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Posts Tagged ‘Pasteur effect’

Irreconciliable Dissonance in Physical Space and Cellular Metabolic Conception


Irreconciliable Dissonance in Physical Space and Cellular Metabolic Conception

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Pasteur Effect – Warburg Effect – What its history can teach us today. 

José Eduardo de Salles Roselino

The Warburg effect, in reality the “Pasteur-effect” was the first example of metabolic regulation described. A decrease in the carbon flux originated at the sugar molecule towards the end of the catabolic pathway, with ethanol and carbon dioxide observed when yeast cells were transferred from an anaerobic environmental condition to an aerobic one. In Pasteur´s studies, sugar metabolism was measured mainly by the decrease of sugar concentration in the yeast growth media observed after a measured period of time. The decrease of the sugar concentration in the media occurs at great speed in yeast grown in anaerobiosis (oxygen deficient) and its speed was greatly reduced by the transfer of the yeast culture to an aerobic condition. This finding was very important for the wine industry of France in Pasteur’s time, since most of the undesirable outcomes in the industrial use of yeast were perceived when yeasts cells took a very long time to create, a rather selective anaerobic condition. This selective culture media was characterized by the higher carbon dioxide levels produced by fast growing yeast cells and by a higher alcohol content in the yeast culture media.

However, in biochemical terms, this finding was required to understand Lavoisier’s results indicating that chemical and biological oxidation of sugars produced the same calorimetric (heat generation) results. This observation requires a control mechanism (metabolic regulation) to avoid burning living cells by fast heat released by the sugar biological oxidative processes (metabolism). In addition, Lavoisier´s results were the first indications that both processes happened inside similar thermodynamics limits. In much resumed form, these observations indicate the major reasons that led Warburg to test failure in control mechanisms in cancer cells in comparison with the ones observed in normal cells.

[It might be added that the availability of O2 and CO2 and climatic conditions over 750 million years that included volcanic activity, tectonic movements of the earth crust, and glaciation, and more recently the use of carbon fuels and the extensive deforestation of our land masses have had a large role in determining the biological speciation over time, in sea and on land. O2 is generated by plants utilizing energy from the sun and conversion of CO2. Remove the plants and we tip the balance. A large source of CO2 is from beneath the earth’s surface.]

Biology inside classical thermodynamics places some challenges to scientists. For instance, all classical thermodynamics must be measured in reversible thermodynamic conditions. In an isolated system, increase in P (pressure) leads to increase in V (volume), all this occurring in a condition in which infinitesimal changes in one affects in the same way the other, a continuum response. Not even a quantic amount of energy will stand beyond those parameters.

In a reversible system, a decrease in V, under same condition, will led to an increase in P. In biochemistry, reversible usually indicates a reaction that easily goes either from A to B or B to A. For instance, when it was required to search for an anti-ischemic effect of Chlorpromazine in an extra hepatic obstructed liver, it was necessary to use an adequate system of increased biliary system pressure in a reversible manner to exclude a direct effect of this drug over the biological system pressure inducer (bile secretion) in Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res 1989; 22: 889-893. Frequently, these details are jumped over by those who read biology in ATGC letters.

Very important observations can be made in this regard, when neutral mutations are taken into consideration since, after several mutations (not affecting previous activity and function), a last mutant may provide a new transcript RNA for a protein and elicit a new function. For an example, consider a Prion C from lamb getting similar to bovine Prion C while preserving  its normal role in the lamb when its ability to change Human Prion C is considered (Stanley Prusiner).

This observation is good enough, to confirm one of the most important contributions of Erwin Schrodinger in his What is Life:

“This little book arose from a course of public lectures, delivered by a theoretical physicist to an audience of about four hundred which did not substantially dwindle, though warned at the outset that the subject matter was a difficult one and that the lectures could not be termed popular, even though the physicist’s most dreaded weapon, mathematical deduction, would hardly be utilized. The reason for this was not that the subject was simple enough to be explained without mathematics, but rather that it was much too involved to be fully accessible to mathematics.”

After Hans Krebs, description of the cyclic nature of the citrate metabolism and after its followers described its requirement for aerobic catabolism two major lines of research started the search for the understanding of the mechanism of energy transfer that explains how ADP is converted into ATP. One followed the organic chemistry line of reasoning and therefore, searched for a mechanism that could explain how the breakdown of carbon-carbon link could have its energy transferred to ATP synthesis. One of the major leaders of this research line was Britton Chance. He took into account that relatively earlier in the series of Krebs cycle reactions, two carbon atoms of acetyl were released as carbon dioxide ( In fact, not the real acetyl carbons but those on the opposite side of citrate molecule). In stoichiometric terms, it was not important whether the released carbons were or were not exactly those originated from glucose carbons. His research aimed at to find out an intermediate proteinaceous intermediary that could act as an energy reservoir. The intermediary could store in a phosphorylated amino acid the energy of carbon-carbon bond breakdown. This activated amino acid could transfer its phosphate group to ADP producing ATP. A key intermediate involved in the transfer was identified by Kaplan and Lipmann at John Hopkins as acetyl coenzyme A, for which Fritz Lipmann received a Nobel Prize.

Alternatively, under possible influence of the excellent results of Hodgkin and Huxley a second line of research appears. The work of Hodgkin & Huxley indicated that the storage of electrical potential energy in transmembrane ionic asymmetries and presented the explanation for the change from resting to action potential in excitable cells. This second line of research, under the leadership of Peter Mitchell postulated a mechanism for the transfer of oxide/reductive power of organic molecules oxidation through electron transfer as the key for the energetic transfer mechanism required for ATP synthesis.
This diverted the attention from high energy (~P) phosphate bond to the transfer of electrons. During most of the time the harsh period of the two confronting points of view, Paul Boyer and followers attempted to act as a conciliatory third party, without getting good results, according to personal accounts (in L. A. or Latin America) heard from those few of our scientists who were able to follow the major scientific events held in USA, and who could present to us later. Paul  Boyer could present how the energy was transduced by a molecular machine that changes in conformation in a series of 3 steps while rotating in one direction in order to produce ATP and in opposite direction in order to produce ADP plus Pi from ATP (reversibility).

However, earlier, a victorious Peter Mitchell obtained the result in the conceptual dispute, over the Britton Chance point of view, after he used E. Coli mutants to show H+ gradients in the cell membrane and its use as energy source, for which he received a Nobel Prize. Somehow, this outcome represents such a blow to Chance’s previous work that somehow it seems to have cast a shadow over very important findings obtained during his earlier career that should not be affected by one or another form of energy transfer mechanism.  For instance, Britton Chance got the simple and rapid polarographic assay method of oxidative phosphorylation and the idea of control of energy metabolism that brings us back to Pasteur.

This metabolic alternative result seems to have been neglected in the recent years of obesity epidemics, which led to a search for a single molecular mechanism required for the understanding of the accumulation of chemical (adipose tissue) reserve in our body. It does not mean that here the role of central nervous system is neglected. In short, in respiring mitochondria the rate of electron transport linked to the rate of ATP production is determined primarily by the relative concentrations of ADP, ATP and phosphate in the external media (cytosol) and not by the concentration of respiratory substrate as pyruvate. Therefore, when the yield of ATP is high as it is in aerobiosis and the cellular use of ATP is not changed, the oxidation of pyruvate and therefore of glycolysis is quickly (without change in gene expression), throttled down to the resting state. The dependence of respiratory rate on ADP concentration is also seen in intact cells. A muscle at rest and using no ATP has a very low respiratory rate.   [When skeletal muscle is stressed by high exertion, lactic acid produced is released into the circulation and is metabolized aerobically by the heart at the end of the activity].

This respiratory control of metabolism will lead to preservation of body carbon reserves and in case of high caloric intake in a diet, also shows increase in fat reserves essential for our biological ancestors survival (Today for our obesity epidemics). No matter how important this observation is, it is only one focal point of metabolic control. We cannot reduce the problem of obesity to the existence of metabolic control. There are numerous other factors but on the other hand, we cannot neglect or remove this vital process in order to correct obesity. However, we cannot explain obesity ignoring this metabolic control. This topic is so neglected in modern times that we cannot follow major research lines of the past that were interrupted by the emerging molecular biology techniques and the vain belief that a dogmatic vision of biology could replace all previous knowledge by a new one based upon ATGC readings. For instance, in order to display bad consequences derived from the ignorance of these old scientific facts, we can take into account, for instance, how ion movements across membranes affects membrane protein conformation and therefore contradicts the wrong central dogma of molecular biology. This change in protein conformation (with unchanged amino acid sequence) and/or the lack of change in protein conformation is linked to the factors that affect vital processes as the heart beats. This modern ignorance could also explain some major pitfalls seen in new drugs clinical trials and in a small scale on bad medical practices.

The work of Britton Chance and of Peter Mitchell have deep and sound scientific roots that were made with excellent scientific techniques, supported by excellent scientific reasoning and that were produced in a large series of very important intermediary scientific results. Their sole difference was to aim at very different scientific explanations as their goals (They have different Teleology in their minds made by their previous experiences). When, with the use of mutants obtained in microorganisms P Mitchell´s goal was found to survive and B Chance to succumb to the experimental evidence, all those excellent findings of B Chance and followers were directed to the dustbin of scientific history as an example of lack of scientific consideration.  [On the one hand, the Mitchell model used a unicellular organism; on the other, Chance’s work was with eukaryotic cells, quite relevant to the discussion.]

We can resume the challenge faced by these two great scientists in the following form: The first conceptual unification in bioenergetics, achieved in the 1940s, is inextricably bound up with the name of Fritz Lipmann. Its central feature was the recognition that adenosine triphosphate, ATP, serves as a universal energy  “currency” much as money serves as economic currency. In a nutshell, the purpose of metabolism is to support the synthesis of ATP. In microorganisms, this is perfect! In humans or mammals, or vertebrates, by the same reason that we cannot consider that gene expression is equivalent to protein function (an acceptable error in the case of microorganisms) this oversimplifies the metabolic requirement with a huge error. However, in case our concern is ATP chemistry only, the metabolism produces ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP pays for the performance of almost, all kinds of works. It is possible to presume that to find out how the flow of metabolism (carbon flow) led to ATP production must be considered a major focal point of research of the two contenders. Consequently, what could be a minor fall of one of the contenders, in case we take into account all that was found during their entire life of research, the real failure in B Chance’s final goal was amplified far beyond what may be considered by reason!

Another aspect that must be taken into account: Both contenders have in the scientific past a very sound root. Metabolism may produce two forms of energy currency (I personally don´t like this expression*) and I use it here because it was used by both groups in order to express their findings. Together with simplistic thermodynamics, this expression conveys wrong ideas): The second kind of energy currency is the current of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. The P. Mitchell scientific root undoubtedly have the work of Hodgkin & Huxley, Huxley &  Huxley, Huxley & Simmons

*ATP is produced under the guidance of cell needs and not by its yield. When glucose yields only 2 ATPs per molecule it is oxidized at very high speed (anaerobiosis) as is required to match cellular needs. On the other hand, when it may yield (thermodynamic terms) 38 ATP the same molecule is oxidized at low speed. It would be similar to an investor choice its least money yield form for its investment (1940s to 1972) as a solid support. B. Chance had the enzymologists involved in clarifying how ATP could be produced directly from NADH + H+ oxidative reductive metabolic reactions or from the hydrolysis of an enolpyruvate intermediary. Both competitors had their work supported by different but, sound scientific roots and have produced very important scientific results while trying to present their hypothetical point of view.

Before the winning results of P. Mitchell were displayed, one line of defense used by B. Chance followers was to create a conflict between what would be expected by a restrictive role of proteins through its specificity ionic interactions and the general ability of ionic asymmetries that could be associated with mitochondrial ATP production. Chemical catalyzed protein activities do not have perfect specificity but an outstanding degree of selective interaction was presented by the lock and key model of enzyme interaction. A large group of outstanding “mitochondriologists” were able to show ATP synthesis associated with Na+, K+, Ca2+… asymmetries on mitochondrial membranes and any time they did this, P. Mitchell have to display the existence of antiporters that exchange X for hydrogen as the final common source of chemiosmotic energy used by mitochondria for ATP synthesis.

This conceptual battle has generated an enormous knowledge that was laid to rest, somehow discontinued in the form of scientific research, when the final E. Coli mutant studies presented the convincing final evidence in favor of P. Mitchell point of view.

Not surprisingly, a “wise anonymous” later, pointed out: “No matter what you are doing, you will always be better off in case you have a mutant”

(Principles of Medical Genetics T D Gelehrter & F.S. Collins chapter 7, 1990).

However, let’s take the example of a mechanical wristwatch. It clearly indicates when the watch is working in an acceptable way, that its normal functioning condition is not the result of one of its isolated components – or something that can be shown by a reductionist molecular view.  Usually it will be considered that it is working in an acceptable way, in case it is found that its accuracy falls inside a normal functional range, for instance, one or two standard deviations bellow or above the mean value for normal function, what depends upon the rigor wisely adopted. While, only when it has a faulty component (a genetic inborn error) we can indicate a single isolated piece as the cause of its failure (a reductionist molecular view).

We need to teach in medicine, first the major reasons why the watch works fine (not saying it is “automatic”). The functions may cross the reversible to irreversible regulatory limit change, faster than what we can imagine. Latter, when these ideas about normal are held very clear in the mind set of medical doctors (not medical technicians) we may address the inborn errors and what we may have learn from it. A modern medical technician may cause admiration when he uses an “innocent” virus to correct for a faulty gene (a rather impressive technological advance). However, in case the virus, later shows signals that indicate that it was not so innocent, a real medical doctor will be called upon to put things in correct place again.

Among the missing parts of normal evolution in biochemistry a lot about ion fluxes can be found. Even those oscillatory changes in Ca2+ that were shown to affect gene expression (C. De Duve) were laid to rest since, they clearly indicate a source of biological information that despite the fact that it does not change nucleotides order in the DNA, it shows an opposing flux of biological information against the dogma (DNA to RNA to proteins). Another, line has shown a hierarchy, on the use of mitochondrial membrane potential: First the potential is used for Ca2+ uptake and only afterwards, the potential is used for ADP conversion into ATP (A. L. Lehninger). In fact, the real idea of A. L. Lehninger was by far, more complex since according to him, mitochondria works like a buffer for intracellular calcium releasing it to outside in case of a deep decrease in cytosol levels or capturing it from cytosol when facing transient increase in Ca2+ load. As some of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases were activated by Ca2+, this finding was used to propose a new control factor in addition to the one of ADP (B. Chance). All this was discontinued with the wrong use of calculus (today we could indicate bioinformatics in a similar role) in biochemistry that has established less importance to a mitochondrial role after comparative kinetics that today are seen as faulty.

It is important to combat dogmatic reasoning and restore sound scientific foundations in basic medical courses that must urgently reverse the faulty trend that tries to impose a view that goes from the detail towards generalization instead of the correct form that goes from the general finding well understood towards its molecular details. The view that led to curious subjects as bioinformatics in medical courses as training in sequence finding activities can only be explained by its commercial value. The usual form of scientific thinking respects the limits of our ability to grasp new knowledge and relies on reproducibility of scientific results as a form to surpass lack of mathematical equation that defines relationship of variables and the determination of its functional domains. It also uses old scientific roots, as its sound support never replaces existing knowledge by dogmatic and/or wishful thinking. When the sequence of DNA was found as a technical advance to find amino acid sequence in proteins it was just a technical advance. This technical advance by no means could be considered a scientific result presented as an indication that DNA sequences alone have replaced the need to study protein chemistry, its responses to microenvironmental changes in order to understand its multiple conformations, changes in activities and function. As E. Schrodinger correctly describes the chemical structure responsible for the coded form stored of genetic information must have minimal interaction with its microenvironment in order to endure hundreds and hundreds years as seen in Hapsburg’s lips. Only magical reasoning assumes that it is possible to find out in non-reactive chemical structures the properties of the reactive ones.

For instance, knowledge of the reactions of the Krebs cycle clearly indicate a role for solvent that no longer could be considered to be an inert bath for catalytic activity of the enzymes when the transfer of energy include a role for hydrogen transport. The great increase in understanding this change on chemical reaction arrived from conformational energy.

Again, even a rather simplistic view of this atomic property (Conformational energy) is enough to confirm once more, one of the most important contribution of E. Schrodinger in his What is Life:

“This little book arose from a course of public lectures, delivered by a theoretical physicist to an audience of about four hundred which did not substantially dwindle, though warned at the outset that the subject matter was a difficult one and that the lectures could not be termed popular, even though the physicist’s most dreaded weapon, mathematical deduction, would hardly be utilized. The reason for this was not that the subject was simple enough to be explained without mathematics, but rather that it was much too involved to be fully accessible to mathematics.”

In a very simplistic view, while energy manifests itself by the ability to perform work conformational energy as a property derived from our atomic structure can be neutral, positive or negative (no effect, increased or decreased reactivity upon any chemistry reactivity measured as work)

Also:

“I mean the fact that we, whose total being is entirely based on a marvelous interplay of this very kind, yet if all possess the power of acquiring considerable knowledge about it. I think it possible that this knowledge may advance to little just a short of a complete understanding -of the first marvel. The second may well be beyond human understanding.”

In fact, scientific knowledge allows us to understand how biological evolution may have occurred or have not occurred and yet does not present a proof about how it would have being occurred. It will be always be an indication of possible against highly unlike and never a scientific proven fact about the real form of its occurrence.

As was the case of B. Chance in its bioenergetics findings, we may get very important findings that indicates wrong directions in the future as was his case, or directed toward our past.

The Skeleton of Physical Time – Quantum Energies in Relative Space of S-labs

By Radoslav S. Bozov  Independent Researcher

WSEAS, Biology and BioSystems of Biomedicine

Space does not equate to distance, displacement of an object by classically defined forces – electromagnetic, gravity or inertia. In perceiving quantum open systems, a quanta, a package of energy, displaces properties of wave interference and statistical outcomes of sums of paths of particles detected by a design of S-labs.

The notion of S-labs, space labs, deals with inherent problems of operational module, R(i+1), where an imagination number ‘struggles’ to work under roots of a negative sign, a reflection of an observable set of sums reaching out of the limits of the human being organ, an eye or other foundational signal processing system.

While heavenly bodies, planets, star systems, and other exotic forms of light reflecting and/or emitting objects, observable via naked eye have been deduced to operate under numerical systems that calculate a periodic displacement of one relative to another, atomic clocks of nanospace open our eyes to ever expanding energy spaces, where matrices of interactive variables point to the problem of infinity of variations in scalar spaces, however, defining properties of minute universes as a mirror image of an astronomical system. The first and furthermost problem is essentially the same as those mathematical methodologies deduced by Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein for processing a surface. I will introduce you to a surface interference method by describing undetermined objective space in terms of determined subjective time.

Therefore, the moment will be an outcome of statistical sums of a numerical system extending from near zero to near one. Three strings hold down a dual system entangled via interference of two waves, where a single wave is a product of three particles (today named accordingly to either weak or strong interactions) momentum.

The above described system emerges from duality into trinity the objective space value of physical realities. The triangle of physical observables – charge, gravity and electromagnetism, is an outcome of interference of particles, strings and waves, where particles are not particles, or are strings strings, or  are waves waves of an infinite character in an open system which we attempt to define to predict outcomes of tomorrow’s parameters, either dependent or independent as well as both subjective to time simulations.

We now know that aging of a biological organism cannot be defined within singularity. Thereafter, clocks are subjective to apparatuses measuring oscillation of defined parameters which enable us to calculate both amplitude and a period, which we know to be dependent on phase transitions.

The problem of phase was solved by the applicability of carbon relative systems. A piece of diamond does not get wet, yet it holds water’s light entangled property. Water is the dark force of light. To formulate such statement, we have been searching truth by examining cooling objects where the Maxwell demon is translated into information, a data complex system.

Modern perspectives in computing quantum based matrices, 0+1 =1 and/or 0+0=1, and/or 1+1 =0, will be reduced by applying a conceptual frame of Aladdin’s flying anti-gravity carpet, unwrapping both past and future by sending a photon to both, placing present always near zero. Thus, each parallel quantum computation of a natural system approaching the limit of a vibration of a string defining 0 does not equal 0, and 1 does not equal 1. In any case, if our method 1+1 = 1, yet, 1 is not 1 at time i+1. This will set the fundamentals of an operational module, called labris operator or in simplicity S-labs. Note, that 1 as a result is an event predictable to future, while interacting parameters of addition 1+1 may be both, 1 as an observable past, and 1 as an imaginary system, or 1+1 displaced interactive parameters of past observable events. This is the foundation of Future Quantum Relative Systems Interference (QRSI), taking analytical technologies of future as a result of data matrices compressing principle relative to carbon as a reference matter rational to water based properties.

Goedel’s concept of loops exist therefore only upon discrete relative space uniting to parallel absolute continuity of time ‘lags’. ( Goedel, Escher and Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. A Metaphorical Fugue on Minds and Machines in the Spirit of Lewis Carroll. D Hofstadter.  Chapter XX: Strange Loops, Or Tangled Hierarchies. A grand windup of many of the ideas about hierarchical systems and self-reference. It is concerned with the snarls which arise when systems turn back on themselves-for example, science probing science, government investigating governmental wrongdoing, art violating the rules of art, and finally, humans thinking about their own brains and minds. Does Gödel’s Theorem have anything to say about this last “snarl”? Are free will and the sensation of consciousness connected to Gödel’s Theorem? The Chapter ends by tying Gödel, Escher, and Bach together once again.)  The fight struggle in-between time creates dark spaces within which strings manage to obey light properties – entangled bozons of information carrying future outcomes of a systems processing consciousness. Therefore, Albert Einstein was correct in his quantum time realities by rejecting a resolving cube of sugar within a cup of tea (Henri Bergson 19th century philosopher. Bergson’s concept of multiplicity attempts to unify in a consistent way two contradictory features: heterogeneity and continuity. Many philosophers today think that this concept of multiplicity, despite its difficulty, is revolutionary.) However, the unity of time and space could not be achieved by deducing time to charge, gravity and electromagnetic properties of energy and mass.

Charge is further deduced to interference of particles/strings/waves, contrary to the Hawking idea of irreducibility of chemical energy carrying ‘units’, and gravity is accounted for by intrinsic properties of   anti-gravity carbon systems processing light, an electromagnetic force, that I have deduced towards ever expanding discrete energy space-energies rational to compressing mass/time. The role of loops seems to operate to control formalities where boundaries of space fluctuate as a result of what we called above – dark time-spaces.

