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Global Tert-Amylbenzene Market Size by Application (Pharmaceuticals, Chemical Intermediaries, Batteries), Industry Analysis Report, Regional Outlook, Application Development Potential, Price Trend, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2020 – 2026

Published Date: Dec 2020  |  Report ID: GMI4883  |  Authors: Kunal Ahuja, Harneet Mehar

Report Format:  PDF   |   Pages: 140   |   Base Year: 2019

https://www.gminsights.com/toc/detail/tert-amylbenzene-market

 

Guest Authors: Kunal Ahuja, Harneet Mehar

 

From: Devesh Billore <devesh.b@gminsights.com>

Date: Tuesday, January 5, 2021 at 11:22 AM

To: “Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN” <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: RE: Editorial Inquiry For Exclusive Content on Tert-Amylbenzene Market

 

Hello,

 

Thanks for your response. Yes you can publish the TABLE of CONTENTS of Tert-Amylbenzene Market. Please provide report hyperlink also.

 

Report link: https://www.gminsights.com/industry-analysis/tert-amylbenzene-market

 

It would be great if you can share the URL of the article once you publish it on the website.

Regards,

Devesh Billore

Global Market Insights

E-mail:devesh.b@gminsights.com| Web: www.gminsights.com 

 

Report Content

Chapter 1   Methodology & Scope

1.1    Market definitions

1.2    Base estimates & calculations

1.3    Forecast calculations

1.4    Data Sources

1.4.1    Primary

1.4.2    Secondary

1.4.2.1    Paid Sources

1.4.2.2    Public Sources

Chapter 2   Executive Summary

2.1    Global Tert-Amylbenzene Industry 3600 synopsis, 2020-2026

2.1.1    Business trends

2.1.2    Regional trends

2.1.3    Application trends

Chapter 3   Global Tert-Amylbenzene Industry Insights

3.1    Industry segmentation

3.2    COVID-19 overview of the world economy

3.3    Industry ecosystem analysis

3.3.1    Distribution channel analysis

3.3.1.1    Distributors

3.3.1.2    Technology Providers

3.3.2    Vendor matrix

3.3.3    Impact of COVID-19 on industry value chain

3.4    Raw Material Analysis

3.4.1    Benzene

3.4.2    Tertiary Amylalcohol

3.4.3    Cumene

3.4.4    Propene

3.5    Regulatory landscape

3.5.1    U.S.

3.5.1.1    Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory

3.5.1.1.1    OSHA 1910.1200

3.5.2    Europe

3.5.2.1    REACH (EC 1907/2006)

3.5.3    Product purity certification analysis

3.6    Industry impact forces

3.6.1    Growth drivers

3.6.1.1    Rising demand from electronics industry

3.6.1.2    Pharmaceutical industry growth

3.6.2    Industry pitfalls & challenges

3.6.2.1    High health and environmental effects

3.7    Technology landscape

3.8    Innovation & Sustainability

3.9    Growth potential analysis, 2019

3.9.1    Emerging business models

3.9.1.1    Collaboration/Joint ventures

3.9.1.2    Distribution partnership

3.9.1.3    Digital platform

3.10    Cost structure analysis, 2019

3.11    Porter’s analysis

3.11.1    Bargaining power of suppliers

3.11.2    Bargaining power of buyers

3.11.3    Threat of new entrants

3.11.4    Threat of substitutes

3.12    Pricing Analysis, 2015-2026

3.12.1    North America

3.12.2    Europe

3.12.3    Asia Pacific

3.12.4    Latin America

3.12.5    Middle East & Africa

3.13    Competitive landscape, 2019

3.13.1    Company market share analysis, 2019

3.13.2    Strategy dashboard

3.13.3    List of potential customers/end-users

3.14    PESTEL analysis

3.15    Impact of COVID-19 on tert-amylbenzene demand, by application

3.15.1    Pharmaceuticals

3.15.2    Chemical Intermediates

3.15.3    Battery

Chapter 4   Global Tert-Amylbenzene Market, By Application

4.1    Key application trends

4.2    Pharmaceuticals

4.2.1    Global Tert-Amylbenzene market from pharmaceuticals application, 2015 – 2026

4.2.2    Global Tert-Amylbenzene market from pharmaceuticals application, by region, 2015 – 2026

4.3    Chemical intermediaries

4.3.1    Global Tert-Amylbenzene market from chemical intermediaries application, 2015 – 2026

4.3.2    Global Tert-Amylbenzene market from chemical intermediaries application, by region, 2015 – 2026

4.4    Batteries

4.4.1    Global Tert-Amylbenzene market from batteries application, 2015 – 2026

4.4.2    Global Tert-Amylbenzene market from batteries application, by region, 2015 – 2026

Chapter 5   Global Tert-Amylbenzene Market, By Region

5.1    Key regional trends

5.2    North America

5.2.1    North America Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.2    North America Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.3    U.S.

5.2.3.1    U.S. Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.3.2    U.S. Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.4    Canada

5.2.4.1    Canada Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.4.2    Canada Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.5    Mexico

5.2.5.1    Mexico Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.2.5.2    Mexico Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3    Europe

5.3.1    Europe Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.2    Europe Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.3    Germany

5.3.3.1    Germany Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.3.2    Germany Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.4    UK

5.3.4.1    UK Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.4.2    UK Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.5    France

5.3.5.1    France Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.5.2    France Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.6    Italy

5.3.6.1    Italy Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.6.2    Italy Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.7    Spain

5.3.7.1    Spain Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.7.2    Spain Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.8    Russia

5.3.8.1    Russia Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.3.8.2    Russia Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4    Asia Pacific

5.4.1    Asia Pacific Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.2    Asia Pacific Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.3    China

5.4.3.1    China Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.3.2    China Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.4    India

5.4.4.1    India Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.4.2    India Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.5    Japan

5.4.5.1    Japan Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.5.2    Japan Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.6    South Korea

5.4.6.1    South Korea Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.6.2    South Korea Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.7    Australia

5.4.7.1    Australia Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.7.2    Australia Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.8    Malaysia

5.4.8.1    Malaysia Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.4.8.2    Malaysia Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.5    LATAM

5.5.1    LATAM Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.5.2    LATAM Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.5.3    Brazil

5.5.3.1    Brazil Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.5.3.2    Brazil Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6    MEA

5.6.1    MEA Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.2    MEA Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.3    Saudi Arabia

5.6.3.1    Saudi Arabia Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.3.2    Saudi Arabia Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.4    UAE

5.6.4.1    UAE Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.4.2    UAE Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.5    South Africa

5.6.5.1    South Africa Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

5.6.5.2    South Africa Tert-Amylbenzene market, by application, 2015 – 2026, (Tons) (USD Thousand)

Chapter 6   Company Profiles

6.1    Jiujiang Pro High Technology Materials Co., Ltd.

6.1.1    Business Overview

6.1.2    Financial Data

6.1.3    Product Landscape

6.1.4    Swot Analysis

6.2    Hunan Jinxi Chemical Co. Ltd.

6.2.1    Business Overview

6.2.2    Financial Data

6.2.3    Product Landscape

6.2.4    Swot Analysis

6.3    Zhenjiang Haitong Chemical industry Co., Ltd.

6.3.1    Business Overview

6.3.2    Financial Data

6.3.3    Product Landscape

6.3.4    Swot Analysis

6.4    Solvay

6.4.1    Business Overview

6.4.2    Financial Data

6.4.3    Product Landscape

6.4.4    Strategic Outlook

6.4.5    Swot Analysis

6.5    Sigma Aldrich

6.5.1    Business Overview

6.5.2    Financial Data

6.5.3    Product Landscape

6.5.4    Swot Analysis

6.6    Frontier Scientific, Inc.

6.6.1    Business Overview

6.6.2    Financial Data

6.6.3    Product Landscape

6.6.4    Swot Analysis

6.7    Alfa Chemistry

6.7.1    Business Overview

6.7.2    Financial Data

6.7.3    Product Landscape

6.7.4    Swot Analysis

6.8    TCI Chemical Trading

6.8.1    Business Overview

6.8.2    Financial Data

6.8.3    Product Landscape

6.8.4    Swot Analysis

6.9    Alfa Aesar (part of Thermo Fisher Scientific)

6.9.1    Business Overview

6.9.2    Financial Data

6.9.3    Product Landscape

6.9.4    Swot Analysis
Data Tables

TABLE 1      Global Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 2      Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by region, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 3      Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by region, 2015 – 2026 (USD thousand)

TABLE 4      Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 5      Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 6      Projections of GDP growth (%) in 2020 based on three scenarios

TABLE 7      Global tert amyl benzene distribution channel analysis

TABLE 8      Vendor matrix

TABLE 9      Purity of tert-amylbenzene offered by global companies

TABLE 10     Industry impact forces

TABLE 11     Cost elements

TABLE 12     List of potential customers/end-users

TABLE 13     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene demand, by region, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 14     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene supply, by region, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 15     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene  market from pharmaceuticals application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 16     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume from pharmaceuticals application, by region, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 17     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue from pharmaceuticals application, by region, 2015 – 2026 (USD thousand)

TABLE 18     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene  market from chemical intermediaries application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 19     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume from chemical intermediaries application, by region, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 20     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue from chemical intermediaries application, by region, 2015 – 2026 (USD thousand)

TABLE 21     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene  market from batteries application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 22     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume from batteries application, by region, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 23     Global  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue from batteries application, by region, 2015 – 2026 (USD thousand)

