Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Pyruvate Kinase’ Category


Agios Pharmaceuticals target the metabolism of cancer cells for making drugs that essentially try to repair cancer cells

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

A small biotech behind a groundbreaking approach to tackling cancer just got its first drug approved

http://www.businessinsider.com/fda-approves-agios-pharmaceuticals-drug-targeting-cancer-cell-metabolism-2017-8

See

Cancer Metabolism

http://www.agios.com/research/cancer-metabolism/

Metabolic Immuno-Oncology

http://www.agios.com/research/metabolic-immuno-oncology/

 

 

The VOICE of Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Cancer cells didn’t need as much oxygen to metabolize sugar as normal cells. 

Not correct. Cancer cells metabolize glucose by aerobic glycolysis (4 ATP) with an impaired mitochondrial oxygen utilization (36 ATP). 

There is a reverse Warburg effect in which the underlying stromal cell carries out crosstalk with the epithelial cell. 

There is also a 3rd dimension. Cells undergo a series of adaptive changes tied to proteostasis. This involves the sulfur amino acid cysteine and disulfide bonds, which is involved with protein oligomerization in the ER, and also signaling in the mitochondria with mDNA and the nucleus. 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


Cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

 

New Pancreatic Treatment Shows Promise

http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/new-pancreatic-treatment-shows-promise/81252686/

Study demonstrates how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis. [NIH].   http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/GENHighlight/thumb_May4_2016_NIH_PancreaticCancerCells8616346835.jpg

Scientists say they have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis.

“We show for the first time that if you control the cholesterol metabolism you could reduce pancreatic cancer spread to other organs,” said Ji-Xin Cheng, Ph.D., a professor in Purdue University’s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemistry. “We chose pancreatic cancer to test this approach because it is the most aggressive disease of all the cancers.”

Dr. Cheng had previously led a team of researchers discovering a link between prostate cancer’s aggressiveness and the accumulation of a compound produced when cholesterol is metabolized in cells, findings that could bring new diagnostic and treatment methods. The new study involved researchers at the Purdue Center for Cancer Research and School of Biomedical Engineering, the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center and School of Medicine, and Purdue’s Department of Biological Sciences, Department of Comparative Pathobiology, and Department of Biochemistry.

The findings, detailed in a paper (“Abrogating Cholesterol Esterification Suppresses Growth and Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer”) just published in Oncogene, suggest that a class of drugs previously developed to treat atherosclerosis could be repurposed for treatment of pancreatic cancer and other forms of cancer. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances in arteries, restricting blood flow.

The researchers found accumulations of the compound cholesteryl ester in human pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines, demonstrating a link between cholesterol esterification and metastasis. Excess quantities of cholesterol result in cholesteryl ester being stored in lipid droplets within cancer cells.

“The results of this study demonstrate a new strategy for treating metastatic pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cholesterol esterification,” said Jingwu Xie, Ph.D., the Jonathan and Jennifer Simmons Professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine and a researcher at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center.

The paper’s lead author is Purdue postdoctoral fellow Junjie Li, Ph.D. Purdue researchers have developed an analytical tool, Raman spectromicroscopy, that allows compositional analysis of single lipid droplets in living cells.

“We identified an aberrant accumulation of cholesteryl ester in human pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines,” Dr. Li said. “Depletion of cholesterol esterification significantly reduced pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis in mice.”

Findings show that drugs like avasimibe, previously developed for treatment of atherosclerosis, reduced the accumulation of cholesteryl ester. Pancreatic cancer usually kills within a few months of diagnosis. It is hoped the potential new treatment might extend life of these patients for a year, Cheng said.

The accumulation of cholesteryl ester is controlled by an enzyme called acyl-coenzyme A acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1), and findings have correlated a higher expression of the enzyme with a poor survival rate for patients. The researchers analyzed tissue samples from pancreatic cancer patients and then tested the drug treatment in a type of laboratory mice referred to as an orthotopic mouse model, developed at the IU School of Medicine. Specimens of human pancreatic tissues were obtained from the Simon Cancer Center Solid Tissue Bank.

Imaging showed a decrease of the number of lipid droplets, and Raman spectral analysis verified a significant reduction of cholesteryl ester in the lipid droplets, suggesting that avasimibe acted by blocking cholesterol esterification. The drug did not induce weight loss, and there was no apparent organ toxicity in the liver, kidney, lung and spleen, Dr. Cheng said.

Findings also showed that blocking storage of cholesteryl ester causes cancer cells to die, specifically due to damage to the endoplasmic reticulum, a workhorse of protein and lipid synthesis.

“By using avasimibe, a potent inhibitor of ACAT-1, we found that pancreatic cancer cells were much more sensitive to ACAT-1 inhibition than normal cells,” added Dr. Cheng.

Additional research confirmed that the anticancer effect of avasimibe is specific to ACAT-1 inhibition. The researchers performed various biochemical assays and “genetic ablation” to confirm the drug’s anticancer effect.

“The results showed that avasimibe treatment for four weeks remarkably suppressed tumor size and largely reduced tumor growth rate,” said paper co-author Timothy Ratliff, the Robert Wallace Miller Director of Purdue’s Center for Cancer Research. “Metastatic lesions in lymph nodes and distant organs also were assessed at the end of the study. A much higher number of metastatic lesions in lymph nodes were detected in the control group than the avasimibe-treated group.”

Each mouse in the control group showed at least one metastatic lesion in the liver. In contrast, only three mice in the avasimibe-treated group showed single lesion in liver.

 

Abrogating cholesterol esterification suppresses growth and metastasis of pancreatic cancer

J Li1, D Gu2, S S-Y Lee1, B Song1, S Bandyopadhyay3, S Chen4, S F Konieczny3,5, T L Ratliff5,6, X Liu5,7, J Xie2 and J-X Cheng1,5
O
ncogene 2 May 2016;                                         http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/onc.2016.168

Cancer cells are known to execute reprogramed metabolism of glucose, amino acids and lipids. Here, we report a significant role of cholesterol metabolism in cancer metastasis. By using label-free Raman spectromicroscopy, we found an aberrant accumulation of cholesteryl ester in human pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines, mediated by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) enzyme. Expression of ACAT-1 showed a correlation with poor patient survival. Abrogation of cholesterol esterification, either by an ACAT-1 inhibitor or by shRNA knockdown, significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mechanically, ACAT-1 inhibition increased intracellular free cholesterol level, which was associated with elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress and caused apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new strategy for treating metastatic pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cholesterol esterification.

Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Though localized tumors can often be treated by surgery or other therapies, treatment options for metastatic diseases are limited. Cancer metastasis has been revealed to be a multiple step process, including cancer cell migration, local invasion, intravasation, circulation through blood and lymph vessels, extravasation, survival and colonization in distant organs.1, 2, 3Mediators identified in these processes have provided the basis for the development of therapies to target metastasis. Current therapeutic strategies for treating metastatic tumors mainly focus on targeting the adhesive molecules and extracellular proteases.4However, these therapeutics have not been proven to be effective in clinical trials, partially owing to the various escape mechanisms used by the metastatic cancer cells.2, 5, 6 Thus, an unmet need exists to develop new therapeutic strategies for treating metastatic cancers.

Recent advances in cancer metabolism have unveiled many potential therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. Metabolic reprogramming, a strategy used by cancer cells to adapt to the rapid proliferation, is being recognized as a new hallmark of cancer.7 Substantial studies have found increased glycolysis, glutaminolysis, nucleotide and lipid synthesis in cancer cells.7, 8, 9,10 Considering that altered metabolic pathways only happen in cancer cells but not in normal cells, targeting these pathways may provide cancer-specific treatments. A number of inhibitors of metabolic enzymes, such as glycolysis inhibitors, are under clinical trials as targeted cancer therapeutics.11

Of various metabolic pathways, lipid metabolism has been suggested to have an important role in cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis.12 A recent study reported that surrounding adipocytes provide energy source for ovarian cancer cells to promote its rapid growth and metastasis.13 Blocking lipidde novo synthesis pathway has been shown to suppress tumor regrowth and metastasis after anti-angiogenesis treatment withdrawal.14 In parallel, lipolysis by the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase was shown to regulate the fatty acid network, which promotes cancer cell migration, invasion and growth.15

Cholesterol, a critical component of the plasma membrane, is also implied to be correlated to cancer metastasis.16 It has been shown that prostate cancer bone metastases contain a high level of cholesterol.17 Modulation of cholesterol level in plasma membrane was shown to regulate the capability of cell migration.18, 19Moreover, cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts were shown to have an essential role in cancer cell adhesion and migration.20 Mammalian cells obtain cholesterol either from de novo synthesis or from the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL).21 Inside cells, excess free cholesterol is esterified and stored as cholesteryl ester (CE) in lipid droplets (LDs), which is mediated by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT).22 Increased CE level has been reported in breast cancer,23 leukemia,24 glioma25 and prostate cancer.26Despite these advances, the role of cholesterol esterification in cancer progression, especially in cancer metastasis, is not well understood.

In this article, we report a link between cholesterol esterification and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. Using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy and Raman spectroscopy to map LDs stored inside single cells and analyze the composition of individual LDs, we identified an aberrant accumulation of CE in human pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines. Abrogation of cholesterol esterification, either by inhibiting ACAT-1 enzyme activity or by shRNA knockdown of ACAT-1 expression, significantly reduced pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model. Mechanistically, inhibition of cholesterol esterification disturbed cholesterol homeostasis by increasing intracellular free cholesterol level, which was associated with elevated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and eventually led to apoptosis.

