

Thursday, March 07, 2019
150 order For Order Thu 12:50 PM 
ORDER GRANTING DEFENDANT KITE PHARMA, INC.S EX PARTE APPLICATION FOR AN EXTENSION OF TIME FOR THE MAGISTRATE JUDGE TO HEAR MOTIONS TO COMPEL PRODUCTION OF DOCUMENTS AND WITNESSES144 by Judge S. James Otero: 1. Time is extended until April 17, 2019, for the Magistrate Judge to hear (a) any motions to compel Plaintiffs to produce documents that Kite has already identified as deficient in Plaintiffs production and Plaintiffs have not yet produced, and (b) a motion to compel Bristol-Myers Squibb Company to produce documents in response to Kites subpoena; and 2. Time is extended until May 10, 2019, for the Magistrate Judge to hear a motion to compel deposition testimony regarding the documents described in paragraph 1 above. (lc) Modified on 3/7/2019 (lc)
Wednesday, March 06, 2019
149 transcript -Transcript Order Form (G-120) Wed 2:56 PM 
TRANSCRIPT ORDER as to Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc. for Court Smart (CS). Court will contact Adam R. Lawton at adam.lawton@mto.com with further instructions regarding this order. Transcript preparation will not begin until payment has been satisfied with the transcription company. (Lawton, Adam)
Tuesday, March 05, 2019
147 respm Reply (Motion related) Tue 5:31 PM 
REPLY in support of EX PARTE APPLICATION for Order for Extension of Time for the Magistrate Judge to Hear Motions to Compel Production of Documents and Witnesses 144 filed by Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc..(Lawton, Adam)
Att: 1 Reply Declaration of Adam R. Lawton
146 respm Objection/Opposition (Motion related) Tue 12:26 PM 
OPPOSITION Ex Parte Application re: EX PARTE APPLICATION for Order for Extension of Time for the Magistrate Judge to Hear Motions to Compel Production of Documents and Witnesses 144Opposition filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research.(Wells, Crawford)
Att: 1 Declaration,
Att: 2 Exhibit 1
Monday, March 04, 2019
148 minutes Telephone Conference For Order re Discovery Matter Wed 9:27 AM 
MINUTES OF CONTINUED PRE-MOTION TELEPHONIC DISCOVERY CONFERENCE settling139 Motion re: Informal Discovery Dispute held before Magistrate Judge Karen L. Stevenson. Should Judge Otero grant Kite’s Ex Parte Application, Kite may file a motion to compel. In the interim, at the request of counsel for non-party BMS, who does not receive the CM/ECF notifications in this case, the Court ORDERS Defendant Kite, to provide copies to BMS counsel of the following: (1) Minutes of Pre-Motion Telephonic Discovery Conference held on February 26, 2019, (Dkt. No. 138) (see document for further details). Court Recorder: XTR 03-04-19. (hr)
145 respm Declaration (Motion related) Mon 12:52 PM 
DECLARATION of Adam R. Lawton (Corrected) in support of EX PARTE APPLICATION for Order for Extension of Time for the Magistrate Judge to Hear Motions to Compel Production of Documents and Witnesses 144 filed by Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc.. (Lawton, Adam)
144 17 pgs motion Order Mon 11:50 AM 
EX PARTE APPLICATION for Order for Extension of Time for the Magistrate Judge to Hear Motions to Compel Production of Documents and Witnesses filed by Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc.. (Lawton, Adam)
Att: 1 Proposed Order,
Att: 2 Declaration of Adam R. Lawton,
Att: 3 Exhibit 1,
Att: 4 Exhibit 2,
Att: 5 Exhibit 3,
Att: 6 Exhibit 4,
Att: 7 Exhibit 5,
Att: 8 Exhibit 6,
Att: 9 Exhibit 7,
Att: 10 Exhibit 8,
Att: 11 Exhibit 9,
Att: 12 Exhibit 10,
Att: 13 Exhibit 11,
Att: 14 Exhibit 12,
Att: 15 Exhibit 13,
Att: 16 Exhibit 14,
Att: 17 Exhibit 15,
Att: 18 Exhibit 16
Thursday, February 28, 2019
143 order Leave to File Excess Pages Thu 10:50 AM 
ORDER GRANTING-IN-PART DEFENDANT KITE PHARMA, INC.’S APPLICATION FOR LEAVE TO FILE A 10-PAGE REPLY BRIEF IN SUPPORT OF MOTION FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT OF NONINFRINGEMENT140 by Judge S. James Otero. It is hereby ordered that Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc. may file a reply brief of no more than 10 pages in support of its motion for summary judgment of noninfringement. Plaintiffs are permitted to file a sur-reply, not to exceed 7 pages, addressing the admissibility of the expert declarations submitted in support of its opposition to Defendant’s motion for summary judgment of noninfringement. The sur-reply shall be filed no later than 5 days from Defendant’s reply. IT IS SO ORDERED. (lom)