TABLE 24     North America Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 25     North America  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 26     North America  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 27     U.S.  Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 28     U.S.   Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 29     U.S.   Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 30     Canada   Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 31     Canada    Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 32     Canada Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 33     Mexico Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 34     Mexico  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 35     Mexico  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 36     Europe  Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 37     Europe  Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 38     Europe  Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 39     Germany     Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 40     Germany Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 41     Germany Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 42     UK   Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 43     UK Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 44     UK Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 45     France     Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 46     France Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 47     France Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 48     Italy Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 49     Italy Tert-Amylbenzene  market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 50     Italy Tert-Amylbenzene  market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 51     Spain Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 52     Spain Tert-Amylbenzene  market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 53     Spain Tert-Amylbenzene  market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 54     Russia Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 55     Russia  Tert-Amylbenzene  market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 56     Russia  Tert-Amylbenzene  market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 57     Asia Pacific  Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 58     Asia Pacific   Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 59     Asia Pacific   Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 60     China Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 61     China  Tert-Amylbenzene  market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 62     China  Tert-Amylbenzene  market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 63     India  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 64     India Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 65     India Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 66     Japan  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 67     Japan Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 68     Japan Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 69     South Korea  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 70     South Korea Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 71     South Korea Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 72     Australia  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 73     Australia Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 74     Australia Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 75     Malaysia  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 76     Malaysia Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 77     Malaysia Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 78     LATAM  Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 79     LATAM   Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 80     LATAM   Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 81     Brazil  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 82     Brazil Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 83     Brazil Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 84     MEA  Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 85     MEA   Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 86     MEA   Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 87     Saudi Arabia  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 88     Saudi Arabia Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 89     Saudi Arabia Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 90     UAE  Tert-Amylbenzene  market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 91     UAE Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 92     UAE Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

TABLE 93     South Africa Tert-Amylbenzene market, 2015 – 2026, (Tons)  (USD Thousand)

TABLE 94     South Africa Tert-Amylbenzene market volume, by application, 2015 – 2026 (Tons)

TABLE 95     South Africa Tert-Amylbenzene market revenue, by application, 2015 – 2026 (USD Thousand)

 

Charts & Figures

FIG. 1     Global Tert-Amylbenzene industry 3600 synopsis

FIG. 2     Europe Pulp & Paper Industry Revenue, 2015 – 2019 (USD Billion)

FIG. 3     Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Europe, by cases, as of 30 November 2020 (Number of cases)

FIG. 4     Demand for Lithium-ion batteries from Electric Vehicles, 2015-2030 (Gwh)

FIG. 5     Industry segmentation

FIG. 6     Industry ecosystem analysis

FIG. 7     Global Benzene Production, 2015-2022, (Million Metric Tons)

FIG. 8     China Benzene Production Capacities, 2015-2025 (Million Metric Tons)

FIG. 9     U.S. Benzene Production, 2016-2019, (Thousand Metric Tons)

FIG. 10    Global Cumene Consumption, By Region, 2019, (%)

FIG. 11    U.S. Cumene Prices, 2017-2020, (USD/barrel)

FIG. 12    Global Propylene Production and Consumption, 2018, (Mn MT)

FIG. 13    U.S. Propene Demand, 2016-2019, (Mn MT)

FIG. 14    Consumer electronics revenue in Western Europe, Q4 2015 – Q1 2020 (USD Billion)

FIG. 15    Growth of the middle class population, by region,  2015 – 2030 (Million persons)

FIG. 16    Global pharmaceutical industry revenue, 2014-19, (USD Billion)

FIG. 17    Share of population aged 65 years and above in Europe, major countries, 2019, (%)

FIG. 18    Production Technique of Tert.-Amylbenzene

FIG. 19    Growth Potential Analysis, 2019

FIG. 20    Cost structure analysis, 2019

FIG. 21    Porter’s analysis

FIG. 22    Company market share analysis, 2019

FIG. 23    PESTEL analysis

 

 


REUTERS NEXT (Jan 11-14) kicks off 2021 by gathering global leaders and forward thinkers to reimagine solutions to the challenges the new year brings

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

The Virtual Summit Rethinking the Future

REUTERS NEXT kicks off 2021 by gathering global leaders and forward thinkers to reimagine solutions to the challenges the new year brings.

After the extraordinary upheavals of 2020, we will come together to look ahead at opportunities for change and growth, as well as how to deal with the rifts and problems that our world and our societies face.

No country, company or community can tackle the future alone. To build a better world, thinkers and doers must come together to share ideas, collaborate and act.

REUTERS NEXT draws on Reuters global reach to host diverse voices from around the world who will examine topics from different perspectives, bringing their passion, experience and expertise to find new ways forward.

Join the conversation at REUTERS NEXT as we look ahead, together.

https://reutersevents.com/events/next/#about

https://reutersevents.app.swapcard.com/event/reuters-next

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

Announcing Strategic Transition from 1.0 LPBI to 2.0 LPBI on 1/1/2021: New Management, Marketing Communication and New Scientific/Technical Opportunities

 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Founder, LPBI Group: 1.0 & 2.0

will attend REUTERS NEXT on January 13 & 14, 2021 and

will cover these days in real time

AGENDA

https://reutersevents.com/events/next/conference-agenda.php

 

Day 1: January 11

 RECOVERING GROWTH
5:30am GMT
Capturing a Slice of the Boom in High-Net-Worth Banking

The private banking arm of OCBC Bank is among a handful of Asian banks that have emerged among the biggest serving the region’s growing legion of billionaires. Boasting assets under management of $116 billion, Bank of Singapore has expanded into Europe, India and Dubai as it seeks to serve the family offices of the rich. The private bank, part of Southeast Asia’s second-largest lender, is also exploring setting up an onshore presence in China, the top market for wealth creation.

 

Bahren Shaari

Bahren ShaariChief Executive OfficerBank of Singapore

 

Anshuman Daga

Anshuman DagaSenior Financial CorrespondentReuters

 POLICY & PROGRESS
6:00am GMT
Interview

 

Dr Reza Baqir

Dr Reza BaqirGovernorState Bank Pakistan

 

Simon Robinson

Simon RobinsonGlobal Managing EditorReuters

 POLICY & PROGRESS
6:30am GMT
Interview

 

Tae Yong-ho

Tae Yong-hoThe Member of the National Assembly of The Republic of Korea

 

Jack Kim

Jack KimCorrespondentReuters

 POLICY & PROGRESS
7:00am GMT
Asia’s COVID-19 journey: Swifter Response But Slower Return to Normality?

Asia has managed to control the spread of the new coronavirus more swiftly and effectively than the rest of the world, but many countries in the region are still battling with a persistent resurgence of new cases and the initial amount of vaccines Asia will receive will be limited. Is Asia likely to lag other regions in ending the pandemic and when will things go back to normal?

 

Dr. Pandu Riono

Dr. Pandu RionoEpidemiologist & Senior StaffUniversity of Indonesia, Faculty of Public Health

 

Irma Hidayana

Irma HidayanaCo-Founder & Co-LeaderLaporCovid19

 

Dale Fisher

Dale FisherProfessor of MedicineNational University of Singapore

 

Miyoung Kim

Moderator: Miyoung KimBreaking News Editor, AsiaReuters

 POLICY & PROGRESS
7:30am GMT
Interview

 

Edward Yau Tang-wah

Edward Yau Tang-wahSecretary for Commerce and Economic DevelopmentHong Kong Special Administrative Region Government

 

Anne-Marie Roantree

Anne-Marie RoantreeBureau ChiefReuters

 RADICAL REDESIGN
9:00am GMT
Recovering the Travel Bug post-Covid

 

Deep Kalra

Deep KalraFounder & Group Executive ChairmanMakeMyTrip Limited

 

Sabina Fluxa

Sabina FluxaChief Executive OfficerIberostar

 

Tony Fernandes

Tony FernandesChief Executive OfficerAirAsia

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
9:30am GMT
Urban Mining: Recycling on a Mass Scale

 

Steve Fisher

Steve FisherPresident and Chief Executive OfficerNovelis

 

Yash Lohia

Yash LohiaChief Sustainability OfficerIndorama Ventures

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
10:00am GMT
The Measurement Challenge of Carbon Accounting

How can we cut emissions if we can’t count them?

 

David Hone

David HoneChief Climate Change AdviserShell

 

Nick Stansbury

Nick StansburyHead of Commodity ResearchLegal & General Investment Management (LGIM)

 

Sean Kidney

Sean KidneyChief Executive OfficerClimate Bonds Initiative

 RECOVERING GROWTH
10:30am GMT
Powering Economic Growth in Africa

Look at different investment strategies – infrastructure, digital and trade.

 

Fola Fagbule

Fola FagbuleSenior Vice PresidentAfrica Finance Corporation

 

Juliana Rotich

Juliana RotichVenture PartnerAtlantica Ventures

 

Silver Ojakol

Silver OjakolCommissioner External TradeGhana

 POLICY & PROGRESS
11:00am GMT
Interview

 

Vera Daves de Sousa

Vera Daves de SousaFinance MinisterMinistry of Finance of Angola

 RADICAL REDESIGN
11:30am GMT
Ethnic Diversity at Work: Putting Words into Action

 

Lanaya Irvin

Lanaya IrvinPresidentCoqual

 

John Rice

John RiceFounder & Chief Executive OfficerManagement Leadership for Tomorrow

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
12:00pm GMT
Interview

 

Waad al-Kateab

Waad al-KateabFilmmaker, Activist & FounderAction For Sama

 RADICAL REDESIGN
12:30pm GMT
Ethnic Diversity at Work: Putting Words into Action

Companies lurched into diversity policies after Floyd’s death. Will they stick?

 

soon

Speakers TBC

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
1:00pm GMT
How to Rebuild Trust in Media

In a polarised world, news media need to rebuild trust. Impartiality, transparency, representation and listening all play a part. What other strategies are top media executives planning?

 

Tim Davie

Tim DavieDirector GeneralBBC

 

Michael Friedenberg

Michael FriedenbergPresidentReuters

 

Jane Barrett

Moderator: Jane BarrettGlobal Editor Media News StrategyReuters

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
3:00pm GMT
Interview

 

Professor Jeffrey Sachs

Professor Jeffrey SachsEconomist & DirectorCenter for Sustainable Development at Columbia University

 

soon

Ann SaphirFinancial ReporterReuters

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
3:20pm GMT
Nuclear Energy and its Future

 

Sama Bilbao y Leon

Sama Bilbao y LeonDirector GeneralWorld Nuclear Association

 

Dan Poneman

Dan PonemanPresident & Chief Executive OfficerCentrus Energy Corp.