In this study, we revealed a link between CE accumulation and pancreatic cancer metastasis. Accumulation of CE via ACAT-1 provides a mechanism to keep high metabolic activity and avoid toxicity from excess free cholesterol. Previously, CE has been reported in breast cancer,23 leukemia,24 glioma25 and prostate cancer.26 Inhibition of cholesterol esterification was shown to suppress tumor growth or cancer cell proliferation.24, 25, 26 Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of cholesterol esterification can be used to treat metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Cholesterol is an essential lipid having important roles in membrane construction, hormone production and signaling.21Aberrant cholesterol metabolism is known to be associated with cardiovascular diseases and cancers.35, 36 Statins, inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, have been explored as potential therapies for pancreatic cancer.37 However, statins were not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in clinical trials.38 One possible reason is that HMG-CoA reductase is also required for downstream protein prenylation, a critical process for protein activation.39Thus, the effect of statin is not just inhibiting cholesterol synthesis, but also other pathways which may render toxicity to normal cells. This non-specific toxicity is a possible reason for the limited anti-cancer outcome of statin in clinical trials.

Our study identified cholesterol esterification as a novel target for suppression of pancreatic cancer proliferation and metastasis. Inhibitors of ACAT-1 are expected to have great value as cancer-targeting therapeutics, as CE accumulation only occurs in cancer tissues or cell lines. Our animal studies with avasimibe treatment showed no adverse effect to the animals at a dosage of 15mg/kg. More importantly, modulation of cholesterol esterification suppressed not only tumor growth but also tumor metastasis. These results are expected to stimulate further biological studies to fully appreciate the role of cholesterol metabolism in cancer initiation and progression. As CE accumulation happens in several types of aggressive cancer, blocking cholesterol esterification could be pursued as a therapeutic strategy for other types of cancers. By combining with existing chemotherapies, such as gemcitabine, we believe this metabolic treatment possesses high possibilities to extend patients’ survival time by retarding cancer progression and metastasis.

The molecular mechanism that links CE accumulation to cancer aggressiveness needs further studies. One possible mechanism is that cholesterol esterification keeps signaling pathways active by maintaining a low free cholesterol environment. One of the possible targets is the caveolin-1 signaling pathway. Caveolin-1, a regulator of cellular cholesterol homeostasis, is considered as a marker for pancreatic cancer progression.11 Particularly, a promoting role of caveolin-1 in pancreatic cancer metastasis has been reported.40 Our preliminary studies showed ACAT-1 inhibition reduced the expression level of SREBP1, caveolin-1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (unpublished data). The effect on caveolin-1 is probably mediated by SREBP1, which senses the intracellular cholesterol homeostasis.41 Meanwhile, caveolin-1 may have an important role in mediating the action of SREBP1 on MAPK pathways,42, 43 which are known to have essential roles in cancer cell metastasis.44 Therefore, it is possible that increased free cholesterol level induced by ACAT-1 inhibition inactivates SREBP1, leading to downregulation of caveolin-1/MAPK pathway, which contributes to the reduced cancer aggressiveness.

Besides the caveolin-1/MAPK signaling, other possibilities include the potential alteration of the membrane composition, such as lipid rafts, by ACAT-1 inhibition. Lipid rafts are known to provide platforms for multiple cellular signaling pathways.20 Thus, modulation of cholesterol metabolism is likely to have more profound effects via other signaling pathways. Future studies are needed to fully elucidate the molecular mechanism.

 

Read Full Post »


A Reconstructed View of Personalized Medicine

Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

There has always been Personalized Medicine if you consider the time a physician spends with a patient, which has dwindled. But the current recognition of personalized medicine refers to breakthrough advances in technological innovation in diagnostics and treatment that differentiates subclasses within diagnoses that are amenable to relapse eluding therapies.  There are just a few highlights to consider:

  1. We live in a world with other living beings that are adapting to a changing environmental stresses.
  2. Nutritional resources that have been available and made plentiful over generations are not abundant in some climates.
  3. Despite the huge impact that genomics has had on biological progress over the last century, there is a huge contribution not to be overlooked in epigenetics, metabolomics, and pathways analysis.

A Reconstructed View of Personalized Medicine

There has been much interest in ‘junk DNA’, non-coding areas of our DNA are far from being without function. DNA has two basic categories of nitrogenous bases: the purines (adenine [A] and guanine [G]), and the pyrimidines (cytosine [C], thymine [T], and  no uracil [U]),  while RNA contains only A, G, C, and U (no T).  The Watson-Crick proposal set the path of molecular biology for decades into the 21st century, culminating in the Human Genome Project.

There is no uncertainty about the importance of “Junk DNA”.  It is both an evolutionary remnant, and it has a role in cell regulation.  Further, the role of histones in their relationship the oligonucleotide sequences is not understood.  We now have a large output of research on noncoding RNA, including siRNA, miRNA, and others with roles other than transcription. This requires major revision of our model of cell regulatory processes.  The classic model is solely transcriptional.

  • DNA-> RNA-> Amino Acid in a protein.

Redrawn we have

  • DNA-> RNA-> DNA and
  • DNA->RNA-> protein-> DNA.

Neverthess, there were unrelated discoveries that took on huge importance.  For example, since the 1920s, the work of Warburg and Meyerhoff, followed by that of Krebs, Kaplan, Chance, and others built a solid foundation in the knowledge of enzymes, coenzymes, adenine and pyridine nucleotides, and metabolic pathways, not to mention the importance of Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and other metal cofactors.  Of huge importance was the work of Jacob, Monod and Changeux, and the effects of cooperativity in allosteric systems and of repulsion in tertiary structure of proteins related to hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, which involves the effect of one ligand on the binding or catalysis of another,  demonstrated by the end-product inhibition of the enzyme, L-threonine deaminase (Changeux 1961), L-isoleucine, which differs sterically from the reactant, L-threonine whereby the former could inhibit the enzyme without competing with the latter. The current view based on a variety of measurements (e.g., NMR, FRET, and single molecule studies) is a ‘‘dynamic’’ proposal by Cooper and Dryden (1984) that the distribution around the average structure changes in allostery affects the subsequent (binding) affinity at a distant site.

What else do we have to consider?  The measurement of free radicals has increased awareness of radical-induced impairment of the oxidative/antioxidative balance, essential for an understanding of disease progression.  Metal-mediated formation of free radicals causes various modifications to DNA bases, enhanced lipid peroxidation, and altered calcium and sulfhydryl homeostasis. Lipid peroxides, formed by the attack of radicals on polyunsaturated fatty acid residues of phospholipids, can further react with redox metals finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and other exocyclic DNA adducts (etheno and/or propano adducts). The unifying factor in determining toxicity and carcinogenicity for all these metals is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Various studies have confirmed that metals activate signaling pathways and the carcinogenic effect of metals has been related to activation of mainly redox sensitive transcription factors, involving NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53.

I have provided mechanisms explanatory for regulation of the cell that go beyond the classic model of metabolic pathways associated with the cytoplasm, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and lysosome, such as, the cell death pathways, expressed in apoptosis and repair.  Nevertheless, there is still a missing part of this discussion that considers the time and space interactions of the cell, cellular cytoskeleton and extracellular and intracellular substrate interactions in the immediate environment.

There is heterogeneity among cancer cells of expected identical type, which would be consistent with differences in phenotypic expression, aligned with epigenetics.  There is also heterogeneity in the immediate interstices between cancer cells.  Integration with genome-wide profiling data identified losses of specific genes on 4p14 and 5q13 that were enriched in grade 3 tumors with high microenvironmental diversity that also substratified patients into poor prognostic groups. In the case of breast cancer, there is interaction with estrogen , and we refer to an androgen-unresponsive prostate cancer.

Finally,  the interaction between enzyme and substrates may be conditionally unidirectional in defining the activity within the cell.  The activity of the cell is dynamically interacting and at high rates of activity.  In a study of the pyruvate kinase (PK) reaction the catalytic activity of the PK reaction was reversed to the thermodynamically unfavorable direction in a muscle preparation by a specific inhibitor. Experiments found that in there were differences in the active form of pyruvate kinase that were clearly related to the environmental condition of the assay – glycolitic or glyconeogenic. The conformational changes indicated by differential regulatory response were used to present a dynamic conformational model functioning at the active site of the enzyme. In the model, the interaction of the enzyme active site with its substrates is described concluding that induced increase in the vibrational energy levels of the active site decreases the energetic barrier for substrate induced changes at the site. Another example is the inhibition of H4 lactate dehydrogenase, but not the M4, by high concentrations of pyruvate. An investigation of the inhibition revealed that a covalent bond was formed between the nicotinamide ring of the NAD+ and the enol form of pyruvate.  The isoenzymes of isocitrate dehydrogenase, IDH1 and IDH2 mutations occur in gliomas and in acute myeloid leukemias with normal karyotype. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are remarkably specific to codons that encode conserved functionally important arginines in the active site of each enzyme. In this case, there is steric hindrance by Asp279 where the isocitrate substrate normally forms hydrogen bonds with Ser94.

Personalized medicine has been largely viewed from a lens of genomics.  But genomics is only the reading frame.  The living activities of cell processes are dynamic and occur at rapid rates.  We have to keep in mind that personalized in reference to genotype is not complete without reconciliation of phenotype, which is the reference to expressed differences in outcomes.

 

Read Full Post »


Is the Warburg effect an effect of deregulated space occupancy of methylome?

Larry H. Bernstein and Radoslav Bozov, co-curation

LPBI

 

 

It would appear that pyruvate is directly used by cancer cell machinery for sustaining genome independence, and that CRISP-Cas9 system is essentially a modified CAD protein for making small bases.