Juno Therapeutics, Inc. v. Kite Pharma, Inc. (2:17-cv-07639)

District Court, C.D. California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recorded here ONLY if PDF is Downloadable

Oct 18, 2017

COMPLAINT Receipt No: 0973-20685642 – Fee: $400, filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit 1, # 2 Exhibit 2, # 3 Exhibit 3, # 4 Exhibit 4, # 5 Exhibit 5, # 6 Exhibit 6, # 7 Exhibit 7, # 8 Exhibit 8, # 9 Exhibit 9, # 10 Exhibit 10, # 11 Exhibit 11, # 12 Exhibit 12, # 13 Exhibit 13, # 14 Exhibit 14) (Attorney Morgan Chu added to party Juno Therapeutics, Inc.(pty:pla), Attorney Morgan Chu added to party Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center(pty:pla), Attorney Morgan Chu added to party Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research(pty:pla))(Chu, Morgan) (Entered: 10/18/2017)

Main Doc

3

Oct 18, 2017

Request for Clerk to Issue Summons on Complaint (Attorney Civil Case Opening),, 1 filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. (Chu, Morgan) (Entered: 10/18/2017)

SKIPPED

46

Jan 29, 2018

JOINT REPORT Rule 26(f) Discovery Plan ; estimated length of trial 5-12 days, filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research.. (Attachments: # 1 Appendix 2)(Chu, Morgan) (Entered: 01/29/2018)

SKIPPED

66

Mar 29, 2018

AMENDED ANSWER and AMENDED COUNTERCLAIM to Complaint (Attorney Civil Case Opening),, 1 filed by Defendant and Counterclaimant Kite Pharma, Inc.. (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit A, # 2 Exhibit B, # 3 Exhibit C, # 4 Exhibit D, # 5 Exhibit E, # 6 Exhibit F, # 7 Exhibit G, # 8 Exhibit H, # 9 Exhibit I, # 10 Exhibit J, # 11 Exhibit K, # 12 Exhibit L, # 13 Exhibit M, # 14 Appendix (redline version of amended pleading))(Lawton, Adam) (Entered: 03/29/2018)

SKIPPED

74

May 11, 2018

STIPULATION for Protective Order filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. (Attachments: # 1 Proposed Order)(Tuan, Elizabeth) (Entered: 05/11/2018)

75

May 14, 2018

ORDER GRANTING PROTECTIVE ORDER by Magistrate Judge Rozella A. Oliver re Stipulation for Protective Order 74 (dml) (Entered: 05/14/2018)

Protective Order

SKIPPED

85

Aug 13, 2018

DECLARATION of Alan J. Heinrich re Brief (non-motion non-appeal), 84 ISO Juno’s Claim Construction Brief filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Counter Defendants Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit Exhibit 1, # 2 Exhibit Exhibit 2, # 3 Exhibit Exhibit 3, # 4 Exhibit Exhibit 4, # 5 Exhibit Exhibit 5, # 6 Exhibit Exhibit 6, # 7 Exhibit Exhibit 7, # 8 Exhibit Exhibit 8, # 9 Exhibit Exhibit 9, # 10 Exhibit Exhibit 10, # 11 Exhibit Exhibit 11)(Heinrich, Alan) (Entered: 08/13/2018)

Main Doc

Declaration

115

Dec 3, 2018

SEALED DECLARATION IN SUPPORT OF APPLICATION to file document (Reply in Support of Motion to Dismiss and Exhibits J-M) under seal 114 filed by Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc.. (Attachments: # 1 Unredacted Document Reply in Support of Motion to Dismiss, # 2 Unredacted Document Exhibit J, # 3 Unredacted Document Exhibit K, # 4 Unredacted Document Exhibit L, # 5 Unredacted Document Exhibit M)(Lawton, Adam) (Entered: 12/03/2018)