 

Jay Wileman

Jay WilemanPresident & Chief Executive OfficerGE Hitachi

 

George Borovas

George BorovasHead of Nuclear and Tokyo Office Managing PartnerHunton Andrews Kurth

 

soon

Moderator: Nina ChestneyHead of EMEA Power, Gas, Coal and CarbonReuters

 RECOVERING GROWTH
4:00pm GMT
Trade, Doing Business Globally, Challenges

 

Joe Kaeser

Joe KaeserPresident & Chief Executive OfficerSiemens AG

 RADICAL REDESIGN
4:30pm GMT
Edtech: Making the Most of Online Learning Beyond Covid

 

Dwayne Matthews

Dwayne MatthewsEducation Strategist & FounderTomorrowNow Learning Labs

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
5:00pm GMT
The Arctic Frontier

Climate change is warming the Arctic faster than the rest of the world, opening long-frozen region to exploration, tourism, mining and shipping. Those crowds and commerce have an impact on the environment and indigenous communities.

 

Ann Daniels

Ann DanielsPolar Explorer

 

Ilarion Merculieff

Ilarion MerculieffPresidentGlobal Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways

 

Neil Roberts

Neil RobertsHead of Marine and AviationLloyd’s of London Market Association

 

Clare Baldwin

Moderator: Clare BaldwinSpecial CorrespondentReuters

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
5:30pm GMT
Managing the Energy Transition from Within

Top players in the oil industry discuss the challenges and opportunities for their businesses in a transition away from fossil fuels.

 

Lorenzo Simonelli

Lorenzo SimonelliChief Executive OfficerBaker Hughes

 

Jennifer Hiller

Moderator: Jennifer HillerOil & Gas ReporterReuters

 RADICAL REDESIGN
6:00pm GMT
Interview

 

Salman Khan

Salman KhanFounder and CEOKhan Academy

 RADICAL REDESIGN
6:20pm GMT
Interview

 

Sheryl Sandberg

Sheryl SandbergChief Operating OfficerFacebook

Day 2: January 12

 POLICY & PROGRESS
5:30am GMT
India’s Place in a Divided World

 

Dr. S. Jaishankar

Dr. S. JaishankarExternal Affairs Minister of India

 POLICY & PROGRESS
6:00am GMT
Philippines: On the Road to Recovery?

 

Benjamin Diokno

Benjamin DioknoGovernorBangko Sentral ng Pilipinas

 

Karen Lema

Karen LemaBureau Chief PhilippinesReuters

 RECOVERING GROWTH
6:30am GMT
Where Asia’s Smart Money is Going in 2021

 

Hugh Young

Hugh YoungManaging DirectorAberdeen Standard Investments

 

Elizabeth Allen

Elizabeth AllenHead of Asian Fixed IncomeHSBC Global Asset Management

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
7:00am GMT
Political journalism in Asia: new media, old values

 

Steve Gan

Steve GanEditor-in-chiefMalaysiakini.com

 

Najwa Shihab

Najwa ShihabNewscaster & AnchorMetro TV Indonesia

 

Cherian George

Cherian GeorgeProfessor of Media StudiesHong Kong Baptist University

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
7:30am GMT
Interview

 

K Shanmugam

K ShanmugamMinister for Home Affairs & Minister for Law

 RADICAL REDESIGN
9:00am GMT
Australia vs Big Tech

The ACCC’s Sims is spearheading potential changes to Australia’s merger laws early in 2021, putting the country at the front of a global crackdown on antitrust violations from “Big Tech.” The ACCC is due to deliver a report on the app marketplace, with a focus on the market power of Apple and Google, by the end of March. The regulator has already taken legal action against Google twice – for misleading consumers about how much personal information it was tracking and for misleading consumers about its collection of personal location data.

 

Rod Sims

Rod SimsChairAustralian Competition and Consumer Commission

 RADICAL REDESIGN
10:10am GMT
Interview

 

Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao

Nguyen Thi Phuong ThaoPresident & CEOVietJet

 RECOVERING GROWTH
10:30am GMT
A New Economy: Africa’s Digital Engine

 

Jihan Abass

Jihan AbassFounder & Chief Executive OfficerLami

 

Iyinoluwa Aboyeji

Iyinoluwa AboyejiTech Entrepreneur Co-FounderAndela

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
11:00am GMT
Interview

 

Sir Tim Berners-Lee

Sir Tim Berners-LeeInventor of World Wide Web and CTOInrupt

 

John Bruce

John BruceChief Executive OfficerInrupt

 RADICAL REDESIGN
12:00pm GMT
Banking the Unbanked with New Technology

Digital taking barriers down and making banking more possible – but also making digital a requirement?

 

Vijay Shekar Sharma

Vijay Shekar SharmaChief Executive Officer & FounderPaytm

 POLICY & PROGRESS
12:30pm GMT
Interview

 

Olaf Scholz

Olaf ScholzFederal Minister of Finance and Vice ChancellorGerman Federal Ministry of Finance

 

Mark Bendeich

Mark BendeichEurope News EditorReuters

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
3:00pm GMT
Interview

 

Patricia Espinosa

Patricia EspinosaExecutive SecretaryUnited Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

 

Matthew Green

Matthew GreenClimate Change CorrespondentReuters

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
3:30pm GMT
Misinformation and New Narratives

Conspiracy theories and misinformation have spewed out of social media to mainstream narratives. Where does it all come from? How do they proliferate and what can we do about it?

 

Graham Brookie

Graham BrookieDirector and Managing Editor, Digital Forensic Research Lab (DFRLab)Atlantic Council

 

Claire Wardle

Claire WardleCo-FounderFirst Draft

 

Christina Anagnostopoulos

Christina AnagnostopoulosSenior Producer, Reuters Fact CheckReuters

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
4:00pm GMT
Batteries – Lithium as the New Oil

 

Eric Norris

Eric NorrisPresident – Lithium GBUAlbemarle Corporation

 

Ernest Scheyder

Ernest ScheyderCorrespondentReuters

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
4:30pm GMT
The Future of Fossil Fuels in A Green World

Unlike Shell or BP, Chevron has been unabashed about its commitment to fossil fuels. It’s been smarter than others though, has a stronger balance sheet, and has made more calculated decisions. This has shown up in its market value, which last week surpassed Exxon Mobil for the first time ever. Wirth will have a lot to say about global economies, too, and the global rebound from the Covid-19 crisis.

 

Michael Wirth

Michael WirthChief Executive OfficerChevron

 

Lauren Silva Laughlin

Lauren Silva LaughlinGlobal Deals EditorReuters

 

Rob Cox

Rob CoxGlobal EditorReuters Breakingviews

 RECOVERING GROWTH
5:00pm GMT
Rich World, Poor World. How to Close the Gap

What are the best ways to help the poorer countries of the world and their societies? Is the age of foreign aid over? What about debt relief and keeping more tax in country?

 

Dambisa Moyo

Dambisa MoyoGlobal Economist & AuthorVersaca Investments

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
5:30pm GMT
Keep It In The Ground: A Radical Solution to Climate Change

Is the best way to lower emissions to keep fossil fuels in the ground? Why environmentalists believe not tapping new oil and gas deposits, and plugging abandoned wells, would benefit investors and society.

 

Janet Redman

Janet RedmanClimate Campaign DirectorGreenpeace USA

 

Kassie Siegel

Kassie SiegelSenior Counsel and DirectorThe Climate Law Institute

 

Peter Erickson

Peter EricksonSenior ScientistStockholm Environment Institute

 RECOVERING GROWTH
6:00pm GMT
Interview

 

Stephen Pagliuca

Stephen PagliucaCo-chairBain

 

Lauren Silva Laughlin

Lauren Silva LaughlinGlobal Deals EditorReuters

 RECOVERING GROWTH
6:20pm GMT
Interview

 

Calvin McDonald

Calvin McDonaldChief Executive OfficerLululemon

Day 3: January 13

 RADICAL REDESIGN
5:30am GMT
Asia Aviation in a Post-Pandemic World

The once fast-growing Asian aviation industry has been hit hard by the pandemic, with the region among the slowest to reopen international travel, though domestic travel has begun to rebound. How will the pandemic shape future travel patterns for leisure and business travel? How can airlines like Qantas adapt their product, fleet and route networks for the future passenger mix? How will they restore confidence in international travel before and after a vaccine?

 

Alan Joyce

Alan JoyceChief Executive OfficerQantas

 RECOVERING GROWTH
6:00am GMT
How to Sell Drinks in a Socially-Distanced World

Suntory, like all global drinks makers, has been hit hard by the pandemic which has dented sales of its popular beer and global whiskies. Even with the eventual arrival of vaccines, consumers are expected to remain wary of crowding together at bars and restaurants as they used to. How is Suntory riding out the slump? Are there any new growth opportunities in post-pandemic trends (drinking at home, non-alcohol beers etc.)? Has the pandemic, and the global political landscape, changed his views on globalization? Do Japanese companies including Suntory need to be more wary of large-scale, international acquisitions now?

 

Takeshi Niinami

Takeshi NiinamiChief Executive OfficerSuntory

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
6:30am GMT
Silencing the Messenger: The Struggle for Free Speech in Asia

Over the past three decades, more journalists have been killed in Asia Pacific than any other region on earth, with the Philippines, India, and Afghanistan consistently ranked among the deadliest places to be a journalist. Overall press freedom has worsened in more than a dozen countries across the continent since 2018, according to watchdog Reporters Without Borders, and in a time of pandemic, pervasive online misinformation, and rising authoritarianism, news organizations are facing unprecedented challenges.

 

Khin Omar

Khin OmarBurmese Democracy Activist

 

Nidhi Razdan

Nidhi RazdanAssociate Professor of JournalismHarvard University

 

Vergel O. Santos

Vergel O. SantosMember, Board of TrusteesCenter for Media Freedom and Responsibility

 RECOVERING GROWTH
7:00am GMT
China Private Equity: Navigating volatilities and capturing new growth post-COVID (3)

 

Dr. Fred Hu

Dr. Fred HuChairmanPrimavera Capital Group

 RECOVERING GROWTH
7:20am GMT
China Private Equity: Navigating volatilities and capturing new growth post-COVID (1)

 

Shan Weijian

Shan WeijianChairman and Chief Executive OfficerPAG

 POLICY & PROGRESS
9:00am GMT
The EU economy post-COVID, post-Brexit, in debt…

 

Christine Lagarde

Christine LagardePresidentEuropean Central Bank

 

Alessandra Galloni

Alessandra GalloniGlobal Managing EditorReuters

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
9:45am GMT
How and Why to Fight Threats to Press Freedom Around the World

A global panel on press freedom around the world. Is it getting generally worse?