13C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Lucia Salamanca-Cardona and Kayvan R. Keshari

Cancer & Metabolism 2015; 3:9          http://dx.doi.org:/10.1186/s40170-015-0136-2

In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-13C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

 

Since the hallmark discovery of the Warburg effect in cancer cells in the 1920s, it has been widely accepted that the metabolic properties of cancer cells are vastly different from those of normal cells [1]. Starting from the observation that many cancerous (neoplastic) cells have higher rates of glucose utilization and lactate production, the development of tools and methods to correlate specific cellular metabolic processes to different types of cancer cells has received increased research focus [2, 3]. Several imaging techniques are currently in use for this purpose, including radiography, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetic resonance (MR) [4, 5].

For more than 30 years, MR has been a revolutionary diagnostic tool, used in a wide range of settings from the central nervous system to cardiomyopathies and cancers. MR imaging (MRI) can outline molecular and cellular processes with high spatial resolution. Typically, MRI of body tissues is achieved via contrast visualization of the protons (1H) of water, which are present in high abundance in living systems. This can be extended to MR spectroscopy (MRS), which can further differentiate between less abundant, carbon-bearing, biological metabolites in vivo utilizing 1Hs of these compounds [6, 7]. However, despite its usefulness in imaging whole body tissues, 1H MRS has low spectral resolution and poor sensitivity for these less abundant metabolites. In addition,13C MRS is increasingly difficult, in comparison to 1H MRS, in that both the gyromagnetic ratio (approximately 25 % of 1H) and natural abundance (1.1 % of 1H) are significantly lower, making the detection of carbon-bearing compounds difficult [8, 9]. The low spectral resolution of 1H MRS for metabolites can be addressed by using 13C-enriched compounds, and with this direct 13C MRS, metabolic processes can be traced, utilizing enriched tags on specific carbons in a given metabolite [10]. While enrichment of molecules in 13C can also moderately address the sensitivity limitation of MRS, recent work in hyperpolarization (HP) provides a means of dramatically increasing sensitivity and enhancing signals, well beyond that of the equilibrium state obtained via MRS. [11, 12]. The focus of this review will be the introduction of this approach in the setting of cancer metabolism, delineating probes of interest, which have been applied to study metabolic processes in vivo.

Obtaining a hyperpolarized probe

In MR, a desired target is placed in a magnetic field where the nuclear spins of molecules are aligned with or against the direction of the magnetic field. The nuclear spins have thus different energies, and an MR signal is detected upon relaxation of nuclear spins of higher energy. At thermal equilibrium, the number of spins aligned with the magnetic field nearly equals the number of spins opposing the direction of the magnetic field. Thus, at thermal equilibrium, spin polarization is in the order of >0.0005 % resulting in a limited signal. Signal increases on the order of 100,000-fold can be achieved by hyperpolarizing the system via the redistribution of the spin population levels found at equilibrium [10, 13]. There are several techniques that have been used to achieve hyperpolarization of various nuclei: spin-exchange optical pumping of 3He and 129Xe, parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP), and dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) [11,14, 15]. Both PHIP and DNP techniques can polarize biologically relevant nuclei like 13C and 15N, although there is a wider range of molecules that can be targeted for hyperpolarization using dissolution DNP [14, 1618].

The goal of DNP is the transfer of polarization from highly polarized unpaired electron spins to the nuclear spins of a desired target compound. This is achieved by applying an external magnetic field to a free-radical agent in order to polarize electron spins, followed by saturating the electron spin resonance via microwave irradiation in order to obtain polarization transfer. The free-radical agent is generally a stable organic compound that is compatible with aqueous buffers, which are used as solvent in order to obtain a homogeneous distribution of the radical [13]. Nearly 100 % of the electrons on the free-radical agent are polarized when the free-radical/solvent mixture is subjected to high magnetic fields (≥3.3 T) followed by rapid freezing to 1 K using liquid helium in order to obtain a sample frozen to an amorphous state, which is necessary for retention and transfer of polarization [18]. For biological applications, after transfer of electron spin polarization to the nuclei of interest has occurred, the preparation must exist in solution, which can be achieved utilizing a dissolution process in which the solid sample is rapidly melted via injection of a hot solvent, typically a biologically compatible buffer, into the frozen sample [13]. The dissolution process results in a liquid sample at room temperature, while still preserving the enhanced polarization obtained by the microwave irradiation of the frozen sample [8]. Additionally, the use of chelating agents (e.g., EDTA) with the solvent to eliminate trace metals and more recently the use of gadolinium (Gd) chelates with the DNP sample have been used to further enhance and retain polarization in the liquid sample, albeit with caution over potential toxic effects when applied in vivo and the potential for loss of hyperpolarization due to T 1 shortening [11, 19, 20]. More in-depth exploration of the technical aspects of probe development has been previously reviewed [8, 11].

Considerations in probe selection and current research

The usefulness of a molecule for hyperpolarized MRS is dependent on the polarization lifetime of the nucleus of interest, and this property is determined by the spin-lattice relaxation constant (T1) [21]. Dipolar coupling, the magnetic field range, and molecular size can also affect the T1 of a given nucleus. In general, high magnetic fields and large molecular weights decrease the T1. Dipole-dipole coupling of 13C with 1H is common in biologically relevant molecules, and it shortens relaxation times; therefore, carbon atoms directly bound to 1H are generally not useful as probes for HP. For example, all carbons present in glucose (an important substrate in cancer cells) have relaxation times shorter than 2 s [22]. On the other hand, carbonyl carbons of biologically relevant molecules generally have T1’s above 20 s even at high magnetic fields like [1-13C] pyruvic acid, which has relaxation times of 67, 48, and 44 s at 3, 11.7, and 14.1 T, respectively [2325]. Even carbons that are less oxidized than carbonyls, like the hemi-ketal in [2-13C] fructose have T1’s one order of magnitude higher than glucose carbons. Short spin-lattice relaxation times can sometimes be increased by deuterium enrichment of the sample. With this technique, protons that are directly bound to carbons are exchanged for deuterium atoms which results in the reduction of dipole-dipole relaxation, further preserving the hyperpolarized state [26]. This has resulted in increased T1’s of 13C nuclei in molecules such as glucose (T1 increased from 2 s to 10–14 s), providing the possibility of utilizing them in future metabolic studies [2729]. Despite the effect of deuterium enrichment, research efforts have largely focused on developing carbonyl-bearing molecules as molecular imaging probes. The focus of this review is to introduce representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue and have been applied in the work of multiple groups: aerobic glycolysis, glutamine addiction, and the redox state.

Pyruvate and aerobic glycolysis

Of particular interest to cancer metabolism is the increased conversion of glucose to lactate as a result of modulated aerobic glycolysis. This process, also known as the Warburg effect, is characteristic of many tumors with altered metabolism where pyruvate generated from glucose metabolism via glycolysis is preferentially converted to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as opposed to entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle [1]. With this phenotype, cancer cells show a preference for lactate fermentation even in the presence of oxygen, thus bypassing oxidative respiration for ATP generation. Because of this, pyruvate has been the preferred probe for HP MRS research since it is an intermediate metabolite in pathways characteristic of aberrant metabolism in cancer cells, including increased lactate production as a result of aerobic glycolysis where detection of HP pyruvate-derived lactate can be used as a marker for cancer and response to treatment [30, 31] as well as an intermediate in amino acid metabolism (e.g., interconversion to alanine via transamination with glutamate) (Fig. 1). In addition, as mentioned before, carbonyl carbons in pyruvate have long relaxation times where even the methyl carbon can have T1’s above 50 s after deuterium enrichment [32]. The interconversion of pyruvate to lactate has been exploited for MRI by using [1-13C] pyruvate and detecting the accumulation of increased lactate in cancerous tissue as compared to surrounding benign tissue. Increased conversion of pyruvate to lactate and alanine has been demonstrated to precede MYC-driven tumorigenesis by using HP [1-13C] pyruvate in murine models [33]. Furthermore, in the same study, a decrease in the flux of alanine was observed at the tumor stage while a decrease in lactate conversion was indicative of tumor regression [33]. In transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) models, in vivo studies using HP [1-13C] pyruvate demonstrated that hyperpolarized pyruvate and its metabolic products can be used non-invasively and with high specificity to obtain a profile of the histologic grade of prostate cancers [34]. In vivo imaging following hyperpolarized pyruvate has also been used to evaluate the role of glutaminase and LDH in human lymphoma models [35] as well as to elucidate metabolism of pyruvate in breast cancer [36] and renal cell carcinoma with treatment [30, 37].
https://i0.wp.com/static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2Fs40170-015-0136-2/MediaObjects/40170_2015_136_Fig1_HTML.gif
Flux of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to [1-13C] lactate in prostate regions. a MR image from patient with prostate cancer showing regions of cancerous tissue and surrounding normal tissue. bd Localized dynamic hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate and [1-13C]lactate spectral from voxels overlapping the contralateral region of prostate (turquoise), a region of prostate cancer (yellow), and a vessel outside the prostate (green). Adapted with permission from ref. [43]