Main Doc

117

Jan 4, 2019

STIPULATION to AMEND Protective Order 75 filed by Defendant Kite Pharma, Inc.. (Attachments: # 1 Amended Protective Order, # 2 Proposed Order)(Lawton, Adam) (Entered: 01/04/2019)

118

Jan 7, 2019

ORDER GRANTING AMENDED PROTECTIVE ORDER by Magistrate Judge Rozella A. Oliver, re Stipulation to Amend Protective Order 117 (dml) (Entered: 01/07/2019)

119

Jan 7, 2019

AMENDED PROTECTIVE ORDER by Magistrate Judge Rozella A. Oliver, re Order Granting 118 (dml) (Entered: 01/07/2019)

122

Jan 24, 2019

Joint STIPULATION to Extend Discovery Cut-Off Date to March 29, 2019 filed by Plaintiffs Juno Therapeutics, Inc., Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. (Attachments: # 1 Proposed Order)(Heinrich, Alan) (Entered: 01/24/2019)

Main Doc

SOURCE

https://www.courtlistener.com/docket/6175992/juno-therapeutics-inc-v-kite-pharma-inc/

Other related sources

35 U.S.C. 271 – Infringement of patent

Other related articles published in this Online Open Access Scientific Journal, include the following:

Economic Potential of a Drug Invention (Prof. Zelig Eshhar, Weitzman Institute, registered the patent) versus a Cancer Drug in Clinical Trials: CAR-T as a Case in Point, developed by Kite Pharma, under Arie Belldegrun, CEO, acquired by Gilead for $11.9 billion, 8/2017.

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/10/04/economic-potential-of-a-drug-invention-prof-zelig-eshhar-weitzman-institute-registered-the-patent-versus-a-cancer-drug-in-clinical-trials-car-t-as-a-case-in-point-developed-by-kite-pharma-unde/

 


Tips on 280 Character Tweets on Twitter.com

 

The FIT members @LPBI Group are edified by the following advice and tips on TWEETING

 

From: Gail Thornton <gailsthornton@yahoo.com>

Reply-To: Gail Thornton <gailsthornton@yahoo.com>

Date: Saturday, March 2, 2019 at 5:33 PM

To: Rick Mandahl <rmandahl@gmail.com>, Amnon Danzig <amnon.danzig@gmail.com>, Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Re: In 280 Characters

Aviva:

Please let me offer some recommendations, suggestions and advice on how to compose tweets moving forward. These tips are a departure for how you currently compose and post tweets.

You need to find businesses, universities, research centers, who have a large number of followers (upwards of 500,000) and target them with your tweets.

Keep Tweets conversational.   Avoid business jargon when possible.

Think about how your content will be consumed by your followers. Would they want to retweet it or pass it along to others? Incorporate humor, inspiration and newsworthy content to draw followers in.

Twitter is particularly powerful at driving “amplification” for brand messages–retweets that share your message. In fact, 78% of user engagement with a brand’s Tweets is in the form of Retweets, This is essential in getting more people to read your tweets.

Tweets that contained more adverbs and verbs have a higher click-through rate than tweets with more nouns and adjectives. So the general rule that action words make for stronger, more compelling writing is also true for Tweets.

SUPER IMPORTANT: 

Consider creating a hashtag that is short, recognizable by followers, and allows them to easily follow along. If you’re using an existing hashtag, ensure you’re adding value to the conversation. The volume of hashtags is important as well: one or two hashtags can get you up to two times more engagement than tweets without hashtags (not 8-9-10), according to a study by Buddy Media/Salesforce.

There is usually a spike in retweets among those in the 71-100 character range—the “medium” length tweets column in this chart.   

 

Tweets with images received 18% more click-throughs, 89% more favorites, and 150% more retweets.

There is a 30% greater engagement rate when Tweets are published during the day (between 8AM-7PM). This makes sense if you consider the majority of news, store hours and activities happen during the day.

For example, a content calendar that you should adapt for LPBI. All businesses with Twitter accounts have a monthly content calendar that precisely and strategically lays out each day what you want to tweet. It is not a random act of tweeting that gets you noticed.