 

Maria Ressa

Maria RessaFounder, Rapplercompany

 

Sonny Swe

Sonny SweCo-Founder & Chief Executive OfficerFrontier Myanmar

 RADICAL REDESIGN
10:30am GMT
Telling Africa Stories

How African storytellers are reshaping the way the world sees the continent.

 

Bibi Bakare-Yusuf

Bibi Bakare-YusufFounder & PublisherCassava Republic Press

 

Mo Abudu

Mo AbuduChief Executive OfficerEbonylife Media & Ebonylife Place

 RADICAL REDESIGN
12:00pm GMT
Managing the Masses and Politicians through the Fog of Covid

 

Dr. Anders Tegnell

Dr. Anders TegnellState EpidemiologistSweden

 

Dr. Chikwe Ihekweazu

Dr. Chikwe IhekweazuDirector GeneralNigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC)

 RADICAL REDESIGN
1:00pm GMT
Precious Cargo: Transporting Vaccines and Looking for Recovery

 

John Pearson

John PearsonChief Executive OfficerDHL Express

 RECOVERING GROWTH
1:30pm GMT
Interview

 

Alan Jope

Alan JopeChief Executive OfficerUnilever

 RECOVERING GROWTH
3:00pm GMT
Pets and the pandemic: The future of animal science

 

Kristin Peck

Kristin PeckChief Executive OfficerZoetis

 POLICY & PROGRESS
3:30pm GMT
Public Health Lessons from COVID and Vaccinations

COVID-19 has laid bare many failings in the public health system. What lessons are there to learn around the world and what are the biggest challenges beyond COVID?

 

Heidi J Larson

Heidi J LarsonProfessor of AnthropologyRisk and Decision Science Vaccine Confidence Project

 

Professor Michelle Williams

Professor Michelle WilliamsDean of the FacultyHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

4:00pm GMT
Interview

 

soon

Speaker TBC

 RADICAL REDESIGN
4:30pm GMT
Interview

 

Sandeep Mathrani

Sandeep MathraniChief Executive OfficerWeWork

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
5:00pm GMT
The Edelman Trust Barometer 2021

Richard Edelman discusses the new Trust Barometer for 2021. To discuss trust in journalism, politicians, tech companies etc.

 

Richard Edelman

Richard EdelmanChief Executive OfficerEdelman

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
5:30pm GMT
Climate and Environmental Justice

What do we do about the unequal impact of climate change?

 

Dr Friederike Otto

Dr Friederike OttoAssociate Director, Environmental Change InstituteUniversity of Oxford

 

Osprey Orielle Lake

Osprey Orielle LakeFounder and Executive DirectorWomen’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

 

Mohamed Adow

Mohamed AdowDirectorPower Shift Africa

 

Valerie Volcovici

Valerie VolcoviciCorrespondentReuters

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
6:00pm GMT
The Changing Nature of Philanthropy in the 2020s

 

Darren Walker

Darren WalkerPresidentFord Foundation

 RADICAL REDESIGN
6:30pm GMT
Interview

 

Sundar Pichai

Sundar PichaiChief Executive OfficerGoogle and Alphabet

Day 4: January 14

 POLICY & PROGRESS
5:30am GMT
Interview

Mahathir bin Mohamad served twice as Malaysia’s prime minister, from July 1981 to October 2003 and from May 2018 to March 2020. Forming the new Homeland Fighters Party, Mahathir remains a prominent voice in the Southeast Asian nation’s politics.

 

Mahathir Mohamad

Mahathir MohamadFormer Prime Minister of Malaysia

 POLICY & PROGRESS
6:00am GMT
Interview

 

soon

Speaker TBC

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
6:30am GMT
Palm Oil Production in Asia: Looking For a Sustainable Future

Global sales of palm oil, used in everything from cookies to soap, reached $43 billion last year, with Southeast Asia responsible for the bulk of production. The industry has come under fire in recent years, including consumer boycotts, for clearing biodiversity-rich tropical rainforests in the region. Yet it also provides hundreds of thousands of jobs as well as substantial foreign income. The major players, Indonesia and Malaysia, are looking at ways to expand coveted green credentials, even as they push for consumer companies to step up purchases of the more expensive sustainable palm oil.

 

Ravi Muthayah

Ravi MuthayahSecretary-GeneralMalaysia Plantation & Commodities Ministry

 

Olivier Tichit

Olivier TichitLeader of SustainabilityMusim Mas

 

Mohd Haris Mohd Arshad

Mohd Haris Mohd ArshadManaging DirectorSime Darby Oils

 RADICAL REDESIGN
7:10am GMT
Tech Innovation in China

Nowhere else in the world has seen more rapid digitization in the past decade than in China, where technological innovation driven by the private sector has transformed all aspects of society, from the way people socialize to how business is done. The commercial outlook for innovators in China is positive, with a ready market of 1.4 billion people, but any new technological offerings and innovation remain beholden to sudden shifts in the mood in Beijing.

 

Ma Baoli

Ma BaoliFounder, Chairman & Chief Executive OfficerBlueCity

 POLICY & PROGRESS
7:30am GMT
Interview

 

Taro Kono

Taro KonoJapan Minister of State for Special Missions

 RECOVERING GROWTH
9:00am GMT
The business of vaccinating the world against COVID-19

India’s Serum Institute is one of the biggest vaccine makers by volume in the world. CEO Poonawalla’s early bet on the AstraZeneca-University of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine candidate during first phase trials appears to have paid off. The institute plans to prioritize distribution in India before providing doses to the COVAX facility, an international initiative aimed at ensuring almost 100 low and middle income economies have access to a vaccine.

 

Adar Poonawalla

Adar PoonawallaChief Executive OfficerIndia’s Serum Institute

 RECOVERING GROWTH
10:00am GMT
Interview

 

N Chandrasekaran

N ChandrasekaranChairmanTata Group

 RADICAL REDESIGN
10:30am GMT
The Future of Further Education post-Covid

How has Covid changed universities and which changes will stick.

 

Sebastian Thrun

Sebastian ThrunFounder, President & Executive ChairmanUdacity

 

Louise Richardson

Louise RichardsonVice-ChancellorUniversity of Oxford

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
11:30am GMT
The Amazon and Business. A Delicate Coexistence

The Amazon rainforest is being destroyed for business but are the two incompatible? Can we save the Amazon and profit from it?

 

João Paulo Ferreira

João Paulo FerreiraChief Executive OfficerNatura & Co Latin America

 RECOVERING GROWTH
12:00pm GMT
Interview

 

Peter Wennink

Peter WenninkPresident & Chief Executive OfficerASML

 RADICAL REDESIGN
1:00pm GMT
Break the Mould: Diversity in Tech and Finance

 

soon

Speaker TBC

 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
3:00pm GMT
ESG: Should We Really Divest Energy Stocks?

If big investors dump stocks, there may be less accountability. What to do?

 

John Flint

John FlintFormer Group Chief ExecutiveHSBC

 

Adam Matthews

Adam MatthewsDirector of Ethics and EngagementChurch of England Pensions Board

 MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
4:00pm GMT
Interview

 

soon

Speaker TBC

 RADICAL REDESIGN
5:00pm GMT
Diversity in Law

How the US legal profession is pushing greater diversity and where the blockers still are.

 

Justice Goodwin Liu

Justice Goodwin LiuAssociate JusticeCalifornia Supreme Court

 

Anne Robinson

Anne RobinsonManaging Director, General Counsel and Corporate SecretaryVanguard

 

Dev Stahlkopf

Dev StahlkopfCorporate Vice President and General Counsel, Legal AffairsMicrosoft

 RADICAL REDESIGN
5:30pm GMT
Equality in Law and the Push for Diversity

 

Jitse Groen

Jitse GroenChief Executive OfficerJustEat

 

Brian Niccol

Brian NiccolChairman & Chief Executive OfficerChipotle

 RADICAL REDESIGN
6:00pm GMT
The Future of Travel – How Airbnb is Changing Post-COVID

Off the back of its successful IPO, Airbnb’s CEO Brian Chesky shares lessons from the pandemic and how he sees travel returning in 2021.

 

Brian Chesky

Brian CheskyChief Executive OfficerAirbnb

 RECOVERING GROWTH
6:30pm GMT
The Next Frontiers of Venture Capitalism

Interview with Y Combinator on where they are putting their trend-setting bets in 2021.

 

Michael Seibel

Michael SeibelGroup Partner and Managing DirectorY-Combinator

 

Jared Friedman

Jared FriedmanGroup PartnerY-Combinator

 


Announcing Strategic Transition from 1.0 LPBI to 2.0 LPBI on 1/1/2021: New Management, Marketing Communication and New Scientific/Technical Opportunities

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

For your New Opportunity in 2021: Management, MarkComm and Scientific/Technical

CONTACT

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Director & Founder

https://lnkd.in/eEyn69r

e-Mail: avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

(M) 617-775-0451

 

DESCRIPTION

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/vision/

 

Announcement

Strategic Transition from 1.0 LPBI to 2.0 LPBI on

 1/1/2021

 

We have transitioned from

  • 1.0 LPBI was an electronic Scientific Publisher, 2012 – 2020

to

  • 2.0 LPBI a Medical Text Analysis (NLP-ML-AI) – SaaS and Content Monetization (Blockchain) – BaaS. A new company profile, 2021 – 2025

Our New NEEDS in Business Development and M&A – Pursue with results:

  • Equity Sharing based

Opportunities Map in the Acquisition Arena

Our New NEEDS in Marketing Communication, Media & PR – Produce new Digital mediums

  • Equity Sharing based
  1. The Announcement of 2.0 LPBI Launch
  2. NEW Website for 2.0 – Initiative #2
  3. Podcast – Strategy #4 – we wish to publish 2 Podcasts per quarter
  4. Planning Advertisement for Amazon Books using Amazon Advertising
  5. NEW documentation on Strategy #2 – Monetization of Journal Articles
  6. NEW documentation on Strategy #2 – Monetization of other IP Asset Classes
  7. NEW documentation on Strategy #1, #3, #6
  8. Reporting on developments in Strategy #5: Joint Ventures & Partnership

Our New Scientific/Technical Opportunities in Natural Language Processing (NLP), Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI)

 

Seeking 10 Students INTERNS for a major Medical Text Analysis using NLP, ML, AI

This is a ONE year VIRTUAL STUDENT INTERNSHIP for

  • Computer Science & Biological Sciences or
  • PreMed students
  • PostDocs will develop the interpretation for the hyper-graphs

This internship is not fee for service – but voluntary and offers

  • Mentorship by Scientists
  • Letter of recommendation
  • Opportunity to publish with lead authors
  • Hands on experience with software
  • Opportunities to present in corporate business meetings
  • Scientific Career guidance
  • Access to contacts in Academe and Industry

 

DESCRIPTION

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2021-medical-text-analysis-nlp/

 

 


Acute Changes in Serotonin Detected by AI-designed Serotonin Sensor

Reporter: Adina Hazan, PhD

 

With 14 receptors and expression in central and peripheral nervous system, serotonin is an essential modulatory molecule. It plays critical roles in a multitude of functions, including addiction, appetite, blood pressure, digestion, and sleep. The clinical implications of this is clearly seen during the treatment of depression or anxiety, where reuptake inhibition of serotonin may improve mood but can unpredictably affect appetite and weight. Thus, development of precise tools to study serotonin, the receptor, or overall cell response is necessary.

Elizabeth Unger from the Tian group at UC Davis, Jacob Keller from the Looger lab from HHMI, Michael Altermatt from the Gradinaru group at California Institute of Technology, and colleagues did just this, by redesigned the binding pocket of periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) using artificial intelligence, such that it became a fluorescent sensor specific for serotonin. Not only this, the group showed that it could express and use this molecule to detect serotonin on the cell, tissue, and whole animal level.

By starting with a microbial PBP and early version of an acetyl choline sensor (iAChSnFR), the scientists used machine learning and modeling to redesign the binding site to exhibit a higher affinity and specificity to serotonin. After three repeats of mutagenesis, modeling, and library readouts, they produced iSeroSnFR. This version harbors 19 mutations compared to iAChSnFR0.6 and a Kd of 310 µM. This results in an increase in fluorescence in HEK293T cells expressing the serotonin receptor of 800%. Of over 40 neurotransmitters, amino acids, and small molecules screened, only two endogenous molecules evoked some fluorescence, but at significantly higher concentrations.

To acutely test the ability of the sensor to detect rapid changes of serotonin in the environment, the researchers used caged serotonin, a technique in which the serotonin is rapidly released into the environment with light pulses, and showed that iSeroSnFR accurately and robustly produced a signal with each flash of light. With this tool, it was then possible to move to ex-vivo mouse brain slices and detect endogenous serotonin release patterns across the brain. Three weeks after targeted injection of iSeroSnFR to specifically deliver the receptor into the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, strong fluorescent signal could be detected during perfusion of serotonin or electrical stimulation.

Most significantly, this molecule was also shown to be detected in freely moving mice, a tool which could offer critical insight into the acute role of serotonin regulation during important functions such as mood and alertness. Through optical fiber placements in the basolateral amygdala and prefrontal cortex, the team measured dynamic and real-time changes in serotonin release in fear-trained mice, social interactions, and sleep wake cycles. For example, while both areas of the brain have been established as relevant to the fear response, they reliably tracked that the PFC response was immediate, while the BSA displayed a delayed response. This additional temporal resolution of neuromodulation may have important implications in neurotransmitter pharmacology of the central nervous system.

This study provided the scientific community with several insights and tools. The serotonin sensor itself will be a critical tool in the study of the central nervous system and possibly beyond. Additionally, an AI approach to mutagenesis in order to redesign a binding pocket of a receptor opens new avenues to the development of pharmacological tools and may lead to many new designs in therapeutics and research.

SOURCE:

Unger, E. K., Keller, J. P., Altermatt, M., et al. “Directed evolution of a selective and sensitive serotonin sensor via machine learning,” December 23, 2020, Cell; DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2020.11.040

Other related articles to Serotonin published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Serotonin

 

Not Lower Levels of Serotonin, but Damaged Brain Synapses as the Origin for Mental Depression

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/09/not-lower-levels-of-serotonin-but-damaged-brain-synapses-as-the-origin-for-mental-depression/

 

Neuroscience impact of synaptic pruning discovery

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/03/neuroscience-impact-of-synaptic-pruning-discovery/


@ PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com  Top Articles by Views >500 for 365 days ending 2020-12-29 (Summarized) – #1: Coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 Portal

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Contributions to 2020 Article Views

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Top Posts for 365 days ending 2020-12-29 (Summarized)

December 30, 2019 to Today

Title
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Home page / Archives 76,698
Coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 Portal 1.0 LPBI FIT Members 2,844
Biotech Chinese and Israeli Strategic Collaboration: Pontifax and WuXi PharmaTech (Cayman) Inc. (NYSE: WX) Aviva Lev-Ari 2,610
Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) – an unproved supplement Dr. Larry 1,883
The Relevance of Glycans in the Viral Pathology of COVID-19 Ofer Markman 1,745
Recent comprehensive review on the role of ultrasound in breast cancer management Dror Nir 1,689
Sex determination vs. Sex differentiation Dr. Saha 1,530
Evolution of Myoglobin and Hemoglobin Dr. Larry 1,350
The History and Creators of Total Parenteral Nutrition Dr. Larry 1,281
Isoenzymes in cell metabolic pathways Dr. Larry 1,166
Interaction of enzymes and hormones Dr. Saha 1,156
Cytoskeleton and Cell Membrane Physiology Dr. Larry 1,134
Carbohydrate Metabolism Dr. Larry 1,063
The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century Dr. Larry 1,050
Paclitaxel vs Abraxane (albumin-bound paclitaxel) Dr. Tilda 1,025
Apixaban (Eliquis): Mechanism of Action, Drug Comparison and Additional Indications Aviva Lev-Ari 979
Introduction to Subcellular Structure Dr. Larry 899
Three Technology Leaders in Single Cell Sequencing: 10X Genomics, Illumina and MissionBio Aviva Lev-Ari 897
Summary of Transcription, Translation ond Transcription Factors Dr. Larry 879
SAR-Cov-2 is probably a vasculotropic RNA virus affecting the blood vessels: Endothelial cell infection and endotheliitis in COVID-19 Aviva Lev-Ari 859
Llama-inspired “AeroNabs” to strangle COVID-19 with an inhaler Irina Robu 810
Clinical Indications for Use of Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) in the Adult Patient Market: Clinical Outcomes after Use, Therapy Demand and Cost of Care Aviva Lev-Ari 795
Unique Selling Proposition (USP) — Building Pharmaceuticals Brands Aviva Lev-Ari 766
Vegan Diet is Sulfur Deficient and Heart Unhealthy Dr. Larry 763
ATP – the universal energy carrier in the living cell: Reflections on the discoveries and applications in Medicine Aviva Lev-Ari 762
SARS-CoV-2 is pre-adapted to Human Transmission, branches of evolution stemming from a less well-adapted human SARS-CoV-2-like virus have been found: The Role of SARS-CoV-2 Virus Progenitors for Future Virus Disease Transmission and Pandemic Re-Emergence Aviva Lev-Ari 759
A Primer on DNA and DNA Replication Dr. Larry 758
Bradykinin Hypothesis: Potential Explanation for COVID-19 Aviva Lev-Ari 725
Hematopoiesis Dr. Larry 715
Sex Hormones Dr. Larry 709
Nathalie’s Story: A Health Journey With A Happy Ending Gail Thornton 700
Highlights in the History of Physiology Dr. Larry 697
Thymus vs Bone Marrow, Two Cell Types in Human Immunology: B- and T-cell differences Dr. Larry 694
Top Ten Cardiovascular Medical Devices Companies – the Share of Top Institutional Investors Aviva Lev-Ari 690
Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries Gail Thornton 684
The role and importance of transcription factors Dr. Larry 637
Clinical Trial for the Use of Nitric Oxide to Treat Severe COVID-19 Infection Aviva Lev-Ari 636
The Neurogenetics of Language – Patricia Kuhl Dr. Larry 620
Linus Pauling: On Lipoprotein(a) Patents and On Vitamin C Aviva Lev-Ari 617
Development of Medical Counter-measures for 2019-nCoV, CoVid19, Coronavirus Aviva Lev-Ari 601
Sexed Semen and Embryo Selection in Human Reproduction and Fertility Treatment Dr. Saha 576
Summary, Metabolic Pathways Dr. Larry 541
Introduction to Protein Synthesis and Degradation Dr. Larry 508

 


Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC): 2020 Top 25 Best Performing Articles

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Here are the top 25 best performing articles on the Diagnostic and Interventional Cardiology (DAIC) website from 2020. This is based on the analytics of DAIC’s record 3.3 million pages views in 2020:

1. Kawasaki-like Inflammatory Disease Affects Children With COVID-19

2. COVID-19 Hydroxychloroquine Treatment Brings Prolonged QT Arrhythmia Issues

3. ESC Council on Hypertension Says ACE-I and ARBs Do Not Increase COVID-19 Mortality

4. The Cardiac Implications of Novel Coronavirus

5. FDA Approves ECMO to Treat COVID-19 Patients

6. World’s First Transcatheter Mitral Valve Approved in Europe

7. New Guidelines for Stress Echocardiography in Ischemic Heart Disease

8. First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

9. ACC COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team

10. FDA Reports of Deaths and Injuries From Use of Antimalarial hydroxychloroquine in COVID-19 Patients

11. 8 Cardiovascular Technologies to Watch in 2020

12. FDA Clears Medtronic Micra AV to Treat AV Block

13. ACC 2020 Late-breaking Presentations

14. Abbott Recalls Two Coronary Balloon Catheters That May Not Deflate

15. New Heart Failure Devices and Drugs to Treat Heart Failure

16. Italian Cardiologist Maurizio Galderisi Died From COVID-19

17. ASE Guidelines for the Protection of Echocardiography Providers During the COVID-19 Outbreak

18. CMS Calls For Postponing All Elective Cardiac Tests and Procedures to Aid COVID-19 Containment

19. COVID-19 Genetic PCR Tests Give False Negative Results if Used Too Early

20. ISCHEMIA Trial Results Find Interventions for Stable Heart Disease No better Than Drug Therapy

21. Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

22. WHO Database Shows Serious Health Impact of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin Being Used to Treat COVID-19

23. A Double-Edged Sword: How Over-the-Counter ECG Devices are Impacting Cardiac Care

24. AI Tool Allows Automated ECG Interpretation for Cardiac Diagnostics

25. Medtronic Resolute Onyx Drug Eluting Stent First to Receive One-Month DAPT Indication
 

Related Content:

Top 25 Cardiology Videos on DAIC in 2020

Most Popular Cardiology Technology Content in November 2020

The Most Popular Cardiology Topics in 2019

Top 25 Cardiology Videos on DAIC in 2019

Top 25 Stories in Radiology in 2020

Top 25 Videos For Radiology on ITN in 2020

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/article/top-25-stories-cardiology-2020?oly_enc_id=9685J9265356C8S


Mechanistic link between SARS-CoV-2 infection and increased risk of stroke using 3D printed models and human endothelial cells

Reporter: Adina Hazan, PhD

 

Kaneko, et al.  from UCLA aimed to explore why SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with an increased rate of cerebrovascular events, including

  • ischemic stroke and
  • intracerebral hemorrhage

While some suggested mechanisms include an overall systemic inflammatory response including increasing circulating cytokines and leading to a prothrombotic state, this may be only a partial answer. A SARS-CoV-2 specific mechanism could be likely, considering that both angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), the receptor necessary for SARS-CoV-2 to gain entry into the cell, and SARS-CoV-2 RNA have been reportedly detected in the human brain postmortem.

One of the difficulties in studying vasculature mechanisms is that the inherent 3D shape and blood flow subject this tissue to different stressors, such as flow, that could be critically relevant during inflammation. To accurately study the effect of SARS-CoV-2 on the vasculature of the brain, the team generated 3D models of the human middle cerebral artery during intracranial artery stenosis using data from CT (computed tomography) angiography. This data was then exported with important factors included such as

  • shear stress during perfusion,
  • streamlines, and
  • flow velocity to be used to fabricate 3D models.

These tubes were then coated with endothelial cells isolated and sorted from normal human brain tissue resected during surgery. In doing so, this model could closely mimic the cellular response of the vasculature of the human brain.

Surprisingly, without this 3D tube, human derived brain endothelial cells displayed very little expression of ACE2 or, TMPRSS2 (transmembrane protease 2), a necessary cofactor for SARS-COV-2 viral entry.

Interestingly,

  • horizontal shear stress increased the expression of ACE2 and
  • increased the binding of spike protein to ACE2, especially within the stenotic portion of the 3D model.

By exposing the endothelial cells to liposomes expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, they also were able to explore key upregulated genes in the exposed cells, in which they found that

  • “binding of SARS-CoV-2 S protein triggered 83 unique genes in human brain endothelial cells”.

This included many inflammatory signals, some of which have been previously described as associated with SARS-COV-2, and others whose effects are unknown. This may provide an important foundation for exploring potential therapeutic targets in patients susceptible to cerebrovascular events.

Overall, this study shows important links between the

  • mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 and the
  • increase in ischemic events in these patients. It also has important implications for
  • treatment for SARS-CoV-2, as high blood pressure and atherosclerosis may be increasing ACE2 expression in patients, providing the entry port for viral particles into brain endothelia.

SOURCE:

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.032764

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Human Heart

Reporters: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/09/29/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-the-human-heart/

 

SAR-Cov-2 is probably a vasculotropic RNA virus affecting the blood vessels: Endothelial cell infection and endotheliitis in COVID-19

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN – Bold face and colors are my addition

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/06/01/sar-cov-2-is-probably-a-vasculotropic-rna-virus-affecting-the-blood-vessels-endothelial-cell-infection-and-endotheliitis-in-covid-19/

 

Diagnosis of Coronavirus Infection by Medical Imaging and Cardiovascular Impacts of Viral Infection, Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN  Lead Curator – e–mail: avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu


Mysteries of COVID Smell Loss

Reported : Irina  Robu, PhD

When Covid-19 patients have smell loss it tends to be sudden and severe. They are usually don’t have a blocked, stuffy or runny nose – most people with coronavirus can still breathe freely.  Since the epidemy started in march, an estimated of 80 percent of people with COVID-19 have experience smell disturbances in addition to loss of taste and the ability to smell chemical irritants. Research has shown that smell loss is common in people with COVID-19 disease, the reason why researchers and doctors have recommended to use a diagnostic test to determine if a patient has COVID-19.

Yet, the mystery is how the new coronavirus robs patients of their senses. During the early days of the epidemic, physicians and researchers thought that COVID related loss of smell might signal that the virus makes its way into the brain through the nose, where it can do the most severe damage. According to Sandeep Robert Data, a neuroscientist at Harvard Medical School, the research data showed that the primary source is the in the nose, but more specifically in the nasal epithelium. It looks like the virus attacks the cells responsible for registering odors rather than attacking neurons directly.  

It is well known that  olfactory neurons do not have angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, which permit the virus entry to cells, on their surface. But sustentacular cells, which provide support for  olfactory neurons are scattered with the receptors. These cells preserve the important  balance of salt ions in the mucus that neurons rest on on to send signals to the brain. If that balance is disturbed, it could lead to a closure of neuronal signaling and loss of smell.

The sustentacular cells correspondingly deliver the metabolic and physical support necessary to keep the fingerlike cilia on the olfactory neurons wherever receptors that detect odors are disturbed. Nicolas Meunier, a neuroscientist at the Paris-Saclay University in France determined that disruption of the olfactory epithelium might explain the loss of smell. Yet, it remains unclear if the damage done by the virus or because it invades immune cells.

Since COVID-19 doesn’t cause nasal congestion, researchers have found a few clues about the loss of smell. Taste receptor cells, which detect chemicals in the saliva and sends signals to the brain do not have ACE receptors. They don’t necessarily  get infected by COVID-19, but other support cells in the tongue carry the receptor.

Researchers determined that more clues on  to how the virus obliterates smell. However, some patients have seen that after five months the ability to smell has returned but not as great as expected. That news is welcomed for patients that have suffered loss of smell due to the COVID-19 virus, yet apprehensions about long term loss of smell is a large cause of concern.

SOURCE

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mysteries-of-covid-smell-loss-finally-yield-some-answers1/


Machine Learning Implementation of a Prediction Model for Heart Failure Using Flask and Heroku

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Deploying a Heart Failure Prediction Model Using Flask and Heroku

Guest Author: Osasona Ifeoluwa

She Code Africa Cohort 3 Final project.

We published this article as an Educational Example for:

1. Designing a Prediction Model in Cardiology by using Data Created by other Authors

2. Using a Machine Learning Implementation for computation of the prediction values

3. Development of a Web Application to rest in the Public Domain

4. Usage of the Github repository 

5. to be added by Adina Hazan, PhD

6. to be added by Adina Hazan, PhD

7. to be added by Buddhadeb Pradhan, PhD

8. to be added by Buddhadeb Pradhan, PhD

 

Cardiovascular diseases (which often leads to heart failures) are the number 1 cause of death globally, taking an estimated 17.9 million lives each year, which accounts for 31% of global deaths.

Most cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by addressing behavioral risk factors such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet and obesity, physical inactivity, and harmful use of alcohol using population-wide strategies. However, people with cardiovascular disease or who are at high cardiovascular risk (due to the presence of one or more risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or already established disease) need early detection and management wherein a machine learning model can be of great help.

This machine learning model could help in predicting mortality caused by heart failure by taking in important features from the dataset and making predictions based on these features.

The dataset consists of 12 variables/features, and 1 output variable/target variable. Let us examine the role of each feature in determining if a person is likely to have heart failure or not:

  1. Age: This is the age of the patient
  2. Anemia: is the decrease in red blood cells or hemoglobin
  3. Creatinine_phosphokinase: is the level of creatine kinase in the blood. This enzyme is important for muscle function.
  4. Diabetes: is a chronic disease that causes high blood sugar
  5. Ejection fraction: is the percentage of blood leaving the heart at each contraction
  6. High blood pressure: is blood pressure that is higher than normal
  7. Platelets: are tiny blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding
  8. Serum creatinine: is the level of serum creatinine in the blood
  9. Serum sodium: is the level of serum sodium in the blood
  10. Sex: gender of the patient
  11. Time: This captures the time of the event
  12. Death event: which is the predictor variable.

Now that we know the function of each feature, Let’s get started

Step 1: Import Libraries

Step 2: Import the Dataset

The Dataset used in building this model was downloaded as a CSV file to my PC from Kaggle.

Step 3: Data Cleaning and EDA

This data was pretty much clean, so I didn’t have to do any more cleaning. However, some important pieces of information can still be explored.

Next, I use Matplotlib to visualize the distribution of the target variable (Death_event)

To check for the relationship between all the features and the target variable, I use a heatmap, which gives a graphical representation of the relationship between the variables.

Note: More analysis was done before Feature Selection, and details can be found on the Jupyter Notebook uploaded to Github.

Step 4: Splitting the Train and Test Data

Step 5: Data Preprocessing

This brings the data to a state that the model can parse easily. For the purpose of this project, the Standard Scaler is used, which standardizes the features by subtracting the mean and then scaling to unit variance.

Step 6: Model Selection

The support vector machine (SVM), a supervised machine learning model that uses classification algorithms for two-group classification problems is used. After giving the SVM model sets of the preprocessed training data for each category, they’re able to categorize new output.

The classification report shows an accuracy of 81%.

Since this model will be deployed, it is saved into a pickle file (model.pkl) created by pickle, and this file will reflect in your project folder.

Pickle is a python module that enables python objects to be written to files on the disk and read back into the python program runtime.

Step 7: Deploying with Flask and Heroku

Deploying a machine learning model means making the model available for end-users to make use of.

Create the Webpage

Here we will create a CSS webpage that has text boxes to take in input from users. The CSS file was named index.html and can be found here.

Several templates for creating a CSS webpage can be found online.

Deploy the model on the webpage using Flask

In deploying this heart failure prediction model into production, a web application framework called Flask is used. Flask makes it easy to write applications, and also gives a variety of choices for developing web applications.

To make use of this web application framework in deploying this model, we install Flask by running the following command:

Next, a Flask environment with an API endpoint that takes in the model and enables it to receive input from users, and return output is setup.

After this, a python file app.py is created, and the required libraries imported

Create the Flask App

Load the pickle

Create an app route to render the HTML template as the home page

Create an API that gets input from the user and computes a predicted value based on the model.

Now, call the run function to start the Flask server.

This should return an output that shows that your app is running. Simply copy the URL and paste it into your browser to test the app.

Deploy the Flask APP to Heroku

Heroku is a multi-language application platform that allows developers to deploy, and manage their applications. It is flexible and easy to use, offering developers the simplest path to getting their apps to market.

The first thing to do in deploying the Flask app to Heroku is to Sign up and Log In to Heroku. After which you can create a Procfile and requirement.txt file, which handles the configuration part in order to deploy the model into the Heroku server.

web: gunicorn is the fixed command for the Procfile.

The requirements file consists of all the libraries that have to get installed in the Heroku environment.

Next, you commit your code to Github and connect Github to Heroku.

After you connect, there are 2 ways to deploy your app. You could either choose automatic deploy or manual deploy. The automatic deployment will take place whenever you commit anything into your Github repository.

By selecting the branch and clicking on deploy, build starts.

After a successful deployment, the app will be created. Click on the view and your app should open. A new URL will also be created and can be shared by users.

Check Out my app via ‘https://heart-failure-prediction-app20.herokuapp.com/

The link to the Github Repository can be found here

Dataset Authors: Davide Chicco, Giuseppe Jurman

Link to Dataset

This was my first machine learning Deployment project, and I hope someone finds this useful🙂.

SOURCE

https://osasonaifeoluwa.medium.com/deploying-a-heart-failure-prediction-model-using-flask-and-heroku-55fdf51ee18e


Allocation and Prioritization of Vaccine Dose Administration Schedules: Cover more people or Adhere to Immunization Protocol

Curators:

This curation has four parts:

Part 1:

Waiting on the Covid booster would allow more people to be vaccinated sooner.

  • By Michael Segal, MD, PhD

Part 2:

Expert Opinion by Clinical Authority in Practice of Cardiac Imaging:

  • The Voice of Dr. Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

Part 3:

Expert Opinion by Scientific Authority in Population Biology

  • The Voice of Prof. Marcus W. Feldman, PhD

Part 4:

Summary

  • The Voices of Prof. Stephen J. Williams, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Introduction

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

We agree the protocol should not be changed

Quote Tweet

Pearl Freier
@PearlF
FDA’s Peter Marks explained why the 2 dose regimen for Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine shouldn’t be changed to 1 dose in attempt to reach more patients while there’s limited supply. Aside from 95% effectiveness w/ 2 dose regimen based on clinical data, he said no one knows how long 1/n

Pearl Freier
@PearlF

Replying to

1 dose would be effective for & no one knows if only given 1 dose if patient would get an immune response that “would just dwindle” “And we know that can happen because we know already that people who get very mild covid-19 tend to lose their immune responses pretty quickly.” 2/n

Pearl Freier
@PearlF

We need to make sure that those who get the vaccine regimen are people who know they’ve gotten that protection [95% effective]. Because that’s something we know, whereas the other [1 dose] is conjecture. And I would hate for people to change their behavior on the basis of 3/n

Pearl Freier
@PearlF

one dose of vaccine where we don’t know what’s really happening.” Peter Marks/FDA said (6 min mark) youtube.com/watch?v=uePet5 (
Research!America Alliance Member Meeting with Dr. Peter Marks
With several COVID-19 vaccine candidates under FDA review, Dr. Peter Marks, Director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), joined us …
youtube.com

 (she/her/hers)

@lisabari

Replying to

It will be really interesting to learn more about the immune response from J&J’s one dose regimen.

Pearl Freier
@PearlF

I think they’re expecting data from J&J in January

Part 1:

Waiting on the Covid booster would allow more people to be vaccinated sooner.

By Michael Segal, MD, PhD

https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-shot-instead-of-two-at-saving-lives-11607643152

A Shot (Instead of Two) at Saving Lives

Waiting on the Covid booster would allow more people to be vaccinated sooner.

By Michael Segal

Dec. 10, 2020 6:32 pm ET

Recent days brought good news and bad news about coronavirus vaccines. The developments could add up to months of delay in getting most Americans inoculated. But there’s a way to make use of the good news to speed up herd immunity.

The bad news is that in July the U.S. passed up an opportunity to secure by June 2021 more than 100 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine, now expected to receive emergency-use authorization in the next few days. Instead, officials followed a balanced-portfolio strategy that reserved as many as 300 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, whose prospects are unclear.

The good news is that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines performed at the upper end of expectations, with 95% efficacy after two doses. And intriguingly, Pfizer’s submission to the Food and Drug Administration shows that the efficacy of the vaccine in preventing disease had largely kicked in by two weeks after the first dose, and there was no dramatic increase in efficacy after the booster was given three weeks later.

The protocol in Pfizer’s clinical trial was to give all participants two doses. The FDA is likely to approve this protocol, and standard procedure is to prescribe a drug according to protocol. But we are in a pandemic and supplies of vaccine are inadequate. There’s an alternative: vaccinating as many people as possible with a first dose and waiting on the booster until supplies are plentiful.

The Pfizer study wasn’t designed to put a number on first-dose efficacy, but the data in Pfizer’s “cumulative incidence curves” suggest at least 75% efficacy for two weeks after one dose. The question is whether to use the 100 million doses on 50 million people, of whom two doses would protect roughly 47.5 million, or to give one dose each to 100 million people and protect at least 75 million.

States have the authority to allocate vaccines as they choose, but they’re unlikely to deviate from the study protocol unless a federal authority—whether the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or a coronavirus “czar”—suggests this as an option.

Even under such an approach, some essential personnel—such as doctors and nurses who work directly with coronavirus patients and health aides who work in multiple nursing homes—should get two doses as soon as possible, given their high-risk role in the pandemic response.

The U.S. will have more than these 100 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine. Some will come from Moderna, and the federal government could use the Defense Production Act to snatch some Pfizer doses that the company contracted to sell to other countries. Even so, supply will be constrained at first, and officials need to think clearly and flexibly about how to allocate the limited doses that will be available soon.

Harvard epidemiologist Michael Mina expressed his disappointment with society’s decision making during the pandemic: “I’m just astounded by the dysfunction, the willingness to just stay the course as hundreds of thousands of people die, and the unwillingness to innovate in literally any way.” Here’s a simple innovation that could save many lives.

Dr. Segal is a neurologist and neuroscientist.

Copyright ©2020 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

Appeared in the December 11, 2020, print edition.

Part 2:

Expert Opinion by Clinical Authority in Practice of Cardiac Imaging:

The Voice of Dr. Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

From: Justin MDMEPhD <jdpmdphd@gmail.com>

Date: Saturday, December 12, 2020 at 10:40 PM

To: “Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN” <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Re: I NEED YOUR EXPERT OPINION on Mickey Segal’s WSJ op-ed on vaccine dose allocation

Michael Segal proposes off-label use of the Pfizer 2-injection Covid-19 vaccine, based on data that suggested “75% protection at 2 weeks.” There was no controlled study reported of any sustained benefit from the single injection beyond 2 weeks, because those who received a first injection of vaccine received the designed booster at 2 weeks. Dr. Segal suggests it would be irresponsible to use the medication in the manner designed and tested. Instead, he could have proposed a study to determine the duration and degree of benefit from a single dose injection. However, one might argue that could delay the release of an effective regimen for the possibility that his proposed 1 dose regimen might be adequate for some, and possibly for more than the two weeks observed. Even if his guess is correct on both counts, both in his guess that the partial benefit at two weeks might be adequate and that it might last longer than the observed two weeks, it could still be deemed irresponsible to impose his guess for obvious reasons. His guess might be wrong, and could deprive many of the regimen that was validated as effective. Diverting an effective validated regimen to a guess could put many in harms way who would have been protected by the designed 2 dose regimen. He admits to low confidence in his recommendation when he proposes that essential workers should get the validated 2-dose regimen. Why does his recommendation stop there – why not propose a quarter dose to 4 times as many, or 1/8 dose to 8 times as many? Why apply the argument just to the two-dose regimen? He could also guess that a half dose of the single injection successful vaccines might be adequate. The motivation to second guess supply choices and doses is understandable, but it is not sound, as it is just a guess, not a validated regimen.

In addition, he also argues for 20-20 hindsight in the government distributing funds to mulitiple vaccines, instead of disproportionate purchase from Pfizer. Trials are limited in size, and further data will be collected on those vaccinated. Balanced investment may save more lives, not fewer, depending on those outcomes.

On Sat, Dec 12, 2020, 8:20 PM Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu> wrote:

Dear Dr. Pearlman,

Please send me 1/2 –1 page as a Critic of 

  • Mickey Segal’s WSJ op-ed on vaccine dose allocation, below

Part 3:

Expert Opinion by Scientific Authority in Population Biology

The Voice of Prof. Marcus W. Feldman, PhD

From: Marcus W Feldman <mfeldman@stanford.edu>

Date: Sunday, December 13, 2020 at 6:52 PM

To: “Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN” <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Re: Mickey Segal’s WSJ op-ed on vaccine dose allocation

RE Segal’s note:

We need more details on the longer term efficacy of the one-dose regimen. Once we have such data, the question of whether 100 million one-dose treatments will be more protective of the population than 50 million two-dose treatments can be addressed. The question of how many hospitalizations and/or deaths would be avoided by going straight to the one-dose regimen can’t be answered. Both approaches leave unanswered whether the transmission of the virus from a vaccinated person is reduced. I would estimate that we need 300 million 2-dose treatments to vaccinate all under 16 year olds.

On Dec 13, 2020, at 1:56 PM, Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu> wrote:

Dear Prof. Feldman,

Please send me 1/2 –1 page as a Critic of 

  • Mickey Segal’s WSJ op-ed on vaccine dose allocation, below

Part 4:

Summary

The Voices of Prof. Stephen J. Williams, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

The Voice of Prof. Stephen J. Williams, PhD

In light of just approved Moderna vaccine, AstraZenaca & JNJ forthcoming vaccine and the approved Pfizer BioNTech coverage should be over 200 million in US, making rationing of second booster shot unnecessary.  However, there is still a concern among the developing and underdeveloped nations that access to these vaccines will be restricted.

The following curation are articles related to this matter from the AAAS and CDC.

CDC advisory panel takes first shot at prioritizing who gets the first shots of COVID-19 vaccines
By Jon CohenDec. 1, 2020 , 8:25 PM
Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

Health care workers and elderly people living in long-term care facilities should receive top priority for COVID-19 vaccines in the United States if, as expected, one or more becomes available next month in limited supply. That’s what a group that advises the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on such fraught issues decided today in a near-unanimous vote.

After hearing detailed presentations from CDC scientists who explained the rationale for this specific prioritization scheme, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted 13 to one to support their proposal. Under the scheme, the first phase of vaccination, known as 1a, would begin with about 21 million health care workers and about 3 million adults who live in long-term care facilities. As spelled out in the 4-hour-long virtual meeting, these groups are at highest risk of becoming seriously ill or dying from COVID-19, and protecting them first, in turn, reduces the burden on society.

“I agree strongly with the decision of the committee,” says Stanley Perlman, a veteran coronavirus researcher and clinician at the University of Iowa who advised ACIP but is not part of it. “The discussions were incredibly thoughtful with everyone recognizing that we needed to make difficult choices. Of course, these allocation issues will become irrelevant once there are enough doses of useful vaccines.”

‘Just beautiful’: Another COVID-19 vaccine, from newcomer Moderna, succeeds in large-scale trial
By Jon CohenNov. 16, 2020 , 7:00 AM
Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation.

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Now, there are two. Another COVID-19 vaccine using the same previously unproven technology as the vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech, the U.S. and German companies that reported success on 9 November, appears to work remarkably well. And this time, the maker, U.S. biotech Moderna, is releasing a bit more data to back its claim than the other two companies.

An independent board monitoring Moderna’s 30,000-person vaccine trial met on Sunday and reported to the company and U.S. government health officials that only five people in the vaccinated group developed confirmed cases of COVID-19, whereas 90 people who received placebo shots became ill with the disease. That’s an efficacy of 94.5%, the company reported in a press release this morning. Although the clinical trial measurement may not translate into an equally high level of real-world protection, the success indicates the vaccine is Iikely more than effective enough to stop the pandemic if it can be widely distributed.

“That efficacy is just beautiful, and there’s no question about the veracity of it either,” says Lawrence Corey, a virologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center who co-led the clinical trials network that is testing the vaccine.

Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine ready to ship pending FDA approval -U.S. health chief

Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-usa-azar-idUSKBN28R265?taid=5fdc062c54859c0001437b9b&utm_campaign=trueanthem&utm_medium=trueanthem&utm_source=twitter

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on Thursday said nearly 6 million doses of Moderna Inc’s experimental COVID-19 vaccine were poised to ship nationwide as soon as it secures Food and Drug Administration approval. Azar, in an interview on CNBC, said federal health officials had allotted 5.9 million doses to send to the nation’s governors, who are managing each state’s distribution. “We’re ready to start shipping this weekend to them for rollout Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday of next week. We’re ready to go,” he said. An FDA panel of outside advisers is weighing the safety and effectiveness of Moderna’s vaccine candidate at a meeting on Thursday. The agency will weigh the committee’s conclusions in making its approval decision.

The strategy seems to have been produce multiple vaccines from multiple sources which reduce the strain on manufacturing of required doses.
However, many underdeveloped nations as well as developing nations are worried about the nationalism of access to these vaccines.  Please read below:

Abstract

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (AfSD) has the vision to leave no one behind, particularly low-income countries. Yet COVID-19 seems to have brought up new rules and approaches. Through document and critical discourse analysis, it emerges that there has been a surge in COVID-19 vaccines and treatments nationalism. Global solidarity is threatened, with the USA, United Kingdom, European Union and Japan having secured 1.3 billion doses of potential vaccines as of August 2020. Vaccines ran out even before their approval with three candidates from Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca having shown good Phase III results in November 2020. Rich countries have gone years ahead in advance vaccines and treatments purchases. This is a testimony that the 2030 AfSD, especially SDG 3 focusing on health will be difficult to achieve. Low-income countries are left gasping for survival as the COVID-19 pandemic relegates them further into extreme poverty and deeper inequality. The paper recommends the continued mobilisation by the World Health Organisation and other key stakeholders in supporting the GAVI vaccine alliance and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (COVAX) global vaccines initiative that seeks to make two billion vaccine doses available to 92 low and middle-income countries by December 2021.

Others have voiced their concerns on this matter:

 

Reserving coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines for global access: cross sectional analysis

From: Anthony D So 1 2Joshua Woo 2 BMJ2020 Dec 15;371:m4750. doi: 10.1136/bmj.m4750.

Abstract

Objective: To analyze the premarket purchase commitments for coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) vaccines from leading manufacturers to recipient countries.

Design: Cross sectional analysis.

Data sources: World Health Organization’s draft landscape of covid-19 candidate vaccines, along with company disclosures to the US Securities and Exchange Commission, company and foundation press releases, government press releases, and media reports.

Eligibility criteria and data analysis: Premarket purchase commitments for covid-19 vaccines, publicly announced by 15 November 2020.

Main outcome measures: Premarket purchase commitments for covid-19 vaccine candidates and price per course, vaccine platform, and stage of research and development, as well as procurement agent and recipient country.

Results: As of 15 November 2020, several countries have made premarket purchase commitments totaling 7.48 billion doses, or 3.76 billion courses, of covid-19 vaccines from 13 vaccine manufacturers. Just over half (51%) of these doses will go to high income countries, which represent 14% of the world’s population. The US has reserved 800 million doses but accounts for a fifth of all covid-19 cases globally (11.02 million cases), whereas Japan, Australia, and Canada have collectively reserved more than one billion doses but do not account for even 1% of current global covid-19 cases globally (0.45 million cases). If these vaccine candidates were all successfully scaled, the total projected manufacturing capacity would be 5.96 billion courses by the end of 2021. Up to 40% (or 2.34 billion) of vaccine courses from these manufacturers might potentially remain for low and middle income countries-less if high income countries exercise scale-up options and more if high income countries share what they have procured. Prices for these vaccines vary by more than 10-fold, from $6.00 (£4.50; €4.90) per course to as high as $74 per course. With broad country participation apart from the US and Russia, the COVAX Facility-the vaccines pillar of the World Health Organization’s Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator-has secured at least 500 million doses, or 250 million courses, and financing for half of the targeted two billion doses by the end of 2021 in efforts to support globally coordinated access to covid-19 vaccines.

Conclusions: This study provides an overview of how high income countries have secured future supplies of covid-19 vaccines but that access for the rest of the world is uncertain. Governments and manufacturers might provide much needed assurances for equitable allocation of covid-19 vaccines through greater transparency and accountability over these arrangements.

The Voice of Adina Hazan, PhD

I have a few issues with the proposal and the asserted outcomes:

The author suggests that back in July 2020 “the U.S. passed up an opportunity to secure by June 2021 more than 100 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine…[by] follow[ing] a balanced-portfolio strategy”. By stating that the U.S. “passed up an opportunity” at that time when all available evidence could not indicate which vaccine would prove successful is taking a “hindsight is 2020” approach. Instead, an all-or-nothing portfolio in July 2020 for one vaccine over another would have been at best unwise and at worst could have passed up the “right” vaccine.

In addition, the author’s core suggestion is that every person in America and the world needs the vaccine at the same time, aka as soon as possible. Considering the incredibly striated outcomes of patients that contract COVID-19, this is not the case. We know that males up until 85 years old with have a much worse prognosis than women, for example1. In addition, all data suggests that the lowest risk group is children, with a death rate in the U.S. of 0.1%1. Trying to vaccinate all children with a vaccine whose long-term effects are, at this time, unknown, for a disease with such a low death rate is not urgent and may warrant waiting for more evidence. Instead of trying to inoculate everyone as fast as possible, the two-dose approach that is currently implemented ensures that those most at risk receive the maximum protection, instead of leaving them at higher risks even after vaccination. In this way, the vaccine will do what it was originally intended to do: protect the most vulnerable immediately, and in turn begin to alleviate the strain on the overall population as a result of this disease.

  1. S. CDC website (Deaths by Age Group, 12/18/2020)

The Voice of Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

  • I recommand to adhere to administration protocol.
  • I agree with Dr. Joel Jertock:

It is very clear that the current COVID vaccination protocols call for two shots, three weeks apart, for maximum protection.

Limiting personnel to a single shot, “to spread the available vaccines further” just means wasting those doses.  It is similar to taking an antibiotic for only 5 days instead of the recommended 10 days, “to make the pills last longer.”

References on Vaccine Development 

Development of Medical Counter-measures for 2019-nCoV, CoVid19, Coronavirus