Early work that utilized HP pyruvate to assess the response of tumors to treatment was conducted in mice xenografted with EL-4 lymphoma cells and treated with etoposide, a topoisomerase inhibitor that causes rapid cell death [38, 39]. In this study, tumor necrosis was correlated to a decrease in the flux of hyperpolarized lactate which was suggested to be due to a decrease in NAD+ and NADH in the intracellular pool as well as loss of LDH function. More recently, HP [1-13C] pyruvate has been used as a biomarker to evaluate early response to radiation therapy in glioma tumors by observing a decrease in hyperpolarized lactate suggested to be a result of changes in tumor perfusion which can be detected between 24 and 96 h following treatment [40, 41]. HP [1-13C] pyruvate has also been used to detect early response to temozolomide (TMZ) treatment on human glioblastoma rat models [42]. The study successfully showed for the first time detection of response to TMZ therapy 1 day after TMZ administration. The continued reports on using HP pyruvate as an imaging probe for assessing treatment response indicate the potential of the compound to become a standard in the field. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the usefulness of HP [1-13C] pyruvate as a tool for early assessment of therapy response, which can improve treatment selection at the clinical level. Pyruvate has also been validated as a metabolic imaging marker for use in humans [43]. In a two-phase study, patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer of various histological grades were injected with HP [1-13C] pyruvate. In the first phase, a maximum dose level was determined to establish pharmacological safety of the HP probe while still injecting enough pyruvate to allow visualization. This addressed one of the major challenges faced in translating HP MRI to clinical applications: the potential toxicity of compounds that must be injected into patients. In the second phase, metabolism of pyruvate was visualized in real time and differences in the ratio of [1-13C] lactate to [1-13C] pyruvate between identified cancerous regions and normal tissue regions were successfully observed (Fig. 1ad). [1-13C] lactate in regions that did not contain tumor was not detected, confirming previous biopsy and preclinical studies that demonstrated low flux of [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate and low concentrations of lactate in benign prostate tissues [44, 45]. Preliminary results indicated the possibility of detecting previously unobserved cancerous regions by HP [1-13C] pyruvate, later confirmed to be Gleason 4+3 cancer by biopsy, though further investigation into the relationship between grade and metabolism in prostate cancer patients is needed. While there are challenges associated with translation to clinical use for HP [1-13C] pyruvate, the first in human study demonstrated the feasibility of hyperpolarization technology as a safe diagnostic tool and provides the potential for utilizing this approach in preclinical models with direct translation to the clinic.

Glutamine metabolism

Glutamine is an amino acid that plays an important cellular role as nitrogen donor in the form of an amide group for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, leaving a glutamate molecule in the process although glutamine can also be converted to glutamate by glutaminase in a reaction independent of nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutamate is the primary nitrogen donor for the biosynthesis of non-essential amino acids. Transaminases catalyze the transfer of the amine group from glutamate to α-ketoacids to synthesize alanine, aspartate (precursor for asparagine), serine (precursor for glycine and cysteine), ornithine (precursor for arginine), and proline which is derived from the glutamate carbon backbone. Glutamine is considered a non-essential amino acid as it can be recycled from glutamate and ammonia in a reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthetase; however, some cancer cells show increase consumption of glutamine and are unable to grow in the absence of exogenous glutamine [46, 47]. This metabolic characteristic of cells to require exogenous glutamine for growth has been termed “glutamine addiction” and has generated extensive research interest as an indicator of development of cancerous tissues [48]. In particular to the field of HP MRI, the conversion rate of glutamine to glutamate (Fig. 2) was explored in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a [5-13C] glutamine probe (Fig. 2) [49]. Using the ratio between [5-13C] glutamine and [5-13C] glutamate, it was demonstrated that HCC cells convert glutamine at a higher rate than normal cells supporting the notion of glutamine addiction. One important aspect of this study was the choice of [5-13C] glutamine as a probe as opposed to [1-13C] glutamine, which has a longer T1 (16.1 vs. 24.6 s at 9.4 T) [49, 50]. [5-13C] glutamine was selected because the chemical shift change obtained from [1-13C] in glutamine and glutamate is far too small, which could prevent proper identification and quantification of the peaks. This highlights the importance of understanding not only the target compound to be hyperpolarized but also the metabolic products to be detected and their resulting spectra in MR. This is further emphasized with studies that demonstrate the usefulness of [1-13C] glutamine as a source for [1-13C] glutamate in order to follow the metabolism of α-ketoglutarate to observe the metabolic state of the TCA cycle in transformed cells [51]. Furthermore, [1-13C] α-ketoglutarate has been hyperpolarized and used to visualize other metabolic events involving [1-13C] glutamate such as mutations in IDH1 expression in glioma tumors and pathways dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) [5153]. More recently, [5-13C] glutamine has been used to visualize the metabolism of liver cancer in vivo and in vitro, as well as the treatment response of prostate cancer cells in vitro [54]. Based on the promise of glutamine as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis and treatment response, extending the spin-lattice relaxation time of the [5-13C] glutamine has been researched and successfully accomplished. The facile synthesis of [5-13C-4-2H2] glutamine has been reported, and its study showed that by relying on the effect of deuterium enrichment to lessen dipolar coupling effects, the T1 of [5-13C] glutamine could be increased from approximately 15 to 30 s [55]. Visualization of real-time conversion of glutamine to glutamate in SF188 cells was achieved using this probe, demonstrating the promise of [5-13C-4-2H2] glutamine as a probe for molecular imaging of metabolic events in real time. Further investigation of this probe applied to in vivo preclinical models will lay the foundation for its clinical translational potential in the future.
https://i2.wp.com/static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2Fs40170-015-0136-2/MediaObjects/40170_2015_136_Fig2_HTML.gif
Metabolism of [5-13C] glutamine to [5-13C] glutamate. a Time-dependent spectral data following conversion of [5-13C] glutamine to [5-13C] glutamate. The signals are from 13C-enriched [5-13C]glutamate at 181.5 ppm and [5-13C]glutamine at 178.5 ppm and from natural abundance 13C label in [1-13C]glutamate at 175.2 ppm and [1-13C]glutamine at 174.7 ppm. b Plot of the ratio of the signal intensities of [5-13C]glutamate/[5-13C]glutamine showing the ratio in hepatoma cells (shaded circle), cell lysate (square), and control (triangle). These results demonstrated that hepatoma cancer cells convert glutamine to glutamine at a higher rate than normal cells. Adapted with permission from ref. [49]

Dehydroascorbate as a redox sensor

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like the hydroxyl radical, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide have been shown to cause DNA damage and can lead to mutations that transform normal cells into cancerous cells [56]. The reduction/oxidation (redox) state, which is dependent on the balance between oxidizing equivalents like ROS and reducing cofactors, can provide insight into the physiological condition of the cell with respect to potential cancer transformations. Furthermore, the presence of ROS in tissue has been implicated to be a factor in developing resistance to radiation therapies [57]. During oxidative stress (i.e., when there is an increase in ROS), redox homeostasis is maintained by the action of antioxidant compounds, such as ascorbate (or vitamin C, VitC), which can scavenge for ROS and reduce the compounds to rid the cells of damaging agents [58]. In this process, ascorbate that is available to cells in high concentrations can be oxidized to dehydroascorbate (DHA) while reducing ROS. DHA can then be transported into the cell where DHA is reduced back to ascorbate resulting in a process of recycling ascorbate and DHA (Fig. 3) [59]. In this sense, the ratio of DHA to ascorbate can be used as a molecular marker to investigate the redox state and thus the physiological state of tissues. Additionally, conversion of DHA to ascorbate can be enzymatically catalyzed in an NADPH-dependent manner or via oxidation of glutathione (GSH) to glutathione sulfide (GSSG); thus, visualization of ascorbate/DHA metabolism offers a method for probing in vivo metabolism of NADPH as well as determination of GSSG to GSH ratio, both of which have been implicated to be indicators of oxidative stress in the cells, particularly for neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and cancer diseases [6062]. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] DHA was successfully used in murine models to detect increased reducing capacity in prostate cancer with the purpose of developing a non-invasive, early diagnostic tool for improving selection of treatment therapies [62, 63]. DHA demonstrates a relatively long T1 at clinically relevant field strengths (>50 s at 3 T) and adequate chemical shift separation between it and its metabolic product ascorbate (δ = 3.8 ppm). Increased reduction of HP [1-13C] DHA to ascorbate was observed in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue as well as other metabolic organs (Fig. 3). This was additionally demonstrated in lymphoma cells, further supporting the potential for using DHA as a probe in living systems [64]. A following study validated these results, and the correlation between increased DHA reduction and glutathione was established in vivo, thus showing the utility of [1-13C] DHA as a molecular imaging probe to detect events that go beyond the direct metabolism of DHA [63]. Notwithstanding the potential of HP DHA as a diagnostic probe, the toxicity of DHA remains to be validated. Earlier studies on mammalian cells showed DHA toxicity starting at 10 mM, while a study carried on rats demonstrated neurological effects of DHA starting at injections of 50 mg/kg [65, 66]. However, as outlined above, successful use of DHA injections in rats and mice for hyperpolarization has been demonstrated without reported side effects on the animals. More research is needed to determine the parameters regarding the toxicity of DHA in larger animal models using pure formulations to assess its potential for clinical trials. Further work in DHA could demonstrate its applicability for the study of ROS and redox changes in model systems.
https://i2.wp.com/static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2Fs40170-015-0136-2/MediaObjects/40170_2015_136_Fig3_HTML.gif
Determination of redox state by imaging of HP [1-13C] ascorbate (VitC) and [1-13C] dehydroascorbate (DHA). Oxidative stress caused by ROS (1.) can be alleviated by oxidation of ascorbate to DHA (2.), and recycling of DHA to ascorbate can occur indirectly with oxidation of glutathione (3.) or directly with oxidation of NADH (4.). The ratio of [ascorbate] to [DHA] has been successfully used in mice models as a biomarker to determine pH in vivo. Adapted with permission from ref. [62]