  • On Monday, you could launch a Twitter-only promotion for your followers. Tweet an online offer code or a secret word for customers to use when they visit your business.
  • On Tuesday, tweet a behind-the-scenes tour of your business. Highlight how your products are made or where they are sourced from.
  • On Wednesday: Create a regular series of Tweets that are informative or surprising such as tips.
  • On Thursday, retweet a few positive customer reviews. Or tweet some industry-related news your followers might find interesting.
  • Finally on Fridays, give customers a glimpse into your workplace culture. Tweet photos or Vine videos of your colleagues and employees hard at work or having fun.

Audio Podcasting @LPBI Group

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

On 3/9/2019 – Gail Thornton wrote:

The podcast idea is a good one if the content is unique to LPBI, which means podcasts need to created specifically for LBPI. Podcast ideas need to be created one per month, for example, and there  needs to be a calendar of them for the year with a specific person responsible for conducting it. 

Your aim is to get medical/scientific trade publications interested in retweeting your offerings — or interested in interviewing you or positioning LPBI and its key authors/writers as thought leaders on medical or scientific topics.

My idea: Anyone on the LPBI team can write a #ThoughtLeaderThursdays post for LinkedIn on a specific topic. These are creatively written brief articles on industry knowledge about a specific topic, current trends in science or insights into a scientific topic.

The posts are toughly 800-1,000 words. If anyone knows of a graphic designer, then a photo of the author can accompany the article along with a compelling graphic. Again, this is another way for others to share this post and for LPBI to develop a greater following of people

on social/digital media. On LinkedIn, type in #thoughtleaderthursdays and you’ll see examples. 

 

LinkedIn

LinkedIn

 

On 3/10/2019 – Dr. Williams wrote

Notes from book on Audio Podcasting

  1. Microphones -MOST important part is getting a good microphone
  2. Yeti by Blue Micorphone BEST
  3. Audiotechnia ATR BEST
  4. Logitech is OK but not best
  5. Test your microphones
  6. Test direction of microphone – above your mouth produces a nasal sound. Microphone at your throat produces too much bass
  7. Test microphone distance – SPEAK in NORMAL voice then adjust the GAIN later. Note: Skype does a good job auto-adjusting the gain so don’t worry while conducting interviews about Gain issues
  8. Get good headphones
  9. Eliminates background noise. Get good headphones like BEATS STUDIO which will detect any background noise during recording.

*** NOTE if doing a co-host podcast USE SKYPE

  1. Recording on Skype
  2. Record using either the Pamela or Call recorder Program. ALWAYS CHOOSE .wav format, never .mp3 format because . wav has higher quality
  3. EDITING -probably the SECOND MOST IMPORTANT PROCESS. There are three suggested audio editing software programs
  4. Audacity – this is a FREE program
  5. Adobe Audition – very good but $300
  6. If you have a Macintosh or Apple it comes with Garageband, a very good audio editing software
  7. Hosting
  8. If uploading a weekly show you will need a hosting site with at least 125 MB capacity per month
  9. If using WORDPRESS use the plugin Blubrry Power Press: lets you easily put in your audiopodcast
  10. Upload to itunes – it takes a week but they will give you a URL so you can put it on your blog site

 

  • On 3/9/2019 – Aviva posted

Top 10 CRISPR Podcasts Every Scientist (& Non-Scientist) by Synthego.com

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/03/09/top-10-crispr-podcasts-every-scientist-non-scientist-by-synthego-com/

  • On 3/12/2015 – Dr. Williams posted

Podcast Review: Quiet Innovation Podcast on Obtaining $ for Your Startup

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/12/podcast-review-quiet-innovation-podcast-on-obtaining-for-your-startup/

 

  • On 1/25/2016 – Aviva posted

Launching LPBI’s, Fourth Line of Business (D): FIVE Podcast – Audio Series in BioMed

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/25/launching-lpbis-fourth-line-of-business-d-five-podcast-audio-series-in-biomed/

 

  • On 3/17/2016 – Aviva posted

CRISPR: A Podcast from Nature.com on Gene Editing

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/17/crispr-a-podcast-from-nature-com-on-gene-editing/

 

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Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

This article appeared on the website of Cardiovascular Business

‘Patient No. 1’ from a Hep C heart transplant study shares his story

By the time three transplant physicians approached Tom Giangiulio Jr. about being the first patient in a new clinical trial to accept a heart from a Hepatitis C-positive donor, Giangiulio didn’t have much of a choice.