Indeed, the concept of horizon is a constant due to ever expanding observables. Thus, it fails to acquire a rational approach towards space-time issues.

Richard Feynman has touched on issues of touching of space, sums of paths of particle traveling through time. In a way he has resolved an important paradigm, storing information and possibly studying it by opening a black box. Schroedinger’s cat is alive again, but incapable of climbing a tree when chased by a dog. Every time a cat climbs a garden tree, a fruit falls on hedgehogs carried away parallel to living wormholes whose purpose of generating information lies upon carbon units resolving light.

In order to deal with such a paradigm, we will introduce i+1 under square root in relativity, therefore taking negative one ( -1 = sqrt (i+1), an operational module R dealing with Wheelers foam squeezed by light, releasing water – dark spaces. Thousand words down!

What is a number? Is that a name or some kind of language or both? Is the issue of number theory possibly accountable to the value of the concept of entropic timing? Light penetrating a pyramid holding bean seeds on a piece of paper and a piece of slice of bread, a triple set, where a church mouse has taken a drop of tear, but a blood drop. What an amazing physics! The magic of biology lies above egoism, above pride, and below Saints.

We will set up the twelve parameters seen through 3+1 in classic realities:

–              discrete absolute energies/forces – no contradiction for now between Newtonian and Albert Einstein mechanics

–              mass absolute continuity – conservational law of physics in accordance to weak and strong forces

–              quantum relative spaces – issuing a paradox of Albert Einstein’s space-time resolved by the uncertainty principle

–              parallel continuity of multiple time/universes – resolving uncertainty of united space and energy through evolving statistical concepts of scalar relative space expansion and vector quantum energies by compressing relative continuity of matter in it, ever compressing flat surfaces – finding the inverse link between deterministic mechanics of displacement and imaginary space, where spheres fit within surface of triangles as time unwraps past by pulling strings from future.

To us, common human beings, with an extra curiosity overloaded by real dreams, value happens to play in the intricate foundation of life – the garden of love, its carbon management in mind, collecting pieces of squeezed cooling time.

The infinite interference of each operational module to another composing ever emerging time constrains unified by the Solar system, objective to humanity, perhaps answers that a drop of blood and a drop of tear is united by a droplet of a substance separating negative entropy to time courses of a physical realities as defined by an open algorithm where chasing power subdue to space becomes an issue of time.

Jose Eduardo de Salles Roselino

Some small errors: For intance an increase i P leads to a decrease in V ( not an increase in V)..

 

Radoslav S. Bozov  Independent Researcher

If we were to use a preventative measures of medical science, instruments of medical science must predict future outcomes based on observable parameters of history….. There are several key issues arising: 1. Despite pinning a difference on genomic scale , say pieces of information, we do not know how to have changed that – that is shift methylome occupying genome surfaces , in a precise manner.. 2. Living systems operational quo DO NOT work as by vector gravity physics of ‘building blocks. That is projecting a delusional concept of a masonry trick, who has not worked by corner stones and ever shifting momenta … Assuming genomic assembling worked, that is dealing with inferences through data mining and annotation, we are not in a position to read future in real time, and we will never be, because of the rtPCR technology self restriction into data -time processing .. We know of existing post translational modalities… 3. We don’t know what we don’t know, and that foundational to future medicine – that is dealing with biological clocks, behavior, and various daily life inputs ranging from radiation to water systems, food quality, drugs…

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New Insights on the Warburg Effect [2.2]

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator, Writer

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/8/05/15/lhbern/New_Insights_on_the_Warburg_Effect_%5B2.2%5D

 

New Insights on the Warburg Effect [2.2]

Defective Mitochondria Transform Normal Cells into Tumors

GEN News Jul 9, 2015

Ninety-one years ago Otto Warburg demonstrated that cancer cells have impaired respiration, which became known as the Warburg Effect. The interest in this and related work was superceded in the last quarter of the twentieth century by work on the genetic code. Now there is renewed interest.

An international research team reports that a specific defect in mitochondria plays a key role in the transition from normal cells to cancerous ones. The scientists disrupted a key component of mitochondria of otherwise normal cells and the cells took on characteristics of malignant cells.

Their study (“Disruption of cytochrome c oxidase function induces the Warburg effect and metabolic reprogramming”) is published Oncogene and was led by members of the lab of Narayan G. Avadhani, Ph.D., the Harriet Ellison Woodward Professor of Biochemistry in the department of biomedical sciences in the school of veterinary medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Satish Srinivasan, Ph.D., a research investigator in Dr. Avadhani’s lab, was the lead author.

This is consistent with the 1924 observation by Warburg that cancerous cells consumed glucose at a higher rate than normal cells (Meyerhof ratio) and had defects in their grana, the organelles that are now known as mitochondria. He postulated that these defects led to problems in the process by which the cell produces energy. But the process called oxidative phosphorylation was not yet known. Further work in his laboratory was carried out by Hans Krebs and by Albert Szent Gyorgyi elucidating the tricarboxylic acid cycle.  The discovery of the importance of cytochrome c and adenosine triphosphate in oxidative phosphorylation was made in the post World War II period by Fritz Lippman, with an important contribution by Nathan Kaplan. All of the name scientists, except Kaplan, received Nobel Prizes. The last piece of the puzzle became the demonstation of a sequence of hydrogen transfers on the electron transport chain. The researchers above have now shown that mitochondrial defects indeed contributed to the cells becoming cancerous.

“The first part of the Warburg hypothesis has held up solidly in that most proliferating tumors show high dependence on glucose as an energy source and they release large amounts of lactic acid,” said Dr. Avadhani. “But the second part, about the defective mitochondrial function causing cells to be tumorigenic, has been highly contentious.”

To see whether the second part of Warburg’s postulation was correct, the researchers took cell lines from the skeleton, kidney, breast, and esophagus and used RNA molecules to silence the expression of select components of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C, or CcO, a critical enzyme involved in oxidative phosphorylation. CcO uses oxygen to make water and set up a transmembrane potential that is used to synthesize ATP, the molecule used for energy by the body’s cells.

The biologists observed that disrupting only a single protein subunit of cytochrome oxidase C led to major changes in the mitochondria and in the cells themselves. “These cells showed all the characteristics of cancer cells,” noted Dr. Avadhani.

The normal cells that converted to cancerous cells displayed changes in their metabolism, becoming more reliant on glucose by utilization of the glycolytic pathway. They reduced their synthesis of ATP.  Oxidative phosphorylation was reduced in concert with the ATP reduction. The large switch to glycolysis as primary energy source is a less efficient means of making ATP that is common in cancer cells.

The cells lost contact inhibition and gained an increased ability to invade distant tissues, both hallmarks of cancer cells. When they were grown in a 3D medium, which closely mimics the natural environment in which tumors grow in the body, the cells with disrupted mitochondria formed large, long-lived colonies, akin to tumors.

The researchers also silenced cytochrome oxidase C subunits in breast and esophageal cancer cell lines. They found that the cells became even more invasive, according to Dr. Srinivasan. The team then looked at actual tumors from human patients and found that the most oxygen-starved regions, which are common in tumors, contained defective versions of CcO.

“That result alone couldn’t tell us whether that was the cause or effect of tumors, but our cell system clearly says that mitochondrial dysfunction is a driving force in tumorigenesis,” explained Dr. Avadhani.

The researchers observed that disrupting CcO triggered the mitochondria to activate a stress signal to the nucleus, akin to an SOS alerting the cell that something was wrong. Dr. Avadhani and his colleagues had previously seen a similar pathway activated in cells with depleted mitochondrial DNA, which is also linked to cancer.

Building on these findings, Dr. Avadhani and members of his lab will examine whether inhibiting components of this mitochondrial stress signaling pathway might be a strategy for preventing cancer progression.

“We are targeting the signaling pathway, developing a lot of small molecules and antibodies,” said Dr. Avadhani. “Hopefully if you block the signaling the cells will not go into the so called oncogenic mode and instead would simply die.”

In addition, they noted that looking for defects in CcO could be a biomarker for cancer screening.

 

Who controls the ATP supply in cancer cells? Biochemistry lessons to understand cancer energy metabolism

Rafael Moreno-Sánchez, Alvaro Marín-Hernández, Emma Saavedra, Juan P. Pardo, Stephen J. Ralph, Sara Rodríguez-Enríquez
Intl J Biochem Cell Biol 7 Feb 2014; 50:10-23
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2014.01.025

The supply of ATP in mammalian and human cells is provided by glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). There are no other pathways or processes able to synthesize ATP at sufficient rates to meet the energy demands of cells. Acetate thiokinase or acetyl-CoA synthetase, a ubiquitous enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of ATP and acetate from acetyl-CoA, PPi and AMP, might represent an exception under hypoxia in cancer cells, although the flux through this branch is negligible (≤10%) when compared to the glycolytic flux (Yoshii et al., 2009).

Glycolysis in human cells can be defined as the metabolic process that transforms 1 mol of glucose (or other hexoses) into 2 moles of lactate plus 2 moles of ATP. These stoichiometric values represent a maximum and due to the several reactions branching off glycolysis, they will be usually lower under physiological conditions, closer to 1.3–1.9 for the lactate/glucose ratio (Travis et al., 1971; Jablonska and Bishop, 1975; Suter and Weidemann, 1975; Hanson and Parsons, 1976; Wu and Davis, 1981; Pick-Kober and Schneider, 1984; Sun et al., 2012). OxPhos is the metabolic process that oxidizes several substrates through the Krebs cycle to produce reducing equivalents (NADH, FADH2), which feed the respiratory chain to generate an H+.

Applying basic biochemical principles, this review analyzes data that contrasts with the Warburg hypothesis that glycolysis is the exclusive ATP provider in cancer cells. Although disregarded for many years, there is increasing experimental evidence demonstrating that oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) makes a significant contribution to ATP supply in many cancer cell types and under a variety of conditions.

Substrates oxidized by normal mitochondria such as amino acids and fatty acids are also avidly consumed by cancer cells. In this regard, the proposal that cancer cells metabolize glutamine for anabolic purposes without the need for a functional respiratory chain and OxPhos is analyzed considering thermodynamic and kinetic aspects for the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate catalyzed by isocitrate dehydrogenase.

In addition, metabolic control analysis (MCA) studies applied to energy metabolism of cancer cells are reevaluated. Regardless of the experimental/environmental conditions and the rate of lactate production, the flux-control of cancer glycolysis is robust in the sense that it involves the same steps:

  • glucose transport,
  • hexokinase,
  • hexosephosphate isomerase, and
  • glycogen degradation,

all at the beginning of the pathway; these steps together with phosphofructokinase 1 also control glycolysis in normal cells.

The respiratory chain complexes exert significantly higher flux-control on OxPhos in cancer cells than in normal cells. Thus, determination of the contribution of each pathway to ATP supply and/or the flux-control distribution of both pathways in cancer cells is necessary in order to identify differences from normal cells which may lead to the design of rational alternative therapies that selectively target cancer energy metabolism.

Fig. 1. Labeling patterns of 13C-glutamate or 13C-glutamine mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells.

Fig. 2. Survey in PubMed of papers published in the field of tumor mitochondrial metabolism from 1951 to September 2013.

 

Emerging concepts in bioenergetics and cancer research: Metabolic flexibility, coupling, symbiosis, switch, oxidative tumors, metabolic remodeling, signaling and bioenergetic therapy

Emilie Obre, Rodrigue Rossignol
Intl J Biochem Cell Biol 2015; 59:167-181
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2014.12.008

The field of energy metabolism dramatically progressed in the last decade, owing to a large number of cancer studies, as well as fundamental investigations on related transcriptional networks and cellular interactions with the microenvironment. The concept of metabolic flexibility was clarified in studies showing the ability of cancer cells to remodel the biochemical pathways of energy transduction and linked anabolism in response to glucose, glutamine or oxygen deprivation.

A clearer understanding of the large scale bioenergetic impact of C-MYC, MYCN, KRAS and P53 was obtained, along with its modification during the course of tumor development. The metabolic dialog between different types of cancer cells, but also with the stroma, also complexified the understanding of bioenergetics and raised the concepts of metabolic symbiosis and reverse Warburg effect.

Signaling studies revealed the role of respiratory chain derived reactive oxygen species for metabolic remodeling and metastasis development. The discovery of oxidative tumors in human and mice models related to chemoresistance also changed the prevalent view of dysfunctional mitochondria in cancer cells. Likewise, the influence of energy metabolism-derived oncometabolites emerged as a new means of tumor genetic regulation. The knowledge obtained on the multi-site regulation of energy metabolism in tumors was translated to cancer preclinical studies, supported by genetic proof of concept studies targeting LDHA, HK2, PGAM1, or ACLY.

Here, we review those different facets of metabolic remodeling in cancer, from its diversity in physiology and pathology, to the search of the genetic determinants, the microenvironmental regulators and pharmacological modulators.

 

Pyruvate kinase M2: A key enzyme of the tumor metabolome and its medical relevance

Mazurek, S.
Biomedical Research 2012; 23(SPEC. ISSUE): Pages 133-142

Tumor cells are characterized by an over expression of the glycolytic pyruvate kinase isoenzyme
type M2 (abbreviations: M2-PK or PKM2). In tumor metabolism the quaternary structure of M2-PK (tetramer/dimer ratio) determines whether glucose is used for glycolytic energy regeneration (highly active tetrameric form, Warburg effect) or synthesis of cell building blocks (nearly inactive dimeric form) which are both prerequisites for cells with a high proliferation rate. In tumor cells the nearly inactive dimeric form of M2- PK is predominant due to direct interactions with different oncoproteins. Besides its key functions in tumor metabolism recent studies revealed that M2-PK may also react as protein kinase as well as co activator of transcription factors. Of medical relevance is the quantification of the dimeric form of M2-PK with either an ELISA or point of care rapid test in plasma and stool that is used for follow-up studies during therapy (plasma M2-PK) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (fecal M2-PK; mean sensitivity for CRC in 12 independent studies with altogether 704 samples: 80% ± 7%). An intervention in the regulation mechanisms of the expression, activity and tetramer: dimer ratio of M2-PK has significant consequences for the proliferation rate and tumorigenic capacity of the tumor cells, making this enzyme an intensively

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The Metabolic View of Epigenetic Expression

Writer and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Introduction

This is the fifth contribution to a series of articles on cancer, genomics, and metabolism.   I begin this after reading an article by Stephen Williams “War on Cancer May Need to Refocus Says Cancer Expert on NPR”, and after listening to NPR “On the Media”. This is an unplanned experience, perhaps partly related to an Op-Ed in the New York Times two days before by Angelina Jolie Pittman.  Taking her article prior to pre-emptive breast surgery for the BRCA1 mutation two years ago and her salpingo-oophorectomy at age 39 years with her family history, and her adoption of several children even prior to her marriage to Brad Pitt, reveals an unusual self-knowledge as well as perspective on the disease risk balanced with her maternal instincts.  I sense (but don’t know) that she had a good knowledge not stated about the estrogen sensitivity of breast cancer for some years, and balanced that knowledge in her life decisions.

Tracing the history of cancer and the Lyndon Johnson initiated “War on Cancer” the initiative is presented as misguided.  Moreover, the imbalance is posed aas focused overly on genomics, and there is an imbalnced in the attention to the types of cancer, bladder cancer (urothelial) receiving too little attention. However, the events that drive this are complex, and not surprising.  The funding is driven partly by media attention (a film star or President’s wife) and not to be overlooked, watch where the money flows.  People who have the ability to donate and also have a family experience will give, regardless of the statistics because it is 100 percent in their eyes.

Insofar as the scientific endeavor goes, young scientists are committed to a successful research career, and they also need funding, so they have to balance the risk of success and failure in the choice of problems they choose to work on.  But until the 20th century, the biological sciences were largely descriptive. The emergence of a “Molecular Biology” is a unique 20th century development. The work of Pathology – pioneered by Rokitansky, Virchow, and to an extent also the anatomist/surgeon John Harvey – was observational science.  The description of Hodgkin’s lymphoma was observational, and it was a breakthrough in medicine.

With the emergence of genomics from biochemistry and genetics in molecular biology (biology at the subcellular level), a part of medicine that was well founded became an afterthought.  After all, after many years of the history of medicine and pathology, it is well known that cancers are not only a dysmetabolism of cellular replication and cellular regulation, but cancers have a natural history related to organ system, tissue specificity, sex, and age of occurrence. This should be well known to the experienced practitioner, but not necessarily to the basic researcher with no little clinical exposure.  Consequently, it was quite remarkable to me to find that the truly amazing biochemist who gave a “Harvey Lecture” at Harvard on the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenases, and who shared in the discovery of Coenzyme A, had made the observation that organs that are primarily involved with synthetic activity -adrenal, pituitary, and thyroid, testis, ovary, breast (most notably) – have a more benign course than those of stomach, colon, pancreas, melanoma, hematopoietic, and sarcomas. The liver is highly synthetic, but doesn’t fit so nicely because of the role in detoxification and the large role in glucose and fat catabolism.  Further, this was at a time that we knew nothing about the cell death pathway and cellular repair, and how is it in concert with cell proliferation.

The first important reasoning about cancer metabolism was opened by Otto Warburg in the late 1920s.  I have  little reason to doubt his influence on Nathan Kaplan, who used the terms DPN(+/H) and TPN(+/H), disregarding the terms NAD(+/H) and NADP(+/H), although I was told it was because of the synthesis of the pyridine nucleotide adducts for study (APDPN, etc.).

In a recent article, I had an interesting response from Jose ES Rosalino:

In mRNA Translation and Energy Metabolism in Cancer

Topisirovic and N. Sonenberg – Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology, Volume LXXVI – http://dx.doi.org:/10.1101/sqb.2011.76.010785

“A prominent feature of cancer cells is the use of aerobic glycolysis under conditions in which oxygen levels are sufficient to support energy production in the mitochondria (Jones and Thompson 2009; Cairns et al. 2010). This phenomenon, named the “Warburg effect,” after its discoverer Otto Warburg, is thought to fuel the biosynthetic requirements of the neoplastic growth (Warburg 1956; Koppenol et al. 2011) and has recently been acknowledged as one of the hallmarks of cancer (Hanahan and Weinberg 2011). mRNA translation is the most energy-demanding process in the cell (Buttgereit and Brand 1995). Again, the use of aerobic glycolysis expression has being twisted.”

To understand my critical observation consider this: Aerobic glycolysis is the carbon flow that goes from Glucose to CO2 and water (includes Krebs cycle and respiratory chain for the restoration of NAD, FAD etc.

Anerobic glyclysis is the carbon flow that goes from glucose to lactate. It uses conversion of pyruvate to lactate to regenerate NAD.

“Pasteur effect” is an expression coined by Warburg it refers to the reduction in the carbon flow from glucose when oxygen is offered to yeasts. The major reason for that is in general terms, derived from the fact that carbon flow is regulated by several cell requirements but majorly by the ATP needs of the cell. Therefore, as ATP is generated 10 more efficiently in aerobiosis than under anaerobiosis, less carbon flow is required under aerobiosis than under anaerobiosis to maintain ATP levels. Warburg, after searching for the same regulatory mechanism in normal and cancer cells for comparison found that transformed cell continued their large flow of glucose carbons to lactate despite of the presence of oxygen.

So, it is wrong to describe that aerobic glycolysis continues in the presence of oxygen. It is what it is expected to occur. The wrong thing is that anaerobic glycolysis continues under aerobiosis.

In our discussion of transcription and cell regulatory processes, we have already encountered a substantial amount of “enzymology” that drives what is referred to as “epigenetics”.  Enzymatic reactions are involved almost everywhere we look at the processes involved in RNA nontranscriptional affairs.

Enzyme catalysis

Pyruvate carboxylase is critical for non–small-cell lung cancer proliferation
K Sellers,…, TW-M Fan
J Clin Invest. Jan 2015; xx
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1172/JCI72873

Anabolic biosynthesis requires precursors supplied by the Krebs cycle, which in turn requires anaplerosis to replenish precursor intermediates. The major anaplerotic sources are pyruvate and glutamine, which require the activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and glutaminase 1 (GLS1), respectively. Due to their rapid proliferation, cancer cells have increased anabolic and energy demands; however, different cancer cell types exhibit differential requirements for PC- and GLS-mediated pathways for anaplerosis and cell proliferation. Here, we infused patients with early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with uniformly 13C-labeled glucose before tissue resection and determined that the cancerous tissues in these patients had enhanced PC activity. Freshly resected paired lung tissue slices cultured in 13C6-glucose or 13C5, 15N2-glutamine tracers confirmed selective activation of PC over GLS in NSCLC. Compared with noncancerous tissues, PC expression was greatly enhanced in cancerous tissues, whereas GLS1 expression showed no trend. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of paired lung tissues showed PC overexpression in cancer cells rather than in stromal cells of tumor tissues. PC knockdown induced multinucleation, decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in human NSCLC cells, and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Growth inhibition was accompanied by perturbed Krebs cycle activity, inhibition of lipid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and altered glutathione homeostasis. These findings indicate that PC-mediated anaplerosis in early stage NSCLC is required for tumor survival and proliferation.

Accelerated glycolysis under aerobic conditions (the “Warburg effect”) has been a hallmark of cancer for many decades (1). It is now recognized that cancer cells must undergo many other metabolic reprograming changes (2) to meet the increased anabolic and energetic demands of proliferation (3, 4). It is also becoming clear that different cancer types may utilize a variety of metabolic adaptations that are context dependent, commensurate with the notion that altered metabolism is a hallmark of cancer (12). Enhanced glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis generates both energy (i.e., ATP) and molecular precursors for the biosynthesis of complex carbohydrates, sugar nucleotides, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. However, increased glycolysis alone is insufficient to meet the total metabolic demands of proliferating cancer cells. The Krebs cycle is also a source of energy via the oxidation of pyruvate, fatty acids, and amino acids such as glutamine. Moreover, several Krebs cycle intermediates are essential for anabolic and glutathione metabolism, including citrate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate (Figure 1A).