Other metabolic imaging probes

While the three probes discussed earlier are the most well studied in metabolic events that are characteristic of cancer cells in general, other molecules have been evaluated in their potential to be used as biomarkers. Hyperpolarized bicarbonate (H13CO3) has been successfully used to determine the pH in extracellular matrix of lymphoma tumors in mice, and a correlation between acidic environments and cancer was established [67]. The relaxation times for bicarbonate compounds at 3 T are between 34 and 50 s, which is enough time to detect the rapid conversion of H13CO3 and 13CO2 catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase [23]. The attractive feature of this probe is based on how ubiquitous acidic extracellular environments are to a wide variety of diseases; thus, HP bicarbonate has the potential for clinical translation beyond cancer research, though extensive work will be necessary to generate a preparation which will result in an adequate dose for the clinic [68, 69]. More recently, the potential of α-ketoisocaproate (KIC) as a molecular probe for in vivo detection of branched chain amino acid transaminase (BCAT) has been explored. BCAT catalyzes the conversion of KIC to leucine, and its expression has been suggested to correlate to genetic characterization of certain tumors. In a pilot study, HP α-keto-[1-13C]-isocaproate was shown to have a T1 of 100 s so its metabolism can be sensitively traced for over a minute after injection [70]. In the same study, metabolism of HP [1-13C] KIC to [1-13C] leucine by BCAT was observed in murine lymphoma tumor tissue but was absent in rat mammary adenocarcinoma with a correlation between BCAT expression and [1-13C] leucine signal detection [70]. Additionally, in the same models, [1-13C] pyruvate conversion to [1-13C] lactate and [1-13C] alanine was detected in both types of tumors. These findings show the promise of using [1-13C] KIC as a discriminative probe in addition to pyruvate in order to diagnose different types of cancer [71, 72]. Furthermore, the correlation between BCAT expression and [1-13C] leucine detection was also shown in rat brain tissue, confirming the usefulness of HP [1-13C] KIC in assessing BCAT activity in vivo [73]. Choline is another compound that has been evaluated as a molecular imaging probe since elevated choline and choline-derived metabolites have been correlated by 1H-MRS imaging to cancer in the brain, breast, colon, cervix, and prostate [7476]. Despite its potential as a global marker for cancer because of the long T1 relaxation times that can be achieved with deuterium and 15N enrichment [77, 78], HP applications of 13C enriched choline are limited due to the small change in chemical shifts of choline and choline-derived metabolites as well as its potential toxicity [16, 79, 80]. It has been shown that choline toxicity occurs at doses of 53 mg/kg in mice, although a recent study successfully detected HP 13C choline in vivo without adverse effects in rats at doses of 50 mg/kg by using atropine to prevent cholinergic intoxication [81, 82] though metabolic products have been difficult to visualize in vivo. As mentioned earlier, the usefulness of glucose as a probe is limited due to the short relaxation times of all the carbons present in the molecule and although the T1’s can be increased through deuterium enrichment, the lifetime of the probe remains a hurdle for clinical applications [27, 28]. Thus, fructose (a pentose analog of glucose) has been successfully used as an alternative to probe glycolytic pathways [83] in TRAMP models where differences in HP [2-13C] fructose uptake and metabolism was visualized in tumor regions compared to surrounding normal tissues. Like choline, the limiting factor in the usefulness of [2-13C] fructose for in vivo studies is in small chemical shifts between the metabolite and its phosphorylated product. Finally, tumor necrosis can be used as a measure of treatment response, particularly early necrosis. HP [1,4-,13C] malate has been visualized in lymphoma mice models after injection of HP [1,4-13C] fumarate [84]. In normal cells, fumarate has a slow rate of transport into the mitochondria; however, in necrotic cells where the mitochondrial membrane is degraded, fumarase has access to the HP fumarate and its ubiquitous cofactor, water, thus facilitating rapid conversion to malate. Preliminary studies have shown the potential for its use in animal models though further work is required to determine the necessary density of necrotic cells for detection and the timings required for adequate visualization in patients.

Conclusions

The application of hyperpolarized 13C imaging has been extensively investigated in preclinical models, and the successful demonstration of HP [1-13C] pyruvate in patients with prostate cancer has validated the potential of HP MRI as a safe diagnostic and treatment assessment tool. Application of other probes beyond pyruvate is still in its infancy, particularly because of the need to further study the currently developed models under conditions that are relevant to a clinical setting (i.e., lower magnetic fields) as well as to study the necessary parameters (probe toxicity dose limits, safety limits for rapid injection) to withstand the necessary hurdles to translation. Nevertheless, these vast research findings are promising and indicate an eventual translation to humans. Furthermore, there is a large variety of biologically relevant molecules that have the potential to be hyperpolarized (Fig. 4), and molecular imaging of metabolic events in real time using not only one single probe but a combination of relevant probes could become an invaluable tool in elucidating so far undiscovered metabolic and proteomic interactions that play a role in cancer development and treatment. This gives HP MRI the great potential to revolutionize current molecular imaging technologies.
https://i0.wp.com/static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2Fs40170-015-0136-2/MediaObjects/40170_2015_136_Fig4_HTML.gif
Metabolic pathways with compounds that can be used as molecular imaging probes for HP MRI. A wide variety of metabolic pathways have already been visualized or have the potential to be visualized using hyperpolarization technology that can be applied to different pathological states of the cell including cardiovascular disease and a large variety of cancers. 1. Metabolism of C1 (red dots) in pyruvate. Theasterisks on selected compounds represent enrichment of 13C in the second pass of pyruvate in TCA cycle. 2. Metabolism of C1 (brown dots) in DHA using a pool of NADPH derived from the pentose phosphate pathway. 3. Metabolism of C1 (blue dots) and C5 (green dots) of glutamine. 4. Metabolism of C1 and C4 (purple dots) of fumarate unrelated to TCA metabolites. 5. Metabolism of extracellular bicarbonate (gray dots). MTC1 monocarboxylate transporter 1, MTC4 monocarboxylate transporter 4,System ASC amino acid transporter, GLUTs glucose transporters, DCT dicarboxylate transporter, DHARdehydroascorbate reductase, GR glutathione reductase, GSH glutathione, GSSG glutathione disulfide,LDH lactate dehydrogenase, ALT alanine transaminase, CA carbonic anhydrase, PC pyruvate carboxylase,PDH pyruvate dehydrogenase, CS citrate synthase, GLS glutaminase, GLDH glutamate dehydrogenase,IDH isocitrate dehydrogenase, OGDC oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, SCS succinyl CoA synthetase, SQR succinate dehydrogenase, FH fumarate hydratase, MDH malate dehydrogenase, FUMfumarase. Cofactors have been omitted for brevity

Abbreviations

ALT:   alanine transaminase;   BCAT:  branched chain amino acid transaminase;   DHA:  dehydroascorbate;   DNP:  dynamic nuclear polarization;   EDTA:  ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid;   GSH:  glutathione;   GSSG:   glutathione sulfide;   HCC:  hepatocellular carcinoma;   HIF:  hypoxia-inducible factor;   HP:  hyperpolarized/hyperpolarization;   IDH:  isocitrate dehydrogenase;   KIC:  ketoisocaproate;   LDH:  lactate dehydrogenase;   MR: magnetic resonance;   MRI:  Magnetic resonance imaging;   MRS:  magnetic resonance spectroscopy;   NAD(H):  nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide;   NADP(H):  nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate;   PET:  positron emission tomography;   ROS:  reactive oxygen species;   SPECT:  single-photon emission computed tomography;   TRAMP:  transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate

References

  1. Warburg O. On the origin of cancer cells. Science. 1956;123:309–14.View ArticlePubMed
  2. Gatenby RA, Gillies RJ. Why do cancers have high aerobic glycolysis? Nat Rev Cancer. 2004;4(11):891–9.View ArticlePubMed
  3. Vander Heiden MG, Cantley LC, Thompson CB. Understanding the Warburg effect: the metabolic requirements of cell proliferation. Science. 2009;324:1029–33.View ArticlePubMed CentralPubMed
  4. Shie P, Cardarelli R, Brandon D, Erdman W, AbdulRahim N. Meta-analysis: comparison of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and bone scintigraphy in the detection of bone metastases in patients with breast cancer. Clin Nucl Med. 2008;33:97–101.View ArticlePubMed
  5. Frangioni JV. New technologies for human cancer imaging. J Clin Oncol. 2008;26:4012–21.View ArticlePubMed CentralPubMed
  6. Castillo M, Kwock L, Mukherji SK. Clinical applications of proton MR spectroscopy. Am J Neuroradiol. 1996;17:1–16.PubMed
  7. Barker PB, Bizzi A, De Stefano N, Gullapalli R, Lin DD. Clinical MR spectroscopy: techniques and applications. Cambridge University Press; 2009.
  8. Comment A, Merritt ME. Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance as a sensitive detector of metabolic function. Biochemistry. 2014;53:7333–57.View ArticlePubMed
  9. Rider OJ, Tyler DJ. Clinical implications of cardiac hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. J Cardiov Magn Reson. 2013;15:93.View Article
  10. Golman K, Olsson LE, Axelsson O, Månsson S, Karlsson M, Petersson JS. Molecular imaging using hyperpolarized 13C. Br J Radiol. 2003;76 Suppl 2:S118–S27.View ArticlePubMed

….. more

sjwilliamspa commented on Is the Warburg effect an effect of deregulated space occupancy of methylome?

Is the Warburg effect an effect of deregulated space occupancy of methylome? Larry H. Bernstein and Radoslav Bozov, …

It would be an interesting figure, although I am not sure anyone has been able to measure it, is the spatial distribution of lactate and pyruvate over the tumor as a function of diffusion distance such as a heat map to see if pyruvate and lactate levels have a gradiant over a solid tumor. I am not sure it would but interesting to see where tumor cells, which undergo Warburg type metabolic phenotype actually exist, if it is a function of angiogenesis or a function of the proliferative capacity of cells in situ.