He had already been on the heart transplant waitlist for more than two years, he was a live-in at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and he had a body size (6-foot-2, 220 pounds) and blood type (O-positive) that was difficult to match to a donor.

It took Giangiulio less than 24 hours to speak to his previous cardiologist and his family and decide to enroll in the program. The doctors at Penn explained to him that because of new medications that can cure Hepatitis C, they were confident the virus could be eradicated post-transplant.

“There was no hesitation at all, not with me,” said Carin Giangiulio, Tom’s wife of 33 years. “Because I knew what the alternative was and we didn’t have too much choice except for going on a VAD (ventricular assist device) … and he didn’t want to do that. I said, ‘If they have a cure, then it’s a no-brainer. Let’s just do it.’ And I’m glad we did because I don’t think he would’ve been here today.”

Tom, 59, is set to celebrate his second anniversary with his new heart in June. He received the heart the day after Father’s Day in 2017 and subsequently contracted Hepatitis C, which was promptly wiped out with a 12-week regimen of elbasvir/grazoprevir (Zepatier).

Some of Giangiulio’s doctors at Penn published in February their experience with the first 10 patients in the clinical trial, called USHER, in the American Journal of Transplantation. All nine patients who survived were cured of Hepatitis C thanks to the antiviral therapy.

The implications of the research are massive, said Rhondalyn McLean, MD, MHS, the medical director of Penn’s heart transplant program and lead author of the recently published study. For the past two decades, the U.S. has struggled to increase the number of heart transplants above about 3,000 per year. And every year, patients die waiting for a heart transplant or become too sick to handle a transplant surgery.

McLean estimated 700 hearts from donors with Hepatitis C are discarded each year in the U.S. If even half of those are suitable for transplant, it would increase by 10 percent the number of organs that are available for implantation.

“There are so many people who have end-stage heart failure who die waiting for transplant, so anytime that we can increase our access to organs then I think we’re all going to be happy about that,” McLean said. “I think the people believe in the medicine, they believe that Hepatitis C is curable, so the risk to these folks is low. With the results of the study, I think we’ve proven that we can do this safely and the medications have great efficacy.”

Transplanting Hepatitis C-positive hearts isn’t a new idea, McLean explained.

“We used to do this all the time (with) the thinking that Hepatitis C usually doesn’t cause a problem for many, many years, so if hearts are only going to last 13 years or so and Hepatitis C doesn’t usually cause a problem for 30 years in someone, it should be an OK thing to do,” she said.

But then a study published in the 1990s found Hepatitis C-negative patients who accepted a heart from a donor with Hepatitis C actually had an increased risk of death compared to those who received normal hearts, and the practice of using these organs ceased.

However, with the new medications—the first commercially available treatment for Hepatitis C was approved by the FDA in 2014—McLean and her team are systematically studying the safety of implanting these hearts and then wiping out the virus once it’s contracted. And they’re optimistic about the program, which showed the first 10 patients had no evidence of the virus after their 12-week medication regimens.

“That met the criteria for sustained virologic response and those patients are deemed to be cured,” she said. “There’s no reason to think that this population would be any different than your normal, nontransplant population (in terms of Hepatitis C reappearing) so I think it was a pretty successful study.”

Penn researchers are also studying a similar approach in kidney and lung transplant candidates, which could help patients stuck on waitlists for those organs as well.

McLean described the increasing availability of these organs as an “unfortunate benefit” of the opioid epidemic. Through sharing needles, many opioid users are contracting Hepatitis C and dying young. Organs from young donors tend to perform better and often have no other problems, so solving the Hep C issue through medication could have a huge impact if this strategy is eventually rolled out on a broader scale.

“It’s hard when you have single-center studies,” McLean said. “They’re always promising, but in order to get a better assessment of what we’re doing and how the drug is doing I think you need to combine numbers so there has to be a registry that looks at all of the patients who have received these drugs and then using numbers to determine whether this is a successful strategy for us. And I believe that it will be.”

Those are the large-scale implications of this research. Tom Giangiulio can share the personal side.

Patient No. 1

Giangiulio said he feels “extremely gifted” to be Patient No. 1 in the USHER program. He knows he may not be alive if he wasn’t.

He recalls going into ventricular tachycardia about a week before his transplant and said it “scared the daylights” out of him.

“The amount of red tape, meetings and research, technology, and things that had to happen at a very precise moment in time for me to be the first … it’s mind-boggling to think about it,” he said. “But for all that to happen and for it to happen when it happened—and for me to get the heart when I got it—there was a lot of divine intervention along with a lot of people that were involved.”

Giangiulio has also experienced some powerful moments since receiving the transplant. After a bit of written correspondence with his donor’s family, he met the young man’s family one weekend in December of 2018.

He said riding over to the meeting was probably the most tense he’s ever been, but once he arrived the experience far exceeded his expectations.

“We were there for 2 ½ hours and nobody wanted to leave,” Giangiulio said.

The donor’s mother got Giangiulio a gift, a ceramic heart with a photograph of her son. A fellow transplant patient had told Giangiulio about a product called Enso, a kidney-shaped object you can hold in your hand which plays a recording of a user’s heartbeat.

Giangiulio decided to give it to her.

“I was very cautious at the advice of the people here at Penn,” he said. “Nobody knew how she would react to it. It might bother her, she could be thrilled to death. And she was, she was thrilled to death with it and she sleeps with it every night. She boots up the app and she listens to my heartbeat on that app every night.”

Another moment that sticks out to Giangiulio is meeting Patient No. 7 in the USHER program, who he remains in touch with. They ran into each other while waiting to get blood work done, and began talking about their shared experience as transplant recipients.

The clinical trial came up and Giangiulio slow-played his involvement, asking Patient No. 7 about the trial and not letting on that he was ultra-familiar with the program.

When Giangiulio finally told him he was Patient No. 1, Patient No. 7 “came launching out of his chair” to hug him.

“He said, ‘I owe you my life,’” Giangiulio recalled.

After Giangiulio responded that it was the doctors he really owed, Patient No. 7 said he had specifically asked how Patient No. 1 was doing when McLean first offered the program to him.

“She explained that I was going to be No. 7. … I didn’t care about 6, 5, 4, 3 or 2. I wanted to know how No. 1 was doing,” Giangiulio recalled of the conversation. “He said, ‘That was you. … They told me how well you were doing and that if I wanted you’d come here and talk to me, so I owe you.’”

Giangiulio feels strongly about giving back and reciprocating the good fortune he’s had. That’s why he talks to fellow patients and the media to share his story—because it could save other people’s lives, too.

He can’t do as much physical labor as he used to, but he remains involved in the excavating company he owns with his brothers and is the Emergency Management Coordinator for Waterford Township, New Jersey. He also serves on the township’s planning board and was previously Director of Public Safety.

“To me, he’s Superman,” Carin Giangiulio said. “It was insane, completely insane what the human body can endure and still survive.”

That now includes being given a heart with Hepatitis C and then wiping out the virus with the help of modern medicine.

“I would tell (other transplant candidates) to not fear it, especially if you’re here at Penn,” Giangiulio said. “I know there’s a lot of good hospitals across the country, but my loyalty kind of lies here for understandable reasons.”

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2016

People with blood type O have been reported to be protected from coronary heart disease, cancer, and have lower cholesterol levels.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/11/people-with-blood-type-o-have-been-reported-to-be-protected-from-coronary-heart-disease-cancer-and-have-lower-cholesterol-levels/

2015

A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery from Diagnosis and Intervention to Recovery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/10/a-patients-perspective-on-open-heart-surgery-from-diagnosis-and-intervention-to-recovery/

No evidence to change current transfusion practices for adults undergoing complex cardiac surgery: RECESS evaluated 1,098 cardiac surgery patients received red blood cell units stored for short or long periods

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/08/no-evidence-to-change-current-transfusion-practices-for-adults-undergoing-complex-cardiac-surgery-recess-evaluated-1098-cardiac-surgery-patients-received-red-blood-cell-units-stored-for-short-or-lon/

2013

ACC/AHA Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/05/accaha-guidelines-for-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-surgery/

On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac SurgeryPrediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/

 

Editor’s note:

I wish to encourage the e-Reader of this Interview to consider reading and comparing the experiences of other Open Heart Surgery Patients, voicing their private-life episodes in the ER that are included in this recently published volume, The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/21/the-voices-of-patients-hospital-ceos-health-care-providers-caregivers-and-families-personal-experience-with-critical-care-and-invasive-medical-procedures/

 

I also wish to encourage the e-Reader to consider, if interested, reviewing additional e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases from the same Publisher, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, on Amazon.com.

  • Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms, on Amazon since 6/2/12013

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

  • Cardiovascular, Volume Two: Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation, on Amazon since 11/30/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics, on Amazon since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four: Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases, on Amazon since 12/26/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A


Top 10 CRISPR Podcasts Every Scientist (& Non-Scientist) by Synthego.com

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

  • On 3/12/2015 – Dr. Williams posted

Podcast Review: Quiet Innovation Podcast on Obtaining $ for Your Startup

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/12/podcast-review-quiet-innovation-podcast-on-obtaining-for-your-startup/

 

  • On 1/25/2016 – I posted

Launching LPBI’s, Fourth Line of Business (D): FIVE Podcast – Audio Series in BioMed

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/25/launching-lpbis-fourth-line-of-business-d-five-podcast-audio-series-in-biomed/

 

  • On 3/17/2016 – I posted

CRISPR: A Podcast from Nature.com on Gene Editing

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/17/crispr-a-podcast-from-nature-com-on-gene-editing/

 

 

Download eBook


CRISPR 101

CRISPR has ignited a revolution. Although it’s a relatively recent discovery in the history of biotechnology, CRISPR has quickly become a standard laboratory tool. This comprehensive CRISPR 101 eBook is designed to ease any scientist into the world of CRISPR by providing an overview of its fundamentals.

Download

Download eBook


CRISPR 101

CRISPR has ignited a revolution. Although it’s a relatively recent discovery in the history of biotechnology, CRISPR has quickly become a standard laboratory tool. This comprehensive CRISPR 101 eBook is designed to ease any scientist into the world of CRISPR by providing an overview of its fundamentals.

Download

SOURCE

https://www.synthego.com/blog/10-podcasts-every-crispr-scientist-will-love


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

The bacterial makeup of human milk is influenced by the mode of breastfeeding, according to a new study. Although previously considered sterile, breast milk is now known to contain a low abundance of bacteria. While the complexities of how maternal microbiota influence the infant microbiota are still unknown, this complex community of bacteria in breast milk may help to establish the infant gut microbiota. Disruptions in this process could alter the infant microbiota, causing predisposition to chronic diseases such as allergies, asthma, and obesity. While it’s unclear how the breast milk microbiome develops, there are two theories describing its origins. One theory speculates that it originates in the maternal mammary gland, while the other theory suggests that it is due to retrograde inoculation by the infant’s oral microbiome.

 

To address this gap in knowledge scientists carried out bacterial gene sequencing on milk samples from 393 healthy mothers three to four months after giving birth. They used this information to examine how the milk microbiota composition is affected by maternal factors, early life events, breastfeeding practices, and other milk components. Among the many factors analyzed, the mode of breastfeeding (with or without a pump) was the only consistent factor directly associated with the milk microbiota composition. Specifically, indirect breastfeeding was associated with a higher abundance of potential opportunistic pathogens, such as Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonadaceae. By contrast, direct breastfeeding without a pump was associated with microbes typically found in the mouth, as well as higher overall bacterial richness and diversity. Taken together, the findings suggest that direct breastfeeding facilitates the acquisition of oral microbiota from infants, whereas indirect breastfeeding leads to enrichment with environmental (pump-associated) bacteria.

 

The researchers argued that this study supports the theory that the breast milk microbiome is due to retrograde inoculation. Their findings indicate that the act of pumping and contact with the infant oral microbiome influences the milk microbiome, though they noted more research is needed. In future studies, the researchers will further explore the composition and function of the milk microbiota. In addition to bacteria, they will profile fungi in the milk samples. They also plan to investigate how the milk microbiota influences both the gut microbiota of infants and infant development and health. Specifically, their projects will examine the association of milk microbiota with infant growth, asthma, and allergies. This work could have important implications for microbiota-based strategies for early-life prevention of chronic conditions.

 

References:

 

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/human-breast-milk-microbiome-affected-mode-feeding#.XIOH0igzZPY

 

http://childstudy.ca/2019/02/13/breastmilk-microbiome-linked-to-method-of-feeding/

 

https://gizmodo.com/pumping-breast-milk-changes-its-microbiome-1832568169

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190213124445.htm

 

https://www.cell.com/cell-host-microbe/fulltext/S1931-3128(19)30049-6

 

https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/news-and-research/baby-friendly-research/infant-health-research/epigenetics-microbiome-research/