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Posts Tagged ‘Infectious disease’


The Journey of Antibiotic Discovery

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

The term ‘antibiotic’ was introduced by Selman Waksman as any small molecule, produced by a microbe, with antagonistic properties on the growth of other microbes. An antibiotic interferes with bacterial survival via a specific mode of action but more importantly, at therapeutic concentrations, it is sufficiently potent to be effective against infection and simultaneously presents minimal toxicity. Infectious diseases have been a challenge throughout the ages. From 1347 to 1350, approximately one-third of Europe’s population perished to Bubonic plague. Advances in sanitary and hygienic conditions sufficed to control further plague outbreaks. However, these persisted as a recurrent public health issue. Likewise, infectious diseases in general remained the leading cause of death up to the early 1900s. The mortality rate shrunk after the commercialization of antibiotics, which given their impact on the fate of mankind, were regarded as a ‘medical miracle’. Moreover, the non-therapeutic application of antibiotics has also greatly affected humanity, for instance those used as livestock growth promoters to increase food production after World War II.

 

Currently, more than 2 million North Americans acquire infections associated with antibiotic resistance every year, resulting in 23,000 deaths. In Europe, nearly 700 thousand cases of antibiotic-resistant infections directly develop into over 33,000 deaths yearly, with an estimated cost over €1.5 billion. Despite a 36% increase in human use of antibiotics from 2000 to 2010, approximately 20% of deaths worldwide are related to infectious diseases today. Future perspectives are no brighter, for instance, a government commissioned study in the United Kingdom estimated 10 million deaths per year from antibiotic resistant infections by 2050.

 

The increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, alongside the alarmingly low rate of newly approved antibiotics for clinical usage, we are on the verge of not having effective treatments for many common infectious diseases. Historically, antibiotic discovery has been crucial in outpacing resistance and success is closely related to systematic procedures – platforms – that have catalyzed the antibiotic golden age, namely the Waksman platform, followed by the platforms of semi-synthesis and fully synthetic antibiotics. Said platforms resulted in the major antibiotic classes: aminoglycosides, amphenicols, ansamycins, beta-lactams, lipopeptides, diaminopyrimidines, fosfomycins, imidazoles, macrolides, oxazolidinones, streptogramins, polymyxins, sulphonamides, glycopeptides, quinolones and tetracyclines.

 

The increase in drug-resistant pathogens is a consequence of multiple factors, including but not limited to high rates of antimicrobial prescriptions, antibiotic mismanagement in the form of self-medication or interruption of therapy, and large-scale antibiotic use as growth promotors in livestock farming. For example, 60% of the antibiotics sold to the USA food industry are also used as therapeutics in humans. To further complicate matters, it is estimated that $200 million is required for a molecule to reach commercialization, with the risk of antimicrobial resistance rapidly developing, crippling its clinical application, or on the opposing end, a new antibiotic might be so effective it is only used as a last resort therapeutic, thus not widely commercialized.

 

Besides a more efficient management of antibiotic use, there is a pressing need for new platforms capable of consistently and efficiently delivering new lead substances, which should attend their precursors impressively low rates of success, in today’s increasing drug resistance scenario. Antibiotic Discovery Platforms are aiming to screen large libraries, for instance the reservoir of untapped natural products, which is likely the next antibiotic ‘gold mine’. There is a void between phenotanypic screening (high-throughput) and omics-centered assays (high-information), where some mechanistic and molecular information complements antimicrobial activity, without the laborious and extensive application of various omics assays. The increasing need for antibiotics drives the relentless and continuous research on the foreground of antibiotic discovery. This is likely to expand our knowledge on the biological events underlying infectious diseases and, hopefully, result in better therapeutics that can swing the war on infectious diseases back in our favor.

 

During the genomics era came the target-based platform, mostly considered a failure due to limitations in translating drugs to the clinic. Therefore, cell-based platforms were re-instituted, and are still of the utmost importance in the fight against infectious diseases. Although the antibiotic pipeline is still lackluster, especially of new classes and novel mechanisms of action, in the post-genomic era, there is an increasingly large set of information available on microbial metabolism. The translation of such knowledge into novel platforms will hopefully result in the discovery of new and better therapeutics, which can sway the war on infectious diseases back in our favor.

 

References:

 

https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6382/8/2/45/htm

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19515346

 

https://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(11)00184-2/fulltext

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21700626

 

http://www.med.or.jp/english/journal/pdf/2009_02/103_108.pdf

 

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Reducing the Burden of Tuberculosis Treatment

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Tuberculosis is one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases, which requires six-month course of daily antibiotics. To help overcome that, a team of researchers led by MIT has devised a new way to deliver antibiotics, which they hope will make it easier to cure more patients and reduce health care costs. In their approach a coiled wire loaded with antibiotics is inserted into the patient’s stomach through a nasogastric tube. Once in the stomach, the device slowly releases antibiotics over one month, eliminating the need for patients to take pills every day.

The device is a thin, elastic wire made of nitinol that can change its shape based on temperature. The researchers can string up to 600 “pills” of various antibiotics along the wire, and the drugs are packaged in polymers whose composition can be adjusted to control the rate of drug release once the device go in the stomach. The wire is distributed to the patient’s stomach via a tube inserted through the nose, which is used regularly in hospitals for delivering medications and nutrients. When the wire reaches the higher temperatures of the stomach, it forms a coil, which stops it from passing further through the digestive system. The researchers then tested the device in pigs and found that this device could release different antibiotics at a constant rate for 28 days. Once all of the drugs are delivered, the device is recovered through the nasogastric tube using a magnet that can attract the coil.

Giovanni Traverso and Robert Langer have been working on a variety of pills and capsules that can remain in the stomach and slowly release medication after being swallowed. This type of drug delivery, can expand treatment to several chronic diseases that require daily doses of medication. One capsule that shows promise appears to be for delivering small amounts of drugs to treat HIV and malaria. After being swallowed, the capsule’s outer coating disintegrates, allowing six arms to expand, helping the device to lodge in the stomach. This device can carry about 300 milligrams of drugs which is enough for a week’s worth of HIV treatment but it falls short of the payload of 3 grams of antibiotics every day needed to treat tuberculosis.

The researchers in addition to David Collins, an economist analyzed the potential economic impact of this type of treatment. He determined that if  the treatment is applied in India, costs could be reduced by about $8,000 per patient. I think that such an approach can be helpful for longer regimens required for the treatment of extensively drug-resistant TB and even hepatitis C and this approach can be an vital milestone toward addressing this problem.

 SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2019/stomach-device-antibiotics-tuberculosis-0313?utm_source=&utm_medium=&utm_campaign=&hootPostID=a4ebcfad3e9982776b3c1883db19141c

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The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on Vaccines and Philimmune, LLC

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D

I am intending to do a series of posts highlighting interviews with Philadelphia area biotech startup CEO’s and show how a vibrant biotech startup scene is evolving in the city as well as the Delaware Valley area. Philadelphia has been home to some of the nation’s oldest biotechs including Cephalon, Centocor, hundreds of spinouts from a multitude of universities as well as home of the first cloned animal (a frog), the first transgenic mouse, and Nobel laureates in the field of molecular biology and genetics. Although some recent disheartening news about the fall in rankings of Philadelphia as a biotech hub and recent remarks by CEO’s of former area companies has dominated the news, biotech incubators like the University City Science Center and Bucks County Biotechnology Center as well as a reinvigorated investment community (like PCCI and MABA) are bringing Philadelphia back. And although much work is needed to bring the Philadelphia area back to its former glory days (including political will at the state level) there are many bright spots such as the innovative young companies as outlined in these posts.

First up I got to talk with Florian Schodel, M.D., Ph.D., CEO of Philimmune, which provides expertise in medicine, clinical and regulatory development and analytical sciences to support successful development and registration of vaccines and biologics. Before founding Philimmune, Dr. Schodel was VP in Vaccines Clinical Research of Merck Research Laboratories and has led EU vaccine clinical trials and the clinical development of rotavirus, measles, mumps, hepatitis B, and rubella vaccines. In addition Dr. Schodel and Philimmune consult on several vaccine development efforts at numerous biotech companies including:

 

\His specialties and services include: vaccines and biologics development strategy, clinical development, clinical operations, strategic planning and alliances, international collaborations, analytical and assay development, project and portfolio integration and leadership.

Successful development of vaccines and biologics poses some unique challenges: including sterile manufacturing and substantial early capital investment before initiated clinical trials, assay development for clinical trial support, and unique trail design. Therefore vaccines and biologics development is a highly collaborative process between several disciplines.

The Philadelphia area has a rich history in vaccine development including the discovery and development of the rubella, cytomegaolovirus, a rabies, and the oral polio vaccine at the Wistar Institute. Dr. Schodel answered a few questions on the state of vaccine development and current efforts in the Philadelphia area, including recent efforts by companies such as GSK’s efforts and Inovio’s efforts developing an Ebola vaccine.

In his opinion, Dr. Schodel believes our biggest hurdle in vaccine development in a societal issue, not a preclinic development issue. Great advances have been made to speed the discovery process and enhance quality assurance of manufacture capabilities like

however there has not been a great history or support for developing vaccines for the plethora of infectious diseases seen in the developing world. As Dr. Schodel pointed out, there are relatively few players in the field, and tough to get those few players excited for investing in new targets.

 

However, some companies are rapidly expanding their vaccine portfolios including

 

 

Why haven’t 3rd world countries developed their own vaccine programs?

 

  1. Hard to find partners willing to invest and support development
  2. Developing nations don’t have the money or infrastructure to support health programs
  3. Doctors in these countries need to be educated on how to conduct trials, conduct vaccine programs like Gates Foundation does. For more information see Nature paper on obstacles to vaccine introduction in third world countries.

 

Lastly, Dr. Schodel touched on a growing area, cancer vaccine development. Recent advances in bladder cancer vaccine, cervical, and promising results in an early phase metastatic breast cancer vaccine trial and phase I oral cancer vaccine trial have reinvigorated this field of cancer vaccinology.

 

Historic Timeline of Vaccine Development

vaccine development timeline

Graphic from http://en.pedaily.cn/Item.aspx?id=194125

 

Other posts on this site related to Biotech Startups in Philadelphia and some additional posts on infectious disease include:

 

RAbD Biotech Presents at 1st Pitch Life Sciences-Philadelphia

LytPhage Presents at 1st Pitch Life Sciences-Philadelphia

Hastke Inc. Presents at 1st Pitch Life Sciences-Philadelphia

1st Pitch Life Science- Philadelphia- What VCs Really Think of your Pitch

The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century

 

 

 

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WordPress.com Annual Report for 2013

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 220,000 times in 2013. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 9 days for that many people to see it.

In 2013, there were 958 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 1,505 posts. There were 982 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 253 MB. That’s about 3 pictures per day.

The busiest day of the year was September 19th with 2,501 views. The most popular post that day was Is the Warburg Effect the Cause or the Effect of Cancer: A 21st Century View?.

SOURCE

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/annual-report/

UPDATES on 1/4/2014

On 1/4/2014

We celebrate 1,544 articles, 5,683 tags, 303,847 views, first article 4/30/2012 – Open Access Online Scientific Journal  

UPDATED on 11/10/2013

On April 15, 2013

We celebrate 800 articles, 4040 tags, 158,147 views, first article 4/30/2012 – Open Access Online Scientific Journal

On November 10, 2013

We celebrate 1,338 articles, 5,316 tags, 275,104 views, first article 4/30/2012 – Open Access Online Scientific Journal

Encouragement by the Founder: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Updated CURRENT NEEDS on 1/1/2014:

We are SEEKING resources to satisfy our needs at present time:

1. Efforts to find a buyer for our Scientific Journal for 12/2014

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

2. Efforts to find a Publisher for a hardcopy version of a Three Volume Series  onCardiovascular Diseases

3. Find few additional Authors for the Journal

4. Find Editors for Cardiovascular Diseases e-Books

5. Find one Editor for Infectious Diseases

6. Find one Editor for immunology

7. Find few Patent Holders in BioMed, for our Business Partner in Shanghai to be connected to Private Equity investors

8. Find Angel Investors for Venture #5

Business Portfolios

VENTURE #1:

e-Publishing: Medicine, HealthCare, Life Sciences, BioMed, Pharmaceutical

  • Open Access Online Scientific Journal

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Site statistics https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/index.php?page=stats

  • Scoop.it!.com
  1. http://www.scoop.it/t/cardiotoxicity
  2. http://www.scoop.it/t/cardiovascular-and-vascular-imaging
  3. http://www.scoop.it/t/cardiovascular-disease-pharmaco-therapy

VENTURE #2:

1. BioMedical e-Books Series:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

2. on Amazon’s Kindle e-Books List since 6/2013

3. Plans for Volume 1,2,3 – Hardcover

 

VENTURE #3:

International Scientific Delegations

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/scientific-delegation/

  • Shanghai, May 2014 
  • Barcelona, Spain, November 2014
  • Amsterdam, May 2015
  • Geneva, November 2015

VENTURE #4:

Joint Ventures

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/joint-ventures/

  • Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence AND NEW MEDICINE, INC. [ongoing]
  • Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence AND Bio-Tree Systems [pending Bio-Tree finding funding]
  • Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence AND Lou Pharma [pending finding Licensees for drugs manufactured in Spain]
  • Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence AND AlphaSzenszor Inc.
  • Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence AND ValveCure, LLC

VENTURE #5:

Invented HERE!

1.  Development of a NEW Nitric Oxide monitor to Alpha Szenszor Inc. sensor portfolio. A concept for a low cost POC e-nose, capable of real time ppb detection of Cancer
The Cancer Team at Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence under the leadership of Dr. Williams

2.  Development of a NEW Nitric Oxide monitor to Alpha Szenszor Inc. sensor portfolio. A concept for Inhaled Nitric Oxide for the Adult HomeCare Market –

IP by Dr. Pearlman and Dr. A. Lev-Ari

a.  iknow iNO is i-kNOw – Inhaled Nitric Oxide for the HomeCare Market

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/16/iknow-ino-is-i-know-inhaled-nitric-oxide-for-the-homecare-market/

b. electronic Book on Nitric Oxide by Nitric Oxide Team @ Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI)

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

c. The rationale and use of inhaled NO in Pulmonary Artery Hypertension and Right Sided Heart Failure

Larry H. Bernstein 8/20/2012

d. Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Adults: Clinical Trials and Meta Analysis Studies – Recent Findings

3.  Cancer Genomics for NEW product development in diagnosis and treatment of Cancer Patients using sensory technology with applications for Radiation Therapy – The Cancer Team at Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence under leadership of Dr. Sidney Kadish.

4.  Developing Mitral Valve Disease: MRI Methods and Devices for Percutaneous Mitral Valve Replacement and Mitral Valve Repair
Augmentation of Patented Technology using RF – Dr. Pearlman’s IP Non-Hardware Mitral Annuloplasty – Dr. Justin D. Pearlman

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/joint-ventures/valvecure-llc/non-hardware-mitral-annuloplasty-dr-justin-d-pearlman/

5.  Novel Technology using MRI for Vascular Lesions, Tumors, Hyperactive Glands and non-Surgical Cosmetic Reconstruction – Dr. Pearlman’s IP

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-a-e-books-on-cardiovascular-diseases/httppharmaceuticalintelligence-combiomed-e-bookscardiovascular-diseases-causes-risks-and-management/cvd-business-affairs/mitral-valve-disease-mri-methods-and-devices/

VENTURE # 6:

PRESS Coverage of Conferences

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/press-coverage/

Top Authors for all days ending 2014-01-05 (Summarized)


Author Views
2012pharmaceutical 96,387
larryhbern 42,452
tildabarliya 17,394
Dr. Sudipta Saha 13,882
Dror Nir 8,909
ritusaxena 8,851
sjwilliamspa 8,456
aviralvatsa 4,681
zraviv06 2,402
anamikasarkar 2,132
Demet Sag, Ph.D., CRA, GCP 2,072
pkandala 1,818
Alan F. Kaul, PharmD., MS, MBA, FCCP 1,329
zs22 1,153
megbaker58 1,005
Aashir Awan, Phd 775
jdpmdphd 344
Ed Kislauskis 244
jukkakarjalainen 168
apreconasia 148

 

 

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CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: Recent Advances in Genomic Analysis and Disease – Part IIC


CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: Recent Advances in Genomic Analysis and Disease – Part IIC

Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Triplex Medical Science

Part I: The Initiation and Growth of Molecular Biology and Genomics – Part I From Molecular Biology to Translational Medicine: How Far Have We Come, and Where Does It Lead Us?

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=8634&action=edit&message=1

Part II: CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE is divided into a three part series.

Part IIA. “CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: Milestones along the Way” reviews the Human Genome Project and the decade beyond.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/12/cracking-the-code-of-human-life-milestones-along-the-way/

Part IIB. “CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: The Birth of BioInformatics & Computational Genomics” lays the manifold multivariate systems analytical tools that has moved the science forward to a groung that ensures clinical application.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/13/cracking-the-code-of-human-life-the-birth-of-bioinformatics-and-computational-genomics/

Part IIC. “CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: Recent Advances in Genomic Analysis and Disease “ will extend the discussion to advances in the management of patients as well as providing a roadmap for pharmaceutical drug targeting.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/14/cracking-the-code-of-human-life-recent-advances-in-genomic-analysis-and-disease/

To be followed by:
Part III will conclude with Ubiquitin, it’s role in Signaling and Regulatory Control.

Part IIC of series on CODE OF HUMAN LIFE
CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: Recent Advances in Genomic Analysis and Disease

This final paper of Part II concludes a thorough review of the scientific events leading to the discovery of the human genome, the purification and identification of the components of the chromosome and the DNA structure and role in regulation of embryogenesis, and potential targets for cancer.

The first two articles, Part IIA, Part IIB,  go into some depth to elucidate the problems and breakthoughs encountered in the Human Genome Project, and the construction of a 3-D model necessary to explain interactions at a distance.

Part IIC, the final article, is entirely concerned with clinical application of this treasure trove of knowledge to resolving diseases of epigenetic nature in the young and the old, chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, infectious disease, gastrointestinal disorders, neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: Recent Advances in Genomic Analysis and Disease – Part IIC

1. Gene Links to Heart Disease

 

Recently, large studies have identified some of the genetic basis for important common diseases such as heart disease and diabetes, but most of the genetic contribution to them remains undiscovered. Now researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by biostatistician Andrea Foulkes have applied sophisticated statistical tools to existing large databases to reveal substantial new information about genes that cause such conditions as high cholesterol linked to heart disease.

Foulkes says, “This new approach to data analysis provides opportunities for developing new treatments.” It also advances approaches

  • to identifying people at greatest risk for heart disease. Another important point is that our method is straightforward to use with freely
  • available computer software and can be applied broadly to advance genetic knowledge of many diseases.

The new analytical approach she developed with cardiologist Dr. Muredach Reilly at the University of Pennsylvania and others is called “Mixed modeling of Meta-Analysis P-values” or MixMAP. Because it makes use of existing public databases, the powerful new method

  • represents a low-cost tool for investigators.
  • MixMAP draws on a principled statistical modeling framework and the vast array of summary data now available from genetic association
  • studies to formally test at a new, locus-level, association.

While that traditional statistical method looks for one unusual “needle in a haystack” as a possible disease signal, Foulkes and colleagues’

  • new method uses knowledge of DNA regions in the genome that are likely to
  • contain several genetic signals for disease variation clumped together in one region.
  • Thus, it is able to detect groups of unusual variants rather than just single SNPs, offering a way to “call out” gene
  • regions that have a consistent signal above normal variation.

http://Science.com/Science News/Identify Genes Linked to Heart Disease/

2. Apolipoprotein(a) Genetic Sequence Variants

The LPA gene codes for apolipoprotein(a), which, when linked with low-density lipoprotein particles, forms lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] —

  • a well-studied molecule associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). The Lp(a) molecule has both atherogenic and thrombogenic effects in vitro , but the extent to which these translate to differences in how atherothrombotic disease presents is unknown.

LPA contains many single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and 2 have been identified by previous groups as being strongly associated with

  • levels of Lp(a) and, as a consequence, strongly associated with CAD.

However, because atherosclerosis is thought to be a systemic disease, it is unclear to what extent Lp(a) leads to atherosclerosis in other arterial beds (eg, carotid, abdominal aorta, and lower extremity),

  • as well as to other thrombotic disorders (eg, ischemic/cardioembolic stroke and venous thromboembolism).

Such distinctions are important, because therapies that might lower Lp(a) could potentially reduce forms of atherosclerosis beyond the coronary tree.

To answer this question, Helgadottir and colleagues compiled clinical and genetic data on the LPA gene from thousands of previous

  • participants in genetic research studies from across the world. They did not have access to Lp(a) levels, but by knowing the genotypes for
  • 2 LPA variants, they inferred the levels of Lp(a) on the basis of prior associations between these variants and Lp(a) levels. [1]

Their studies included not only individuals of white European descent but also a significant proportion of black persons, in order to

  • widen the generalizability of their results.

Their main findings are that LPA variants (and, by proxy, Lp(a) levels) are associated with

  • CAD,
  • peripheral arterial disease,
  • abdominal aortic aneurysm,
  • number of CAD vessels,
  • age at onset of CAD diagnosis, and
  • large-artery atherosclerosis-type stroke.

They did not find an association with

  • cardioembolic or small-vessel disease-type stroke;
  • intracranial aneurysm;
  • venous thrombosis;
  • carotid intima thickness; or,
  • in a small subset of individuals, myocardial infarction.

Apolipoprotein(a) Genetic Sequence Variants Associated With Systemic Atherosclerosis and Coronary Atherosclerotic Burden but Not With Venous Thromboembolism. Helgadottir A, Gretarsdottir S, Thorleifsson G, et al.    J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012;60:722-729

English: Structure of the LPA protein. Based o...

English: Structure of the LPA protein. Based on PyMOL rendering of PDB 1i71. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Micrograph of an artery that supplies the hear...

Micrograph of an artery that supplies the heart with significant atherosclerosis and marked luminal narrowing. Tissue has been stained using Masson’s trichrome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Genomic Blueprint of the Heart

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have revealed the precise order and timing of hundreds of genetic “switches” required to construct a fully

  • functional heart from embryonic heart cells — providing new clues into the genetic basis for some forms of congenital heart disease.

In a study being published online today in the journal Cell, researchers in the laboratory of Gladstone Senior Investigator Benoit Bruneau, PhD,

  • employed stem cell technology, next-generation DNA sequencing and computing tools to piece together the instruction manual, or “genomic
  • blueprint” for how a heart becomes a heart. These findings offer renewed hope for combating life-threatening heart defects such as arrhythmias (irregular heart beat) and ventricular septal defects (“holes in the heart”).

ScienceDaily (Sep. 13, 2012)

They approach heart formation with a wide-angle lens by

  • looking at the entirety of the genetic material that gives heart cells their unique identity.

The news comes at a time of emerging importance for the biological process called “epigenetics,” in which a non-genetic factor impacts a cell’s genetic

  • makeup early during development — but sometimes with longer-term consequences. All of the cells in an organism contain the same DNA, but the
  • epigenetic instructions encoded in specific DNA sequences give the cell its identity. Epigenetics is of particular interest in heart formation, as the
  • incorrect on-and-off switching of genes during fetal development can lead to congenital heart disease — some forms of which may not be apparent until adulthood.

the scientists took embryonic stem cells from mice and reprogrammed them into beating heart cells by mimicking embryonic development in a petri dish. Next, they extracted the DNA from developing and mature heart cells, using an advanced gene-sequencing technique called ChIP-seq that lets scientists “see” the epigenetic signatures written in the DNA.

Map of Heart Disease Death Rates in US White M...

Map of Heart Disease Death Rates in US White Males from 2000-2004 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Estimated propability of death or non-fatal my...

Estimated propability of death or non-fatal myocardial-infarction over one year corresponding ti selectet values of the individual scores. Ordinate: individual score, abscissa: Propability of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction in 1 year (in %) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

simply finding these signatures was only half the battle — we next had to decipher which aspects of heart formation they encoded

To do that, we harnessed the computing power of the Gladstone Bioinformatics Core. This allowed us to take the mountains of data collected from

  • gene sequencing and organize it into a readable, meaningful blueprint for how a heart becomes a heart.”

http://ScienceDaily.org/Scientists Map the Genomic Blueprint of the Heart.  ScienceDaily.

Performance of transcription factor identification tools from differential gene expression data

A three step process is a clear way to establish belief in the performance of transcription factor identification tools

  • from differential gene expression data.
  • identify several types of differential gene expression data sets where the stimulus or trigger is clearly know
  • identify the transcription factors most likely associated with the sets expression data.
  • perform an upstream analysis from the identified transcription factor.

If the transcription factor and upstream analysis tools can trace the signal cascade back to the stimulus, the tools are

  • clearly producing relevant results, and belief in the performance of the analysis tools is established.

At this point, the tools can be directed with confidence to more challenging analyses such as

  • developed resistance or pathway elucidation.

The performance of IPA‘s new Transcription Factor and Upstream analysis tools was evaluated on the following datasets (processing details below):

  • TGFb stimulation, 1 hour, A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line
  • BMP2 stimulation, 1 hour, Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell E14Tg2A.4
  • TNFa stimulation, 1 hour primary murine hepatocytes

For each of the above datasets, an upstream analysis from the identified transcription factors correctly identified the stimulus. IPA’s tools were very

  • easy to use and the
  • analysis time for the above experiments was less than one minute.

The performance, speed, and ease of use can only be characterized as very good, perhaps leading to breakthroughs when extended and used creatively. Ingenuity’s new transcription factor analysis tool in IPA, coupled with Ingenuity’s established upstream grow tools,  should be strongly considered for every lab analyzing differential expression data.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE17896

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE2639

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE19272

Differential expression data was obtained from CEL files using the Matlab functions:

affyrma, genelowvalfilter, genevarfilter, mattest, and mavolcanoplot.

Rick Stanton, Pathway Analysis Consultant Ingenuity.com

3. miR-200a regulates Nrf2 activation by targeting Keap1 mRNA in breast cancer cells.

Eades G, Yang M, Yao Y, Zhang Y, Zhou Q. J Biol Chem. 2011 Nov 25;286(47):40725-33. Epub 2011 Sep 16.
http://JBiolChem.com/miR-200a regulates Nrf2 activation by targeting Keap1 mRNA in breast cancer cells.

NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an important transcription factor that

  • activates the expression of cellular detoxifying enzymes.

Nrf2 expression is largely regulated through the association of Nrf2 with Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which

  • results in cytoplasmic Nrf2 degradation.

Conversely, little is known concerning the regulation of Keap1 expression. Until now, a regulatory role for microRNAs (miRs) in controlling Keap1 gene expression had not been characterized. By using miR array-

  • based screening, we observed miR-200a silencing in breast cancer cells and
  • demonstrated that upon re-expression, miR-200a
  • targets the Keap1 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), leading to Keap1 mRNA degradation. Loss of this regulatory mechanism may
  • contribute to the dysregulation of Nrf2 activity in breast cancer. Previously, we have identified epigenetic repression of miR-200a

in breast cancer cells. Here, we find that treatment with epigenetic therapy, the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, restored miR-200a expression and reduced Keap1 levels. This reduction in Keap1 levels corresponded with

  • Nrf2 nuclear translocation
  • and activation of Nrf2-dependent NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene transcription.

Moreover, we found that Nrf2 activation inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells. Finally, our in vitro observations were confirmed in a model of carcinogen-induced mammary hyperplasia in vivo. In conclusion, our study demonstrates

  • that miR-200a regulates the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway in mammary epithelium, and we find that epigenetic therapy can restore miR-200a
  • regulation of Keap1 expression,
  • reactivating the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant pathway in breast cancer.

Nuclear factor-like 2  (erythroid-derived 2, also known as NFE2L2 or Nrf2, is a transcription factor that in humans is encoded by the NFE2L2 gene.[1])  NFE2L2 induces the expression of various genes including those that encode for several antioxidant enzymes, and it may play a physiological role in the regulation of oxidative stress. Investigational drugs that target NFE2L2 are of interest as potential therapeutic interventions for

  • oxidative-stress related pathologies.

4. Highly active zinc finger nucleases by extended modular assembly

MS Bhakta, IM Henry, DG Ousterout, KT Das, et al.  Corresponding author; email: djsegal@ucdavis.edu
http://CSHNLpress.com/Highly active zinc finger nucleases by extended modular assembly

Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are important tools for genome engineering. Despite intense interest by many academic groups,

  • the lack of robust non-commercial methods has hindered their widespread use. The modular assembly (MA) of ZFNs from
  • publicly-available one-finger archives provides a rapid method to create proteins that can recognize a very broad spectrum of DNA sequences.

However, three- and four-finger arrays often fail to produce active nucleases. Efforts to improve the specificity of the one-finger archives have not increased the success rate above 25%, suggesting that the MA method might

  • be inherently inefficient due to its insensitivity to context-dependent effects.

Here we present the first systematic study on the effect of array length on ZFN activity.  ZFNs composed of six-finger MA arrays produced mutations at 15 of 21 (71%) targeted

  • loci in human and mouse cells. A novel Drop-Out Linker scheme was used to rapidly assess three- to six-finger combinations,
  • demonstrating that shorter arrays could improve activity in some cases. Analysis of 268 array variants revealed that half of

MA ZFNs of any array composition that exceed an ab initio

  • B-score cut-off of 15 were active.
  • MA ZFNs are able to target more DNA sequences with higher success rates than other methods.

This article is distributed exclusively by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the first six months after the full-issue publication date http://genome.cshlp.org/site/misc/terms.xhtml
After six months, it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License), as described at
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/Highly_active_zinc_finger_nucleases_by_extended_ modular_assembly/

PERSONALIZED MEDICINE in the Pipeline

These insightful reviews are based on the strategic data and insights from Thomson Reuters Cortellis™ for Competitive Intelligence.  (A Review of April-June 2012).

http://ThomsonReuters.com/DIFFERENTIATED INNOVATION: PERSONALIZED MEDICINE IN THE PIPELINE/ Cortellis™ for Competitive Intelligence/APRIL-JUNE 2012

The majority of diseases are complex and multi-factorial, involving multiple genes interacting with environmental factors. At the genetic level,

  • information from genome-wide association studies that elucidate common patterns of genetic variation across various human populations,
  • in addition to profiling, technologies can be utilized in discovery research to provide snapshots of genes and expression profiles that are controlled
  • by the same regulatory mechanism and are altered between healthy and diseased states.

The characterization of genes that are abnormally expressed in disease tissues could further be employed as

  • diagnostic markers,
  • prognostic indicators of efficacy and/or toxicity, or as
  • targets for therapeutic intervention.

As the defining catalyst that exponentially paved the way for personalized medicine, information from the published genome sequence revealed that much of the genetic variations in humans are concentrated in about 0.1 percent of the over 3 billion base pairs in the haploid DNA. Most of these variations involve substitution of a single nucleotide for another at a given location in the genetic sequence, known as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP).

  • Combinations of linked SNPs aggregate together to form haplotypes and
  • together these serve as markers for locating genetic variations in DNA sequences.

SNPs located within the protein-coding region of a gene or within the control regions of DNA that regulate a gene’s activity could

  • have a substantial effect on the encoded protein and thus influence phenotypic outcomes.

Analyzing SNPs between patient population cohorts could highlight specific genotypic variations which can be correlated with specific phenotypic variations in disease predisposition and drug responses.

Prior to the genomic revolution, many of the established therapies were directed against less than 500 drug targets, with many of the top selling drugs acting on well defined protein pathways. However, the sequencing of the human genome has massively expanded the pool of molecular targets that could be exploited in unmet medical needs and currently, of the approximately 22,300 protein-coding genes in the human code, it has been estimated that up to 3000 are druggable. Furthermore, genomic technologies such as

  • high-throughput sequencing
  • and transcription profiling,

can be used to identify and validate biologically relevant target molecules, or can be applied to cell-based and mice disease models or directly to in vivo human tissues,

  • helping to correlate gene targets with phenotypic traits of complex diseases.

This is particularly important, as

  • insufficient validation of target gene/proteins in complex diseases may be a contributing factor in the decline in R&D productivity.

Personalized medicine no doubt is already having a tremendous impact on drug development pipelines. According to a study conducted by the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, more than 90 percent of biopharmaceutical companies now utilize at least some

  • genomics-derived targets in their drug discovery programs.

However, pipeline analysis from Cortellis for Competitive Intelligence suggests that there is still a scientific gap that has resulted in difficulty optimizing these novel genomic targets into the clinical R&D portfolios of major pharmaceutical companies, particularly outside the oncology field. Selected examples of personalized medicine product candidates in clinical development include (see TABLE 4).

Table 4: Selected Personalized Medicines in Clinical Development
(DATA are Derived from Cortellis for Competitive Intelligence & Thomson Reuters IntegritySM)
http://Thomson Reuters.com/Cortellis for Competitive Intelligence/IntegritySM/Table_4_Selected_Personalized_Medicines_in_Clinical_Development/

PHARMA MATTERS | SPOTLIGHT ON… PERSONALIZED MEDICINE

The paucity of actual targeted therapy examples, especially outside oncology, suggest

  • that integration of the personalized medicine paradigm into biopharmaceutical R&D is still fraught with challenges.

Despite the fact that the Human genome Project has been completed for over ten years, the broader application of genomics with drug development

  • still remains unrealized, and is hampered by a number of scientific challenges. One of the major obstacles stems from
  • incomplete association of genomic alterations with complex disease pathways and the phenotypic consequences.

As the modality of most complex diseases are multi-factorial, understanding how each genomic driver event plays a role in disease and the

  • interaction/interdependence with other genetic and environmental factors is important for
  • determining the rationale for targeted prevention or treatment of the disease.

Mutations found in Melanomas may shed light on Cancer Growth

Gina Kolata. New York Times.
http://NewYorkTimes.com/mutations_found_in_melanomas_may_shed-light_on_how_cancers_grow/

Mutations in Melanoma are in regions that control genes, not in the genes themselves. The mutations are exactly the type caused by exposure to ultraviolet light.  The findings are reported in two papers in http://Science.com/ScienceExpress/

The findings do not suggest new treatments, but they help explain how melanomas – and possibly – other cancers – develop and what drives their growth. This is a modification found in the “dark matter”, according to Dr. Levi A. Garraway,  the 99 percent of DNA in a region that regulates genes. A small control region was mutated in 7 out of 10 of the tumors, commonly of one or two tiny changes.
A German Team led by Rajiv Kumar (Heidelberg) and Dirk Schadendorf (Essen) looked at a family whose members tended to get melanomas.  Their findings indicate that those inherited with the mutations might be born with cells that have taken the first step toward cancer.
The mutations spur cells to make telomerase, that keeps the cells immortal by preventing them from losing the ends of their chromosome, the telomere. Abundant telomerase occurs in 90 percent of cancers, according to Immaculata De Vivo at Harvard Medical School.
The importance of the findings is that the mechanism of telomerase involvement in cancer is now within view. But it is not clear how to block the telomerase production in cancer cells.
A slight mutation in the matched nucleotides c...

A slight mutation in the matched nucleotides can lead to chromosomal aberrations and unintentional genetic rearrangement. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Comment

This discussion addresses the issues raised about the direction to follow in personalized medicine. Despite the amount of work necessary to bring the clarity that is sought after, the experiments and experimental design is most essential.

  • The arrest of ciliogenesis in ovarian cancer cell lines compared to wild type (WT) ovarian epithelial cells, and
  •  The link to suppressing ciliogenesis by AURA protein and CHFR at the base of the cilium, which disappears at mitosis or with proliferation.
  •  There is no accumulation by upregulation of PDGF under starvation by the cancer cells compared to the effect in WT OSE.

Here we have a systematic combination of signaling events tied to changes in putative biomarkers that occur synchronously in Ov cancer cell lines.

These changes are identified with changes in

  • proliferation,
  • loss of ciliary structure, and
  • proliferation.

In this described scenario,

  • WT OSE cells would be arrested, and
  • it appears that they would take the path to apoptosis (under starvation).

Even without more information, this cluster is what one wants to have in a “syndromic classification”. The information used to form the classification entails the identification of strong ‘signaling-related’ biomarkers. The Gli2 peptide has to be part of this.

In principle, a syndromic classification would be ideally expected to have no less than 64 classes. If the classification is “weak”, then the class frequencies would be close to what one would expect in the WT OSE. In this case, in reality,

  • several combinatorial classes would have low frequency, and
  • others would be quite high.

This obeys the classification rules established by feature identification, and the information gain described by Solomon Kullback and extended by Akaike.

Does this have to be the case for all different cancer types? I don’t think so. The cells are different in ontogenesis.  In this case, even the WT OSE have mesenchymal features and so, are not fully directed to epithelial expression.  This happens to be the case in actual anatomic expression of the ovary.  On the other hand, one would expect shared features of the

  • ovary,
  • testes,
  • thyroid,
  • adrenals, and
  • pituitary.

There is biochemical expression in terms of their synthetic function – TPN organs. I would have to put the liver into that broad class. Other organs – skeletal muscle & heart – transform substrate into energy or work.  (Where you might also put intestinal smooth muscle).

They have to have different biomarker expressions, even though they much less often don’t form neoplasms. (Bone is not just a bioenergetic force. It is maintained by muscle action. It forms sarcomas. But there has to be a balance between bone removal by osteoclasts and refill by osteoblasts.)

Viewpoint: What we have learned

  1. The Watson-Crick model proposed in 1953 is limited for explaining fully genome effects
  2. The Pauling triplex model may have been prescient because of a more full anticipation of molecular bonding variants
  3. A more adequate triple-helix model has been proposed and is consistent with a compact genome in the nucleus

The structure of the genome is not as we assumed – based on the application of Fractal Geometry.  Current body of evidence is building that can reveal a more complete view of genome function.

  • transcription
  • cell regulation
  • mutations

Summary

I have just completed a most comprehensive review of the Human Genome Project. There are key research collaborations, problems in deciphering the underlying structure of the genome, and there are also both obstacles and insights to elucidating the complexity of the final model.

This is because of frequent observations of molecular problems in folding and other interactions between nucleotides that challenge the sufficiency of the original DNA model proposed by Watson and Crick. This has come about because of breakthrough innovation in technology and in computational methods.

Radoslav Bozov •

Molecular biology and growth was primarily initiated on biochemical structural paradigms aiming to define functional spatial dynamics of molecules via assignation of various types of bondings – covalent and non-covalent – hydrogen, ionic , dipole-dipole, hydrophobic interactions.

  • Lab techniques based on z/m paradigm allowed separation, isolation and identification of bio substances with a general marker identity finding correlation between physiological/cellular states.
  • The development of electronic/x-ray technologies allowed zooming in nano space without capturing time.
  • NMR technology identified the existence of space topology of initial and final atomic states giving a highly limited light on time – energy axis of atomic interactions.
  • Sequence technology and genomic perturbations shed light on uncertainty of genomic dynamics and regulators of functional ever expanding networks.
  • Transition state theory coupled to structural complexity identification and enzymatic mechanisms ran up parallel to work on various phenomena of strings of nucleotides (oligomers and polymers) – illusion/observation of constructing models on the dynamics of protein-dna-rna interference.
  • The physical energetic constrains of biochemistry were inapplicable in open biological systems. Biologists have accepted observation as a sole driver towards re-evaluating models.
  • The separation of matter and time constrains emerged as deviation of energy and space constrains transforming into the full acceptance of code theory of life. One simple thing was left unnoticed over time –
  • the amount of information of quantum matter within a single codon is larger than that of a single amino acid. This violated all physical laws/principles known to work with a limited degree of certainty.
  • The limited amount of information analyzed by conventional sequence identity led to the notion of applicability of statistical measures of and PCR technology. Mutations were identified over larger scale of data.
  • Quantum chemistry itself is being limited due discrete space/energy constrains, thus it transformed into concepts/principles in biology that possess highly limited physical values whatsoever.
  • The central dogma is partially broken as a result of
  1. regulatory constrains
  2. epigenetic phenomena and
  3. iRNA.

Large scale code computational data run into uncertainty of the processes of evolution and its consequence of signaling transformation. All drugs were ‘lucky based’ applicability and/or discovery with largely unpredictable side effect over time.

Other Related articles on this Open Access Online Sceintific Journal include the following:

Big Data in Genomic Medicine  lhb

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/17/big-data-in-genomic-medicine/

BRCA1 a tumour suppressor in breast and ovarian cancer – functions in transcription, ubiquitination and DNA repair S Saha    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/04/brca1-a-tumour-suppressor-in-breast-and-ovarian-cancer-functions-in-transcription-ubiquitination-and-dna-repair/

Computational Genomics Center: New Unification of Computational Technologies at Stanford A Lev-Ari  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/03/computational-genomics-center-new-unification-of-computational-technologies-at-stanford/

Personalized medicine gearing up to tackle cancer ritu saxena     https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/07/personalized-medicine-gearing-up-to-tackle-cancer/

Differentiation Therapy – Epigenetics Tackles Solid Tumors sj Williams     https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/03/differentiation-therapy-epigenetics-tackles-solid-tumors/

Mechanism involved in Breast Cancer Cell Growth: Function in Early Detection & Treatment A Lev-Ari   https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/17/mechanism-involved-in-breast-cancer-cell-growth-function-in-early-detection-treatment/

The Molecular pathology of Breast Cancer Progression tilde barliya      https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/10/the-molecular-pathology-of-breast-cancer-progression/

Gastric Cancer: Whole-genome reconstruction and mutational signatures A Lev-Ari     https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/24/gastric-cancer-whole-genome-reconstruction-and-mutational-signatures-2/

Paradigm Shift in Human Genomics – Predictive Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine – Part 1 (pharmaceuticalintelligence.com) A Lev-Ari                  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/paradigm-shift-in-human-genomics-predictive-biomarkers-and-personalized-medicine-part-1/

LEADERS in Genome Sequencing of Genetic Mutations for Therapeutic Drug Selection in Cancer Personalized Treatment: Part 2 A Lev-Ari
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/leaders-in-genome-sequencing-of-genetic-mutations-for-therapeutic-drug-selection-in-cancer-personalized-treatment-part-2/

Personalized Medicine: An Institute Profile – Coriell Institute for Medical Research: Part 3 A Lev-Ari   https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/personalized-medicine-an-institute-profile-coriell-institute-for-medical-research-part-3/

Harnessing Personalized Medicine for Cancer Management, Prospects of Prevention and Cure: Opinions of Cancer Scientific Leaders @ http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com ALA    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/7000/Harnessing Personalized Medicine for Cancer Management, Prospects of Prevention and Cure: Opinions of Cancer Scientific Leaders/

GSK for Personalized Medicine using Cancer Drugs needs Alacris systems biology model to determine the in silico effect of the inhibitor in its “virtual clinical trial” A Lev-Ari     https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/14/gsk-for-personalized-medicine-using-cancer-drugs-needs-alacris-systems-biology-model-to-determine-the-in-silico-effect-of-the-inhibitor-in-its-virtual-clinical-trial/

Recurrent somatic mutations in chromatin-remodeling and ubiquitin ligase complex genes in serous endometrial tumors S Saha   https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/19/recurrent-somatic-mutations-in-chromatin-remodeling-and-ubiquitin-ligase-complex-genes-in-serous-endometrial-tumors/

Personalized medicine-based cure for cancer might not be far away ritu saxena   https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/20/personalized-medicine-based-cure-for-cancer-might-not-be-far-away/

Human Variome Project: encyclopedic catalog of sequence variants indexed to the human genome sequence A Lev-Ari
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/24/human-variome-project-encyclopedic-catalog-of-sequence-variants-indexed-to-the-human-genome-sequence/

Prostate Cancer Cells: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Induce Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition sjwilliams
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/30/histone-deacetylase-inhibitors-induce-epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition-in-prostate-cancer-cells/

Inspiration From Dr. Maureen Cronin’s Achievements in Applying Genomic Sequencing to Cancer Diagnostics A Lev-Ari
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/10/inspiration-from-dr-maureen-cronins-achievements-in-applying-genomic-sequencing-to-cancer-diagnostics/

The “Cancer establishments” examined by James Watson, co-discoverer of DNA w/Crick, 4/1953 A Lev-Ari
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/09/the-cancer-establishments-examined-by-james-watson-co-discover-of-dna-wcrick-41953/

Directions for genomics in personalized medicine lhb    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/27/directions-for-genomics-in-personalized-medicine/

How mobile elements in “Junk” DNA promote cancer. Part 1: Transposon-mediated tumorigenesis. Sjwilliams
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/31/how-mobile-elements-in-junk-dna-prote-cancer-part1-transposon-mediated-tumorigenesis/

Mitochondria: More than just the “powerhouse of the cell” eritu saxena   https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/09/mitochondria-more-than-just-the-powerhouse-of-the-cell/

Mitochondrial fission and fusion: potential therapeutic targets? Ritu saxena    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/31/mitochondrial-fission-and-fusion-potential-therapeutic-target/

Mitochondrial mutation analysis might be “1-step” away ritu saxena     https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/14/mitochondrial-mutation-analysis-might-be-1-step-away/

mRNA interference with cancer expression lhb    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/26/mrna-interference-with-cancer-expression/

Read Full Post »


Curator/Reporter Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

Based on: A review by (Wink et al., 2011)

This post is in continuation to Part 1 by the same title.

In part one I covered the basics of role of redox chemistry in immune reactions, the phagosome cauldron, and how bacteria bacteria, virus and parasites trigger the complex pathway of NO production and its downstream effects. While we move further in this post, the previous post can be accessed here.

REDOX REGULATION OF IMMUNE FUNCTION

Regulation of the redox immunomodulators—NO/RNS and ROS

In addition to eradicating pathogens, NO/RNS and ROS and their chemical interactions act as effective immunomodulators that regulate many cellular metabolic pathways and tissue repair and proinflammatory pathways. Figure 3 shows these pathways.

Figure 3. Schematic overview of interactive connections between NO and ROS-mediated metabolic pathways. Credit: (Wink et al., 2011)

Regulation of iNOS enzyme activity is critical to NO production. Factors such as the availability of arginine, BH4, NADPH, and superoxide affect iNOS activity and thus NO production. In the absence of arginine and BH4 iNOS becomes a O2_/H2O2 generator (Vásquez-Vivar et al., 1999). Hence metabolic pathways that control arginine and BH4 play a role in determining the NO/superoxide balance. Arginine levels in cells depend on various factors such as type of uptake mechanisms that determine its spatial presence in various compartments and enzymatic systems. As shown in Fig3 Arginine is the sole substrate for iNOS and arginase. Arginase is another key enzyme in immunemodulation. AG is also regulated by NOS and NOX activities. NOHA, a product of NOS, inhibits AG, and O2–increases AG activity. Importantly, high AG activity is associated with elevated ROS and low NO fluxes. NO antagonises NOX2 assembly that in turn leads to reduction in O2_ production. NO also inhibits COX2 activity thus reducing ROS production. Thus, as NO levels decline, oxidative mechanisms increase. Oxidative and nitrosative stress can also decrease intracellular GSH (reduced form) levels, resulting in a reduced antioxidant capability of the cell.

Immune-associated redox pathways regulate other important metabolic cell functions that have the potential for widespread impact on cells, organs, and organisms. These pathways, such as mediated via methionine and polyamines, are critical for DNA stabilization, cell proliferation, and membrane channel activity, all of which are also involved in immune-mediated repair processes.

NO levels dictate the immune signaling pathway

NO/RNS and ROS actively control innate and adaptive immune signaling by participating in induction, maintenance, and/or termination of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling. As in pathogen eradication, the temporal and spatial concentration profiles of NO are key factors in determining immune-mediated processes.

Brune and coworkers (Messmer et al., 1994) first demonstrated that p53 expression was associated with the concentrations of NO that led to apoptosis in macrophages. Subsequent studies linked NO concentration profiles with expression of other key signaling proteins such as HIF-1α and Akt-P (Ridnour et al., 2008; Thomas et al., 2008). Various levels of NO concentrations trigger different pathways and expectedly this concentration-dependent profile varies with distance from the NO source.NO is highly diffucible and this characteristic can result in 1000 fold reduction in concentration within one cell length distance travelled from the source of production. Time course studies have also shown alteration in effects of same levels of NO over time e.g. NO-mediated ERK-P levels initially increased rapidly on exposure to NO donors and then decreased with continued NO exposure (Thomas et al., 2004), however HIF-1α levels remained high as long as NO levels were elevated. Thus some of the important factors that play critical role in NO effects are: distance from source, NO concentrations, duration of exposure, bioavailability of NO, and production/absence of other redox molecules.

Figure and legend credits: (Wink et al., 2011)

Fig 4: The effect of steady-state flux of NO on signal transduction mechanisms.

This diagram represents the level of sustained NO that is required to activate specific pathways in tumor cells. Similar effects have been seen on endothelial cells. These data were generated by treating tumor or endothelial cells with the NO donor DETANO (NOC-18) for 24 h and then measuring the appropriate outcome measures (for example, p53 activation). Various concentrations of DETANO that correspond to cellular levels of NO are: 40–60 μM DETANO = 50 nM NO; 80–120 μM DETANO = 100 nM NO; 500 μM DETANO = 400 nM NO; and 1 mM DETANO = 1 μM NO. The diagram represents the effect of diffusion of NO with distance from the point source (an activated murine macrophage producing iNOS) in vitro (Petri dish) generating 1 μM NO or more. Thus, reactants or cells located at a specific distance from the point source (i.e., iNOS, represented by star) would be exposed to a level of NO that governs a specific subset of physiological or pathophysiological reactions. The x-axis represents the different zone of NO-mediated events that is experienced at a specific distance from a source iNOS producing >1 μM. Note: Akt activation is regulated by NO at two different sites and by two different concentration levels of NO.

Species-specific NO production

The relationship of NO and immunoregulation has been established on the basis of studies on tumor cell lines or rodent macrophages, which are readily available sources of NO. However in humans the levels of protein expression for NOS enzymes and the immune induction required for such levels of expression are quite different than in rodents (Weinberg, 1998). This difference is most likely due to the human iNOS promotor rather than the activity of iNOS itself. There is a significant mismatch between the promoters of humans and rodents and that is likely to account for the notable differences in the regulation of gene induction between them. The combined data on rodent versus human NO and O2– production strongly suggest that in general, ROS production is a predominant feature of activated human macrophages, neutrophils, and monocytes, and the equivalent murine immune cells generate a combination of O2– and NO and in some cases, favor NO production. These differences may be crucial to understanding how immune responses are regulated in a species-specific manner. This is particularly useful, as pathogen challenges change constantly.

The next post in this series will cover the following topics:

The impact of NO signaling on an innate immune response—classical activation

NO and proinflammatory genes

NO and regulation of anti-inflammatory pathways

NO impact on adaptive immunity—immunosuppression and tissue-restoration response

NO and revascularization

Acute versus chronic inflammatory disease

Bibliography

1. Wink, D. A. et al. Nitric oxide and redox mechanisms in the immune response. J Leukoc Biol 89, 873–891 (2011).

2. Vásquez-Vivar, J. et al. Tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibition of superoxide generation from neuronal nitric oxide synthase. J. Biol. Chem. 274, 26736–26742 (1999).

3. Messmer, U. K., Ankarcrona, M., Nicotera, P. & Brüne, B. p53 expression in nitric oxide-induced apoptosis. FEBS Lett. 355, 23–26 (1994).

4. Ridnour, L. A. et al. Molecular mechanisms for discrete nitric oxide levels in cancer. Nitric Oxide 19, 73–76 (2008).

5. Thomas, D. D. et al. The chemical biology of nitric oxide: implications in cellular signaling. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 45, 18–31 (2008).

6. Thomas, D. D. et al. Hypoxic inducible factor 1alpha, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p53 are regulated by distinct threshold concentrations of nitric oxide. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101, 8894–8899 (2004).

7. Weinberg, J. B. Nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase type 2 expression by human mononuclear phagocytes: a review. Mol. Med. 4, 557–591 (1998).

Further reading on NO:

Nitric Oxide in bone metabolism July 16, 2012

Author: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/16/nitric-oxide-in-bone-metabolism/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_134751669

Nitric Oxide production in Systemic sclerosis July 25, 2012

Curator: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/25/nitric-oxide-production-in-systemic-sclerosis/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_138370383

Nitric Oxide Signalling Pathways August 22, 2012 by

Curator/ Author: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/nitric-oxide-signalling-pathways/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_151245569

Nitric Oxide: a short historic perspective August 5, 2012

Author/Curator: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/05/nitric-oxide-a-short-historic-perspective-7/

Nitric Oxide: Chemistry and function August 10, 2012

Curator/Author: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/10/nitric-oxide-chemistry-and-function/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_145137865

Nitric Oxide and Platelet Aggregation August 16, 2012 by

Author: Dr. Venkat S. Karra, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/16/no-and-platelet-aggregation/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_147475405

The rationale and use of inhaled NO in Pulmonary Artery Hypertension and Right Sided Heart Failure August 20, 2012

Author: Larry Bernstein, MD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/20/the-rationale-and-use-of-inhaled-no-in-pulmonary-artery-hypertension-and-right-sided-heart-failure/

Nitric Oxide: The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1998 Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro, Ferid Murad August 16, 2012

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/16/nitric-oxide-the-nobel-prize-in-physiology-or-medicine-1998-robert-f-furchgott-louis-j-ignarro-ferid-murad/

Coronary Artery Disease – Medical Devices Solutions: From First-In-Man Stent Implantation, via Medical Ethical Dilemmas to Drug Eluting Stents August 13, 2012

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/13/coronary-artery-disease-medical-devices-solutions-from-first-in-man-stent-implantation-via-medical-ethical-dilemmas-to-drug-eluting-stents/

Nano-particles as Synthetic Platelets to Stop Internal Bleeding Resulting from Trauma

August 22, 2012

Reported by: Dr. V. S. Karra, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/nano-particles-as-synthetic-platelets-to-stop-internal-bleeding-resulting-from-trauma/

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and the Role of agent alternatives in endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Activation and Nitric Oxide Production July 19, 2012

Curator and Research Study Originator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/19/cardiovascular-disease-cvd-and-the-role-of-agent-alternatives-in-endothelial-nitric-oxide-synthase-enos-activation-and-nitric-oxide-production/

Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs: Reduction Methods for CV Risk

July 2, 2012

An Investigation of the Potential of circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (cEPCs) as a Therapeutic Target for Pharmacological Therapy Design for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction: A New Multimarker Biomarker Discovery

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/02/macrovascular-disease-therapeutic-potential-of-cepcs-reduction-methods-for-cv-risk/

Bone remodelling in a nutshell June 22, 2012

Author: Aviral Vatsa, Ph.D., MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/bone-remodelling-in-a-nutshell/

Targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues: current status and challenges- Part, September  

Author: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, September 23, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/23/targeted-delivery-of-therapeutics-to-bone-and-connective-tissues-current-status-and-challenges-part-i/

Calcium dependent NOS induction by sex hormones: Estrogen

Curator: S. Saha, PhD, October 3, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/03/calcium-dependent-nos-induction-by-sex-hormones/

Nitric Oxide and Platelet Aggregation,

Author V. Karra, PhD, August 16, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/16/no-and-platelet-aggregation/

Bystolic’s generic Nebivolol – positive effect on circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells endogenous augmentation

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, July 16, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Nebivolol

Endothelin Receptors in Cardiovascular Diseases: The Role of eNOS Stimulation

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, 10/4/2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/04/endothelin-receptors-in-cardiovascular-diseases-the-role-of-enos-stimulation/

Inhibition of ET-1, ETA and ETA-ETB, Induction of NO production, stimulation of eNOS and Treatment Regime with PPAR-gamma agonists (TZD): cEPCs Endogenous Augmentation for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction – A Bibliography

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, 10/4/2012.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/04/inhibition-of-et-1-eta-and-eta-etb-induction-of-no-production-and-stimulation-of-enos-and-treatment-regime-with-ppar-gamma-agonists-tzd-cepcs-endogenous-augmentation-for-cardiovascular-risk-reduc/

Nitric Oxide Nutritional remedies for hypertension and atherosclerosis. It’s 12 am: do you know where your electrons are?

Author and Reporter: Meg Baker, 10/7/2012.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/07/no-nutritional-remedies-for-hypertension-and-atherosclerosis-its-12-am-do-you-know-where-your-electrons-are/

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Curator and Reporter: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

Based on: A review by Wink et al., 2011

This is the first part of a two part post

Nitric oxide (NO), reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) perform dual roles as immunotoxins and immunomodulators. An incoming immune signal initiates NO and ROS production both for tackling the pathogens and modulating the downstream immune response via complex signaling pathways. The complexity of these interactions is a reflection of involvement of redox chemistry in biological setting (fig. 1)

Fig 1. Image credit: (Wink et al., 2011)

Previous studies have highlighted the role of NO in immunity. It was shown that macrophages released a substance that had antitumor and antipathogen activity and required arginine for its production (Hibbs et al., 1987, 1988). Hibbs and coworkers further strengthened the connection between immunity and NO by demonstrating that IL2 mediated immune activation increased NO levels in patients and promoted tumor eradication in mice (Hibbs et al., 1992; Yim et al., 1995).

In 1980s a number of authors showed the direct evidence that macrophages made nitrite, nitrates and nitrosamines. It was also shown that NO generated by macrophages could kill leukemia cells (Stuehr and Nathan, 1989). Collectively these studies along with others demonstrated the important role NO plays in immunity and lay the path for further research in understanding the role of redox molecules in immunity.

NO is produced by different forms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes such as eNOS (endothelial), iNOS (inducible) and nNOS (neuronal). The constitutive forms of eNOS generally produce NO in short bursts and in calcium dependent manner. The inducible form produces NO for longer durations and is calcium independent. In immunity, iNOS plays a vital role. NO production by iNOS can occur over a wide range of concentrations from as little as nM to as much as µM. This wide range of NO concentrations provide iNOS with a unique flexibility to be functionally effective in various conditions and micro-environements and thus provide different temporal and concentration profiles of NO, that can be highly efficient in dealing with immune challenges.

Redox reactions in immune responses

NO/RNS and ROS are two categories of molecules that bring about immune regulation and ‘killing’ of pathogens. These molecules can perform independently or in combination with each other. NO reacts directly with transition metals in heme or cobalamine, with non-heme iron, or with reactive radicals (Wink and Mitchell, 1998). The last reactivity also imparts it a powerful antioxidant capability. NO can thus act directly as a powerful antioxidant and prevent injury initiated by ROS (Wink et al., 1999). On the other hand, NO does not react directly with thiols or other nucleophiles but requires activation with superoxide to generate RNS. The RNS species then cause nitrosative and oxidative stress (Wink and Mitchell, 1998).

The variety of functions achieved by NO can be understood if one looks at certain chemical concepts. NO and NO2 are lipophilic and thus can migrate through cells, thus widening potential target profiles. ONOO-, a RNS, reacts rapidly with CO2 that shortens its half life to <10 ms. The anionic form and short half life limits its mobility across membranes. When NO levels are higher than superoxide levels, the CO2-OONOintermediate is converted to NO2 and N2O3 and changes the redox profile from an oxidative to a nitrosative microenvironment. The interaction of NO and ROS determines the bioavailability of NO and proximity of RNS generation to superoxide source, thus defining a reaction profile. The ROS also consumes NO to generate NO2 and N2O3 as well as nitrite in certain locations. The combination of these reactions in different micro-environments provides a vast repertoire of reaction profiles for NO/RNS and ROS entities.

The Phagosome ‘cauldron’

The phagosome provides an ‘isolated’ environment for the cell to carry out foreign body ‘destruction’. ROS, NO and RNS interact to bring about redox reactions. The concentration of NO in a phagosome can depend on the kind of NOS in the vicinity and its activity and other localised cellular factors. NO and is metabolites such as nitrites and nitrates along with ROS combine forces to kill pathogens in the acidic environment of the phagosome as depicted in the figure 2 below.

Fig 2. The NO chemistry of the phagosome. (image credit: (Wink et al., 2011)

This diagram depicts the different nitrogen oxide and ROS chemistry that can occur within the phagosome to fight pathogens. The presence of NOX2 in the phagosomes serves two purposes: one is to focus the nitrite accumulation through scavenging mechanisms, and the second provides peroxide as a source of ROS or FA generation. The nitrite (NO2−) formed in the acidic environment provides nitrosative stress with NO/NO2/N2O3. The combined acidic nature and the ability to form multiple RNS and ROS within the acidic environment of the phagosome provide the immune response with multiple chemical options with which it can combat bacteria.

Bacteria

There are various ways in which NO combines forces with other molecules to bring about bacterial killing. Here are few examples

E.coli: It appears to be resistant to individual action of NO/RNS and H2O2 /ROS. However, when combined together, H2O2 plus NO mediate a dramatic, three-log increase in cytotoxicity, as opposed to 50% killing by NO alone or H2O2 alone. This indicates that these bacteria are highly susceptible to their synergistic action.

Staphylococcus: The combined presence of NO and peroxide in staphylococcal infections imparts protective effect. However, when these bacteria are first exposed to peroxide and then to NO there is increased toxicity. Hence a sequential exposure to superoxide/ROS and then NO is a potent tool in eradicating staphylococcal bacteria.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis: These bacterium are sensitive to NO and RNS, but in this case, NO2 is the toxic species. A phagosome microenvironment consisting of ROS combined with acidic nitrite generates NO2/N2O3/NO, which is essential for pathogen eradication by the alveolar macrophage. Overall, NO has a dual function; it participates directly in killing an organism, and/or it disarms a pathway used by that organism to elude other immune responses.

Parasites

Many human parasites have demonstrated the initiation of the immune response via the induction of iNOS, that then leads to expulsion of the parasite. The parasites include Plasmodia(malaria), Leishmania(leishmaniasis), and Toxoplasma(toxoplasmosis). Severe cases of malaria have been related with increased production of NO. High levels of NO production are however protective in these cases as NO was shown to kill the parasites (Rockett et al., 1991; Gyan et al., 1994). Leishmania is an intracellualr parasite that resides in the mamalian macrophages. NO upregulation via iNOS induction is the primary pathway involved in containing its infestation. A critical aspect of NO metabolism is that NOHA inhibits AG activity, thereby limiting the growth of parasites and bacteria including Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Schistosoma, HelicobacterMycobacterium, and Salmonella, and is distinct from the effects of RNS. Toxoplasma gondii is also an intracellular parasite that elicits NO mediated response. INOS knockout mice have shown more severe inflammatory lesions in the CNS that their wild type counterparts, in response to toxoplasma exposure. This indicates the CNS preventative role of iNOS in toxoplasmosis (Silva et al., 2009).

Virus

Viral replication can be checked by increased production of NO by induction of iNOS (HIV-1, coxsackievirus, influenza A and B, rhino virus, CMV, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, human herpesvirus-1, and human parainfluenza virus type 3) (Xu et al., 2006). NO can reduce viral load, reduce latency and reduce viral replication. One of the main mechanisms as to how NO participates in viral eradication involves the nitrosation of critical cysteines within key proteins required for viral infection, transcription, and maturation stages. For example, viral proteases or even the host caspases that contain cysteines in their active site are involved in the maturation of the virus. The nitrosative stress environment produced by iNOS may serve to protect against some viruses by inhibiting viral infectivity, replication, and maturation.

To be continued in part 2 …

Bibliography

Gyan, B., Troye-Blomberg, M., Perlmann, P., Björkman, A., 1994. Human monocytes cultured with and without interferon-gamma inhibit Plasmodium falciparum parasite growth in vitro via secretion of reactive nitrogen intermediates. Parasite Immunol. 16, 371–3

Hibbs, J.B., Jr, Taintor, R.R., Vavrin, Z., 1987. Macrophage cytotoxicity: role for L-arginine deiminase and imino nitrogen oxidation to nitrite. Science 235, 473–476.

Hibbs, J.B., Jr, Taintor, R.R., Vavrin, Z., Rachlin, E.M., 1988. Nitric oxide: a cytotoxic activated macrophage effector molecule. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 157, 87–94.

Hibbs, J.B., Jr, Westenfelder, C., Taintor, R., Vavrin, Z., Kablitz, C., Baranowski, R.L., Ward, J.H., Menlove, R.L., McMurry, M.P., Kushner, J.P., 1992. Evidence for cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthesis from L-arginine in patients receiving interleu

Rockett, K.A., Awburn, M.M., Cowden, W.B., Clark, I.A., 1991. Killing of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro by nitric oxide derivatives. Infect Immun 59, 3280–3283.

Stuehr, D.J., Nathan, C.F., 1989. Nitric oxide. A macrophage product responsible for cytostasis and respiratory inhibition in tumor target cells. J. Exp. Med. 169, 1543–1555.

Wink, D.A., Hines, H.B., Cheng, R.Y.S., Switzer, C.H., Flores-Santana, W., Vitek, M.P., Ridnour, L.A., Colton, C.A., 2011. Nitric oxide and redox mechanisms in the immune response. J Leukoc Biol 89, 873–891.

Wink, D.A., Mitchell, J.B., 1998. Chemical biology of nitric oxide: Insights into regulatory, cytotoxic, and cytoprotective mechanisms of nitric oxide. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 25, 434–456.

Wink, D.A., Vodovotz, Y., Grisham, M.B., DeGraff, W., Cook, J.C., Pacelli, R., Krishna, M., Mitchell, J.B., 1999. Antioxidant effects of nitric oxide. Meth. Enzymol. 301, 413–424.

Xu, W., Zheng, S., Dweik, R.A., Erzurum, S.C., 2006. Role of epithelial nitric oxide in airway viral infection. Free Radic. Biol. Med. 41, 19–28.

Yim, C.Y., McGregor, J.R., Kwon, O.D., Bastian, N.R., Rees, M., Mori, M., Hibbs, J.B., Jr, Samlowski, W.E., 1995. Nitric oxide synthesis contributes to IL-2-induced antitumor responses against intraperitoneal Meth A tumor. J. Immunol. 155, 4382–4390.

Further reading on NO:

Nitric Oxide in bone metabolism July 16, 2012

Author: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/16/nitric-oxide-in-bone-metabolism/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_134751669

Nitric Oxide production in Systemic sclerosis July 25, 2012

Curator: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/25/nitric-oxide-production-in-systemic-sclerosis/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_138370383

Nitric Oxide Signalling Pathways August 22, 2012 by

Curator/ Author: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/nitric-oxide-signalling-pathways/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_151245569

Nitric Oxide: a short historic perspective August 5, 2012

Author/Curator: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/05/nitric-oxide-a-short-historic-perspective-7/

Nitric Oxide: Chemistry and function August 10, 2012

Curator/Author: Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/10/nitric-oxide-chemistry-and-function/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_145137865

Nitric Oxide and Platelet Aggregation August 16, 2012 by

Author: Dr. Venkat S. Karra, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/16/no-and-platelet-aggregation/?goback=%2Egde_4346921_member_147475405

The rationale and use of inhaled NO in Pulmonary Artery Hypertension and Right Sided Heart Failure August 20, 2012

Author: Larry Bernstein, MD

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/20/the-rationale-and-use-of-inhaled-no-in-pulmonary-artery-hypertension-and-right-sided-heart-failure/

Nitric Oxide: The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1998 Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro, Ferid Murad August 16, 2012

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/16/nitric-oxide-the-nobel-prize-in-physiology-or-medicine-1998-robert-f-furchgott-louis-j-ignarro-ferid-murad/

Coronary Artery Disease – Medical Devices Solutions: From First-In-Man Stent Implantation, via Medical Ethical Dilemmas to Drug Eluting Stents August 13, 2012

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/13/coronary-artery-disease-medical-devices-solutions-from-first-in-man-stent-implantation-via-medical-ethical-dilemmas-to-drug-eluting-stents/

Nano-particles as Synthetic Platelets to Stop Internal Bleeding Resulting from Trauma

August 22, 2012

Reported by: Dr. V. S. Karra, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/nano-particles-as-synthetic-platelets-to-stop-internal-bleeding-resulting-from-trauma/

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and the Role of agent alternatives in endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Activation and Nitric Oxide Production July 19, 2012

Curator and Research Study Originator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/19/cardiovascular-disease-cvd-and-the-role-of-agent-alternatives-in-endothelial-nitric-oxide-synthase-enos-activation-and-nitric-oxide-production/

Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs: Reduction Methods for CV Risk

July 2, 2012

An Investigation of the Potential of circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (cEPCs) as a Therapeutic Target for Pharmacological Therapy Design for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction: A New Multimarker Biomarker Discovery

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/02/macrovascular-disease-therapeutic-potential-of-cepcs-reduction-methods-for-cv-risk/

Bone remodelling in a nutshell June 22, 2012

Author: Aviral Vatsa, Ph.D., MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/bone-remodelling-in-a-nutshell/

Targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues: current status and challenges- Part, September  

Author: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, September 23, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/23/targeted-delivery-of-therapeutics-to-bone-and-connective-tissues-current-status-and-challenges-part-i/

Calcium dependent NOS induction by sex hormones: Estrogen

Curator: S. Saha, PhD, October 3, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/03/calcium-dependent-nos-induction-by-sex-hormones/

Nitric Oxide and Platelet Aggregation,

Author V. Karra, PhD, August 16, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/16/no-and-platelet-aggregation/

Bystolic’s generic Nebivolol – positive effect on circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells endogenous augmentation

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, July 16, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Nebivolol

Endothelin Receptors in Cardiovascular Diseases: The Role of eNOS Stimulation

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, 10/4/2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/04/endothelin-receptors-in-cardiovascular-diseases-the-role-of-enos-stimulation/

Inhibition of ET-1, ETA and ETA-ETB, Induction of NO production, stimulation of eNOS and Treatment Regime with PPAR-gamma agonists (TZD): cEPCs Endogenous Augmentation for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction – A Bibliography

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, 10/4/2012.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/04/inhibition-of-et-1-eta-and-eta-etb-induction-of-no-production-and-stimulation-of-enos-and-treatment-regime-with-ppar-gamma-agonists-tzd-cepcs-endogenous-augmentation-for-cardiovascular-risk-reduc/

Nitric Oxide Nutritional remedies for hypertension and atherosclerosis. It’s 12 am: do you know where your electrons are?

Author and Reporter: Meg Baker, 10/7/2012.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/07/no-nutritional-remedies-for-hypertension-and-atherosclerosis-its-12-am-do-you-know-where-your-electrons-are/

 

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