Response by LHB…

Radoslav Bozov has repeatedly referred to the real problem of space/time in the required experimental view that is intractable, as seen by Erwin Schroedinger.  It is confounded by
the restrictions imposed by research, and to an extent also the dilemma of location and velocity.

I think it is to an extent also inherent in the modern revelations of autophagy and apoptosis that were not part of the view in the mid 20th century.  However, the work of B. Chance led to a substantially better understanding of the hydride transfer in the NAD/NADH.  What is overlooked is the important role cited by NO Kaplan of NADPH/NADP vs NADH/NAD associated with synthetic and, alternatively, catabolic processes in the cell. What role the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase would play is anyones guess.   In any case the proliferation of malignant cells is dependent on NADPH.  This would limit the NAD/NADH related reactions. The effect in the cytoplasm is PYR –> LAC, with generation of NAD from NADH.  In addition, the type of isoenzyme favored should be consequential.  For instance, the M-type LDH does not form an abortive ternary complex LDH*NAD+*PYR. In addition, Bernstein, Everse and Grisham showed that in cancer there is an aberrant cytoplasmic MDH.

Read Full Post »


P13K delta-gamma anticancer agent

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

RP 6350, Rhizen Pharmaceuticals S.A. and Novartis tieup for Rhizen’s inhaled dual Pl3K-delta gamma inhibitor

by DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

 

(A)           and                         (Al)                  and                (A2)

(S)-2-(l-(9H-purin-6-ylamino)propyl)-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (Compound A1 is RP 6350).

 

str1

 

RP 6350, RP6350, RP-6350

(S)-2-(l-(9H-purin-6-ylamino)propyl)-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4H-chromen-4-one

mw 415

Rhizen Pharmaceuticals is developing RP-6530, a PI3K delta and gamma dual inhibitor, for the potential oral treatment of cancer and inflammation  In November 2013, a phase I trial in patients with hematologic malignancies was initiated in Italy ]\. In September 2015, a phase I/Ib study was initiated in the US, in patients with relapsed and refractory T-cell lymphoma. At that time, the study was expected to complete in December 2016

PATENTS……..WO 11/055215 ,  WO 12/151525.

  • Antineoplastics; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase delta inhibitors; Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase gamma inhibitors
  • Phase I Haematological malignancies
  • Preclinical Multiple myeloma

 

Swaroop K. V. S. Vakkalanka,
COMPANY Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02017613

 

PI3K delta/gamma inhibitor RP6530 An orally active, highly selective, small molecule inhibitor of the delta and gamma isoforms of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) with potential immunomodulating and antineoplastic activities. Upon administration, PI3K delta/gamma inhibitor RP6530 inhibits the PI3K delta and gamma isoforms and prevents the activation of the PI3K/AKT-mediated signaling pathway. This may lead to a reduction in cellular proliferation in PI3K delta/gamma-expressing tumor cells. In addition, this agent modulates inflammatory responses through various mechanisms, including the inhibition of both the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha activity. Unlike other isoforms of PI3K, the delta and gamma isoforms are overexpressed primarily in hematologic malignancies and in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. By selectively targeting these isoforms, PI3K signaling in normal, non-neoplastic cells is minimally impacted or not affected at all, which minimizes the side effect profile for this agent. Check for active clinical trials using this agent. (NCI Thesaurus)

Company Rhizen Pharmaceuticals S.A.
Description Dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta and gamma inhibitor
Molecular Target Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta ; Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) gamma
Mechanism of Action Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta inhibitor; Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) gamma inhibitor
Therapeutic Modality Small molecule

 

Dual PI3Kδ/γ Inhibition By RP6530 Induces Apoptosis and Cytotoxicity In B-Lymphoma Cells
 Swaroop Vakkalanka, PhD*,1, Srikant Viswanadha, Ph.D.*,2, Eugenio Gaudio, PhD*,3, Emanuele Zucca, MD4, Francesco Bertoni, MD5, Elena Bernasconi, B.Sc.*,3, Davide Rossi, MD, Ph.D.*,6, and Anastasios Stathis, MD*,7
 1Rhizen Pharmaceuticals S A, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, 2Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd., Hyderabad, India, 3Lymphoma & Genomics Research Program, IOR-Institute of Oncology Research, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 4IOSI Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 5Lymphoma Unit, IOSI-Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 6Italian Multiple Myeloma Network, GIMEMA, Italy, 7Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland

RP6530 is a potent and selective dual PI3Kδ/γ inhibitor that inhibited growth of B-cell lymphoma cell lines with a concomitant reduction in the downstream biomarker, pAKT. Additionally, the compound showed cytotoxicity in a panel of lymphoma primary cells. Findings provide a rationale for future clinical trials in B-cell malignancies.

POSTER SESSIONS
Blood 2013 122:4411; published ahead of print December 6, 2013
Swaroop Vakkalanka, Srikant Viswanadha, Eugenio Gaudio, Emanuele Zucca, Francesco Bertoni, Elena Bernasconi, Davide Rossi, Anastasios Stathis
  • Dual PI3K delta/gamma Inhibition By RP6530 Induces Apoptosis and Cytotoxicity
  • RP6530, a novel, small molecule PI3K delta/gamma
  • Activity and selectivity of RP6530 for PI3K delta and gamma isoforms

Introduction Activation of the PI3K pathway triggers multiple events including cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell survival and motility. While α and β isoforms are ubiquitous in their distribution, expression of δ and γ is restricted to cells of the hematopoietic system. Because these isoforms contribute to the development, maintenance, transformation, and proliferation of immune cells, dual targeting of PI3Kδ and γ represents a promising approach in the treatment of lymphomas. The objective of the experiments was to explore the therapeutic potential of RP6530, a novel, small molecule PI3Kδ/γ inhibitor, in B-cell lymphomas.

Methods Activity and selectivity of RP6530 for PI3Kδ and γ isoforms and subsequent downstream activity was determined in enzyme and cell-based assays. Additionally, RP6530 was tested for potency in viability, apoptosis, and Akt phosphorylation assays using a range of immortalized B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Raji, TOLEDO, KG-1, JEKO, OCI-LY-1, OCI-LY-10, MAVER, and REC-1). Viability was assessed using the colorimetric MTT reagent after incubation of cells for 72 h. Inhibition of pAKT was estimated by Western Blotting and bands were quantified using ImageJ after normalization with Actin. Primary cells from lymphoid tumors [1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 2 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), 2 mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 1 splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), and 1 extranodal MZL (EMZL)] were isolated, incubated with 4 µM RP6530, and analyzed for apoptosis or cytotoxicity by Annexin V/PI staining.

Results RP6530 demonstrated high potency against PI3Kδ (IC50=24.5 nM) and γ (IC50=33.2 nM) enzymes with selectivity over α (>300-fold) and β (>100-fold) isoforms. Cellular potency was confirmed in target-specific assays, namely anti-FcεR1-(EC50=37.8 nM) or fMLP (EC50=39.0 nM) induced CD63 expression in human whole blood basophils, LPS induced CD19+ cell proliferation in human whole blood (EC50=250 nM), and LPS induced CD45R+ cell proliferation in mouse whole blood (EC50=101 nM). RP6530 caused a dose-dependent inhibition (>50% @ 2-7 μM) in growth of immortalized (Raji, TOLEDO, KG-1, JEKO, REC-1) B-cell lymphoma cells. Effect was more pronounced in the DLBCL cell lines, OCI-LY-1 and OCI-LY-10 (>50% inhibition @ 0.1-0.7 μM), and the reduction in viability was accompanied by corresponding inhibition of pAKT with EC50 of 6 & 70 nM respectively. Treatment of patient-derived primary cells with 4 µM RP6530 caused an increase in cell death. Fold-increase in cytotoxicity as evident from PI+ staining was 1.6 for CLL, 1.1 for DLBCL, 1.2 for MCL, 2.2 for SMZL, and 2.3 for EMZL. Cells in early apotosis (Annexin V+/PI-) were not different between the DMSO blank and RP6530 samples.

Conclusions RP6530 is a potent and selective dual PI3Kδ/γ inhibitor that inhibited growth of B-cell lymphoma cell lines with a concomitant reduction in the downstream biomarker, pAKT. Additionally, the compound showed cytotoxicity in a panel of lymphoma primary cells. Findings provide a rationale for future clinical trials in B-cell malignancies.

Disclosures:Vakkalanka:Rhizen Pharmaceuticals, S.A.: Employment, Equity Ownership; Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd.: Employment, Equity Ownership.Viswanadha:Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd.: Employment. Bertoni:Rhizen Pharmaceuticals SA: Research Funding.

 

PI3K Dual Inhibitor (RP-6530)


Therapeutic Area Respiratory , Oncology – Liquid Tumors , Rheumatology Molecule Type Small Molecule
Indication Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) , Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma , Asthma , Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , Rheumatoid Arthritis
Development Phase Phase I Rt. of Administration Oral

Description

Rhizen is developing dual PI3K gamma/delta inhibitors for liquid tumors and inflammatory conditions.