Figure 1. PC is activated in human NSCLC tumors. (A) PC and GLS1 catalyze the major anaplerotic inputs (blue) into the Krebs cycle to support the anabolic demand for biosynthesis (green). Also shown is the fate of 13C from 13C6-glucose through glycolysis and into the Krebs cycle via PC (red).
(B) Representative Western blots of PC and GLS1 protein expression levels in human NC lung (N) and NSCLC (C) tissues. (C) Pairwise PC and GLS1 expression (n = 86) was normalized to α-tubulin and plotted as the log10 ratio of CA/NC tissues. For PC, nearly all log ratios were positive (82 of 86), with a clustering in the 0.5–1 range (i.e., typically 3- to 10-fold higher expression in the tumor tissue; Wilcoxon test, P < 0.0001). In contrast, GLS1 expression was nearly evenly distributed between positive and negative log10 ratios and showed no statistically significant difference between the CA and NC tissues (Wilcoxon test, P = 0.213). Horizontal bar represents the median. (D) In vivo PC activity was enhanced in CA tissue compared with that in paired NC lung tissues (n = 34) resected from the same human patients given 13C6-glucose 2.5–3 hours before tumor resection. PC activity was inferred from the enrichment of 13C3-citrate (Cit+3), 13C5-Cit (Cit+5), 13C3-malate (Mal+3), and 13C3-aspartate (Asp+3) as determined by GC-MS. *P < 0.05 and **P < 0.01 by paired Student t test. Error bars represent the SEM.

Continued functioning of the Krebs cycle requires the replenishment of intermediates that are diverted for anabolic uses or glutathione synthesis. This replenishment process, or anaplerosis, is accomplished via 2 major pathways: glutaminolysis (deamidation of glutamine via glutaminase [GLS] plus transamination of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate) and carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate via ATP-dependent pyruvate carboxylase (PC) (EC 6.4.1.1) (refs. 3, 20, 21, and Figure 1A). The relative importance of these pathways is likely to depend on the nature of the cancer and its specific metabolic adaptations, including those to the microenvironment (20, 22). For example, glutaminolysis was shown to be activated in the glioma cell line SF188, while PC activity was absent, despite the high PC activity present in normal astrocytes. However, SF188 cells use PC to compensate for GLS1 suppression or glutamine restriction (20), and PC, rather than GLS1, was shown to be the major anaplerotic input to the Krebs cycle in primary glioma xenografts in mice. It is also unclear as to the relative importance of PC and GLS1 in other cancer cell types or, most relevantly, in human tumor tissues in situ. Our preliminary evidence from 5 non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients indicated that PC expression and activity are upregulated in cancerous (CA) compared with paired noncancerous (NC) lung tissues (21), although it was unclear whether PC activation applies to a larger NSCLC cohort or whether PC expression was associated with the cancer and/or stromal cells

Here, we have greatly extended our previous findings (21) in a larger cohort (n = 86) by assessing glutaminase 1 (GLS1) status and analyzing in detail the biochemical and phenotypic consequences of PC suppression in NSCLC. We found PC activity and protein expression levels to be, on average, respectively, 100% and 5- to 10-fold higher in cancerous (CA) lung tissues than in paired NC lung tissues resected from NSCLC patients, whereas GLS1 expression showed no significant trend. We have also applied stable isotope–resolved metabolomic (SIRM) analysis to paired freshly resected CA and NC lung tissue slices in culture (analogous to the Warburg slices; ref. 25) using either [U-13C] glucose or [U-13C,15N] glutamine as tracers. This novel method provided information about tumor metabolic pathways and dynamics without the complication of whole-body metabolism in vivo.

PC expression and activity, but not glutaminase expression, are significantly enhanced in early stages of malignant NSCLC tumors. PC protein expression was significantly higher in primary NSCLC tumors than in paired adjacent NC lung tissues (n = 86, P < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) (Figure 1, B and C). The median PC expression was 7-fold higher in the tumor, and the most probable (modal) overexpression in the tumor was approximately 3-fold higher (see Supple-mental Table 1; supplemental material available online with this article; http://dx.doi.org:/10.1172/JCI72873DS1). We found that PC expression was also higher in the tumor tissue compared with that detected in the NC tissue in 82 of 86 patients. In contrast, GLS1 expression was not significantly different between the tumor and NC tissues (P = 0.213, Wilcoxon test) (Figure 1C and Supplemental Table 1). The 13C3-Asp produced from 13C6-glucose (Figure 1A) infused into NSCLC patients was determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to estimate in vivo PC activity. A bolus injection of 10 g 13C6-glucose in 50 ml saline led to an average of 44% 13C enrichment in the plasma glucose immediately after infusion (Supplemental Table 2). Because the labeled glucose was absorbed by various tissues over the approximately 2.5 hours between infusion and tumor resection, plasma glucose enrichment dropped to 17% (Supplemental Table 2). The labeled glucose in both CA and NC lung tissues was metabolized to labeled lactate, but this occurred to a much greater extent in the CA tissues (Supplemental Figure 1A), which indicates accelerated glycolysis in these tissues.

Fresh tissue (Warburg) slices confirm enhanced PC and Krebs cycle activity in NSCLC. To further assess PC activity relative to GLS1 activity in human lung tissues, thin (<1 mm thick) slices of paired CA and NC lung tissues freshly resected from 13 human NSCLC patients were cultured in 13C6-glucose or 13C5,15N2-glutamine for 24 hours. These tissues maintain biochemical activity and histological integrity for at least 24 hours under culture conditions (Figure 2A, Supplemental Figure 2, A and B, and ref. 26). When the tissues were incubated with 13C6-glucose, CA slices showed a significantly greater percentage of enrichment in glycolytic 13C3-lactate (3 in Figure 2B) than did the NC slices, indicative of the Warburg effect. In addition, the CA tissues had significantly higher fractions of 13C4-, 13C5-, and 13C6-citrate (4, 5, and 6 of citrate, respectively, in Figure 2B) than did the NC tissues. These isotopologs require the combined action of PDH, PC, and multiple turns of the Krebs cycle (Figure 2C). Consistent with the labeled citrate data, the increase in the percentage of enrichment of 13C3-, 13C4-, and 13C5-glutamate (3, 4, and 5 of glutamate, respectively, in Figure 2B) in the CA tissues indicates enhanced Krebs cycle and PC activity.

Figure 2. Ex vivo CA lung tissue slices have enhanced oxidation of glucose through glycolysis and the Krebs cycle with and without PC input compared with that of paired NC lung slices. Thin slices of CA and NC lung tissues freshly resected from 13 human NSCLC patients were incubated with 13C6-glucose for 24 hours as described in the Methods. The percentage of enrichment of lactate, citrate, glutamate, and aspartate was determined by GC-MS. (A) 1H{13C} HSQC NMR showed an increase in labeled lactate, glutamate, and aspartate. In addition, CA tissues had elevated 13C abundance in the ribose moiety of the adenine-containing nucleotides (1′-AXP), indicating that the tissues were viable and had enhanced capacity for nucleotide synthesis. (B) CA tissue slices (n = 13) showed increased glucose metabolism through glycolysis based on the increased percentage of enrichment of 13C3-lactate (“3”), and through the Krebs cycle based on the increased percentage of enrichment of 13C4–6-citrate (“4–6”) and 13C3–5-glutamate (“3–5”) (see 13C fate tracing in C). *P < 0.05 and **P < 0.01 by paired Student’s t test. Error bars represent the SEM. (C) An atom-resolved map illustrates how PC, PDH, and 2 turns of the Krebs cycle activity produced the 13C isotopologs of citrate and glutamate in B, whose enrichment were significantly enhanced in CA tissue slices.

Figure 4. PC suppression via shRNA inhibits proliferation and tumorigenicity of human NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Proliferation and colony-formation assays were initiated 1 week after transduction and selection with puromycin. A549 xenograft in NSG mice was performed 8 days after transduction. *P < 0.01, **P < 0.001, ***P < 0.0001, and ****P < 0.00001 by Student t test, assuming unequal variances. Error bars represent the SEM. (A) NSCLC cells lines were transduced with shPC55 or shEV. Proliferation assays (n = 6) revealed substantial growth inhibition induced by PC knockdown in all 5 cell lines after a relatively long latency period. (B) Colony-formation assays indicated that PC knockdown reduced the capacity of A549 and PC9 cells to form colonies in soft agar (n = 3). (C) Tumor xenografts from shPC55-transduced A549 cells showed a 2-fold slower growth rate than did control shEV tumors (P < 0.001 by the unpaired Welch version of the t test). Tumor size was calculated as πab/4, where a and b are the x,y diameters. Each point represents an average of 6 mice. The solid lines are the nonlinear regression fits to the equation: size = a + bt2, as described in the Methods. (D) The extent of PC knockdown in the mouse xenografts (n = 6) was lesser than that in cell cultures, leading to less attenuation of PC expression (30%–60% of control) and growth inhibition. In addition, PC expression in the excised tumors correlated with the individual growth rates, as determined by Pearson’s correlation coefficient.

Fatty acyl synthesis from 13C5-glutamine (“Even” in Figure 6B) via glutaminolysis and the Krebs cycle was greatly attenuated in PC-suppressed cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PC knockdown severely inhibits lipid production by blocking the biosynthesis of fatty acyl components but not the glucose-derived glycerol backbone. This is consistent with decreased Krebs cycle activity (Figure 5), which in turn curtails citrate export from the mitochondria to supply the fatty acid precursor acetyl CoA in the cytoplasm.

Figure 5. PC knockdown perturbs glucose and glutamine flux through the Krebs cycle. 13C Isotopolog concentrations were determined by GC-MS (n = 3). Values represent the averages of triplicates, with standard errors. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, and ****P < 0.0001 by Student’s t test, assuming unequal variances. The experiments were repeated 3 times. (A) A549 cells were transduced with shPC55 for 10 days before incubation with 13C6-glucose for 24 hours. As expected, the 13C isotopologs of Krebs cycle metabolites produced via PC and Krebs cycle activity were depleted in PC-deficient cells (tracked by blue dots in the atom-resolved map and blue circles in the bar graphs; see also Figure 2C). In addition, 13C6-glucose metabolism via PDH was also perturbed (indicated by red dots and circles). (B) Treatment of PC-knockdown cells with 13C5,15N2-glutamine revealed that anaplerotic input via GLS did not compensate for the loss of PC activity, since GLS activity was attenuated, as inferred from the activity markers (indicated by red dots and circles). Decarboxylation of glutamine-derived malate by malic enzyme (ME) and reentry of glutamine-derived pyruvate into the Krebs cycle via PC or PDH (shown in blue and green, respectively) were also attenuated. Purple diamonds denote 15N; black diamonds denote 14N.

Figure 6. PC suppression hinders Krebs cycle–fueled biosynthesis. (A) 13C atom–resolved pyrimidine biosynthesis from 13C6-glucose and 13C5-glutamine is depicted with a 13C5-ribose moiety (red dots) produced via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and 13C1-3  uracil ring (blue dots) derived from  13C2-4-aspartate produced via the Krebs cycle or the combined action of ME and PC (blue dots). A549 cells transduced with shPC55 or shEV were incubated with 13C6-glucose or 13C5-glutamine for 24 hours. Fractional enrichment of UTP and CTP isotopologs from FT-ICR-MS analysis of polar cell extracts showed reduced enrichment of 13C6-glucose–derived 13C5-ribose (the “5” isotopolog) and 13C6-glucose– or 13C5-glutamine–derived 13C1-3-pyrimidine rings (the “6–8” or “1–3” isotopologs, highlighted by dashed green rectangles; for the “6–8” isotopologs, 5 13Cs arose from ribose and 1–3 13Cs from the ring) (10, 45). These data suggest that PC knockdown inhibits de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis from both glucose and glutamine. (B) Glucose and glutamine carbons enter fatty acids via citrate. FT-ICR-MS analysis of labeled lipids from the nonpolar cell extracts showed that PC knockdown severely inhibited the incorporation of glucose and glutamine carbons into the fatty acyl chains (even) and fatty acyl chains plus glycerol backbone (odd >3) of phosphatidylcholine lipids. However, synthesis of the 13C3-glycerol backbone (the “3” isotopolog) or its precursor 13C3-α-glycerol-3-phosphate (αG3P, m+3) from 13C6-glucose was enhanced rather than inhibited by PC knockdown. These data suggest that PC suppression specifically hinders fatty acid synthesis in A549 cells. Values represent the averages of triplicates (n = 3), with standard errors. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01,  and ***P < 0.001 by Student’s t test, assuming unequal variances.

De novo glutathione synthesis was analyzed by 1H{13C} HSQC NMR. Glutathione synthesis from both glucose and glutamine was suppressed by PC knockdown (Supplemental Figure 9, A and B). Reduced de novo synthesis led to a large decrease in the total level of reduced glutathione (GSH; Supplemental Figure 12, A and B). At the same time, PC-knockdown cells accumulated slightly more oxidized GSH (GSSG; Supplemental Figure 12, A and B), leading to a significantly reduced GSH/GSSG ratio both in cell culture and in vivo (Supplemental Figure 12C). To determine whether this perturbation of glutathione homeostasis compromises the ability of PC-suppressed cells to handle oxidative stress, we measured ROS production by DCFDA fluorescence. PC-knockdown cells had over 70% more basal ROS than did control cells (0 mM H2O2; Supplemental Figure 12D). When cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of H2O2, the knockdown cells were less able to quench ROS, as they produced up to 300% more ROS than did control cells (Supplemental Figure 12D). However, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 10 mM did not rescue the growth of PC-knockdown cells, suggesting that such a growth effect is not simply related to an inability to regenerate GSH from GSSG. Altogether, these results show that PC suppression compromises anaplerotic input into the Krebs cycle, which in turn reduces the activity of the Krebs cycle, while limiting the ability of A549 cells to synthesize nucleotides, lipids, and glutathione. These downstream effects of PC knockdown were also evident when comparing the metabolism of shPC55-transduced A549 cells against that of A549 cells transduced with a scrambled vector (shScr) (Supplemental Figure 13), which suggests that they are on-target effects of PC knockdown.

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In vivo HIF-mediated reductive carboxylation is regulated by citrate levels and sensitizes VHL-deficient cells to glutamine deprivation.
Gameiro PA, Yang J, Metelo AM,…, Stephanopoulos G, Iliopoulos O.
Cell Metab. 2013 Mar 5; 17(3):372-85.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.cmet.2013.02.002

Hypoxic and VHL-deficient cells use glutamine to generate citrate and lipids through reductive carboxylation (RC) of α-ketoglutarate. To gain insights into the role of HIF and the molecular mechanisms underlying RC, we took advantage of a panel of disease-associated VHL mutants and showed that HIF expression is necessary and sufficient for the induction of RC in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. HIF expression drastically reduced intracellular citrate levels. Feeding VHL-deficient RCC cells with acetate or citrate or knocking down PDK-1 and ACLY restored citrate levels and suppressed RC. These data suggest that HIF-induced low intracellular citrate levels promote the reductive flux by mass action to maintain lipogenesis. Using [(1-13)C]glutamine, we demonstrated in vivo RC activity in VHL-deficient tumors growing as xenografts in mice. Lastly, HIF rendered VHL-deficient cells sensitive to glutamine deprivation in vitro, and systemic administration of glutaminase inhibitors suppressed the growth of RCC cells as mice xenografts.

Cancer cells undergo fundamental changes in their metabolism to support rapid growth, adapt to limited nutrient resources, and compete for these supplies with surrounding normal cells. One of the metabolic hallmarks of cancer is the activation of glycolysis and lactate production even in the presence of adequate oxygen. This is termed the Warburg effect, and efforts in cancer biology have revealed some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenotype (Cairns et al., 2011). More recently, 13C isotopic studies have elucidated the complementary switch of glutamine metabolism that supports efficient carbon utilization for anabolism and growth (DeBerardinis and Cheng, 2010). Acetyl-CoA is a central biosynthetic precursor for lipid synthesis, being generated from glucose-derived citrate in well-oxygenated cells (Hatzivassiliou et al., 2005). Warburg-like cells, and those exposed to hypoxia, divert glucose to lactate, raising the question of how the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is supplied with acetyl-CoA to support lipogenesis. We and others demonstrated, using 13C isotopic tracers, that cells under hypoxic conditions or defective mitochondria primarily utilize glutamine to generate citrate and lipids through reductive carboxylation (RC) of α-ketoglutarate by isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or 2 (IDH2) (Filipp et al., 2012; Metallo et al., 2012; Mullen et al., 2012; Wise et al., 2011).

The transcription factors hypoxia inducible factors 1α and 2α (HIF-1α, HIF-2α) have been established as master regulators of the hypoxic program and tumor phenotype (Gordan and Simon, 2007; Semenza, 2010). In addition to tumor-associated hypoxia, HIF can be directly activated by cancer-associated mutations. The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor is inactivated in the majority of sporadic clear-cell renal carcinomas (RCC), with VHL-deficient RCC cells exhibiting constitutive HIF-1α and/or HIF-2α activity irrespective of oxygen availability (Kim and Kaelin, 2003). Previously, we showed that VHL-deficient cells also relied on RC for lipid synthesis even under normoxia. Moreover, metabolic profiling of two isogenic clones that differ in pVHL expression (WT8 and PRC3) suggested that reintroduction of wild-type VHL can restore glucose utilization for lipogenesis (Metallo et al., 2012). The VHL tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) has been reported to have several functions other than the well-studied targeting of HIF. Specifically, it has been reported that pVHL regulates the large subunit of RNA polymerase (Pol) II (Mikhaylova et al., 2008), p53 (Roe et al., 2006), and the Wnt signaling regulator Jade-1. VHL has also been implicated in regulation of NF-κB signaling, tubulin polymerization, cilia biogenesis, and proper assembly of extracellular fibronectin (Chitalia et al., 2008; Kim and Kaelin, 2003; Ohh et al., 1998; Thoma et al., 2007; Yang et al., 2007). Hypoxia inactivates the α-ketoglutarate-dependent HIF prolyl hydroxylases, leading to stabilization of HIF. In addition to this well-established function, oxygen tension regulates a larger family of α-ketoglutarate-dependent cellular oxygenases, leading to posttranslational modification of several substrates, among which are chromatin modifiers (Melvin and Rocha, 2012). It is therefore conceivable that the effect of hypoxia on RC that was reported previously may be mediated by signaling mechanisms independent of the disruption of the pVHL-HIF interaction. Here we

  • demonstrate that HIF is necessary and sufficient for RC,
  • provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that link HIF to RC,
  • detected RC activity in vivo in human VHL-deficient RCC cells growing as tumors in nude mice,
  • provide evidence that the reductive phenotype of VHL-deficient cells renders them sensitive to glutamine restriction in vitro, and
  • show that inhibition of glutaminase suppresses growth of VHL-deficient cells in nude mice.

These observations lay the ground for metabolism-based therapeutic strategies for targeting HIF-driven tumors (such as RCC) and possibly the hypoxic compartment of solid tumors in general.

HIF Inactivation Is Necessary for Downregulation of Reductive Carboxylation by pVHL

(A) Expression of HIF-1 α, HIF-2α, and their target protein GLUT1 in UMRC2-derived cell lines, as indicated.

(B) Carbon atom transition map: the fate of [1-13C1] and [5-13C1]glutamine used to trace reductive carboxylation in this work (carbon atoms are represented by circles). The [1-13C1] (green circle) and [5-13C1] (red circle) glutamine-derived isotopic labels are retained during the reductive TCA cycle (bold red pathway). Metabolites containing the acetyl-CoA carbon skeleton are highlighted by dashed circles.

(C) Relative contribution of reductive carboxylation.

(D and E) Relative contribution of glucose oxidation to the carbons of indicated metabolites (D) and citrate (E). Student’s t test compared VHL-reconstituted to vector-only or to VHL mutants (Y98N/Y112N). Error bars represent SEM. Pyr, pyruvate; Lac, lactate; AcCoA, acetyl-CoA, Cit, citrate; IsoCit, isocitrate; Akg, α-ketoglutarate; Suc, succinate; Fum, fumarate; Mal, malate; OAA, oxaloacetate; Asp, aspartate; Glu, glutamate; PDH, pyruvate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; IDH, isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes; ACO, aconitase enzymes; ACLY, ATP-citrate lyase; GLS, glutaminase.

To test the effect of HIF activation on the overall glutamine incorporation in the TCA cycle, we labeled an isogenic pair of VHL-deficient and VHL-reconstituted UMRC2 cells with [U-13C5]glutamine, which generates M4 fumarate, M4 malate, M4 aspartate, and M4 citrate isotopomers through glutamine oxidation. As seen in Figure S1B, VHL-deficient/VHL-positive UMRC2 cells exhibit similar enrichment of M4 fumarate, M4 malate, and M4 asparate (but not citrate) showing that VHL-deficient cells upregulate reductive carboxylation without compromising oxidative metabolism from glutamine. Next, we tested whether HIF inactivation by pVHL is necessary to regulate the reductive utilization of glutamine for lipogenesis. To this end, we traced the relative incorporation of [U-13C6]glucose or [5-13C1]glutamine into palmitate. Labeled carbon derived from [5-13C1]glutamine can be incorporated into fatty acids exclusively through RC, and the labeled carbon cannot be transferred to palmitate through the oxidative TCA cycle (Figure 1B, red carbons). Tracer incorporation from [5-13C1]glutamine occurs in the one carbon (C1) of acetyl-CoA, which results in labeling of palmitate at M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, and M8 mass isotopomers. In contrast, lipogenic acetyl-CoA molecules originating from [U-13C6]glucose are fully labeled, and the labeled palmitate is represented by M2, M4, M6, M8, M10, M12, M14, and M16 mass isotopomers. VHL-deficient control cells and cells expressing pVHL type 2B mutants exhibited high palmitate labeling from the [5-13C1]glutamine; conversely, reintroduction of wild-type or type 2C pVHL mutant (L188V) resulted in high labeling from [U-13C6]glucose (Figures 2A and 2B, box inserts highlight the heavier mass isotopomers).

hif-inactivation-is-necessary-for-downregulation-of-reductive-carboxylation-by-pvhl

hif-inactivation-is-necessary-for-downregulation-of-reductive-carboxylation-by-pvhl

Figure 2.  HIF Inactivation Is Necessary for Downregulation of Reductive Lipogenesis by pVHL

Next, to determine the specific contribution from glucose oxidation or glutamine reduction to lipogenic acetyl-CoA, we performed isotopomer spectral analysis (ISA) of palmitate labeling patterns. ISA indicates that wild-type pVHL or pVHL L188V mutant-reconstituted UMRC2 cells relied mainly on glucose oxidation to produce lipogenic acetyl-CoA, while UMRC2 cells reconstituted with a pVHL mutant defective in HIF inactivation (Y112N or Y98N) primarily employed RC. Upon disruption of the pVHL-HIF interaction, glutamine becomes the preferred substrate for lipogenesis, supplying 70%–80% of the lipogenic acetyl-CoA (Figure 2C). This is not a cell-line-specific phenomenon, but it applies to VHL-deficient human RCC cells in general; the same changes are observed in 786-O cells reconstituted with wild-type pVHL or mutant pVHL or infected with vector only as control (Figure S2). Type 2A pVHL mutants (Y112H, which retain partial HIF binding) confer an intermediate reductive phenotype between wild-type VHL (which inactivates HIF) and type 2B pVHL mutants (which are totally defective in HIF regulation) as seen in Figures 1 and ​and 2.2. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the ability of pVHL to regulate reductive carboxylation and lipogenesis from glutamine tracks genetically with its ability to bind and degrade HIF, at least in RCC cells.

HIF Is Sufficient to Induce RC from Glutamine in RCC Cells

To test the hypothesis that HIF-2α is sufficient to promote RC from glutamine, we expressed a pVHL-insensitive HIF-2α mutant (HIF-2α P405A/P531A, marked as HIF-2α P-A) in VHL-reconstituted 786-O cells (Figure 3). HIF-2α P-A is constitutively expressed in this polyclonal cell population, despite the reintroduction of wild-type VHL, reflecting a pseudohypoxia condition (Figure 3A). We confirmed that this mutant is transcriptionally active by assaying for the expression of its targets genes GLUT1, LDHA, HK1, EGLN, HIG2, and VEGF (Figures 3B and S3A). As shown in Figure 3C, reintroduction of wild-type VHLinto 786-O cells suppressed RC, whereas the expression of the constitutively active HIF-2α mutant was sufficient to stimulate this reaction, restoring the M1 enrichment of TCA cycle metabolites observed in VHL-deficient 786-O cells. Expression of HIF-2α P-A also led to a concomitant decrease in glucose oxidation, corroborating the metabolic alterations observed in glutamine metabolism (Figures 3D and 3E). Additional evidence of the HIF2α-regulation on the reductive phenotype was obtained with [U-13C5]glutamine, which generates M5 citrate, M3 fumarate, M3 malate, and M3 aspartate through RC (Figure 3F).

Our current work showed that HIF-2α is sufficient to induce the reductive program in RCC cells that express only the HIF-2α paralog, while mouse NEK cells appeared to use HIF-1α preferentially to promote RC. Together with the evidence that HIF-1α and HIF-2α may have opposite roles in tumor growth, it is possible that the cellular context dictates which paralog activates RC. It is also possible that HIF-2α adopts the RC regulatory function of HIF-1α upon deletion of the latter in RCC cells. Further studies are warranted in understanding the relative role of HIF-α paralogs in regulating RC in different cell types.

Finally, the selective sensitivity to glutaminase inhibitors exhibited by VHL-deficient cells, together with the observed RC activity in vivo, strongly suggests that reductive glutamine metabolism may fuel tumor growth. Investigating whether the reductive flux correlates with tumor hypoxia and/or contributes to the actual cell survival under low oxygen conditions is warranted. Together, our findings underscore the biological significance of reductive carboxylation in VHL-deficient RCC cells. Targeting this metabolic signature of HIF may open viable therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of hypoxic and VHL-deficient tumors.

Elevated levels of 14-3-3 proteins, serotonin, gamma enolase and pyruvate kinase identified in clinical samples from patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer
Dowling P, Hughes DJ, Larkin AM, Meiller J, …, Clynes M
Clin Chim Acta. 2015 Feb 20;441:133-41.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.cca.2014.12.005.

Highlights

  • Identification of a number of significant proteins and metabolites in CRC patients
  • 14-3-3 proteins, serotonin, gamma enolase and pyruvate kinase all significant
  • Intense staining for 14-3-3 epsilon in tissue specimens from CRC patients
  • Tissue 14-3-3 epsilon levels concordant with abundance in the circulation
  • Biomolecules provide insight into the biology associated with tumor development

Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC), a heterogeneous disease that is common in both men and women, continues to be one of the predominant cancers worldwide. Lifestyle, diet, environmental factors and gene defects all contribute towards CRC development risk. Therefore, the identification of novel biomarkers to aid in the management of CRC is crucial. The aim of the present study was to identify candidate biomarkers for CRC, and to develop a better understanding of their role in tumorogenesis. Methods: In this study, both plasma and tissue samples from patients diagnosed with CRC, together with non-malignant and normal controls were examined using mass spectrometry based proteomics and metabolomics approaches.
Results: It was established that the level of several biomolecules, including serotonin, gamma enolase, pyruvate kinase and members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins, showed statistically significant changes when comparing malignant versus non-malignant patient samples, with a distinct pattern emerging mirroring cancer cell energy production. Conclusion: The diagnosis and management of CRC could be enhanced by the discovery and validation of new candidate biomarkers, as found in this study, aimed at facilitating early detection and/or patient stratification together with providing information on the complex behavior of cancer cells.

Table 2 – List of proteins found to show statistically significant differences between control (n=10) and CRC (n=16; 8 stage III/8 stage IV) patient plasma samples fractionated using Proteominer beads. Information provided in the table includes accession number, discovery platform used, protein description, the number of unique peptides for quantitation, a mascot score for protein identification (confidence number), ANOVA p-values(≥0.05), fold change in protein abundance (≥2-fold) and highest/lowest mean change.

Table 3 – List of metabolites found to show statistically significant differences between control (n=8) and CRC (n=16; 8 stage III/8 stage IV) patient plasma samples. Included in the table is the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) entry, platform used to analyse the biochemicals, biochemical name, ANOVA p-values (≥0.05), fold-change and highest/lowest mean change.

Fig.1. Box and whisker plots for: (A) M2-PK, (B) gamma enolase, (C) 14-3-3 (pan) and (D) serotonin. ELISA analysisofM2-PK, gamma enolase, serotonin and 14-3-3 (pan) in plasma samples from control (n = 20), polyps (n = 10), adenoma (n = 10), stage I/II CRC (n= 20) and stage III/IV (n= 20)patients. The figures show statistically significant p-value for various comparisons between the different sample groups. This ELISA measurement for 14-3-3 detects all known isoforms of mammalian 14-3-3 proteins (β/α, γ, ε, η, ζ/δ, θ/τ and σ).

Role of lipid peroxidation derived 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) in cancer- Focusing on mitochondria
Huiqin Zhonga, Huiyong Yin
Redox Biol Apr 2015; 4: 193–199

Oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation has been associated with human physiology and diseases including cancer. Overwhelming data suggest that reactive lipid mediators generated from this process, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), are biomarkers for oxidative stress and important players for mediating a number of signaling pathways. The biological effects of 4-HNE are primarily due to covalent modification of important biomolecules including proteins, DNA, and phospholipids containing amino group. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the role of 4-HNE in pathogenesis of cancer and focus on the involvement of mitochondria: generation of 4-HNE from oxidation of mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin; covalent modification of mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA; potential therapeutic strategies for targeting mitochondrial ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, and 4-HNE.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, and lipid peroxyl radicals, are ubiquitous and considered as byproducts of aerobic life [1]. Most of these chemically reactive molecules are short-lived and react with surrounding molecules at the site of formation while some of the more stable molecules diffuse and cause damages far away from their sites of generation. Overproduction of these ROS, termed oxidative stress, may provoke oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in cellular membranes through free radical chain reactions and form lipid hydroperoxides as primary products [2]; some of these primary oxidation products may decompose and lead to the formation of reactive lipid electrophiles. Among these lipid peroxidation (LPO) products, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenals (4-HNE) represents one of the most bioactive and well-studied lipid alkenals [3]. 4-HNE can modulate a number of signaling processes mainly through forming covalent adducts with nucleophilic functional groups in proteins, nucleic acids, and membrane lipids. These properties have been extensively summarized in some excellent reviews [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9] and [10].

Conclusions

Lipid peroxidation-derived 4-HNE is a prototypical reactive lipid electrophile that readily forms covalent adducts with nucleophilic functional groups in macromolecule such as proteins, DNA, and lipids (Fig. 3). A body of work have shown that generation of 4-HNE macromolecule adducts plays important pathological roles in cancer through interactions with mitochondria. First of all, mitochondria are one of the most important cellular sites of 4-HNE production, presumably from oxidation of abundant PUFA-containing lipids, such as L4CL. Emerging evidence suggest that this process play a critical role in apoptosis. Secondly, in response to the toxicity of 4-HNE, mitochondria have developed a number of defense mechanisms to convert 4-HNE to less reactive chemical species and minimize its toxic effects. Thirdly, 4-HNE macromolecule adducts in mitochondria are involved in the cancer initiation and progression by modulating mitochondrial function and metabolic reprogramming. 4-HNE protein adducts have been widely studied but the mtDNA modification by lipid electrophiles has yet to emerge. The biological consequence of PE modification remains to be defined, especially in the context of cancer. Last but not the least, manipulation of mitochondrial ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, and production of lipid electrophiles may be a viable approach for cancer prevention and treatment.

K.J. Davies. Oxidative stress, antioxidant defenses, and damage removal, repair, and replacement systems. IUBMB Life, 50 (4–5) (2000): 279–289. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/713803728.1132732

Shoeb, N.H. Ansari, S.K. Srivastava, K.V. Ramana. 4-hydroxynonenal in the pathogenesis and progression of human diseases. Current Medicinal Chemistry, 21 (2) (2014):230–237 http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/09298673113209990181 23848536

J.D. West, L.J. Marnett. Endogenous reactive intermediates as modulators of cell signaling and cell death. Chemical Research in Toxicology, 19 (2)(2006): 173–194 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/tx050321u.16485894

Barrera, S. Pizzimenti,…, A. Lepore, et al. Role of 4-hydroxynonenal-protein adducts in human diseases. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling (2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ars.2014.6166 25365742

J.R. Roede, D.P. Jones. Reactive species and mitochondrial dysfunction: mechanistic significance of 4-hydroxynonenal. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, 51 (5) (2010):380–390 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/em.20553 20544880

Guéraud, M. Atalay, N. Bresgen, …, I. Jouanin, W. Siems, K. Uchida. Chemistry and biochemistry of lipid peroxidation products. Free Radical Research, 44 (10) (2010): 1098–1124 http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10715762.2010.498477.20836659

Z.H. Chen, E. Niki. 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) has been widely accepted as an inducer of oxidative stress. Is this the whole truth about it or can 4-HNE also exert protective effects? IUBMB Life, 58 (5–6) (2006): 372–373. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15216540600686896 16754333

Aldini, M. Carini, K.-J. Yeum, G. Vistoli. Novel molecular approaches for improving enzymatic and nonenzymatic detoxification of 4-hydroxynonenal: toward the discovery of a novel class of bioactive compounds. Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 69 (0) (2014): 145–156 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2014.01.017 24456906

Fig. 2.   Catabolism of 4-HNE in mitochondria. ROS induced lipid peroxidation in IMM and OMM (outer membrane of mitochondria) leads to 4-HNE formation. In matrix, 4-HNE conjugation with GSH produces glutathionyl-HNE (GS-HNE); this process occurs spontaneously or can be catalyzed by GSTs. 4-HNE is reduced to 1,4-dihydroxy-2-nonene (DHN) catalyzed ADH or AKRs. ALDH2 catalyzes the oxidation of 4-HNE to form 4-hydroxy-2-nonenoic acid (HNA).

Role of 4-hydroxynonenal in cancer focusing on mitochondria

Role of 4-hydroxynonenal in cancer focusing on mitochondria

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Role of 4-hydroxynonenal in cancer focusing on mitochondria

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Fig. 3. A schematic view of 4-HNE macromolecule adducts in cancer cell. 4-HNE macromolecule adducts are involved in cancer initiation, progression, metabolic reprogramming, and cell death. 4-HNE (depicted as a zigzag line) is produced through ROS-induced lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial and plasma membranes. Biological consequences of 4-HNE adduction:

  1. reducing membrane integrity;
  2. affecting protein function in cytosol;
  3. causing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage;
  4. inhibiting ETC activity;
  5. activating UCPs activity;
  6. reducing TCA activity;
  7. inhibiting ALDH2 activity.

DNA methylation paradigm shift: 15-lipoxygenase-1 upregulation in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and prostate cancer by atypical promoter hypermethylation.
Kelavkar UP1, Harya NS, … , Chandran U, Dhir R, O’Keefe DS.
Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 2007 Jan; 82(1-4):185-97

Fifteen (15)-lipoxygenase type 1 (15-LO-1, ALOX15), a highly regulated, tissue- and cell-type-specific lipid-peroxidating enzyme has several functions ranging from physiological membrane remodeling, pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation and carcinogenesis. Several of our findings support a possible role for 15-LO-1 in prostate cancer (PCa) tumorigenesis. In the present study, we identified a CpG island in the 15-LO-1 promoter and demonstrate that the methylation status of a specific CpG within this island region is associated with transcriptional activation or repression of the 15-LO-1 gene. High levels of 15-LO-1 expression was exclusively correlated with one of the CpG dinucleotides within the 15-LO-1 promoter in all examined PCa cell-lines expressing 15-LO-1 mRNA. We examined the methylation status of this specific CpG in microdissected high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), PCa, metastatic human prostate tissues, normal prostate cell lines and human donor (normal) prostates. Methylation of this CpG correlated with HGPIN, PCa and metastatic human prostate tissues, while this CpG was unmethylated in all of the normal prostate cell lines and human donor (normal) prostates that either did not display or had minimal basal 15-LO-1 expression. Immunohistochemistry for 15-LO-1 was performed in prostates from PCa patients with Gleason scores 6, 7 [(4+3) and (3+4)], >7 with metastasis, (8-10) and 5 normal (donor) individual males. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to detect 15-LO-1 in PrEC, RWPE-1, BPH-1, DU-145, LAPC-4, LNCaP, MDAPCa2b and PC-3 cell lines. The specific methylated CpG dinucleotide within the CpG island of the 15-LO-1 promoter was identified by bisulfite sequencing from these cell lines. The methylation status was determined by COBRA analyses of one specific CpG dinucleotide within the 15-LO-1 promoter in these cell lines and in prostates from patients and normal individuals. Fifteen-LO-1, GSTPi and beta-actin mRNA expression in BPH-1, LNCaP and MDAPCa2b cell lines with or without 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and trichostatin-A (TSA) treatment were investigated by qRT-PCR. Complete or partial methylation of 15-LO-1 promoter was observed in all PCa patients but the normal donor prostates showed significantly less or no methylation. Exposure of LNCAP and MDAPCa2b cell lines to 5-aza-dC and TSA resulted in the downregulation of 15-LO-1 gene expression. Our results demonstrate that 15-LO-1 promoter methylation is frequently present in PCa patients and identify a new role for epigenetic phenomenon in PCa wherein hypermethylation of the 15-LO-1 promoter leads to the upregulation of 15-LO-1 expression and enzyme activity contributes to PCa initiation and progression.

Transcriptional regulation of 15-lipoxygenase expression by promoter methylation.
Liu C1, Xu D, Sjöberg J, Forsell P, Björkholm M, Claesson H
Exp Cell Res. 2004 Jul 1; 297(1):61-7.

15-Lipoxygenase type 1 (15-LO), a lipid-peroxidating enzyme implicated in physiological membrane remodeling and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis, is highly regulated and expressed in a tissue- and cell-type-specific fashion. It is known that interleukins (IL) 4 and 13 play important roles in transactivating the 15-LO gene. However, the fact that they only exert such effects on a few types of cells suggests additional mechanism(s) for the profile control of 15-LO expression. In the present study, we demonstrate that hyper- and hypomethylation of CpG islands in the 15-LO promoter region is intimately associated with the transcriptional repression and activation of the 15-LO gene, respectively. The 15-LO promoter was exclusively methylated in all examined cells incapable of expressing 15-LO (certain solid tumor and human lymphoma cell lines and human T lymphocytes) while unmethylated in 15-LO-competent cells (the human airway epithelial cell line A549 and human monocytes) where 15-LO expression is IL4-inducible. Inhibition of DNA methylation in L428 lymphoma cells restores IL4 inducibility to 15-LO expression. Consistent with this, the unmethylated 15-LO promoter reporter construct exhibited threefold higher activity in A549 cells compared to its methylated counterpart. Taken together, demethylation of the 15-LO promoter is a prerequisite for the gene transactivation, which contributes to tissue- and cell-type-specific regulation of 15-LO expression.

mechanism of the lipoxygenase reaction

Radical mechanism of the lipoxygenase reaction pattabhiraman

Radical mechanism of the lipoxygenase reaction pattabhiraman

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Position determinants of lipoxygenase reaction pattabhiraman

Position determinants of lipoxygenase reaction pattabhiraman

http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/dissertationen/pattabhiraman-shankaranarayanan-2003-11-03/HTML/pattabhiraman_html_m3642741b.jpg

Position determinants of lipoxygenase reaction

This suggests that the space inside the active site cavity plays an important role in the positional specificity (Borngräber et al., 1999). The reverse process on 12-LOX works equally well (Suzuki et al., 1994; Watanabe and Haeggstrom, 1993). However, conversion to 5-LOX by mutagenesis has not been successful. The positional determinant residues on 15-LOX were mutated to those of 5-LOX but the enzyme was inactive (Sloane et al., 1990). 15-LOX possess the ability to oxygenate 15-HpETE to form 5, 15-diHpETE. Methylation of carboxy end of the substrate increased the activity significantly. This phenomenon was hypothesised to be due to an inverse orientation of the substrate at the active site. In this case the caroboxy end may slide into the cavity as suggested by experiments with modified [page 6↓]substrates and site directed mutagenesis (Schwarz et al., 1998; Walther et al., 2001). Thus, the determinant of positional specificity is not only the volume but also the orientation of the substrate in the active site.

The N-terminal domain of the enzyme does not play a major role in the dioxygenation reaction of 12/15 lipoxygenase. N-terminal domain truncations did not impair the lipoxygenase activity. The ability of the enzyme to bind to membranes, however, is impaired in the mutants (point and truncations) of the N-ternimal domain without significant alterations to the catalytic activity (Walther et al., 2002). Mutation to Trp 181, which is localised in the catalytic domain, also impaired membrane binding function. This suggests that the C-terminal domain is responsible for the catalytic activity and a concerted action of N-terminal and C-terminal domain was necessary for effective membrane binding.

Metabolomic studies

New paradigms for metabolic modeling of human cells

Mardinoglu A, Nielsen J
Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2015 Jan 2; 34C:91-97.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.copbio.2014

integration of genetic and biochemical knowledge

integration of genetic and biochemical knowledge

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0958166914002286-fx1.jpg

Highlights

  • We presented the timeline of generation and evaluation of global reconstructions of human metabolism.
  • We reviewed the generation of the context specific GEMs through the use of human generic GEMs.
  • We discussed the generation of multi-tissue GEMs in the context of whole-body metabolism.
  • We finally discussed the integration of GEMs with other biological networks.

Abnormalities in cellular functions are associated with the progression of human diseases, often resulting in metabolic reprogramming. GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs) have enabled studying global metabolic reprogramming in connection with disease development in a systematic manner. Here we review recent work on reconstruction of GEMs for human cell/tissue types and cancer, and the use of GEMs for identification of metabolic changes occurring in response to disease development. We further discuss how GEMs can be used for the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. Finally, challenges in integration of cell/tissue models for simulation of whole body functions as well as integration of GEMs with other biological networks for generating complete cell/tissue models are presented.

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0958166914002286-gr2.sml

Inter- and intra-tumor profiling of multi-regional colon cancer and metastasis
Kogita A, Yoshioka Y, …, Nakai T, Okuno K, Nishio K
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2015 Feb 27; 458(1):52-6.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.01.064

Highlights

  • Mutation profiling of tumors of multi-regional colon cancers using targeted sequencing.
  • Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples were available for next-generation sequencing.
  • Different clones existed in primary tumors and metastatic tumors.
  • Muti-clonalities between intra- and inter-tumors.

Intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity may hinder personalized molecular-target treatment that depends on the somatic mutation profiles. We performed mutation profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumors of multi-regional colon cancer and characterized the consequences of intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity and metastasis using targeted re-sequencing. We performed targeted re-sequencing on multiple spatially separated samples obtained from multi-regional primary colon carcinoma and associated metastatic sites in two patients using next-generation sequencing. In Patient 1 with four primary tumors (P1-1, P1-2, P1-3, and P1-4) and one liver metastasis (H1), mutually exclusive pattern of mutations was observed in four primary tumors. Mutations in primary tumors were identified in three regions; KARS (G13D) and APC (R876*) in P1-2, TP53 (A161S) in P1-3, and KRAS (G12D), PIK3CA (Q546R), and ERBB4 (T272A) in P1-4. Similar combinatorial mutations were observed between P1-4 and H1. The ERBB4 (T272A) mutation observed in P1-4, however, disappeared in H1. In Patient 2 with two primary tumors (P2-1 and P2-2) and one liver metastasis (H2), mutually exclusive pattern of mutations were observed in two primary tumors. We identified mutations; KRAS (G12V), SMAD4 (N129K, R445*, and G508D), TP53 (R175H), and FGFR3 (R805W) in P2-1, and NRAS (Q61K) and FBXW7 (R425C) in P2-2. Similar combinatorial mutations were observed between P2-1 and H2. The SMAD4 (N129K and G508D) mutations observed in P2-1, however, were nor detected in H2. These results suggested that different clones existed in primary tumors and metastatic tumor in Patient 1 and 2 likely originated from P1-4 and P2-1, respectively. In conclusion, we detected the muti-clonalities between intra- and inter-tumors based on mutational profiling in multi-regional colon cancer using next-generation sequencing. Primary region from which metastasis originated could be speculated by mutation profile. Characterization of inter- and inter-tumor heterogeneity can lead to underestimation of the tumor genomics landscape and treatment strategy of personal medicine.

Fig.1. Treatment timelines for the two patients. A) Patient 1 (a 55-year-old man) had multifocal sigmoid colon cancers, and all of which were surgically resected in their entirety (P1-1, P1-2, P1-3, and P1-4). The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy (8 courses of XELOX). Eight months later, a single liver metastasis (H1) was detected, and the patients received neoadjuvant treatment of XELOX plus bevacizumab. Thereafter, he received a partial hepatectomy. B) Patient 2 (an 84-year-old woman) had cecal and sigmoid colon cancers (P2-1 and P2-2, respectively) with a single liver metastasis (H2). She received a subtotal colectomy and subsegmental hepatectomy.

Fig. 2. Schematic representation of intra-tumor heterogeneity in two patients. A) In patient 1, primary tumor (P1-4) contains two or more subclones. The clone without the ERBB4 (T272A) mutation created the liver metastasis. B) In patient 2, primary tumor (P2-1) contains two or more subclones. The clone without the SMAD4 (N129K and G508D) mutation created the liver metastasis.

Loss of Raf-1 Kinase Inhibitor Protein Expression Is Associated With Tumor Progression and Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

Parham MinooInti ZlobecKristi BakerLuigi TornilloLuigi TerraccianoJeremy R. Jass, and Alessandro Lugli
American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 127, 820-827
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1309/5D7MM22DAVGDT1R8(2007)

Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) is known as a critical down-regulator of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and a potential molecular determinant of malignant metastasis. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of RKIP expression in colorectal cancer (CRC). Immunohistochemical staining for RKIP was performed on a tissue microarray comprising 1,197 mismatch repair (MMR)-proficient and 141 MMR-deficient CRCs. The association of RKIP with clinicopathologic features was analyzed. Loss of cytoplasmic RKIP was associated with distant metastasis (P = .038), higher N stage (P = .032), vascular invasion (P = .01), and worse survival (P = .001) in the MMR-proficient group. In MMR-deficient CRCs, loss of cytoplasmic RKIP was associated with distant metastasis (P = .043) and independently predicted worse survival (P = .004). Methylation analysis of 28 cases showed that loss of RKIP expression is unlikely to be due to promoter methylation.

Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) is a ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved protein that belongs to the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein family.1,2 RKIP is present in the cytoplasm and at the cell membrane3 and appears to have multiple biologic functions that implicate spermatogenesis, neural development, cardiac function, and membrane biogenesis.4-6 RKIP has also been shown to have a role in the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. Originally, RKIP was identified as a phospholipid-binding protein and, subsequently, as an interacting partner of Raf-1 kinase that blocks mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) initiated by Raf-1.7 Initial studies showed that RKIP achieves this role by competitive interference with the binding of MEK to Raf-1.8 Recently, RKIP was shown to inhibit activation of Raf-1 by blocking phosphorylation of Raf-1 by p21-activated kinase and Src family kinases.9 It has also been suggested that RKIP could be involved in regulation of apoptosis by modulating the NF-κB pathway10 and in regulation of the spindle checkpoint via Aurora B.11 RKIP has also been implicated in tumor biology. In breast and prostate cancers, ectopic expression of RKIP sensitized cells to chemotherapeutic-induced apoptosis, and reduced expression of RKIP led to resistance to chemotherapy.12 A link between RKIP and cancer was first established in prostate cancer, with RKIP showing reduced expression in prostate cancer cells and the lowest expression levels in metastatic cells, suggesting that RKIP expression is inversely associated with the invasiveness of prostate cancer.13 Restoration of RKIP expression in metastatic prostate cancer cells inhibited invasiveness of the cells in vitro and in vivo in spontaneous lung metastasis but not the growth of the primary tumor in a murine model.13

Clinicopathologic Parameters The clinicopathologic data for 1,420 patients included T stage (T1, T2, T3, and T4), N stage (N0, N1, and N2), tumor grade (G1, G2, and G3), vascular invasion (presence or absence), and survival. The distribution of these features has been described previously.18-20 For 478 patients, information on local recurrence and distant metastasis was also available.

Methylation of RKIP Methylation of RKIP promoter was examined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using an AmpliTaq Gold kit (Roche, Branchburg, NJ) as described previously.25 The primers for amplification of the unmethylated sequence were 5′-TTTAGTGATATTTTTTGAGATATGA-3′ and 3′-CACTCCCTAACCTCTAATTAACCAA-5′ and for the methylated reaction were 5′-TTTAGCGATATTTTTTGAGATACGA-3′ and 3′-GCTCCCTAACCTCTAATTAACCG- 5′. The conditions for amplification were 10 minutes at 95°C followed by 39 cycles of denaturing at 95°C for 30 seconds, annealing at 52°C for 30 seconds, and 30 seconds of extension at 72°C. The PCR products were subjected to electrophoresis on 8% acrylamide gels and visualized by SYBR gold nucleic acid gel stain (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). CpGenome Universal Methylated DNA (Chemicon, Temecula, CA) was used as a positive control sample for methylation. Randomization of MMR-Proficient CRCs The 1,197 MMR-proficient CRCs were randomly assigned into 2 groups consisting of 599 (group 1) and 598 (group 2) cases and matched for sex, tumor location, T stage, N stage, tumor grade, vascular invasion, and survival ❚Table 1❚. Immunohistochemical cutoff scores for RKIP expression were determined for group 1, and the association of RKIP expression and T stage, N stage, tumor grade, vascular invasion, local recurrence, distant metastasis, and 10-year survival were studied in group 2.

❚Table 1❚ Characteristics of the Randomized Mismatch Repair–Proficient Subgroups of Colorectal Cancer Cases*

Variable p
Group Gp 1 (n=599) Gp 2 (n=598) 0.235
Sex M F M F
288 (48.3) 308

(51.7)

287

(48.2)

308

(51.8)

0.82
Tumor location Right-sided 417 (70.6) 417 (71.2) Left-sided 174 (29.4) 169 (28.8)
T1 T2 T3 T4
T stage 25 (4.3) 35 (6.0) 92(15.8) 97(16.7) 375(64.2)
365(62.8)
92(15.8)
84(14.5)
0.514
N stage N0 N1 N2
289(50.7) 154(27.0) 154(26.9) 127(22.3) 120(21.0) 0.847
Tumor grade G1 G2 G3
14 (2.4) 13 (2.2) 503(86.7) 507(86.7) 63 (10.9) 65 (11.1) 0.969
Vascular invasion Presence 412 (70.9) 422 (72.1) Absence 169 (29.1) 163 (27.9) 0.643
Median survival, mo 68.0 (57.0-91.0) 76.0 (62.0-88.0) 0.59

(95% confidence interval) * Data are given as number (percentage) unless otherwise indicated.
Data were not available for all cases; percentages are based on the number of cases available for the variable, not the total number of cases in the group. Cases were assigned into groups matched for all variables listed. †
The χ2 test was used for sex, tumor location, T stage, N stage, tumor grade, and vascular invasion and log-rank test for survival analysis. P > .05 indicates that there is no difference between groups 1 and 2.
Breast and prostate cancer: more similar than different

Gail P. Risbridger1, Ian D. Davis2, Stephen N. Birrell3 & Wayne D. Tilley3
Nature Reviews Cancer 10, 205-212 (March 2010)
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/nrc2795

Breast cancer and prostate cancer are the two most common invasive cancers in women and men, respectively. Although these cancers arise in organs that are different in terms of anatomy and physiological function both organs require gonadal steroids for their development, and tumours that arise from them are typically hormone-dependent and have remarkable underlying biological similarities. Many of the recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of breast and prostate cancers have paved the way for new treatment strategies. In this Opinion article we discuss some key issues common to breast and prostate cancer and how new insights into these cancers could improve patient outcomes.

Emerging field of metabolomics. Big promise for cancer biomarker identification and drug discovery
Patel S, Ahmed S.
J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2015 Mar 25; 107C:63-74.
http://DX.doi.ORG:/10.1016/j.jpba.2014.12.020

Highlights

  • Mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and chemometrics have enabled cancer biomarker discovery.
  • Metabolomics can non-invasively identify biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer.
  • All major types of cancers and their biomarkers discovered by metabolomics have been discussed.
  • This review sheds light on the pitfalls and potentials of metabolomics with respect to oncology.

Most cancers are lethal and metabolic alterations are considered a hallmark of this deadly disease. Genomics and proteomics have contributed vastly to understand cancer biology. Still there are missing links as downstream to them molecular divergence occurs. Metabolomics, the omic science that furnishes a dynamic portrait of metabolic profile is expected to bridge these gaps and boost cancer research. Metabolites being the end products are more stable than mRNAs or proteins. Previous studies have shown the efficacy of metabolomics in identifying biomarkers associated with diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. Metabolites are highly informative about the functional status of the biological system, owing to their proximity to organismal phenotypes. Scores of publications have reported about high-throughput data generation by cutting-edge analytic platforms (mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance). Further sophisticated statistical softwares (chemometrics) have enabled meaningful information extraction from the metabolomic data. Metabolomics studies have demonstrated the perturbation in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, choline and fatty acid metabolism as traits of cancer cells. This review discusses the latest progress in this field, the future trends and the deficiencies to be surmounted for optimally implementation in oncology. The authors scoured through the most recent, high-impact papers archived in Pubmed, ScienceDirect, Wiley and Springer databases to compile this review to pique the interest of researchers towards cancer metabolomics.

Table.  Novel Cancer Markers Identified by Metabolomics

Quantitative analysis of acetyl-CoA production in hypoxic cancer cells reveals substantial contribution from acetate
Jurre J Kamphorst, Michelle K Chung, Jing Fan and Joshua D Rabinowitz
Cancer & Metabolism 2014, 2:23
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1186/2049-3002-2-23

Background: Cell growth requires fatty acids for membrane synthesis. Fatty acids are assembled from 2-carbon units in the form of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA). In nutrient and oxygen replete conditions, acetyl-CoA is predominantly derived from glucose. In hypoxia, however, flux from glucose to acetyl-CoA decreases, and the fractional contribution of glutamine to acetyl-CoA increases. The significance of other acetyl-CoA sources, however, has not been rigorously evaluated. Here we investigate quantitatively, using 13C-tracers and mass spectrometry, the sources of acetyl-CoA in hypoxia. Results: In normoxic conditions, cultured cells produced more than 90% of acetyl-CoA from glucose and glutamine-derived carbon. In hypoxic cells, this contribution dropped, ranging across cell lines from 50% to 80%. Thus, under hypoxia, one or more additional substrates significantly contribute to acetyl-CoA production. 13C-tracer experiments revealed that neither amino acids nor fatty acids are the primary source of this acetyl-CoA. Instead, the main additional source is acetate. A large contribution from acetate occurs despite it being present in the medium at a low concentration (50–500 μM). Conclusions: Acetate is an important source of acetyl-CoA in hypoxia. Inhibition of acetate metabolism may impair tumor growth.

Cancer cells have genetic mutations that drive proliferation. Such proliferation creates a continuous demand for structural components to produce daughter cells [13]. This includes demand for fatty acids for lipid membranes. Cancer cells can obtain fatty acids both through uptake from extracellular sources and through de novo synthesis, with the latter as a major route by which non-essential fatty acids are acquired in many cancer types [4,5].

The first fatty acid to be produced by de novo fatty acid synthesis is palmitate. The enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) makes palmitate by catalyzing the ligation and reduction of 8-acetyl (2-carbon) units donated by cytosolic acetyl-CoA. This 16-carbon fatty acid palmitate is then incorporated into structural lipids or subjected to additional elongation (again using acetyl-CoA) and desaturation reactions to produce the diversity of fatty acids required by the cell.

Acetyl-CoA sits at the interface between central carbon and fatty acid metabolism. In well-oxygenated conditions with abundant nutrients, its 2-carbon acetyl unit is largely produced from glucose. First, pyruvate dehydrogenase produces acetyl-CoA from glucose-derived pyruvate in the mitochondrion, followed by ligation of the acetyl group to oxaloacetate to produce citrate. Citrate is then transported into the cytosol and cytosolic acetyl-CoA produced by ATP citrate lyase.

In hypoxia, flux from glucose to acetyl-CoA is impaired. Low oxygen leads to the stabilization of the HIF1 complex, blocking pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity via activation of HIF1-responsive pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) [6,7]. As a result, the glucose-derived carbon is shunted towards lactate rather than being used for generating acetyl-CoA, affecting carbon availability for fatty acid synthesis.

To understand how proliferating cells rearrange metabolism to maintain fatty acid synthesis under hypoxia, multiple studies focused on the role of glutamine as an alternative carbon donor[810]. The observation that citrate M+5 labeling from U-13C-glutamine increased in hypoxia led to the hypothesis that reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate enables hypoxic cells to maintain citrate and acetyl-CoA production. As was noted later, though, dropping citrate levels in hypoxic cells make the α-ketoglutarate to citrate conversion more reversible and an alternative explanation of the extensive citrate and fatty acid labeling from glutamine in hypoxia is isotope exchange without a net reductive flux [11]. Instead, we and others found that hypoxic cells can at least in part bypass the need for acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis by scavenging serum fatty acids [12,13].

In addition to increased serum fatty acid scavenging, we observed a large fraction of fatty acid carbon (20%–50% depending on the cell line) in hypoxic cells not coming from either glucose or glutamine. Here, we used 13C-tracers and mass spectrometry to quantify the contribution from various carbon sources to acetyl-CoA and hence identify this unknown source. We found only a minor contribution of non-glutamine amino acids and of fatty acids to acetyl-CoA in hypoxia. Instead, acetate is the major previously unaccounted for carbon donor. Thus, acetate assimilation is a route by which hypoxic cells can maintain lipogenesis and thus proliferation.

Figure 1. Percentage 13C-labeling of cytosolic acetyl-CoA can be quantified from palmitate labeling. (A) Increasing 13C2-acetyl-CoA labeling shifts palmitate labeling pattern to the right. 13C2-acetyl-CoA labeling can be quantified by determining a best fit between observed palmitate labeling and computed binomial distributions (shown on right-hand side) from varying fractions of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) labeling. (B) Steady-state palmitate labeling from U-13C-glucose and U-13C-glutamine in MDA-MB-468 cells. (C) Percentage acetyl-CoA production from glucose and glutamine. For (B) and (C), data are means ± SD of n = 3.

Fraction palmitate M + x = (16/x)(p)x (1−p)(16−x)

We applied this approach to MDA-MB-468 cells grown in medium containing U-13C-glucose and U-13C-glutamine. The resulting steady-state palmitate labeling patterns showed multiple heavily 13C-labeled forms as well as a remaining unlabeled M0 peak (Figure 1B). The M0-labeled form results from scavenging of unlabeled serum fatty acids and can be disregarded for the purpose of determining AcCoA labeling. From the remaining labeling distribution, we calculated 87% AcCoA labeling from glucose and 6% from glutamine, with 93% collectively accounted for by these two major carbon sources (Additional file 1: Figure S1). Similar results were also obtained for HeLa and A549 cells (Figure 1C)

Figure 2. Acetyl-CoA labeling from 13C-glucose and 13C-glutamine decreases in hypoxia. (A) Steady-state palmitate labeling from U-13C-glucose and U-13C-glutamine in normoxic and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. (B) Percentage acetyl-CoA production from glucose and glutamine in hypoxia. (C) One or more additional carbon donors contribute substantially to acetyl-CoA production in hypoxia. Abbreviations: Gluc, glucose; Gln, glutamine. Data are means ± SD of n = 3.

Figure 3.  Amino acids (other than glutamine) and fatty acids are not major sources of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in hypoxia. (A) Palmitate labeling in hypoxic (1% O2) MDA-MB-468 cells, grown for 48 h in medium where branched chain amino acids plus lysine and threonine were substituted with their respective U-13C-labeled forms. (B) Same conditions, except that glucose and glutamine only or glucose and all amino acids, were substituted with the U-13C-labeled forms. (C) Palmitate labeling in hypoxic (1% O2) MDA-MB-468 cells, grown in medium supplemented with 20 μM U-13C-palmitate for 48 h. Data are means ± SD of n = 3.

Acetate is the main additional AcCoA carbon source in hypoxia

We next investigated if hypoxic cells could activate acetate to AcCoA. Although we used dialyzed serum in our experiments and acetate is not a component of DMEM, we contemplated the possibility that trace levels could still be present or that acetate is produced as a catabolic intermediate from other sources (for example from protein de-acetylation). We cultured MDA-MB-468 cells in 1% O2 in DMEM containing U-13C-glucose and U-13C-glutamine and added increasing amounts of U-13C-acetate (Figure 4A). AcCoA labeling rose considerably with increasing U-13C-acetate concentrations, from approximately 50% to 86% with 500 μM U-13C-acetate. No significant increase in labeling of AcCoA was observed in normoxic cells following incubation with U-13C-acetate. Thus, acetate selectively contributes to AcCoA in hypoxia.

Figure 4.  The main additional AcCoA source in hypoxia is acetate. (A) Percentage 13C2-acetyl-CoA labeling quantified from palmitate labeling in hypoxic (1% O2) and normoxic MDA-MB-468 cells grown in medium with U-13C-glucose and U-13C-glutamine and additionally supplemented with indicated concentrations of U-13C-acetate. (B) Acetate concentrations in fresh 10% DFBS, DMEM, and DMEM with 10% DFBS. (C) Percentage 13C2-acetyl-CoA labeling for hypoxic (1% O2) HeLa and A549 cells. For (A) and (C), data are means ± SD of n ≥ 2. For (B), data are means ± SEM of n = 3.

Tumors require a constant supply of fatty acids to sustain cellular replication. It is thought that most cancers derive a considerable fraction of the non-essential fatty acids through de novo synthesis. This requires AcCoA with its 2-carbon acetyl group acting as the carbon donor. In nutrient replete and well-oxygenated conditions, AcCoA is predominantly made from glucose. However, tumor cells often experience hypoxia, causing limited entry of glucose-carbon into the TCA cycle. This in turn affects AcCoA production, and it has been proposed that hypoxic cells can compensate by increasing AcCoA production from glutamine-derived carbon in a pathway involving reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate [810].

Irrespective of the precise net contribution of acetate in hypoxia, a remarkable aspect is that a significant contribution occurs based only on contaminating acetate (~300 μM) in the culturing medium. This is considerably less than glucose (25 mM) or glutamine (4 mM). Acetate concentrations in the plasma of human subjects have been reported in the range of 50 to 650 μM [2225], and therefore, significant acetate conversion to AcCoA may occur in human tumors. This is supported by clinical observations that 11C-acetate PET can be used to image tumors, in particular those where conventional FDG-PET typically fails [26]. Our results indicate that 11C-acetate PET could be particularly important in notoriously hypoxic tumors, such as pancreatic cancer. Preliminary results provide evidence in this direction [27].

Finally, as our measurements of fatty acid labeling reflect specifically cytosolic AcCoA, it is likely that the cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase ACSS2 plays an important role in the observed acetate assimilation. Accordingly, inhibition of ACSS2 merits investigation as a potential therapeutic approach.

In hypoxic cultured cancer cells, one-quarter to one-half of cytosolic acetyl-CoA is not derived from glucose, glutamine, or other amino acids. A major additional acetyl-CoA source is acetate. Low concentrations of acetate (e.g., 50–650 μM) are found in the human plasma and also occur as contaminants in typical tissue culture media. These amounts are avidly incorporated into cellular acetyl-CoA selectively in hypoxia. Thus, 11C-acetate PET imaging may be useful for probing hypoxic tumors or tumor regions. Moreover, inhibiting acetate assimilation by targeting acetyl-CoA synthetases (e.g., ACSS2) may impair tumor growth.

Differential metabolomic analysis of the potential antiproliferative mechanism of olive leaf extract on the JIMT-1 breast cancer cell line
Barrajón-Catalán E, Taamalli A, Quirantes-Piné R, …, Micol V, Zarrouk M
J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2015 Feb; 105:156-62.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.jpba.2014.11.048

A new differential metabolomic approach has been developed to identify the phenolic cellular metabolites derived from breast cancer cells treated with a supercritical fluid extracted (SFE) olive leaf extract. The SFE extract was previously shown to have significant antiproliferative activity relative to several other olive leaf extracts examined in the same model. Upon SFE extract incubation of JIMT-1 human breast cancer cells, major metabolites were identified by using HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF-MS). After treatment, diosmetin was the most abundant intracellular metabolite, and it was accompanied by minor quantities of apigenin and luteolin. To identify the putative antiproliferative mechanism, the major metabolites and the complete extract were assayed for cell cycle, MAPK and PI3K proliferation pathways modulation. Incubation with only luteolin showed a significant effect in cell survival. Luteolin induced apoptosis, whereas the whole olive leaf extract incubation led to a significant cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. The antiproliferative activity of both pure luteolin and olive leaf extract was mediated by the inactivation of the MAPK-proliferation pathway at the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2). However, the flavone concentration of the olive leaf extract did not fully explain the strong antiproliferative activity of the extract. Therefore, the effects of other compounds in the extract, probably at the membrane level, must be considered. The potential synergistic effects of the extract also deserve further attention. Our differential metabolomics approach identified the putative intracellular metabolites from a botanical extract that have antiproliferative effects, and this metabolomics approach can be expanded to other herbal extracts or pharmacological complex mixtures.

Pancreatic cancer early detection. Expanding higher-risk group with clinical and metabolomics parameters
Shiro Urayama
World J Gastroenterol. 2015 Feb 14; 21(6): 1707–1717.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.3748/wjg.v21.i6.1707

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth and fifth leading cause of cancer death for each gender in developed countries. With lack of effective treatment and screening scheme available for the general population, the mortality rate is expected to increase over the next several decades in contrast to the other major malignancies such as lung, breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. Endoscopic ultrasound, with its highest level of detection capacity of smaller pancreatic lesions, is the commonly employed and preferred clinical imaging-based PDAC detection method. Various molecular biomarkers have been investigated for characterization of the disease, but none are shown to be useful or validated for clinical utilization for early detection. As seen from studies of a small subset of familial or genetically high-risk PDAC groups, the higher yield and utility of imaging-based screening methods are demonstrated for these groups. Multiple recent studies on the unique cancer metabolism including PDAC, demonstrate the potential for utility of the metabolites as the discriminant markers for this disease. In order to generate an early PDAC detection screening strategy available for a wider population, we propose to expand the population of higher risk PDAC group with combination clinical and metabolomics parameters.

Core tip: This is a summary of current pancreatic cancer cohort early detection studies and a potential approach being considered for future application. This is an area that requires heightened efforts as lack of effective treatment and screening scheme for wider population is leading this particular disease to be the second lethal cancer by 2030.

Currently, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth major cause of cancer mortality in the United States[1]. It is predicted that 46420 new cases and 39590 deaths would result from pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2014[2]. Worldwide, there were 277668 new cases and 266029 deaths from this cancer in 2008[3]. In comparison to other major malignancies such as breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers with their respective 89%, 64%, 16%, 99% 5-year survival rate, PDAC at 6% is conspicuously low[2]. For PDAC, the only curative option is surgical resection, which is applicable in only 10%-15% of patients due to the common discovery of late stage at diagnosis[4]. In fact, PDAC is notorious for late stage discovery as evidenced by the low percentage of localized disease at diagnosis, compared to other malignancies: breast (61%), colon (40%), lung (16%), ovarian (19%), prostate (91%), and pancreatic cancer (7%) [5]. With the existing effective screening methods, the decreasing trends of cancer death rate are seen in major malignancies such as breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. In contrast, it is estimated that PDAC is expected to be surfacing as the second leading cause of cancer death by 2030[6].

With the distinct contribution of late-stage discovery and general lack of effective medical therapy, a critical approach in reversing the poor outcome of pancreatic cancer is to develop an early detection scheme for the tumor. In support of this, we see the trend that despite the poor prognosis of the disease, for those who have undergone curative resection with negative margins, the 5-year survival rate is 22% in contrast to 2% for the advanced-stage with distant metastasis[7,8]. An earlier diagnosis with tumor less than 2 cm (T1) is associated with a better 5-year survival of 58% compared to 17% for stage IIB PDAC[9]. Ariyama et al. [10] reported complete survival of 79 patients with less than 1 cm tumors after surgical resection. Furthermore, as a recent report indicates, the estimated time from the transformation to pre-metastatic growths of pancreatic cancer is approximately 15 years[11]; there is a wide potential window of opportunity to apply developing technologies in early detection of this cancer.

Current screening programs have demonstrated that the EUS evaluation can detect premalignant lesions and early cancers in certain small subset of high-risk groups. However, as the overwhelming majority of PDAC cases involve patients who develop the disease sporadically without a recognized genetic abnormality, the application of this modality for PDAC detection screening is very limited for the general adult population.

Select population based approach

Identification of a higher-PDAC-risk group: As the prevalence of PDAC in the general United States population over the age 55 is approximately 68 per 100000, a candidate discriminant test with a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 100% would generate 1999 false-positive test results and 68 true-positives[74]. Thus, relying on a single determinant for distinguishing the PDAC early-stage cases from the general population would necessitate a highly accurate test with a specificity of greater than 99%. More practical approach, then, would be to begin with a subset of population with a higher prevalence, and in conjunction with novel surrogate markers to curtail the at-risk subset, we could begin to identify the group with significantly increased PDAC risk for whom the endoscopic/imaging-based screening strategy could be applied.

An initial approach in selection of the screening population is to utilize selective clinical parameters that could be used to curtail the subset of the general population at increased PDAC risk. For instance, based on the epidemiological evidence, such clinical parameters include hyperglycemia or diabetes, which are noted in 50%-80% of pancreatic cancer patients [7579]. Though not encompassing all PDAC patients, this subset includes a much larger proportion of PDAC patients for whom we may select further for screening. Similarly, patients with a history of chronic pancreatitis or obesity are reported to have increased PDAC risk during their lifetime[8085].

With the recent advancement in the technology and resumed interest in the cancer-associated metabolic abnormality [89,90], application of metabolomics in the cancer field has attracted more attention [91]. Cancer-related metabolic reprogramming, Warburg effect, has been known since nearly a century ago in association with various solid tumors including PDAC [92], as cancer cells undergo energetically inefficient glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen in the environment (aerobic glycolysis)[93]. A number of common cancer mutations including Akt1, HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor), and p53 have been shown to support the Warburg effect through glycolysis and down-regulation of metabolite flux through the Krebs cycle [94101]. In PDAC, increased phosphorylation or activation of Akt1 has also been reported (illuminating on the importance of enzyme functionality)[102] as well as involvement of HIF1 in the tumor growth via effects on glycolytic process [103,104] and membrane-bound glycoprotein (MUC17) regulation [105] – reflective of activation of metabolic pathways. Further evidences of loss-of-function genetic mutations in key mitochondrial metabolic enzymes such as succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase support carcinogenesis and the Warburg effect [106110]. Other important alternative pathways in cancer metabolism such as glutaminolysis and pyruvate kinase isoform suppression have been shown to accumulate respective upstream intermediates and reduction of associated end products such as NADPH, ribose-5-phosphate and nucleic acids [111-116]. As such, various groups have reported metabolomics biomarker applications for different cancers [117,118].

As a major organ involved in metabolic regulation in a healthy individual, pancreatic disorder such as malignancy is anticipated to influence the normal metabolism, presenting further rationale and interest in elucidating the implication of malignant transformation and PDAC development. Proteomic analysis of the pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated alteration in proteins involved in metabolic pathways including increased expression of glycolytic and reduced Krebs cycle enzymes, and accumulation of key proteins involved in glutamine metabolism, in support of Warburg effect. These in turn play significant role in nucleotide and amino acid biosynthesis required for sustaining the proliferating cancer cells[119]. Applications of sensitive mass spectrometric techniques in metabolomics study of PDAC detection biomarkers have led to identification of a set of small molecules or metabolites (or biochemical intermediates) that are potent discriminants of developing PDAC and the controls (See Figure ​1  as an example of metabolomics based analysis, allowing segregation of PDAC from benign cases). Recent reports from our group as well as others have demonstrated that specific candidate metabolites consisting of amino acids, bile acids, and a number of lipids and fatty acids – suspected to be reflective of tumor proliferation as well as many systemic response yet to be determined – were identified as potential discriminant for blood-based PDAC biomarkers[120-123]. As a further supporting data, elucidation of lipids and fatty acids as discriminant factors from PDAC and benign lesions from the cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue has been reported recently[124].

metabolomics based analysis for PDC WJG-21-1707-g001

metabolomics based analysis for PDC WJG-21-1707-g001

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4323446/bin/WJG-21-1707-g001.gif

Figure 1 Example of metabolomics based analysis, allowing segregation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from benign cases. Heat map illustration of discriminant capability of a metabolite set derived from gas chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry …

By virtue of simultaneously depicting the multiple metabolite levels, metabolomics approach reveals various biochemical pathways that are uniquely involved in malignant conditions and has led to findings such as abnormalities of glycine and its mitochondrial biosynthetic pathway, as a potential therapeutic target in certain cancers[125]. Moreover, in combination with other systems biology approaches such as transcriptomics and proteomics, further refinement in characterization of cancer development and therapeutic targets as well as identification of potential biomarkers could be realized for PDAC. Since many enzymes in a metabolic network determine metabolites’ level and nonlinear quantitative relationship from the genes to the proteome and metabolome levels exist, a metabolome cannot be easily decomposed to a specific single marker, which will designate the cancer state[126]. Thus, in order to delineate a pathological state such as PDAC, multiple metabolomic features might be required for accurate depiction of a developing cancer. Future studies are anticipated to incorporate cancer systems’ biological knowledge, including metabolomics, for optimal designation of PDAC biomarkers, which would be utilized in conjunction with a clinical-parameter-derived population subset for establishing the PDAC screening population. Subsequently, further validation studies for the PDAC biomarkers need to be performed.

Current imaging-based detection and diagnostic methods for PDAC is effectively providing answers to clinical questions raised for patients with signs or symptoms of suspected pancreatic lesions. However, the endoscopic/imaging-based screening schemes are currently limited in applications to early PDAC detection in asymptomatic patients, aside from a small group of known genetically high-risk groups. There is a high demand for developing a method of selecting distinct subsets among the general population for implementing the endoscopic/imaging screening test effectively. Application of combinations of clinical risk parameters/factors with the developing molecular biomarkers from translational science such as metabolomics analysis brings hopes of providing us with early PDAC detection markers, and developing effective early detection screening scheme for the patients in the near future.

Serum metabolomic profiles evaluated after surgery may identify patients with estrogen receptor negative early breast cancer at increased risk of disease recurrence
Tenori L, Oakman C, Morris PG, …, Luchinat C, Di Leo A.
Mol Oncol. 2015 Jan; 9(1):128-39.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.molonc.2014.07.012

Purpose: Metabolomics is a global study of metabolites in biological samples. In this study we explored whether serum metabolomic spectra could distinguish between early and metastatic breast cancer patients and predict disease relapse. Methods: Serum samples were analysed from women with metastatic (n = 95) and predominantly oestrogen receptor (ER) negative early stage (n = 80) breast cancer using high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multivariate statistics and a Random Forest classifier were used to create a prognostic model for disease relapse in early patients.
Results: In the early breast cancer training set (n = 40), metabolomics correctly distinguished between early and metastatic disease in 83.7% of cases. A prognostic risk model predicted relapse with 90% sensitivity (95% CI 74.9-94.8%), 67% specificity (95% CI 63.0-73.4%) and 73% predictive accuracy (95% CI 70.6-74.8%). These results were reproduced in an independent early breast cancer set (n = 40), with 82% sensitivity, 72% specificity and 75% predictive accuracy. Disease relapse was associated with significantly lower levels of histidine (p = 0.0003) and higher levels of glucose (p = 0.01), and lipids (p = 0.0003), compared with patients with no relapse.
Conclusions: The performance of a serum metabolomic prognostic model for disease relapse in individuals with ER-negative early stage breast cancer is promising. A confirmation study is ongoing to better define the potential of metabolomics as a host and tumour-derived prognostic tool.

Figure 1 e Clusterization of serum metabolomic profiles. Discrimination between metastatic (green, n [ 95) and early (red, n [ 40) breast cancer patients using the random forest classifier. (a) CPMG; (b) NOESY1D; (c) Diffusion.

Figure 2 e Training set. Comparison between metabolomic classification and actual relapse. The receiver operator curves (ROC) and the area under the curve (AUC) scores are presented for CPMG, NOESY1D and Diffusion.

Figure 3 e Validation set. Comparison between CPMG random forest risk score metabolomic classification and actual relapse The receiver operator curve (ROC) and the area under the curve (AUC) score are presented for the CPMG analysis.

Figure 4 e Discriminant metabolites. Discriminant metabolites (p < 0.05) between profiles from early (green, n [ 80) and metastatic (red, n [ 95) breast cancer patients. Box and whisker plots: horizontal line within the box [ mean; bottom and top lines of the box [ 25th and 75th percentiles, respectively; bottom and top whiskers [ 5th and 95th percentiles, respectively. Median values (arbitrary units) are provided in the associated table, along with raw p values and p values adjusted for multiple testing. pts: patients.

Transparency in metabolic network reconstruction enables scalable biological discovery
Benjamin D Heavner, Nathan D Price
Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Aug 2015; 34: 105–109
Highlights

  • Assembling a network reconstruction can reveal knowledge gaps.
  • Building a functional metabolic model enables testable prediction.
  • Recent work has found that most models contain the same reactions.
  • Reconstruction and functional model building should be explicitly separated.

Reconstructing metabolic pathways has long been a focus of active research. Now, draft models can be generated from genomic annotation and used to simulate metabolic fluxes of mass and energy at the whole-cell scale. This approach has led to an explosion in the number of functional metabolic network models. However, more models have not led to expanded coverage of metabolic reactions known to occur in the biosphere. Thus, there exists opportunity to reconsider the process of reconstruction and model derivation to better support the less-scalable investigative processes of biocuration and experimentation. Realizing this opportunity to improve our knowledge of metabolism requires developing new tools that make reconstructions more useful by highlighting metabolic network knowledge limitations to guide future research.

metabolic network reconstruction

metabolic network reconstruction

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0958166914002250-fx1.jpg

Mapping metabolic pathways has been a focus of significant scientific efforts dating from the emergence of biochemistry as a distinct scientific field in the late 19th century [1]. This endeavor remains an important effort for at least two compelling reasons. First, cataloguing and characterizing the full range of metabolic processes across species (which because of genomics are being discovered at an incredible pace) is a fundamentally important step towards a complete understanding of our ecological environment. Second, mapping metabolic pathways in organisms — many of which can be found with specialized properties shaped by their environment — facilitates metabolic engineering to advance nascent industrial biotechnology efforts ranging from augmenting/replacing petroleum-derived chemical precursors or fuels to biopharmaceutical production [2]. However, despite laudable efforts to enable high-throughput ‘genomic enzymology’ [3•], the traditional biochemical approaches of enzyme expression, purification, and characterization remain time-intensive, capital-intensive, and labor-intensive, and have not expanded in scale like our ability to identify and characterize life genomically. Characterizing new metabolic function is further hampered by the challenge of cultivating environmental isolates in laboratory conditions [4]. Fortunately, recent efforts to leverage genome functional annotation and established knowledge of biochemistry have enabled the computational assembly of ‘draft metabolic reconstructions’ [5], which are parts lists of metabolic network components. In this context, a reconstruction is not just the information embodied in the stoichiometric matrix describing metabolic network structure, but also the associated metadata and annotation that entails an organism-specific knowledge base. Such a reconstruction can serve as the basis for making functional models amenable to mathematical simulation. Thus, a reconstruction is a bottom-up assembly of biochemical information, and a model can serve as a framework for integrating top-down information (for example, model constraints can be generated from statistically inferred gene regulatory networks [6]). Such computational approaches are significantly faster and less expensive than biochemical characterization [7]. They are also providing new resources facilitate cultivation of novel environmental isolates [8], and the scope of draft metabolic network coverage across the biome has increased much faster than wet lab characterization. If the distinction between reconstruction and model formulation can be strengthened and supported through software implementation, there is great opportunity for using both tasks to further advance rapid discovery of biological function.

The iterative process of manual curation of a draft metabolic network reconstruction to assemble a higher confidence compendium of organism-specific metabolism (a process termed ‘biocuration’ [9 and 10]) remains time-intensive and labor-intensive. Biocuration of metabolic reconstructions currently advances on a decadal time scale [11 and 12]. Thus, much research effort has focused instead on developing techniques for rapid development of models that are amenable to simulation [13 and 14]. Thousands of models have been derived from automatically assembled draft reconstructions [15], but most of these models consist of highly conserved portions of metabolism since they are propagated primarily via orthology. Though the number of models is large, they do not reflect the true diversity of cellular metabolic capabilities across different organisms [16•]. Applying the rapid and scalable process of draft network reconstruction to support and accelerate the less-scalable processes of biocuration and in vitro or in vivo experimentation remains an unrealized opportunity. The path forward should focus on increased emphasis on transparently documenting the reconstruction process and developing tools to highlight, rather than obscure, knowledge limitations that ultimately cause limitations to model predictive accuracy.

More explicit annotation of metabolic network reconstruction and model derivation steps can help direct research efforts

Testing implicit hypotheses arising from reconstruction assembly provides one opportunity for guiding experimental efforts. However, the very act of identifying ambiguous information in the literature should also be exploited to contribute to experimental efforts, independent of the choices a researcher makes in assembling a reconstruction. Preliminary steps to facilitate large-scale computational identification of biological uncertainty have been made, such as the development of the Evidence Ontology [18]. However, realizing the potential for using reconstruction assembly to highlight experimental opportunities will require a broader shift to emphasize the limits of our knowledge, rather than only the predictive power of a model that can be derived from a reconstruction. Computational reconstruction of metabolic networks provides two distinct opportunities for guiding experimental efforts even before a mathematically computable model is derived from the assembled knowledge: highlighting areas of uncertainty in the current knowledge of an organism, and introducing hypotheses of metabolic function as choices are made throughout biocuration efforts.

The subsequent process of deriving a mathematically computable model from a reconstruction provides additional opportunities for scalable hypothesis generation that could be exploited to inform experimental efforts. While stoichiometrically constrained models derived from reconstructions are ‘parameter-light’ when compared to dynamic enzyme kinetic models, they are not really ‘parameter free’ [19]. As modelers derive a model from an assembled reconstruction, they must make choices. And, like the ambiguities and choices that are made and should be highlighted in assembling a reconstruction, highlighting the choices made in deriving a model provides further opportunity for scalable hypothesis generation. Examples of choices that often arise in deriving a functional model include adding intracellular transport reactions, filling network gaps, or trimming network dead ends to improve network connectivity [20]. Researchers seeking to conduct Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) [21] or similar approaches must formulate an objective function, can include testable parameters such as ATP maintenance requirements, and can compare model predictions to designated reference phenotype observations. Each of these model-building and tuning activities presents opportunities to rapidly develop and prioritize new hypotheses of metabolic function.

The effort to computationally reconstruct biochemical knowledge to compile organism-specific reconstructions, and to derive computable models from these reconstructions, is a relatively young field of research with abundant opportunity for facilitating biological discovery of metabolic function. Judgment is required in assembling a reconstruction, and there should be careful consideration of the fact that judgment calls represent an implicit hypothesis. Making these hypotheses more explicit would help guide subsequent investigation. Bernhard Palsson and colleagues call for ‘an open discussion to define the minimal quality criteria for a genome scale reconstruction’ [16•] — an effort we fully support. We believe that such a beneficial ‘minimal quality criteria’ should be guided by the goals of reproducibility and transparency, including those aspects that can help to guide discovery of novel gene functions.

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How Might Sleep Apnea Lead to Serious Health Concerns like Cardiac and Cancer?

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

UPDATED on 7/23/2019

Israel-led research team develops AI-based model to detect sleep apnea | The Times of Israel

https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-led-research-team-develops-ai-based-model-to-detect-sleep-apnea/?utm_source=dlvr.it

 

What is the link between sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease and is the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by continuous positive airway pressure in patients (CPAP) with heart failure to improve left ventricular systolic function sufficient?  There are statistics incicating the benefit of CPAP and improvement of LVSF in those patients on CPAP with CHF.  But that observation does not get at why the patients benefit, or whether the OSA is sufficient.  Don’t expect a randomized clinical trial of any design to be brought to bear on the subject, considering the ethical issues involved.  We’ll return to that in a moment.
In a recent study researchers in Spain followed thousands of patients at sleep clinics and found that those with the most severe forms of sleep apnea had a 65 percent greater risk of developing cancer of any kind. The second study, of about 1,500 government workers in Wisconsin, showed that those with the most disordered sleep had five times the rate of dying from cancer as people without the sleep disorder (apnea not specified). Both research teams only looked at cancer diagnoses and outcomes in general.  If I lump the two studies, assuming that all patients with the most disordered sleep had OSA and were on CPAP, what does this tell us?  The heart and lung function together as a cardiopulmonary oxygenation unit!  A problem disrupting oxygenation, such as autonomically controlled sleep disruption or, oronasal obstruction (ASSOCIATED WITH SNORING), would be expected to have an effect on alertness during the day, predisposition to CHF from strain on the CP circulation as well as ventilatory impairment and peripheral oxygenation.  It appears that an association with ANY cancer, unspecified, is a long reach.
In both studies the researchers ruled out the possibility that the usual risk factors for cancer, like
  1. age
  2. smoking
  3. alcohol use
  4. physical activity
  5. weight
The association between cancer and disordered breathing at night remained
  • even after they adjusted for confounding variables.
This led to the conclusion that cancer might be linked to (intermittent) lack of oxygen supply interrupting aerobic cell activity over long periods of time.  The conclusion is drawn that from two associations
  • the research on positive outcome from CPAP in OSA and
  • a possible link between breathing and cardiac and cancer clearly
demonstrates the importance of regular breathing exercises (other wise known as ‘Pranayama’ in India) as part of our every day life.
This answers the first observation I posed. That is, the use of CPAP, while enormously important, is not sufficient.  Regular breathing exercises would seem to be helpful, although not a standard part of current treatment. This would be especially important if the movement of the abdominal muscles and diaphragm were synchronized with the expansion of the nthorax for maximum air flow.  This observation is familiar from working with a certified exercise physiologist.   The other part of this is an optimum time for walking and carrying out basic muscle and flexibility exercises several times a week, which has been shown repeatedly by studies on health benefits.
It is not my place to raise some questions about the way the studies were carried out.  The patients who have sleep apnea would be expected to have an increased body mass index (BMI), and while not sarcopenic, more likely to have excess body fat, abdominal distribution in males, and hip distribution in females, amd more importantly, unseen fat in the abdominal peritoneum.  This is related to type 2 diabetes with a metabolic syndrome, a separate indicator of CVD risk.   The metabolic syndrome involves TNF-alpha (once also known as cachexin), IL-1, IL-6, C-reactive protein, and in the case of fat signaling, adipokines, as well as insulin resistance and, as a result, some counter-regulatory secretion of glucocorticosteroids.  This metabolic picture would result in the following:
  1. impaired glucose utilization
  2. some excess and uncompensated gluconeogenesis
  3. the impaired lactate reentry at the end of glycolysis
  4. an effect on allosteric PFK
Features 1-4 look like what Warburg called a Pasteur Effect, not at the clellular level, but in the whole individual.   While obesity and type 2 diabetes are occuring in the young and adolescent population, the consequences might not be seen until years later.  The consequences could be in a middle aged person falling asleep at a meeting, or a series of automabile accidents related to falling asleep at the wheel.
At a time that clinical laboratory measurements are so accurate, and
  • the associations between type 2 diabetes,
  • measurement of wt/ht^2,
  • arm strength,
  • skin fold thickness,

are common measures of fitness, they don’t appear to have any place in these studies. If that is the case, then how is it possible to make sense of a relationship between SEVERITY of sleep disturbance and health outcome.

English: The Cycle of Obstructive Sleep Apnea ...

English: The Cycle of Obstructive Sleep Apnea – OSA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The graph shows the correlation betwe...

English: The graph shows the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat (%BF) for men in NCHS’ NHANES III 1994 data. The body fat percent shown uses the method from Romero-Corral et al. to convert NHANES BIA to %BF (June 2008). “Accuracy of body mass index in diagnosing obesity in the adult general population”. International Journal of Obesity 32 (6) : 959–956. DOI:10.1038/ijo.2008.11. PMID 18283284. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Body mass index, BMI, body size, body...

English: Body mass index, BMI, body size, body weight, mortality Italiano: indice di massa corporea, IMC, altezza corporea, peso corporeo, mortalità (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italiano: biometria, epidemiologia, rischio, p...

Italiano: biometria, epidemiologia, rischio, peso corporeo umano, mortalità, indice di massa corporea, IMC, body mass index, BMI, prospective studies collaboration (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Mitochondria: Origin from oxygen free environment, role in aerobic glycolysis, metabolic adaptation


 

English: A diagram of cellular respiration inc...

English: A diagram of cellular respiration including glycolysis, Krebs cycle, citric acid cycle, and the electron transport chain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Figure from Journal publication of sc...

English: Diagram showing regulation of the enz...

Reporter and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

Introduction

Mitochondria are essential for life, and are critical for the generation of ATP. Otto Warburg won the Nobel Prize in 1918 for his studies of respiration and he described a situation of impaired respiration in cancer cells causing them to produce lactic acid, like bacteria. This has been termed facultative anaerobic glycolysis. The metabolic explanation for mitochondrial respiration had to await the Nobel discoveries of the Krebs cycle and high energy ~P in acetyl CoA by Fritz Lippman. The Krebs cycle generates 16 ATPs I respiration compared to 2 ATPs through glycolysis. The discovery of the genetic code with the “Watson-Crick” model and the identification of DNA polymerase opened a window for contuing discovery leading to the human genome project at 20th century end that has now been followed by “ENCODE” in the 21st century. This review opens a rediscovery of the metabolic function of mitochondria and adaptive functions with respect to cancer and other diseases.

Function in aerobic and anaerobic metabolism

Two-carbon compounds – the TCA, the pentose phosphate pathway, together with gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle are essential for the provision of anabolic precursors. Yeast environmental diversity mostly leads to a vast metabolic complexity driven by carbon and the energy available in environmental habitats. This resulted in much early research on analysis of yeast metabolism associated with glucose catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Yeasts may be physiologically classified with respect to the type of energy-generating process involved in sugar metabolism, namely non-, facultative- or obligate fermentative. The nonfermentative yeasts have exclusively a respiratory metabolism and are not capable of alcoholic fermentation from glucose, while the obligate-fermentative yeasts – “natural respiratory mutants” – are only capable of metabolizing glucose through alcoholic fermentation. Most of the yeasts identified are facultative-fermentative ones, and depending on the growth conditions, the type and concentration of sugars and/or oxygen availability, may display either a fully respiratory or a fermentative metabolism or even both in a mixed respiratory-fermentative metabolism (e.g., S. cerevisiae). The sugar composition of the media and oxygen availability are the two main environmental conditions that have a strong impact on yeast metabolic physiology, and three frequently observed effects associated with the type of energy-generating processes involved in sugar metabolism and/or oxygen availability are Pasteur, Crabtree and Custer. In modern terms the Pasteur effect refers to an activation of anaerobic glycolysis in order to meet cellular ATP demands owing to the lower efficiency of ATP production by fermentation compared with respiration. In 1861 Pasteur observed that S. cerevisiae consume much more glucose in the absence of oxygen than in its presence. S. cerevisiae only shows a Pasteur at low growth rates and at resting-cell conditions, where a high contribution of respiration to sugar catabolism occurs owing to the loss of fermentative capacity. The Crabtree effect is defined as the occurrence of alcoholic fermentation under aerobic conditions, explained by a theory involving “limited respiratory capacities” in the branching point of pyruvate metabolism. The Custer effect is known as the inhibition of alcoholic fermentation by the absence of oxygen. It is thought that the Custer effect is caused by reductive stress.

Glycolysis

Once inside the cell, glucose is phosphorylated by kinases to glucose 6-phosphate and then isomerized to fructose 6-phosphate, by phosphoglucose isomerase. The next enzyme is phospho-fructokinase, which is subject to regulation by several metabolites, and further phosphorylates fructose 6-phosphate to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. These steps of glycolysis require energy in the form of ATP. Glycolysis leads to pyruvate formation associated with a net production of energy and reducing equivalents. Approximately 50% of glucose 6-phosphate is metabolized via glycolysis and 30% via the pentose phosphate pathway in Crabtree negative yeasts. However, about 90% of the carbon going through the pentose phosphate pathway reentered glycolysis at the level of fructose 6-phosphate or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The pentose phosphate pathway in Crabtree positive yeasts (S. cerevisiae) is predominantly used for NADPH production but not for biomass production or catabolic reactions.
Pyruvate branch point. At the pyruvate (the end product of glycolysis) branching point, pyruvate can follow three different metabolic fates depending on the yeast species and the environmental conditions. On the other hand, the carbon flux may be distributed between the respiratory and fermentative pathways. Pyruvate might be directly converted to acetyl–cofactor A (CoA) by the mitochondrial multienzyme complex pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) after its transport into the mitochondria by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier. Alternatively, pyruvate can also be converted to acetyl–CoA in the cytosol via acetaldehyde and to acetate by the so-called PDH-bypass pathway. Compared with cytosolic pyruvate decarboxylase, the mitochondrial PDH complex has a higher affinity for pyruvate and therefore most of the pyruvate will flow through the PDH complex at low glycolytic rates. However, at increasing glucose concentrations, the glycolytic rate will increase and more pyruvate is formed, saturating the PDH bypass and shifting the carbon flux through ethanol production. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, the external glucose level controls the switch between respiration and fermentation.

Rodrigues F, Ludovico P and Leão C. Sugar Metabolism in Yeasts: an Overview of Aerobic and Anaerobic Glucose Catabolism. In Molecular and Structural Biology. Chapter 6. qxd 07/23/05 P117
Eriksson P, Andre L, Ansell R, Blomberg A, Adler L (1995) Cloning and characterization of GPD2, a second gene encoding sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NAD+) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and its comparison with GPD1. Mol Microbiol 17:95–107.
Flikweert MT, van der Zanden L, Janssen WM, Steensma HY, van Dijken JP, Pronk JT (1996)Pyruvate decarboxylase: an indispensable enzyme for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose. Yeast 12:247–257.

Biogenesis of mitochondrial structures from aerobically grown S. cerevisiae

Under aerobic conditions S. cerevisiae forms mitochondria which are classical in their properties,
but the number, morphology, and enzyme activity of these mitochondria are also affected by catabolite repression, but it cannot respire under anaerobic conditions and lacks cytochromes. These structures were isolated from anaerobically grown yeast cells and contain malate and succinate dehydrogenases, ATPase, and DNA characteristic of yeast mitochondria. These lipid-complete structures consist predominantly of double-membrane vesicles enclosing a dense matrix which contains a folded inner membrane system bordering electron-transparent regions similar to the cristae of mitochondria.

  • The morphology of the structures is critically dependent on their lipid composition
  • Their unsaturated fatty acid content is similar to that of mitochondria from aerobically grown cells
  • The structures from cells grown without lipid supplements have simpler morphology – a dense granular matrix surrounded by a double membrane but have no obvious folded inner membrane system within the matrix
  • The lipid-depleted structures are only isolated in intact form from protoplasts
  • The synthesis of ergosterol and unsaturated fatty acids is oxygen-dependent and anaerobically grown cells may be depleted of these lipid components
  • The cytology of anaerobically grown yeast cells is profoundly affected by both lipid-depletion and catabolite repression
  • Lipid-depleted anaerobic cells, membranous mitochondrial profiles were not demonstrable
  • The structures from the aerobically and anaerobically grown cells are markedly different in morphology and fatty acid composition, but both contain mitochondrial DNA and a number of mitochondrial enzymes

The phospholipid composition of various strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wild type and petite (cytoplasmic respiratory deficient) yeasts and derived mitochondrial mutants grown under conditions designed to induce variations in the complement of mitochondrial were fractionated into various subcellular fractions and analyzed for cytochrome oxidase (in wild type) and phospholipid composition . 90% or more of the phospholipid, cardiolipin was found in the mitochondrial membranes of wild type and petite yeast . Cardiolipin content differed markedly under various growth conditions .

  • Stationary yeast grown in glucose had better developed mitochondria and more cardiolipin than repressed log phase yeast .
  • Aerobic yeast contained more cardiolipin than anaerobic yeast .
  • Respiration-deficient cytoplasmic mitochondrial mutants, both suppressive and neutral, contained less cardiolipin than corresponding wild types .
  • A chromosomal mutant lacking respiratory function had normal cardiolipin content .
  • Log phase cells grown in galactose and lactate, which do not readily repress the development of mitochondrial membranes, contained as much cardiolipin as stationary phase cells grown in glucose .
  • Cytoplasmic mitochondrial mutants respond to changes in the glucose concentration of the growth medium by variations in their cardiolipin content in the same way as wild type yeast does under similar growth conditions.
  • It is of interest that the chromosomal petite, which as far as can be ascertained has qualitatively normal mitochondrial DNA and a normal cardiolipin content when grown under maximally derepressed conditions .

Thus, the genetic defect in this case probably does not diminish the mass of inner mitochondrial membrane under appropriate conditions . This suggests the cardiolipin content of yeast is a good indicator of the state of development of mitochondrial membrane.
Jakovcic S, Getz Gs, Rabinowitz M, Jakob H, Swift H. Cardiolipin Content Of Wild Type and Mutant Yeasts in Relation to Mitochondrial Function and Development. JCB 1971. jcb.rupress.org
Jakovcic S, Haddock J, Getz GS, Rabinowitz M, Swift H. Biochem J. 1971; 121 :341 .
EPHRUSSI, B . 1953 . Nucleocytoplasmic Relations in Microorganisms . Clarendon Press, Oxford.

Mitochondria, hydrogenosomes and mitosomes

Before and after the publication of an unnoticed article in 1905 by Mereschkowsky there were many publications dealing with plant “chimera’s” and cytoplasmic inheritance in plants, which should have favoured the interpretation of plastids as “semi-autonomous” symbiotic entities in the cytoplasm of the eukaryotic plant cell. Twenty years after Mereschkowsky’s plea for an endosymbiotic origin of plastids, Wallin (1925, 1927) postulated the “bacterial nature of mitochondria”. And so it is one of the mysteries of the 20th century that an endosymbiotic origin of plastids had not been generally accepted before the 1970s, primarily because one cannot experience the consequences of mutations in the mitochondrial genome by naked eye.

  • Mitochondrial DNA is usually present in multiple copies in one and the same mitochondrion and those in the hundreds to thousands of mitochondria in a single cell are not necessarily identical.
  • The random partitioning of the mitochondria in mitosis (and meiosis) frequently results in a more or less biased distribution of the diverent mitochondria in the daughter cells, eventually causing diverent phenotypes in different tissues obscuring the maternal inheritance
  • It was not until the 1990s that certain diseases—which had been interpreted as being X-chromosomal with incomplete penetrance—eventually turned out to be

Lastly, the vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded in the nucleus and, consequently, mutations in the corresponding genes exhibit a Mendelian, and not a cytoplasmic, maternal inheritance
In the 1970s and 1980s the unequivocal demonstration of mitochondrial DNA occurred
and mitochondrial mutations at the DNA level provided the final proof for the role of such mutations in a wealth of hereditary diseases in man.

  • The genomics era provided the tools to prove the endosymbiont-hypothesis for the origin of the eukaryotic cell

Since DNA does not arise de novo, the genomes of organisms and organelles provide a historical record for the evolution of the eukaryotic cell and its organelles. The DNA sequences of two to three genomes of the eukaryotic cell turned out to be a record of the evolution of the eukaryotic life on earth. The analysis of organelle genomes unequivocally revealed a cyanobacterial origin for plastids and an -proteobacterial origin for mitochondria. Both plastids and mitochondria appear to be monophyletic, i.e. plastids derived from one and the same cyanobacterial ancestor, and mitochondria from one and the same -proteobacterial ancestor.
The evolution of the eukaryotic cell appears to have involved one (in the case of animals) or two (in the case of plants) events that took place 1.5 to 2 billion years ago. However, it appears that symbioses involving one or the other eubacterium arose repeatedly during the billions of years available. For example, photosynthetic algae by phagotrophic eukaryotes, negating the hypothesis of a single eukaryotic event, rather than stringent selection shaping the diversity of present-day life. Recent hypotheses for the origin of the nucleus have postulated that introns, which could be acquired by the uptake of the -proteobacterial endosymbiont, forced the nucleus-cytosol compartmentalization. Lateral gene transfer among eukaryotes is more frequent than was assumed earlier, and “mitochondrial genes” in the nuclear genomes of amitochondrial organisms are not necessarily the consequence of a transient presence of a DNA-containing mitochondrial-like organelle.
To cope with the obvious ubiquity of “mitochondrial” genes and the chimerism of the DNA of present day eukaryotes, the hydrogen hypothesis postulates that an archaeal host took up a eubacterial symbiont that became the ancestor of mitochondria and hydrogenosomes. The hydrogen hypothesis has the potential to explain both the monophyly of the mitochondria, and the existence of “anaerobic” and “aerobic” variants of one and the same original organelle. Based on these observations we have only the terms “mitochondrion”, “hydrogenosome” and “mitosome” to classify the various variants of the mitochondrial family.
Hackstein JHP, Joachim Tjaden J , Huynen M. Mitochondria, hydrogenosomes and mitosomes: products of evolutionary tinkering! Curr Genet (2006) 50:225–245. DOI 10.1007/s00294-006-0088-8.

Lineages

A look at the phylogenetic distribution of characterized anaerobic mitochondria among animal lineages shows that these are not clustered but spread across metazoan phylogeny. The biochemistry and the enzyme equipment used in the facultatively anaerobic mitochondria of metazoans is nearly identical across lineages, strongly indicating a common origin from an archaic metazoan ancestor. The organelles look like hydrogenosomes – anaerobic forms of mitochondria that generate H2 and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from pyruvateoxidation and which were previously found only in unicellular eukaryotes. The animals harbor structures resembling prokaryotic endosymbionts, reminiscent of the methanogenic endosymbionts found in some hydrogenosome-bearing protists; fluorescence of F420, a typical methanogen cofactor, or lack thereof, will bring more insights as to what these structures are. If we follow the anaerobic lifestyle further back into evolutionary history, beyond the origin of the metazoans, we see that the phylogenetic distribution of eukaryotes with facultative anaerobic mitochondria, eukaryotes with hydrogenosomes and eukaryotes that possess mitosomes (reduced forms of mitochondria with no direct role in ATP synthesis) the picture is similar to that seen for animals. In all six of the major lineages (or supergroups) of eukaryotes that are currently recognized, forms with anaerobic mitochondria have been found. The newest additions to the growing collection of anaerobic mitochondrial metabolisms are the denitrifying foraminiferans. A handful of about a dozen enzymes make the difference between a ‘normal’ O2-respiring mitochondrion found in mammals, and the energy metabolism of eukaryotes with anaerobic mitochondria, hydrogenosomes or mitosomes. Notably, the full complement of those enzymes, once thought to be specific to eukaryotic anaerobes, surprisingly turned up in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , which produces O2 in the light, has typical O2-respiring mitochondria but, within about 30 min of exposure to heterotrophic, anoxic and dark conditions, expresses its anaerobic biochemistry to make H2 in the same way as trichomonads, the group in which hydrogenosomes were discovered. Chlamydomonas provides evidence which indicates that the ability to inhabit oxygen-harbouring, as well as anoxic environments, is an ancestral feature of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. The prokaryote inhabitants have existed for well over a billion years, and have reached this new habitat by dispersal, not by adaptive evolution de novo and in situ. Indeed, geochemical evidence has shown that methanogenesis and sulphate reduction, and the niches in which they occur, are truly ancient.
Mentel and Martin. Anaerobic mitochondria: more common all the time. BMC Biology 2010; 8:32. BioMed Central Ltd. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/32.

Anaerobic mitochondrial enzymes

Mitochondria from the muscle of the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides var. suum function anaerobically in electron transport-associated phosphorylations under physiological conditions. These helminth organelles have been fractionated into inner and outer membrane, matrix, and inter-membrane space fractions. The distributions of enzyme systems were determined and compared with corresponding distributions reported in mammalian mitochondria. Succinate and pyruvate dehydrogenases as well as NADH oxidase, Mg++-dependent ATPase, adenylate kinase, citrate synthase, and cytochrome c reductases were determined to be distributed as in mammalian mitochondria. In contrast with the mammalian systems, fumarase and NAD-linked “malic” enzyme were isolated primarily from the intermembrane space fraction of the worm mitochondria. These enzymes are required for the anaerobic energy-generating system in Ascaris and would be expected to give rise to NADH in the intermembrane space.
Pyruvate kinase activity is barely detectable in Ascaris muscle. Therefore, rather than giving rise to cytoplasmic pyruvate, CO2 is fixed into phosphoenolpyruvate, resulting in the formation of oxalacetate which, in turn, is reduced by NADH to form malate regenerating glycolytic NAD . Ascaris muscle mitochondria utilize malate anaerobically as their major substrate by means of a dismutation reaction. The “malic” enzyme in the mitochondrion catalyzes theoxidation of malate to form pyruvate, CO2, and NADH. This reaction serves to generate intramitochondrial reducing power in the form of NADH. Concomitantly, fumarase catalyzes thedehydration of an equivalent amount of malate to form fumarate which, in turn, is reduced by an NADH-linked fumarate reductase to succinate. The flavin-linked fumarate reductase reaction results in a site I electron transport-associated phosphorylation of ADP, giving rise to ATP. This identifies a proton translocation system to obtain energy generation.
Rew RS, Saz HJ. Enzyme Localization in the Anaerobic Mitochondria Of Ascaris Lumbricoides. The Journal Of Cell Biology 1974; 63: 125-135. jcb.rupress.org

Mitochondrial redox status

Tumor cells are characterized by accelerated growth usually accompanied by up-regulated pathways that ultimately increase the rate of ATP production. These cells can suffer metabolic reprogramming, resulting in distinct bioenergetic phenotypes, generally enhancing glycolysis channeled to lactate production. These investigators showed metabolic reprogramming by means of inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDACis), sodium butyrate and trichostatin. This treatment was able to shift energy metabolism by activating mitochondrial systems such as the respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation that were largely repressed in the untreated controls.
Amoêdo ND, Rodrigues MF, Pezzuto P, Galina A, et al. Energy Metabolism in H460 Lung Cancer Cells: Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors. PLoS ONE 2011; 6(7): e22264. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0022264
Antioxidant pathways that rely on NADPH are needed for the reduction of glutathione and maintenance of proper redox status. The mitochondrial matrix protein isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) is a major source of NADPH. NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT3 is essential for the prevention of age related hearing loss of caloric restricted mice. Oxidative stress resistance by SIRT3 was mediated through IDH2. Inserting SIRT3 Nε-acetyl-lysine into position 413 of IDH2 and has an activity loss by as much as 44-fold. Deacetylation by SIRT3 fully restored maximum IDH2 activity. The ability of SIRT3 to protect cells from oxidative stress was dependent on IDH2, and the deacetylated mimic, IDH2K413R variant was able to protect Sirt3-/- MEFs from oxidative stress through increased reduced glutathione levels. The increased SIRT3 expression protects cells from oxidative stress through IDH2 activation. Together these results uncover a previously unknown mechanism by which SIRT3 regulates IDH2 under dietary restriction. Recent findings demonstrate that IDH2 activities are a major factor in cancer, and as such, these results implicate SIRT3 as a potential regulator of IDH2-dependent functions in cancer cell metabolism.
Wei Yu, Dittenhafer-Reed KE and JM Denu. SIRT3 Deacetylates Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and Regulates Mitochondrial Redox Status. JBC Papers in Press. Published on March 13, 2012 as Manuscript M112.355206. http://www.jbc.org
Computationally designed drug small molecules targeted for metabolic processes: a bridge from the genome to repair of dysmetabolism
New druglike small molecules with possible anticancer applications were computationally designed. The molecules formed stable complexes with antiapoptotic BCL-2, BCL-W, and BFL-1 proteins. These findings are novel because, to the best of the author’s knowledge, molecules that bind all three of these proteins are not known. A drug based on them should be more economical and better tolerated by patients than a combination of drugs, each targeting a single protein. The calculated drug-related properties of the molecules were similar to those found in most commercial drugs. The molecules were designed and evaluated following a simple, yet effective procedure. The procedure can be used efficiently in the early phases of drug discovery to evaluate promising lead compounds in time- and cost-effective ways.
Keywords: small molecule mimetics, antiapoptotic proteins, computational drug design.

Tardigrades

Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant.
Keywords: RNA, expressed sequence tag, cluster, protein family, adaptation, tardigrada, transcriptome

Epicrisis

This discussion has disparate pieces that are tied together by dysfunctional changes that are

  • adaptations from metabolic process in the channeling of energy dependent of mitochondrial enzymes in interaction with three to 6 carbon carbohydrates, high energy phosphate, oxygen and membrane lipid structures, as well as
  • proteins rich or poor in sulfur linked with genome specific targets, and semisynthetic modifications, oxidative stress
  • leading to a new approach to pharmaceutical targeted drug design.

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Nitric Oxide has a Ubiquitous Role in the Regulation of Glycolysis – with a Concomitant Influence on Mitochondrial Function

 

Reporter, Editor, and Topic Co-Leader: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FACP, Clinical Pathologist and Biochemist

 

 

Apoptosis signaling pathways

Apoptosis signaling pathways (Photo credit: AJC1)

This discussion is a followup on a series of articles elucidating the importance of NO, eNOS, iNOS, cardiovascular and vascular endothelium effects, and therapeutic targets.

This mechanism of action and signaling actions have been introduced so that we identify endocrine, paracrine, and such effects in the normal, stressed, and dysfunctional state. The size and breadth of this vital adaptive process is now further explored.

The title is short, befitting a subtitle.  The full topic may be considered “Nitric Oxide has a ubiquitous role in the regulation of glycolysis -with a concomitant influence on mitochondrial function that is active in endothelium, platelets, vascular smooth muscle and neural cells and the balance has a role in chronic inflammation, asthma, hypertension, sepsis and cancer”.

Vascular endothelium

Vascular endothelium (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Nitric Oxide Synthase

Nitric Oxide Synthase (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Nitric Oxide has a ubiquitous role in the regulation of glycolysis with a concomitant influence on mitochondrial function that is active in endothelium, platelets, vascular smooth muscle and neural cells and the balance has a role in chronic inflammation, asthma, hypertension, sepsis and cancer.

Uncoupling of aerobic glycolysis
Potential cytotoxic mediators of endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis include increased formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROSRNS) during the atherosclerotic process. Nitric oxide (NO) has a biphasic action on oxidative cell killing with low concentrations protecting against cell death, whereas higher concentrations are cytotoxic. High levels of NO can be produced by inducible nitric-oxide synthase in response to cytokine stimulation, primarily from macrophages, and elevated levels of NO is injurious to endothelium.Ccytochrome c release and caspase activation are involved in NO induced apoptosis. ROS also induces mitochondrial DNA damage in ECs, and this damage is accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) transcripts, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and cellular ATP levels. Mitochondria have been recognized to play a pivotal role in the signaling cascade of apoptosis leading to atherosclerosis-induced damage in endothelial cells.
The processes involved in the signaling pathways leading to apoptosis are complex but have some degree of convergence between cell types including those in the vasculature. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is a proapoptotic signal, which activates several downstream signaling events including formation of the apoptosome and activation of caspases. Ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase (complex III) is a site for ROS formation, and cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) is a target for the interaction of NO in mitochondria.
The impact of the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis is particularly important in NO-dependent cytotoxicity, and depends also on other factors such as glycolysis. These authors examined whether the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis by chloramphenicol increases the susceptibility of endothelial cells to undergo NO-dependent apoptosis in glucose-free media. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were treated with chloramphenicol, which resulted in a decreased ratio of mitochondrial complex IV to cytochrome c and increased oxidant production in the cell. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis was associated with a greater susceptibility of the cells to apoptosis induced by NO in glucose-free medium.
Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in increased endothelial cell susceptibility to nitric oxide-induced apoptosis. A Ramachandran, DR Moellering, E Ceaser, S Shiva, J Xu, and V Darley-Usmar. PNAS May 14, 2002: 99(10): 6643–6648 http://www.pnas.orgcgidoi10.1073pnas.102019899

Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule whose physiological roles mediated through the activation of the soluble guanylate cyclase are now clearly recognized. At physiological concentrations, NO also inhibits the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) in competition with oxygen, and recently we have suggested that the interplay between the two gases allows this enzyme to act as an oxygen sensor in cells. In addition, NO plays a variety of patho-physiological roles, some of which also may be the consequence of its action at a mitochondrial level. We have characterized the sequence of events that follow inhibition of complex IV by continuous exposure to NO.
The mitochondrion is a key organelle in the control of cell death. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits complex IV in the respiratory chain and is reported to possess both proapoptotic and antiapoptotic actions. We investigated the effects of continuous inhibition of respiration by NO on mitochondrial energy status and cell viability. Serum-deprived human T cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells were exposed to NO at a concentration that caused continuous and complete (;85%) inhibition of respiration. Serum deprivation caused progressive loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Dcm) and apoptotic cell death. In the presence of NO, Dcm was maintained compared to controls, and cells were protected from apoptosis. Similar results were obtained by using staurosporin as the apoptotic stimulus. As exposure of serum-deprived cells to NO progressed (>5 h), however, Dcm fell, correlating with the appearance of early apoptotic features and a decrease in cell viability. Glucose deprivation or iodoacetate treatment of cells in the presence of NO resulted in a collapse of Dcm, demonstrating involvement of glycolytic ATP in its maintenance. Under these conditions cell viability also was decreased. Treatment with oligomycin and or bongkrekic acid indicated that the maintenance of Dcm during exposure to NO is caused by reversal of the ATP synthase and other electrogenic pumps. Thus, blockade of complex IV by NO initiates a protective action in the mitochondrion to maintain Dcm; this results in prevention of apoptosis. It is likely that during cellular stress involving increased generation of NO this compound will trigger a similar sequence of events, depending on its concentration and duration of release. (mitochondrial membrane potential ; apoptosis ; necrosis)

The effect of nitric oxide on cell respiration: A key to understanding its role in cell survival or death. B Beltra, A Mathur, MR Duchen, JD. Erusalimsky, and S Moncada. PNAS Dec 19, 2000; 97(26):4602–14607.

Another study by this group shows that inhibition of respiration by exogenous nitric oxide (NO) in Jurkat cells leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization dependent on the utilization of glycolytic ATP by the F1Fo-ATPase and other transporters acting in reverse mode. This process also occurs in astrocytes, which are highly glycolytic cells, but not in neurons , which do not invoke glycolysis to maintain ATP concentrations. In addition, this hyperpolarization correlates with protection against apoptotic cell death. Others found an early phase of mitochondrial hyperpolarization after treatment of a variety of cells with different pro-apoptotic stimuli, which precedes the generation of free. At present, no satisfactory explanation has been proposed to explain the mechanism of hyperpolarization, the reasons why free radicals are released from the mitochondrion, or the connection of these phenomena with apoptosis.
The authors surmise that a pro-apoptotic stimulus, anti-Fas Ab, leads to release of endogenous NO from Jurkat cells in sufficient amounts to inhibit cell respiration and cause a hyperpolarization dependent on the reversal of the F1Fo-ATPase. Moreover, the reduction of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, after inhibition of cytochrome oxidase by NO, leads to generation of superoxide anion (O2). They suggest the process is a cellular defense response that may be overcome by pro-apoptotic mechanisms that occur in parallel.

Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by endogenous nitric oxide: A critical step in Fas signaling. B Beltran, M Quintero, E Garcıa-Zaragoza, E O’Connor, JV. Esplugues, and Salvador Moncada. PNAS June 25, 2002 99(13): 8892–8897. http://www.pnas.orgcgidoi10.1073pnas.092259799

Nitric oxide has been shown to render cells resistant to oxidative stress. Mechanisms proposed for the ability of nitric oxide to protect cells against oxidative stress include reactions of nitric oxide and the induction of adaptive responses that require protein synthesis. Nitric oxide forms iron complexes preventing the formation of strong oxidants. In addition, reactions of nitric oxide with lipid and or organic radicals protect against membrane peroxidation and peroxidative chemistry-induced cell injury. Exposure to low, nonlethal doses of nitric oxide induces adaptive responses that render cells resistant to lethal concentrations of nitric oxide and or peroxides, such as, the induction of hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and Mn superoxide dismutase. The up-regulation of HO-1 was accompanied by an increase in ferritin to account for the release of iron from HO-1, indicating a role of both iron heme and nonheme iron for peroxide-mediated cellular injury. Further, nitric oxide, by regulating critical mitochondrial functions such as respiration, membrane potential, and release of cytochrome c, is able to trigger defense mechanisms against cell death induced by pro-apoptotic stimuli.
This study investigates the potential contribution of nitric oxide’s ability to protect cells from oxidative stress, low steady state levels of nitric oxide generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the mechanisms of protection against H2O2. Spontaneously transformed human ECV304 cells, which normally do not express eNOS, were stably transfected with a green fluorescent-tagged eNOS cDNA. The eNOS-transfected cells were found to be resistant to injury and delayed death following a 2-h exposure to H2O2 (50–150 mM). Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis abolished the protective effect against H2O2 exposure. The ability of nitric oxide to protect cells depended on the presence of respiring mitochondria. ECV3041 eNOS cells with diminished mitochondria respiration are injured to the same extent as non-transfected ECV304 cells, and recovery of mitochondrial respiration restores the ability of nitric oxide to protect against H2O2-induced death. Nitric oxide had a profound effect in cell metabolism, because ECV3041eNOS cells had lower steady state levels of ATP and higher utilization of glucose via the glycolytic pathway than ECV304 cells. However, the protective effect of nitric oxide against H2O2 exposure is not reproduced in ECV304 cells after treatment with azide and oligomycin suggesting that the dynamic regulation of respiration by nitric oxide represent a critical and unrecognized primary line of defense against oxidative stress.

Dynamic regulation of metabolism and respiration by endogenously produced nitric oxide protects against oxidative stress. E Paxinou, M Weisse, Q Chen, JM Souza, et al. PNAS Sept 25, 2001; 98( 20): 11575–11580. http://www.pnas.orgycgiydoiy10.1073ypnas.201293198.

Nitric oxide (NO) mediates a variety of biological effects including relaxation of blood vessels, cytotoxicity of activated macrophages, and formation of cGMP by activation of glutamate receptors of neurons. NO has also been implicated for such pathophysiological conditions as destruction of tumor cells by macrophages, rheumatoid arthritis, and focal brain ischemia. Some of these effects of NO are associated with hypoxic conditions. O2 radicals and ions that result from reactivity of NO are presumed to be involved in NO cytotoxicity. These investigators report that adaptive cellular response controlled by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia is suppressed by NO. Induction of erythropoietin and glycolytic aldolase A mRNAs in hypoxically cultured Hep3B cells, a human hepatoma cell line, was completely and partially inhibited, respectively, by the addition of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), which spontaneously releases NO. A reporter plasmid carrying four hypoxia-response element sequences connected to the luciferase structural gene was constructed and transfected into Hep3B cells. Inducibly expressed luciferase activity in hypoxia was inhibited by the addition of SNP and two other structurally different NO donors, S-nitroso-Lglutathione and 3-morpholinosydnonimine, giving IC50 values of 7.8, 211, and 490 mM, respectively. Inhibition by SNP was also observed in Neuro 2A and HeLa cells, indicating that the inhibition was not cell-type-specific. The vascular endothelial growth factor promoter activity that is controlled by HIF-1 was also inhibited by SNP (IC50 5 6.6 mM). Induction generated by the addition of cobalt ion (this treatment mimics hypoxia) was also inhibited by SNP (IC50 5 2.5 mM). Increased luciferase activity expressed by cotransfection of effector plasmids for HIF-1a or HIF-1a-like factor in hypoxia was also inhibited by the NO donor. We also showed that the inhibition was performed by blocking an activation step of HIF-1a to a DNA-binding form.
Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 activity by nitric oxide donors in hypoxia. K Sogawa, K Numayama-Tsuruta, M Ema, M Abe, et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (Biochemistry) June 1998; 95:7368–7373. 1998. The National Academy of Sciences 0027-8424.98.957368-6. http:yywww.pnas.org.

The role of nitrogen metabolism in the survival of prolonged periods of waterlogging was investigated in highly flood-tolerant, nodulated Lotus japonicus plants. Alanine production revealed to be a critical hypoxic pathway. Alanine is the only amino acid whose biosynthesis is not inhibited by nitrogen deficiency resulting from RNA interference silencing of nodular leghemoglobin. The metabolic changes that were induced following waterlogging can be best explained by the activation of alanine metabolism in combination with the modular operation of a split tricarboxylic acid pathway. The sum result of this metabolic scenario is the accumulation of alanine and succinate and the production of extra ATP under hypoxia. The importance of alanine metabolism is discussed with respect to its ability to regulate the level of pyruvate, and this and all other changes are discussed in the context of current models concerning the regulation of plant metabolism.
Glycolysis and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Are Linked by Alanine Aminotransferase during Hypoxia Induced by Waterlogging of Lotus japonicus[W][OA]. M Rocha, F Licausi, WL Arau´ jo, A Nunes-Nesi, et al. Plant Physiology Mar 2010; 152: 1501–1513. http://www.plantphysiol.org 2010 Amer Soc Plant Biologists

DNA damage occurs in ischemia, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and other disorders that affect the central nervous system (CNS). Extensive DNA damage triggers cell death and in the mature CNS, this occurs primarily through activation of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cell death pathway. PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear enzyme that, when activated by DNA damage, consumes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)+ to form poly(ADP-ribose) on acceptor proteins. The PARP-1 activation leads to cell death. We used mouse astrocyte cultures to explore the bioenergetic effects of NAD+ depletion by PARP-1 and the role of NAD+ depletion in this cell death program. PARP-1 activation led to a rapid but incomplete depletion of astrocyte NAD+, a near-complete block in glycolysis, and eventual cell death. Repletion of intracellular NAD restored glycolytic function and prevented cell death. The addition of non-glucose substrates to the medium, pyruvate, glutamate, or glutamine, also prevented astrocyte death after PARP-1 activation.
These findings suggest a sequence of events in which NAD+ depletion is a key event linking DNA damage to metabolic impairment and cell deathm. A similar scenario has been proposed by Zong et al. (2004), based on the finding that cell types that depend on aerobic glycolysis for ATP production exhibit a particularly high sensitivity to DNA damage and PARP-1 activation. In mature brain, glucose is normally the dominant metabolic substrate due to relatively slow transport of other metabolites across the blood– brain barrier. Oncein brain, glucose may be metabolized directly by neurons and glia or may be metabolized to lactate in glia and thelactate subsequently shuttled to neurons for oxidative metabolism (Dringen et al., 1993; Pellerin and Magistretti,1994; Wender et al., 2000; Dienel and Cruz, 2004). In either case, a block in glycolytic flux produced by NAD depletion will block energy metabolism in both neurons and glia in brain. Interestingly, the lactate shuttle hypothesis raises the possibility that activation of PARP-1 selectively in astroglia might also block energy metabolism in neurons.

These studies suggest PARP-1 activation leads to rapid depletion of the cytosolic but not the mitochondrial NAD+ pool. Depletion of the cytosolic NAD+ pool renders the cells unable to utilize glucose as a metabolic substrate. Under conditions where glucose is the only available metabolic substrate, this leads to cell death. This cell death pathway is particularly germane to brain because glucose is normally the only metabolic substrate that is transported rapidly across the blood–brain barrier. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Key words: mitochondria; permeability transition; poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; ischemia; peroxynitrite
NAD+as a metabolic link between DNA damage and cell death. DNA damage induced by alkylating agents, oxidative stress, or other agents causes PARP-1 activation. PARP-1 activation leads to depletion in cytosolic NAD with, initially, a relative preservation of mitochondrial NAD and mitochondrial function. The depletion in cytosolic NAD+ blocks glycolysis, and in cells in which glucose is the primary energy substrate, this in turn leads to a block in substrate flux to mitochondria. The resulting mitochondrial dysfunction leads to mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and subsequent downstream events culminating in cell death.
NAD+ as a Metabolic Link Between DNA Damage and Cell Death. W Ying, CC Alano, P Garnier, and RA Swanson. Journal of Neuroscience Research 2005;79:216–223
Key words: glycolysis, mitochondrial energy production, nitric oxide
Abbreviations: NO, nitric oxide; SNAP, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicyllamine; SNP, sodium nitroprusside.
The results indicate that: 1) in porcine platelets NO is able to diminish mitochondrial energy production through the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, 2) the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet secretion (but not aggregation) can be attributed to the reduction of mitochondrial energy production.
Nitric oxide (NO) has been increasingly recognized as an important intra- and intercellular messenger molecule with a physiological role in vascular relaxation, platelet physiology, neurotransmission and immune responses (Moncada et al., 1991; Radomski et al., 1996; Szabó, 1996; Riedel et al., 1999; Titheradge 1999). In vitro NO is a strong inhibitor of platelet adhesion and aggregation (Radomski et al., 1996; Riedel et al., 1999;nSogo et al., 2000). In the blood stream, platelets remain in contact with NO that is permanently released from the endothelial cells and from activated macrophages (Moncada et al., 1991; Riedel et al., 1999; Titheradge 1999). It has been suggested that the activated platelet itself is able to produce NO (Lantoine et al., 1995; Zhou et al., 1995; Radomski et al., 1996). The mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet responses is not entirely clear. It is believed that the main intracellular target for NO in platelets is soluble cytosolic guanylate cyclase (Waldman & Walter 1989; Schmidt et al., 1993; Wang et al., 1998). NO activates the enzyme (Schmidt et al., 1993). Thus, elevated intracellular cGMP level inhibits platelet activation. There are suggestions, however, that elevated cGMP may not be the only intracellular factor directly involved in the inhibition of platelet activation (Gordge et al., 1998; Sogo et al., 2000; Beghetti et al., 2003).
Platelets are fairly active metabolically and have a total ATP turnover rate of about 3–8 times that of resting mammalian muscle (Akkerman, 1978; Akkerman et al., 1978; Holmsen, 1981; Niu et al., 1996). Platelets contain mitochondria which enable these cells to produce energy both in the oxidative and anaerobic way (Holmsen, 1981). Under aerobic conditions, ATP is produced by aerobic glycolysis using glucose or glycogen which can account for 30–50% of total ATP production, and by oxidative metabolism using glucose and glycogen (6–11%), amino-acids (7%) or free fatty acids (20–40%) (Holmsen 1981; Guppy et al., 1990; Niu et al., 1996).
The inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by removing oxygen or by respiratory chain blockers (antimycin A, cyanide, rotenone) results in the stimulation of glycolytic flux (Guppy et al., 1990). This phenomenon is known as Pasteur effect and indicates that in platelets glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration are tightly functionally connected (Akkerman, 1978; Holmsen, 1981; Guppy et al., 1995; Niu et al., 1996). It has been reported that the activation of human platelets by high concentration of thrombin is accompanied by an acceleration of lactate production and an increase in oxygen consumption (Akkerman & Holmsen, 1981; Niu et al., 1996).
The results presented here suggest that also porcine blood platelets stimulated by collagen produce more lactate. This indicates that both glycolytic and oxidativeATP production supports platelet responses. This also indicates that blocking of energy production in platelets may decrease their responses. It is well established that platelet responses have different metabolic energy (ATP) requirements increasing in the order: aggregation< dense and alfa granule secretion < acid hydrolase secretion (Holmsen et al., 1982; Verhoeven et al., 1984; Morimoto & Ogihara, 1996).
The present results indicate that exogenously added NO (in the form of NO donors)stimulates glycolysis in intact porcine platelets. Since in platelets glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration are tightly functionally connected, this can be interpreted to mean that the stimulatory effectof NO on glycolysis in intact platelets may be produced by non-functional mitochondria.This can be really the case since NO donors are able to inhibit both mitochondrial respiration and platelet cytochrome oxidase. Interestingly, the concentrations of NO donors inhibiting mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome oxidase were similar to those stimulating glycolysis in intact platelets.
Studies performed on intact J774 cells have shown that mitochondrial complex I is inhibited only after a prolonged (6–18 h) exposure to NO and that this inhibition appears to result from S-nitrosylation of critical thiols in the enzyme complex (Clementi et al., 1998). Further studies are needed to establish whether long term exposure of platelets to NO affects Mitochondrial complexes I and II.
Comparison of the concentrations of SNP and SNAP affecting cytochrome oxidase activityand mitochondrial respiration with those reducing the platelet responses indicates that NO cannot significantly reduce platelet aggregation through the inhibition of oxidative energy production. By contrast, the concentrations of the NO donors inhibiting platelet secretion, mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome oxidase were similar. This and the fact that the platelet release reaction strongly depends on the oxidative energy production may suggest that in porcine platelets NO can affect platelet secretion through the inhibition of mitochondrial energy production at the step of cytochrome oxidase.

Taking into account that platelets may contain NO synthase and are able to produce significant amounts of NO (Berkels et al., 1997)it seems possible that nitric oxide can function in these cells as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial energy production.
Nitric oxide and platelet energy metabolism. M Tomasiak, H Stelmach, T Rusak and J Wysocka. Acta Biochimica Polonica 2004; 51(3):789–803

These authors previously investigated the bioenergetic consequences of activating J774.A1 macrophages (MФ) with interferon (IFN)γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and found that there is a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mitochondrial impairment and stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which synergize to activate glycolysis and generate large
quantities of ATP. We now demonstrate, using TMRM fluorescence and time-lapse confocal microscopy, that these cells maintain a high mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) despite the complete inhibition of respiration. The maintenance of high ΔΨm is due to the utilization of a significant proportion of glycolytically generated ATP as a defence mechanism against cell death. This is achieved by the reverse functioning of FoF1-ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT). Treatment of activated MФ with inhibitors of either of these enzymes, but not with inhibitors of the respiratory chain complexes I to IV, led to a collapse in ΔΨm and to an immediate increase in intracellular [ATP], due to the prevention of ATP hydrolysis by the FoF1-ATP synthase. This collapse in ΔΨm was followed by translocation of Bax from cytosol to the mitochondria, release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, activation of caspase 3 and 9 and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Our results indicate that during inflammatory activation “glycolytically competent cells” such as MФ utilize significant amounts of the glycolytically-generated ATP to maintain ΔΨm and thereby prevent apoptosis.

Activated macrophages utilize glycolytic ATP to maintain mitochondrial membranepotential and prevent apoptotic cell death. A Garedew, SO Henderson, S Moncada. Cell Death and Differentiation. 2010. DOI : 10.1038/cdd.2010.27
The effects of the sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide (NO) donor clinically used in the treatment of hypertensive emergencies on the energy production of rat reticulocytes were investigated. Rat reticulocyte-rich red blood cell suspensions were aerobically incubated without (control) or in the presence of different concentrations of SNP (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 mM). SNP decreased total and coupled, but increased uncoupled oxygen consumption. This was accompanied by the stimulation of glycolysis, as measured by increased glucose consumption and lactate accumulation. Levels of all glycolytic intermediates indicate stimulation of hexokinase-phosphofructo kinase (HK-PFK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) and pyruvate kinase (PK) activities in the presence of SNP. Due to the decrease of coupled oxygen consumption in the presence of SNP, ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation was significantly diminished. Simultaneous increase of glycolytic ATP production was not enough to provide constant ATP production. In addition, SNP significantly decreased ATP level, which was accompanied with increased ADP and AMP levels. However, the level of total adenine nucleotides was significantly lower, which was the consequence of increased catabolism of adenine nucleotides (increased hypoxanthine level). ATP/ADP ratio and adenylate energy charge level were significantly decreased. In conclusion, SNP induced inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, stimulation of glycolysis, but depletion of total energy production in rat reticulocytes. These alterations were accompanied with instability of energy status.

Effects of Exogenous Donor of Nitric Oxide – Sodium Nitroprusside on Energy Production of Rat Reticulocytes. SD MALETIĆ, L M DRAGIĆEVIĆ-DJOKOVIĆ, BI OGNJANOVIĆ, RV ŽIKIĆ, AŠ ŠTAJN, MB SPASIĆ.
Physiol. Res. 2004;53: 439-447.

Key points to take from this:
1. The role of NO in regulating cellular death is in many organs and central to this function is the stabilization of mitochondria through sufficient levels of NO. High levels of eNO leads to mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the dependence of ATP generated from glycolysis.
2. This is accompanied by inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and stimulation of glycolysis, which brings the discussion to a different domain – cancer growth and Warburgh Effect.
3. This is accompanied by PPAR activation, cytoplasmic NAD+ depletion, and inhibition of glycolysis (critical in cells dependent on aerobic glycolysis), depletion of total energy production, and apoptosis.
4. Maintenance of high glycolytic generation of ATP is essential for cellular defense, but the oxygen consumption is uncoupled.
5. NO donors inhibiting mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome oxidase are similar to those stimulating glycolysis

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