Situation Overview

Dual Pl3K inhibition is strongly implicated as an intervention treatment in allergic and non-allergic inflammation of the airways and autoimmune diseases manifested by a reduction in neutrophilia and TNF in response to LPS. Scientific evidence for PI3-kinase involvement in various cellular processes underlying asthma and COPD stems from inhibitor studies and gene-targeting approaches, which makes it a potential target for treatment of respiratory disease. Resistance to conventional therapies such as corticosteroids in several patients has been attributed to an up-regulation of the PI3K pathway; thus, disruption of PI3K signaling provides a novel strategy aimed at counteracting the immuno-inflammatory response. Given the established criticality of these isoforms in immune surveillance, inhibitors specifically targeting the ? and ? isoforms would be expected to attenuate the progression of immune response encountered in most variations of airway inflammation and arthritis.

Mechanism of Action

While alpha and beta isoforms are ubiquitous in their distribution, expression of delta and gamma is restricted to circulating hematogenous cells and endothelial cells. Unlike PI3K-alpha or beta, mice lacking expression of gamma or delta do not show any adverse phenotype indicating that targeting of these specific isoforms would not result in overt toxicity. Dual delta/gamma inhibition is strongly implicated as an intervention strategy in allergic and non-allergic inflammation of the airways and other autoimmune diseases. Scientific evidence for PI3K-delta and gamma involvement in various cellular processes underlying asthma and COPD stems from inhibitor studies and gene-targeting approaches. Also, resistance to conventional therapies such as corticosteroids in several COPD patients has been attributed to an up-regulation of the PI3K delta/gamma pathway. Disruption of PI3K-delta/gamma signalling therefore provides a novel strategy aimed at counteracting the immuno-inflammatory response. Due to the pivotal role played by PI3K-delta and gamma in mediating inflammatory cell functionality such as leukocyte migration and activation, and mast cell degranulation, blocking these isoforms may also be an effective strategy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis as well.

Given the established criticality of these isoforms in immune surveillance, inhibitors specifically targeting the delta and gamma isoforms would be expected to attenuate the progression of immune response encountered in airway inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

http://www.rhizen.com/images/backgrounds/pi3k%20delta%20gamma%20ii.png

http://www.rhizen.com/images/backgrounds/pi3k%20delta%20gamma%20ii.pngtps:/

Clinical Trials

Rhizen has identified an orally active Lead Molecule, RP-6530, that has an excellent pre-clinical profile. RP-6530 is currently in non-GLP Tox studies and is expected to enter Clinical Development in H2 2013.

In December 2013, Rhizen announced the start of a Phase I clinical trial. The study entitled A Phase-I, Dose Escalation Study to Evaluate Safety and Efficacy of RP6530, a dual PI3K delta /gamma inhibitor, in patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancies is designed primarily to establish the safety and tolerability of RP6530. Secondary objectives include clinical efficacy assessment and biomarker response to allow dose determination and potential patient stratification in subsequent expansion studies.

 

Partners by Region

Rhizen’s pipeline consists of internally discovered (with 100% IP ownership) novel small molecule programs aimed at high value markets of Oncology, Immuno-inflammtion and Metabolic Disorders. Rhizen has been successful in securing critical IP space in these areas and efforts are on for further expansion in to several indications. Rhizen seeks partnerships to unlock the potential of these valuable assets for further development from global pharmaceutical partners. At present global rights on all programs are available and Rhizen is flexible to consider suitable business models for licensing/collaboration.

In 2012, Rhizen announced a joint venture collaboration with TG Therapeutics for global development and commercialization of Rhizen’s Novel Selective PI3K Kinase Inhibitors. The selected lead RP5264 (hereafter, to be developed as TGR-1202) is an orally available, small molecule, PI3K specific inhibitor currently being positioned for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

PATENT
WO2014195888, DUAL SELECTIVE PI3 DELTA AND GAMMA KINASE INHIBITORS

This scheme provides a synthetic route for the preparation of compound of formula wherein all the variables are as described herein in above

Figure imgf000094_0001

15 14 10 12 12a

REFERENCES
April 2015, preclinical data were presented at the 106th AACR Meeting in Philadelphia, PA. RP-6530 had GI50 values of 17,028 and 22,014 nM, respectively
December 2014, data were presented at the 56th ASH Meeting in San Francisco, CA.
December 2013, preclinical data were presented at the 55th ASH Meeting in New Orleans, LA.
June 2013, preclinical data were presented at the 18th Annual EHA Congress in Stockholm, Sweden. RP-6530 inhibited PI3K delta and gamma isoforms with IC50 values of 24.5 and 33.2 nM, respectively.
  • 01 Sep 2015 Phase-I clinical trials in Hematological malignancies (Second-line therapy or greater) in USA (PO) (NCT02567656)
  • 18 Nov 2014 Preclinical trials in Multiple myeloma in Switzerland (PO) prior to November 2014
  • 18 Nov 2014 Early research in Multiple myeloma in Switzerland (PO) prior to November 2014

 

WO2011055215A2 Nov 3, 2010 May 12, 2011 Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd. Novel kinase modulators
WO2012151525A1 May 4, 2012 Nov 8, 2012 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Novel compounds as modulators of protein kinases
WO2013164801A1 May 3, 2013 Nov 7, 2013 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Process for preparation of optically pure and optionally substituted 2- (1 -hydroxy- alkyl) – chromen – 4 – one derivatives and their use in preparing pharmaceuticals
US20110118257 May 19, 2011 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Novel kinase modulators
US20120289496 May 4, 2012 Nov 15, 2012 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Novel compounds as modulators of protein kinases
WO 2011055215

 

 

Read Full Post »

Metabolic Genomics and Pharmaceutics, Vol. 1 of BioMed Series D available on Amazon Kindle


Metabolic Genomics and Pharmaceutics, Vol. 1 of BioMed Series D available on Amazon Kindle

Reporter: Stephen S Williams, PhD

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence would like to announce the First volume of their BioMedical E-Book Series D:

Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics, Vol. I

SACHS FLYER 2014 Metabolomics SeriesDindividualred-page2

which is now available on Amazon Kindle at

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B012BB0ZF0.

This e-Book is a comprehensive review of recent Original Research on  METABOLOMICS and related opportunities for Targeted Therapy written by Experts, Authors, Writers. This is the first volume of the Series D: e-Books on BioMedicine – Metabolomics, Immunology, Infectious Diseases.  It is written for comprehension at the third year medical student level, or as a reference for licensing board exams, but it is also written for the education of a first time baccalaureate degree reader in the biological sciences.  Hopefully, it can be read with great interest by the undergraduate student who is undecided in the choice of a career. The results of Original Research are gaining value added for the e-Reader by the Methodology of Curation. The e-Book’s articles have been published on the Open Access Online Scientific Journal, since April 2012.  All new articles on this subject, will continue to be incorporated, as published with periodical updates.

We invite e-Readers to write an Article Reviews on Amazon for this e-Book on Amazon.

All forthcoming BioMed e-Book Titles can be viewed at:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, launched in April 2012 an Open Access Online Scientific Journal is a scientific, medical and business multi expert authoring environment in several domains of  life sciences, pharmaceutical, healthcare & medicine industries. The venture operates as an online scientific intellectual exchange at their website http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com and for curation and reporting on frontiers in biomedical, biological sciences, healthcare economics, pharmacology, pharmaceuticals & medicine. In addition the venture publishes a Medical E-book Series available on Amazon’s Kindle platform.

Analyzing and sharing the vast and rapidly expanding volume of scientific knowledge has never been so crucial to innovation in the medical field. WE are addressing need of overcoming this scientific information overload by:

  • delivering curation and summary interpretations of latest findings and innovations on an open-access, Web 2.0 platform with future goals of providing primarily concept-driven search in the near future
  • providing a social platform for scientists and clinicians to enter into discussion using social media
  • compiling recent discoveries and issues in yearly-updated Medical E-book Series on Amazon’s mobile Kindle platform

This curation offers better organization and visibility to the critical information useful for the next innovations in academic, clinical, and industrial research by providing these hybrid networks.

Table of Contents for Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics, Vol. I

Chapter 1: Metabolic Pathways

Chapter 2: Lipid Metabolism

Chapter 3: Cell Signaling

Chapter 4: Protein Synthesis and Degradation

Chapter 5: Sub-cellular Structure

Chapter 6: Proteomics

Chapter 7: Metabolomics

Chapter 8:  Impairments in Pathological States: Endocrine Disorders; Stress

                   Hypermetabolism and Cancer

Chapter 9: Genomic Expression in Health and Disease 

 

Summary 

Epilogue

 

 

Read Full Post »


New Insights on the Warburg Effect [2.2]

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator, Writer

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/8/05/15/lhbern/New_Insights_on_the_Warburg_Effect_%5B2.2%5D

 

New Insights on the Warburg Effect [2.2]

Defective Mitochondria Transform Normal Cells into Tumors

GEN News Jul 9, 2015

Ninety-one years ago Otto Warburg demonstrated that cancer cells have impaired respiration, which became known as the Warburg Effect. The interest in this and related work was superceded in the last quarter of the twentieth century by work on the genetic code. Now there is renewed interest.

An international research team reports that a specific defect in mitochondria plays a key role in the transition from normal cells to cancerous ones. The scientists disrupted a key component of mitochondria of otherwise normal cells and the cells took on characteristics of malignant cells.

Their study (“Disruption of cytochrome c oxidase function induces the Warburg effect and metabolic reprogramming”) is published Oncogene and was led by members of the lab of Narayan G. Avadhani, Ph.D., the Harriet Ellison Woodward Professor of Biochemistry in the department of biomedical sciences in the school of veterinary medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Satish Srinivasan, Ph.D., a research investigator in Dr. Avadhani’s lab, was the lead author.

This is consistent with the 1924 observation by Warburg that cancerous cells consumed glucose at a higher rate than normal cells (Meyerhof ratio) and had defects in their grana, the organelles that are now known as mitochondria. He postulated that these defects led to problems in the process by which the cell produces energy. But the process called oxidative phosphorylation was not yet known. Further work in his laboratory was carried out by Hans Krebs and by Albert Szent Gyorgyi elucidating the tricarboxylic acid cycle.  The discovery of the importance of cytochrome c and adenosine triphosphate in oxidative phosphorylation was made in the post World War II period by Fritz Lippman, with an important contribution by Nathan Kaplan. All of the name scientists, except Kaplan, received Nobel Prizes. The last piece of the puzzle became the demonstation of a sequence of hydrogen transfers on the electron transport chain. The researchers above have now shown that mitochondrial defects indeed contributed to the cells becoming cancerous.

“The first part of the Warburg hypothesis has held up solidly in that most proliferating tumors show high dependence on glucose as an energy source and they release large amounts of lactic acid,” said Dr. Avadhani. “But the second part, about the defective mitochondrial function causing cells to be tumorigenic, has been highly contentious.”

To see whether the second part of Warburg’s postulation was correct, the researchers took cell lines from the skeleton, kidney, breast, and esophagus and used RNA molecules to silence the expression of select components of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C, or CcO, a critical enzyme involved in oxidative phosphorylation. CcO uses oxygen to make water and set up a transmembrane potential that is used to synthesize ATP, the molecule used for energy by the body’s cells.

The biologists observed that disrupting only a single protein subunit of cytochrome oxidase C led to major changes in the mitochondria and in the cells themselves. “These cells showed all the characteristics of cancer cells,” noted Dr. Avadhani.

The normal cells that converted to cancerous cells displayed changes in their metabolism, becoming more reliant on glucose by utilization of the glycolytic pathway. They reduced their synthesis of ATP.  Oxidative phosphorylation was reduced in concert with the ATP reduction. The large switch to glycolysis as primary energy source is a less efficient means of making ATP that is common in cancer cells.

The cells lost contact inhibition and gained an increased ability to invade distant tissues, both hallmarks of cancer cells. When they were grown in a 3D medium, which closely mimics the natural environment in which tumors grow in the body, the cells with disrupted mitochondria formed large, long-lived colonies, akin to tumors.

The researchers also silenced cytochrome oxidase C subunits in breast and esophageal cancer cell lines. They found that the cells became even more invasive, according to Dr. Srinivasan. The team then looked at actual tumors from human patients and found that the most oxygen-starved regions, which are common in tumors, contained defective versions of CcO.

“That result alone couldn’t tell us whether that was the cause or effect of tumors, but our cell system clearly says that mitochondrial dysfunction is a driving force in tumorigenesis,” explained Dr. Avadhani.

The researchers observed that disrupting CcO triggered the mitochondria to activate a stress signal to the nucleus, akin to an SOS alerting the cell that something was wrong. Dr. Avadhani and his colleagues had previously seen a similar pathway activated in cells with depleted mitochondrial DNA, which is also linked to cancer.

Building on these findings, Dr. Avadhani and members of his lab will examine whether inhibiting components of this mitochondrial stress signaling pathway might be a strategy for preventing cancer progression.

“We are targeting the signaling pathway, developing a lot of small molecules and antibodies,” said Dr. Avadhani. “Hopefully if you block the signaling the cells will not go into the so called oncogenic mode and instead would simply die.”

In addition, they noted that looking for defects in CcO could be a biomarker for cancer screening.

 

Who controls the ATP supply in cancer cells? Biochemistry lessons to understand cancer energy metabolism

Rafael Moreno-Sánchez, Alvaro Marín-Hernández, Emma Saavedra, Juan P. Pardo, Stephen J. Ralph, Sara Rodríguez-Enríquez
Intl J Biochem Cell Biol 7 Feb 2014; 50:10-23
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2014.01.025

The supply of ATP in mammalian and human cells is provided by glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). There are no other pathways or processes able to synthesize ATP at sufficient rates to meet the energy demands of cells. Acetate thiokinase or acetyl-CoA synthetase, a ubiquitous enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of ATP and acetate from acetyl-CoA, PPi and AMP, might represent an exception under hypoxia in cancer cells, although the flux through this branch is negligible (≤10%) when compared to the glycolytic flux (Yoshii et al., 2009).

Glycolysis in human cells can be defined as the metabolic process that transforms 1 mol of glucose (or other hexoses) into 2 moles of lactate plus 2 moles of ATP. These stoichiometric values represent a maximum and due to the several reactions branching off glycolysis, they will be usually lower under physiological conditions, closer to 1.3–1.9 for the lactate/glucose ratio (Travis et al., 1971; Jablonska and Bishop, 1975; Suter and Weidemann, 1975; Hanson and Parsons, 1976; Wu and Davis, 1981; Pick-Kober and Schneider, 1984; Sun et al., 2012). OxPhos is the metabolic process that oxidizes several substrates through the Krebs cycle to produce reducing equivalents (NADH, FADH2), which feed the respiratory chain to generate an H+.

Applying basic biochemical principles, this review analyzes data that contrasts with the Warburg hypothesis that glycolysis is the exclusive ATP provider in cancer cells. Although disregarded for many years, there is increasing experimental evidence demonstrating that oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) makes a significant contribution to ATP supply in many cancer cell types and under a variety of conditions.

Substrates oxidized by normal mitochondria such as amino acids and fatty acids are also avidly consumed by cancer cells. In this regard, the proposal that cancer cells metabolize glutamine for anabolic purposes without the need for a functional respiratory chain and OxPhos is analyzed considering thermodynamic and kinetic aspects for the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate catalyzed by isocitrate dehydrogenase.

In addition, metabolic control analysis (MCA) studies applied to energy metabolism of cancer cells are reevaluated. Regardless of the experimental/environmental conditions and the rate of lactate production, the flux-control of cancer glycolysis is robust in the sense that it involves the same steps:

  • glucose transport,
  • hexokinase,
  • hexosephosphate isomerase, and
  • glycogen degradation,

all at the beginning of the pathway; these steps together with phosphofructokinase 1 also control glycolysis in normal cells.

The respiratory chain complexes exert significantly higher flux-control on OxPhos in cancer cells than in normal cells. Thus, determination of the contribution of each pathway to ATP supply and/or the flux-control distribution of both pathways in cancer cells is necessary in order to identify differences from normal cells which may lead to the design of rational alternative therapies that selectively target cancer energy metabolism.

Fig. 1. Labeling patterns of 13C-glutamate or 13C-glutamine mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells.

Fig. 2. Survey in PubMed of papers published in the field of tumor mitochondrial metabolism from 1951 to September 2013.

 

Emerging concepts in bioenergetics and cancer research: Metabolic flexibility, coupling, symbiosis, switch, oxidative tumors, metabolic remodeling, signaling and bioenergetic therapy

Emilie Obre, Rodrigue Rossignol
Intl J Biochem Cell Biol 2015; 59:167-181
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2014.12.008

The field of energy metabolism dramatically progressed in the last decade, owing to a large number of cancer studies, as well as fundamental investigations on related transcriptional networks and cellular interactions with the microenvironment. The concept of metabolic flexibility was clarified in studies showing the ability of cancer cells to remodel the biochemical pathways of energy transduction and linked anabolism in response to glucose, glutamine or oxygen deprivation.

A clearer understanding of the large scale bioenergetic impact of C-MYC, MYCN, KRAS and P53 was obtained, along with its modification during the course of tumor development. The metabolic dialog between different types of cancer cells, but also with the stroma, also complexified the understanding of bioenergetics and raised the concepts of metabolic symbiosis and reverse Warburg effect.

Signaling studies revealed the role of respiratory chain derived reactive oxygen species for metabolic remodeling and metastasis development. The discovery of oxidative tumors in human and mice models related to chemoresistance also changed the prevalent view of dysfunctional mitochondria in cancer cells. Likewise, the influence of energy metabolism-derived oncometabolites emerged as a new means of tumor genetic regulation. The knowledge obtained on the multi-site regulation of energy metabolism in tumors was translated to cancer preclinical studies, supported by genetic proof of concept studies targeting LDHA, HK2, PGAM1, or ACLY.

Here, we review those different facets of metabolic remodeling in cancer, from its diversity in physiology and pathology, to the search of the genetic determinants, the microenvironmental regulators and pharmacological modulators.

 

Pyruvate kinase M2: A key enzyme of the tumor metabolome and its medical relevance

Mazurek, S.
Biomedical Research 2012; 23(SPEC. ISSUE): Pages 133-142

Tumor cells are characterized by an over expression of the glycolytic pyruvate kinase isoenzyme
type M2 (abbreviations: M2-PK or PKM2). In tumor metabolism the quaternary structure of M2-PK (tetramer/dimer ratio) determines whether glucose is used for glycolytic energy regeneration (highly active tetrameric form, Warburg effect) or synthesis of cell building blocks (nearly inactive dimeric form) which are both prerequisites for cells with a high proliferation rate. In tumor cells the nearly inactive dimeric form of M2- PK is predominant due to direct interactions with different oncoproteins. Besides its key functions in tumor metabolism recent studies revealed that M2-PK may also react as protein kinase as well as co activator of transcription factors. Of medical relevance is the quantification of the dimeric form of M2-PK with either an ELISA or point of care rapid test in plasma and stool that is used for follow-up studies during therapy (plasma M2-PK) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (fecal M2-PK; mean sensitivity for CRC in 12 independent studies with altogether 704 samples: 80% ± 7%). An intervention in the regulation mechanisms of the expression, activity and tetramer: dimer ratio of M2-PK has significant consequences for the proliferation rate and tumorigenic capacity of the tumor cells, making this enzyme an intensively

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »