Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘National Human Genome Research Institute’

Proteomics, Metabolomics, Signaling Pathways, and Cell Regulation: a Compilation of Articles in the Journal http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com


Compilation of References by Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence in the Journal http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com about
Proteomics, Metabolomics, Signaling Pathways, and Cell Regulation

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Proteomics

  1. The Human Proteome Map Completed

Reporter and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/28/the-human-proteome-map-completed/

  1. Proteomics – The Pathway to Understanding and Decision-making in Medicine

Author and Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/24/proteomics-the-pathway-to-
understanding-and-decision-making-in-medicine/

3. Advances in Separations Technology for the “OMICs” and Clarification of Therapeutic Targets

Author and Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/22/advances-in-separations-technology-for-the-omics-and-clarification-         of-therapeutic-targets/

  1. Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and Linking the Genome to the Metabolome

Author and Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/24/expanding-the-genetic-alphabet-and-linking-the-genome-to-the-                metabolome/

5. Genomics, Proteomics and standards

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/06/genomics-proteomics-and-standards/

6. Proteins and cellular adaptation to stress

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/08/proteins-and-cellular-adaptation-to-stress/

 

Metabolomics

  1. Extracellular evaluation of intracellular flux in yeast cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/25/extracellular-evaluation-of-intracellular-flux-in-yeast-cells/

  1. Metabolomic analysis of two leukemia cell lines. I.

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/23/metabolomic-analysis-of-two-leukemia-cell-lines-_i/

  1. Metabolomic analysis of two leukemia cell lines. II.

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/24/metabolomic-analysis-of-two-leukemia-cell-lines-ii/

  1. Metabolomics, Metabonomics and Functional Nutrition: the next step in nutritional metabolism and biotherapeutics

Reviewer and Curator, Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/22/metabolomics-metabonomics-and-functional-nutrition-the-next-step-          in-nutritional-metabolism-and-biotherapeutics/

  1. Buffering of genetic modules involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism provides homeomeostatic regulation

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/27/buffering-of-genetic-modules-involved-in-tricarboxylic-acid-cycle-              metabolism-provides-homeomeostatic-regulation/

Metabolic Pathways

  1. Pentose Shunt, Electron Transfer, Galactose, more Lipids in brief

Reviewer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/21/pentose-shunt-electron-transfer-galactose-more-lipids-in-brief/

  1. Mitochondria: More than just the “powerhouse of the cell”

Ritu Saxena, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/09/mitochondria-more-than-just-the-powerhouse-of-the-cell/

  1. Mitochondrial fission and fusion: potential therapeutic targets?

Ritu saxena

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/31/mitochondrial-fission-and-fusion-potential-therapeutic-target/

4.  Mitochondrial mutation analysis might be “1-step” away

Ritu Saxena

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/14/mitochondrial-mutation-analysis-might-be-1-step-away/

  1. Selected References to Signaling and Metabolic Pathways in PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/14/selected-references-to-signaling-and-metabolic-pathways-in-                     leaders-in-pharmaceutical-intelligence/

  1. Metabolic drivers in aggressive brain tumors

Prabodh Kandal, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/11/metabolic-drivers-in-aggressive-brain-tumors/

  1. Metabolite Identification Combining Genetic and Metabolic Information: Genetic association links unknown metabolites to functionally related genes

Writer and Curator, Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/22/metabolite-identification-combining-genetic-and-metabolic-                        information-genetic-association-links-unknown-metabolites-to-functionally-related-genes/

  1. Mitochondria: Origin from oxygen free environment, role in aerobic glycolysis, metabolic adaptation

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, author and curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/26/mitochondria-origin-from-oxygen-free-environment-role-in-aerobic-            glycolysis-metabolic-adaptation/

  1. Therapeutic Targets for Diabetes and Related Metabolic Disorders

Reporter, Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/20/therapeutic-targets-for-diabetes-and-related-metabolic-disorders/

10.  Buffering of genetic modules involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism provides homeomeostatic regulation

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/27/buffering-of-genetic-modules-involved-in-tricarboxylic-acid-cycle-              metabolism-provides-homeomeostatic-regulation/

11. The multi-step transfer of phosphate bond and hydrogen exchange energy

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/19/the-multi-step-transfer-of-phosphate-bond-and-hydrogen-                          exchange-energy/

12. Studies of Respiration Lead to Acetyl CoA

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/18/studies-of-respiration-lead-to-acetyl-coa/

13. Lipid Metabolism

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/15/lipid-metabolism/

14. Carbohydrate Metabolism

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/13/carbohydrate-metabolism/

15. Update on mitochondrial function, respiration, and associated disorders

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/08/update-on-mitochondrial-function-respiration-and-associated-                   disorders/

16. Prologue to Cancer – e-book Volume One – Where are we in this journey?

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/13/prologue-to-cancer-ebook-4-where-are-we-in-this-journey/

17. Introduction – The Evolution of Cancer Therapy and Cancer Research: How We Got Here?

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/04/introduction-the-evolution-of-cancer-therapy-and-cancer-research-          how-we-got-here/

18. Inhibition of the Cardiomyocyte-Specific Kinase TNNI3K

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/01/inhibition-of-the-cardiomyocyte-specific-kinase-tnni3k/

19. The Binding of Oligonucleotides in DNA and 3-D Lattice Structures

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/15/the-binding-of-oligonucleotides-in-dna-and-3-d-lattice-structures/

20. Mitochondrial Metabolism and Cardiac Function

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/14/mitochondrial-metabolism-and-cardiac-function/

21. How Methionine Imbalance with Sulfur-Insufficiency Leads to Hyperhomocysteinemia

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/04/sulfur-deficiency-leads_to_hyperhomocysteinemia/

22. AMPK Is a Negative Regulator of the Warburg Effect and Suppresses Tumor Growth In Vivo

Author and Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/12/ampk-is-a-negative-regulator-of-the-warburg-effect-and-suppresses-         tumor-growth-in-vivo/

23. A Second Look at the Transthyretin Nutrition Inflammatory Conundrum

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/03/a-second-look-at-the-transthyretin-nutrition-inflammatory-                         conundrum/

24. Mitochondrial Damage and Repair under Oxidative Stress

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/mitochondrial-damage-and-repair-under-oxidative-stress/

25. Nitric Oxide and Immune Responses: Part 2

Author and Curator: Aviral Vatsa, PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/nitric-oxide-and-immune-responses-part-2/

26. Overview of Posttranslational Modification (PTM)

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/29/overview-of-posttranslational-modification-ptm/

27. Malnutrition in India, high newborn death rate and stunting of children age under five years

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/15/malnutrition-in-india-high-newborn-death-rate-and-stunting-of-                   children-age-under-five-years/

28. Update on mitochondrial function, respiration, and associated disorders

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/08/update-on-mitochondrial-function-respiration-and-associated-                  disorders/

29. Omega-3 fatty acids, depleting the source, and protein insufficiency in renal disease

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/06/omega-3-fatty-acids-depleting-the-source-and-protein-insufficiency-         in-renal-disease/

30. Introduction to e-Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four Part 2: Regenerative Medicine

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, writer, and Aviva Lev- Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/27/larryhbernintroduction_to_cardiovascular_diseases-                                  translational_medicine-part_2/

31. Epilogue: Envisioning New Insights in Cancer Translational Biology
Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology

Author & Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Series C Content Consultant

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/29/epilogue-envisioning-new-insights/

32. Ca2+-Stimulated Exocytosis:  The Role of Calmodulin and Protein Kinase C in Ca2+ Regulation of Hormone                         and Neurotransmitter

Writer and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and
Curator and Content Editor: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/23/calmodulin-and-protein-kinase-c-drive-the-ca2-regulation-of-                    hormone-and-neurotransmitter-release-that-triggers-ca2-stimulated-exocy

33. Cardiac Contractility & Myocardial Performance: Therapeutic Implications of Ryanopathy (Calcium Release-                           related Contractile Dysfunction) and Catecholamine Responses

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC
Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP
and Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/28/cardiac-contractility-myocardium-performance-ventricular-arrhythmias-      and-non-ischemic-heart-failure-therapeutic-implications-for-cardiomyocyte-ryanopathy-calcium-release-related-                    contractile/

34. Role of Calcium, the Actin Skeleton, and Lipid Structures in Signaling and Cell Motility

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP Author: Stephen Williams, PhD, and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/26/role-of-calcium-the-actin-skeleton-and-lipid-structures-in-signaling-and-cell-motility/

35. Identification of Biomarkers that are Related to the Actin Cytoskeleton

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/10/identification-of-biomarkers-that-are-related-to-the-actin-                           cytoskeleton/

36. Advanced Topics in Sepsis and the Cardiovascular System at its End Stage

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/18/advanced-topics-in-Sepsis-and-the-Cardiovascular-System-at-its-              End-Stage/

37. The Delicate Connection: IDO (Indolamine 2, 3 dehydrogenase) and Cancer Immunology

Demet Sag, PhD, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/04/the-delicate-connection-ido-indolamine-2-3-dehydrogenase-and-               immunology/

38. IDO for Commitment of a Life Time: The Origins and Mechanisms of IDO, indolamine 2, 3-dioxygenase

Demet Sag, PhD, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/04/ido-for-commitment-of-a-life-time-the-origins-and-mechanisms-of-             ido-indolamine-2-3-dioxygenase/

39. Confined Indolamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) Controls the Homeostasis of Immune Responses for Good and Bad

Curator: Demet Sag, PhD, CRA, GCP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/31/confined-indolamine-2-3-dehydrogenase-controls-the-hemostasis-           of-immune-responses-for-good-and-bad/

40. Signaling Pathway that Makes Young Neurons Connect was discovered @ Scripps Research Institute

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/26/signaling-pathway-that-makes-young-neurons-connect-was-                     discovered-scripps-research-institute/

41. Naked Mole Rats Cancer-Free

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/20/naked-mole-rats-cancer-free/

42. Late Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease and One-carbon Metabolism

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/06/alzheimers-disease-and-one-carbon-metabolism/

43. Problems of vegetarianism

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/22/problems-of-vegetarianism/

44.  Amyloidosis with Cardiomyopathy

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/31/amyloidosis-with-cardiomyopathy/

45. Liver endoplasmic reticulum stress and hepatosteatosis

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/10/liver-endoplasmic-reticulum-stress-and-hepatosteatosis/

46. The Molecular Biology of Renal Disorders: Nitric Oxide – Part III

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/26/the-molecular-biology-of-renal-disorders/

47. Nitric Oxide Function in Coagulation – Part II

Curator and Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/26/nitric-oxide-function-in-coagulation/

48. Nitric Oxide, Platelets, Endothelium and Hemostasis

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/08/nitric-oxide-platelets-endothelium-and-hemostasis/

49. Interaction of Nitric Oxide and Prostacyclin in Vascular Endothelium

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/14/interaction-of-nitric-oxide-and-prostacyclin-in-vascular-endothelium/

50. Nitric Oxide and Immune Responses: Part 1

Curator and Author:  Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/18/nitric-oxide-and-immune-responses-part-1/

51. Nitric Oxide and Immune Responses: Part 2

Curator and Author:  Aviral Vatsa PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/nitric-oxide-and-immune-responses-part-2/

52. Mitochondrial Damage and Repair under Oxidative Stress

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/mitochondrial-damage-and-repair-under-oxidative-stress/

53. Is the Warburg Effect the cause or the effect of cancer: A 21st Century View?

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/17/is-the-warburg-effect-the-cause-or-the-effect-of-cancer-a-21st-                 century-view/

54. Ubiquinin-Proteosome pathway, autophagy, the mitochondrion, proteolysis and cell apoptosis

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/30/ubiquinin-proteosome-pathway-autophagy-the-mitochondrion-                  proteolysis-and-cell-apoptosis/

55. Ubiquitin-Proteosome pathway, Autophagy, the Mitochondrion, Proteolysis and Cell Apoptosis: Part III

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/14/ubiquinin-proteosome-pathway-autophagy-the-mitochondrion-                   proteolysis-and-cell-apoptosis-reconsidered/

56. Nitric Oxide and iNOS have Key Roles in Kidney Diseases – Part II

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/26/nitric-oxide-and-inos-have-key-roles-in-kidney-diseases/

57. New Insights on Nitric Oxide donors – Part IV

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/26/new-insights-on-no-donors/

58. Crucial role of Nitric Oxide in Cancer

Curator and Author: Ritu Saxena, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/16/crucial-role-of-nitric-oxide-in-cancer/

59. Nitric Oxide has a ubiquitous role in the regulation of glycolysis -with a concomitant influence on mitochondrial function

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/16/nitric-oxide-has-a-ubiquitous-role-in-the-regulation-of-glycolysis-with-         a-concomitant-influence-on-mitochondrial-function/

60. Targeting Mitochondrial-bound Hexokinase for Cancer Therapy

Curator and Author: Ziv Raviv, PhD, RN 04/06/2013

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/06/targeting-mitochondrial-bound-hexokinase-for-cancer-therapy/

61. Biochemistry of the Coagulation Cascade and Platelet Aggregation – Part I

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/26/biochemistry-of-the-coagulation-cascade-and-platelet-aggregation/

Genomics, Transcriptomics, and Epigenetics

  1. What is the meaning of so many RNAs?

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/06/what-is-the-meaning-of-so-many-rnas/

  1. RNA and the transcription the genetic code

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Writer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/02/rna-and-the-transcription-of-the-genetic-code/

  1. A Primer on DNA and DNA Replication

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/29/a_primer_on_dna_and_dna_replication/

4. Synthesizing Synthetic Biology: PLOS Collections

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/17/synthesizing-synthetic-biology-plos-collections/

5. Pathology Emergence in the 21st Century

Author and Curator: Larry Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/03/pathology-emergence-in-the-21st-century/

6. RNA and the transcription the genetic code

Writer and Curator, Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/02/rna-and-the-transcription-of-the-genetic-code/

7. A Great University engaged in Drug Discovery: University of Pittsburgh

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/15/a-great-university-engaged-in-drug-discovery/

8. microRNA called miRNA-142 involved in the process by which the immature cells in the bone  marrow give                              rise to all the types of blood cells, including immune cells and the oxygen-bearing red blood cells

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/24/microrna-called-mir-142-involved-in-the-process-by-which-the-                   immature-cells-in-the-bone-marrow-give-rise-to-all-the-types-of-blood-cells-including-immune-cells-and-the-oxygen-             bearing-red-blood-cells/

9. Genes, proteomes, and their interaction

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Writer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/28/genes-proteomes-and-their-interaction/

10. Regulation of somatic stem cell Function

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Writer and Curator    Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/29/regulation-of-somatic-stem-cell-function/

11. Scientists discover that pluripotency factor NANOG is also active in adult organisms

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/10/scientists-discover-that-pluripotency-factor-nanog-is-also-active-in-           adult-organisms/

12. Bzzz! Are fruitflies like us?

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/07/bzzz-are-fruitflies-like-us/

13. Long Non-coding RNAs Can Encode Proteins After All

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/29/long-non-coding-rnas-can-encode-proteins-after-all/

14. Michael Snyder @Stanford University sequenced the lymphoblastoid transcriptomes and developed an
allele-specific full-length transcriptome

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/014/06/23/michael-snyder-stanford-university-sequenced-the-lymphoblastoid-            transcriptomes-and-developed-an-allele-specific-full-length-transcriptome/

15. Commentary on Biomarkers for Genetics and Genomics of Cardiovascular Disease: Views by Larry H                                     Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/16/commentary-on-biomarkers-for-genetics-and-genomics-of-                        cardiovascular-disease-views-by-larry-h-bernstein-md-fcap/

16. Observations on Finding the Genetic Links in Common Disease: Whole Genomic Sequencing Studies

Author an curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/18/observations-on-finding-the-genetic-links/

17. Silencing Cancers with Synthetic siRNAs

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/09/silencing-cancers-with-synthetic-sirnas/

18. Cardiometabolic Syndrome and the Genetics of Hypertension: The Neuroendocrine Transcriptome Control Points

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/12/cardiometabolic-syndrome-and-the-genetics-of-hypertension-the-neuroendocrine-transcriptome-control-points/

19. Developments in the Genomics and Proteomics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Treatment Targets

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reviewer and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/08/developments-in-the-genomics-and-proteomics-of-type-2-diabetes-           mellitus-and-treatment-targets/

20. Loss of normal growth regulation

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/06/loss-of-normal-growth-regulation/

21. CT Angiography & TrueVision™ Metabolomics (Genomic Phenotyping) for new Therapeutic Targets to Atherosclerosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/15/ct-angiography-truevision-metabolomics-genomic-phenotyping-for-           new-therapeutic-targets-to-atherosclerosis/

22.  CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: The Birth of BioInformatics & Computational Genomics

Genomics Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/30/cracking-the-code-of-human-life-the-birth-of-bioinformatics-                      computational-genomics/

23. Big Data in Genomic Medicine

Author and Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/17/big-data-in-genomic-medicine/

24. From Genomics of Microorganisms to Translational Medicine

Author and Curator: Demet Sag, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/20/without-the-past-no-future-but-learn-and-move-genomics-of-                      microorganisms-to-translational-medicine/

25. Summary of Genomics and Medicine: Role in Cardiovascular Diseases

Author and Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/06/summary-of-genomics-and-medicine-role-in-cardiovascular-diseases/

 26. Genomic Promise for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dementias, Autism Spectrum, Schizophrenia, and Serious                      Depression

Author and Curator, Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/19/genomic-promise-for-neurodegenerative-diseases-dementias-autism-        spectrum-schizophrenia-and-serious-depression/

 27.  BRCA1 a tumour suppressor in breast and ovarian cancer – functions in transcription, ubiquitination and DNA repair

Sudipta Saha, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/04/brca1-a-tumour-suppressor-in-breast-and-ovarian-cancer-functions-         in-transcription-ubiquitination-and-dna-repair/

28. Personalized medicine gearing up to tackle cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/07/personalized-medicine-gearing-up-to-tackle-cancer/

29. Differentiation Therapy – Epigenetics Tackles Solid Tumors

Stephen J Williams, PhD

      https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/03/differentiation-therapy-epigenetics-tackles-solid-tumors/

30. Mechanism involved in Breast Cancer Cell Growth: Function in Early Detection & Treatment

     Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/17/mechanism-involved-in-breast-cancer-cell-growth-function-in-early-          detection-treatment/

31. The Molecular pathology of Breast Cancer Progression

Tilde Barliya, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/10/the-molecular-pathology-of-breast-cancer-progression

32. Gastric Cancer: Whole-genome reconstruction and mutational signatures

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/24/gastric-cancer-whole-genome-reconstruction-and-mutational-                   signatures-2/

33. Paradigm Shift in Human Genomics – Predictive Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine –                                                       Part 1 (pharmaceuticalintelligence.com)

Aviva  Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

http://pharmaceuticalntelligence.com/2013/01/13/paradigm-shift-in-human-genomics-predictive-biomarkers-and-personalized-medicine-part-1/

34. LEADERS in Genome Sequencing of Genetic Mutations for Therapeutic Drug Selection in Cancer                                         Personalized Treatment: Part 2

A Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/leaders-in-genome-sequencing-of-genetic-mutations-for-therapeutic-       drug-selection-in-cancer-personalized-treatment-part-2/

35. Personalized Medicine: An Institute Profile – Coriell Institute for Medical Research: Part 3

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/personalized-medicine-an-institute-profile-coriell-institute-for-medical-        research-part-3/

36. Harnessing Personalized Medicine for Cancer Management, Prospects of Prevention and Cure: Opinions of                           Cancer Scientific Leaders @http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/13/7000/Harnessing_Personalized_Medicine_for_ Cancer_Management-      Prospects_of_Prevention_and_Cure/

37.  GSK for Personalized Medicine using Cancer Drugs needs Alacris systems biology model to determine the in silico
effect of the inhibitor in its “virtual clinical trial”

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/14/gsk-for-personalized-medicine-using-cancer-drugs-needs-alacris-             systems-biology-model-to-determine-the-in-silico-effect-of-the-inhibitor-in-its-virtual-clinical-trial/

38. Personalized medicine-based cure for cancer might not be far away

Ritu Saxena, PhD

  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/20/personalized-medicine-based-cure-for-cancer-might-not-be-far-away/

39. Human Variome Project: encyclopedic catalog of sequence variants indexed to the human genome sequence

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/24/human-variome-project-encyclopedic-catalog-of-sequence-variants-         indexed-to-the-human-genome-sequence/

40. Inspiration From Dr. Maureen Cronin’s Achievements in Applying Genomic Sequencing to Cancer Diagnostics

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/10/inspiration-from-dr-maureen-cronins-achievements-in-applying-                genomic-sequencing-to-cancer-diagnostics/

41. The “Cancer establishments” examined by James Watson, co-discoverer of DNA w/Crick, 4/1953

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/09/the-cancer-establishments-examined-by-james-watson-co-discover-         of-dna-wcrick-41953/

42. What can we expect of tumor therapeutic response?

Author and curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/05/what-can-we-expect-of-tumor-therapeutic-response/

43. Directions for genomics in personalized medicine

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/27/directions-for-genomics-in-personalized-medicine/

44. How mobile elements in “Junk” DNA promote cancer. Part 1: Transposon-mediated tumorigenesis.

Stephen J Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/31/how-mobile-elements-in-junk-dna-prote-cancer-part1-transposon-            mediated-tumorigenesis/

45. mRNA interference with cancer expression

Author and Curator, Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/26/mrna-interference-with-cancer-expression/

46. Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and linking the genome to the metabolome

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/24/expanding-the-genetic-alphabet-and-linking-the-genome-to-the-               metabolome/

47. Breast Cancer, drug resistance, and biopharmaceutical targets

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/18/breast-cancer-drug-resistance-and-biopharmaceutical-targets/

48.  Breast Cancer: Genomic profiling to predict Survival: Combination of Histopathology and Gene Expression                            Analysis

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/24/breast-cancer-genomic-profiling-to-predict-survival-combination-of-           histopathology-and-gene-expression-analysis

49. Gastric Cancer: Whole-genome reconstruction and mutational signatures

Aviva  Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/24/gastric-cancer-whole-genome-reconstruction-and-mutational-                   signatures-2/

50. Genomic Analysis: FLUIDIGM Technology in the Life Science and Agricultural Biotechnology

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/genomic-analysis-fluidigm-technology-in-the-life-science-and-                   agricultural-biotechnology/

51. 2013 Genomics: The Era Beyond the Sequencing Human Genome: Francis Collins, Craig Venter, Eric Lander, et al.

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013_Genomics

52. Paradigm Shift in Human Genomics – Predictive Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine – Part 1

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/Paradigm Shift in Human Genomics_/

Signaling Pathways

  1. Proteins and cellular adaptation to stress

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/08/proteins-and-cellular-adaptation-to-stress/

  1. A Synthesis of the Beauty and Complexity of How We View Cancer:
    Cancer Volume One – Summary

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/26/a-synthesis-of-the-beauty-and-complexity-of-how-we-view-cancer/

  1. Recurrent somatic mutations in chromatin-remodeling and ubiquitin ligase complex genes in
    serous endometrial tumors

Sudipta Saha, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/19/recurrent-somatic-mutations-in-chromatin-remodeling-ad-ubiquitin-           ligase-complex-genes-in-serous-endometrial-tumors/

4.  Prostate Cancer Cells: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Induce Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

Stephen J Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/30/histone-deacetylase-inhibitors-induce-epithelial-to-mesenchymal-              transition-in-prostate-cancer-cells/

5. Ubiquinin-Proteosome pathway, autophagy, the mitochondrion, proteolysis and cell apoptosis

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/30/ubiquinin-proteosome-pathway-autophagy-the-mitochondrion-                   proteolysis-and-cell-apoptosis/

6. Signaling and Signaling Pathways

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/12/signaling-and-signaling-pathways/

7.  Leptin signaling in mediating the cardiac hypertrophy associated with obesity

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/03/leptin-signaling-in-mediating-the-cardiac-hypertrophy-associated-            with-obesity/

  1. Sensors and Signaling in Oxidative Stress

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/01/sensors-and-signaling-in-oxidative-stress/

  1. The Final Considerations of the Role of Platelets and Platelet Endothelial Reactions in Atherosclerosis and Novel
    Treatments

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/15/the-final-considerations-of-the-role-of-platelets-and-platelet-                      endothelial-reactions-in-atherosclerosis-and-novel-treatments

10.   Platelets in Translational Research – Part 1

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/07/platelets-in-translational-research-1/

11.  Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis: Cardiomyocytes and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: The Cardiac and
Cardiovascular Calcium Signaling Mechanism

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A:
Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/09/12/disruption-of-calcium-homeostasis-cardiomyocytes-and-vascular-             smooth-muscle-cells-the-cardiac-and-cardiovascular-calcium-signaling-mechanism/

12. The Centrality of Ca(2+) Signaling and Cytoskeleton Involving Calmodulin Kinases and
Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Failure, Arterial Smooth Muscle, Post-ischemic Arrhythmia,
Similarities and Differences, and Pharmaceutical Targets

     Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author, and Content Consultant to
e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and
Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/09/08/the-centrality-of-ca2-signaling-and-cytoskeleton-involving-calmodulin-       kinases-and-ryanodine-receptors-in-cardiac-failure-arterial-smooth-muscle-post-ischemic-arrhythmia-similarities-and-           differen/

13.  Nitric Oxide Signalling Pathways

Aviral Vatsa, PhD, MBBS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/nitric-oxide-signalling-pathways/

14. Immune activation, immunity, antibacterial activity

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/06/immune-activation-immunity-antibacterial-activity/

15.  Regulation of somatic stem cell Function

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Writer and Curator    Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/29/regulation-of-somatic-stem-cell-function/

16. Scientists discover that pluripotency factor NANOG is also active in adult organisms

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Reporter

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/10/scientists-discover-that-pluripotency-factor-nanog-is-also-active-in-adult-organisms/

Read Full Post »


Gene Expression: Algorithms for Protein Dynamics

Reporter:  Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Stanford-developed algorithm reveals complex protein dynamics behind gene expression

BY KRISTA CONGER

Michael Snyder

In yet another coup for a research concept known as “big data,” researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a computerized algorithm to understand the complex and rapid choreography of hundreds of proteins that interact in mindboggling combinations to govern how genes are flipped on and off within a cell.

To do so, they coupled findings from 238 DNA-protein-binding experiments performed by the ENCODE project — a massive, multiyear international effort to identify the functional elements of the human genome — with a laboratory-based technique to identify binding patterns among the proteins themselves.

The analysis is sensitive enough to have identified many previously unsuspected, multipartner trysts. It can also be performed quickly and repeatedly to track how a cell responds to environmental changes or crucial developmental signals.

“At a very basic level, we are learning who likes to work with whom to regulate around 20,000 human genes,” said Michael Snyder, PhD, professor and chair of genetics at Stanford. “If you had to look through all possible interactions pair-wise, it would be ridiculously impossible. Here we can look at thousands of combinations in an unbiased manner and pull out important and powerful information. It gives us an unprecedented level of understanding.”

Snyder is the senior author of a paper describing the research published Oct. 24 in Cell. The lead authors are postdoctoral scholars Dan Xie, PhD, Alan Boyle, PhD, and Linfeng Wu, PhD.

Proteins control gene expression by either binding to specific regions of DNA, or by interacting with other DNA-bound proteins to modulate their function. Previously, researchers could only analyze two to three proteins and DNA sequences at a time, and were unable to see the true complexities of the interactions among proteins and DNA that occur in living cells.

The challenge resembled trying to figure out interactions in a crowded mosh pit by studying a few waltzing couples in an otherwise empty ballroom, and it has severely limited what could be learned about the dynamics of gene expression.

The ENCODE, for the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements, project was a five-year collaboration of more than 440 scientists in 32 labs around the world to reveal the complex interplay among regulatory regions, proteins and RNA molecules that governs when and how genes are expressed. The project has been generating a treasure trove of data for researchers to analyze for the last eight years.

In this study, the researchers combined data from genomics (a field devoted to the study of genes) and proteomics (which focuses on proteins and their interactions). They studied 128 proteins, called trans-acting factors, which are known to regulate gene expression by binding to regulatory regions within the genome. Some of the regions control the expression of nearby genes; others affect the expression of genes great distances away.

The researchers used 238 data sets generated by the ENCODE project to study the specific DNA sequences bound by each of the 128 trans-acting factors. But these factors aren’t monogamous; they bind many different sequences in a variety of protein-DNA combinations. Xie, Boyle and Snyder designed a machine-learning algorithm to analyze all the data and identify which trans-acting factors tend to be seen together and which DNA sequences they prefer.

Wu then performed immunoprecipitation experiments, which use antibodies to identify protein interactions in the cell nucleus. In this way, they were able to tell which proteins interacted directly with one another, and which were seen together because their preferred DNA binding sites were adjoining.

“Before our work, only the combination of two or three regulatory proteins were studied, which oversimplified how gene regulators collaborate to find their targets,” Xie said. “With our method we are able to study the combination of more than 100 regulators and see a much more complex structure of collaboration. For example, it had been believed that a key regulator of cell proliferation called FOS typically only works with JUN protein family members. We show, in addition to JUN, FOS has different partners under different circumstances. In fact, we found almost all the canonical combinations of two or three trans-acting factors have many more partners than we previously thought.”

To broaden their analysis, the researchers included data from other sources that explored protein-binding patterns in five cell types. They found that patterns of co-localization among proteins, in which several proteins are found clustered closely on the DNA to govern gene expression, vary according to cell type and the conditions under which the cells are grown. They also found that many of these clusters can be explained through interactions among proteins, and that not every protein bound to DNA directly.

“We’d like to understand how these interactions work together to make different cell types and how they gain their unique identities in development,” Snyder said. “Furthermore, diseased cells will have a very different type of wiring diagram. We hope to understand how these cells go astray.”

Other Stanford co-authors include life science research assistant Jie Zhai and life science research associate Trupti Kawli, PhD.

The research was supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (grants U54HG004558 and U54HG006996).

Information about Stanford’s Department of Genetics, which also supported the work, is available at http://genetics.stanford.edu.

PRINT MEDIA CONTACT
Krista Conger | Tel (650) 725-5371
kristac@stanford.edu
BROADCAST MEDIA CONTACT
M.A. Malone | Tel (650) 723-6912
mamalone@stanford.edu

Stanford Medicine integrates research, medical education and patient care at its three institutions – Stanford University School of MedicineStanford Hospital & Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. For more information, please visit the Office of Communication & Public Affairs site at

http://mednews.stanford.edu/.http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2013/october/snyder.html?goback=%2Egde_5180384_member_5799368448383397888#sthash%2EhU03LKIX%2Edpuf

 

Dynamic trans-Acting Factor Colocalization in Human Cells

Cell, Volume 155, Issue 3, 713-724, 24 October 2013
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
10.1016/j.cell.2013.09.043

Authors

    • Highlights
    • Colocalization patterns of 128 TFs in human cells
    • An application of SOMs to study high-dimensional TF colocalization patterns
    • Colocalization patterns are dynamic through stimulation and across cell types
    • Many TF colocalizations can be explained by protein-protein interaction

    Summary

    Different trans-acting factors (TFs) collaborate and act in concert at distinct loci to perform accurate regulation of their target genes. To date, the cobinding of TF pairs has been investigated in a limited context both in terms of the number of factors within a cell type and across cell types and the extent of combinatorial colocalizations. Here, we use an approach to analyze TF colocalization within a cell type and across multiple cell lines at an unprecedented level. We extend this approach with large-scale mass spectrometry analysis of immunoprecipitations of 50 TFs. Our combined approach reveals large numbers of interesting TF-TF associations. We observe extensive change in TF colocalizations both within a cell type exposed to different conditions and across multiple cell types. We show distinct functional annotations and properties of different TF cobinding patterns and provide insights into the complex regulatory landscape of the cell.

    http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674%2813%2901217-8#!

    Personalized medicine aims to assess medical risks, monitor, diagnose and treat patients according to their specific genetic composition and molecular phenotype. The advent of genome sequencing and the analysis of physiological states has proven to be powerful (Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, 2011). However, its implementation for the analysis of otherwise healthy individuals for estimation of disease risk and medical interpretation is less clear. Much of the genome is difficult to interpret and many complex diseases, such as diabetes, neurological disorders and cancer, likely involve a large number of different genes and biological pathways (Ashley et al., 2010,Grayson et al., 2011,Li et al., 2011), as well as environmental contributors that can be difficult to assess. As such, the combination of genomic information along with a detailed molecular analysis of samples will be important for predicting, diagnosing and treating diseases as well as for understanding the onset, progression, and prevalence of disease states (Snyder et al., 2009).

    Presently, healthy and diseased states are typically followed using a limited number of assays that analyze a small number of markers of distinct types. With the advancement of many new technologies, it is now possible to analyze upward of 105 molecular constituents. For example, DNA microarrays have allowed the subcategorization of lymphomas and gliomas (Mischel et al., 2003), and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has identified breast cancer transcript isoforms (Li et al., 2011,van der Werf et al., 2007,Wu et al., 2010,Lapuk et al., 2010). Although transcriptome and RNA splicing profiling are powerful and convenient, they provide a partial portrait of an organism’s physiological state. Transcriptomic data, when combined with genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data are expected to provide a much deeper understanding of normal and diseased states (Snyder et al., 2010). To date, comprehensive integrative omics profiles have been limited and have not been applied to the analysis of generally healthy individuals.

    To obtain a better understanding of: (1) how to generate an integrative personal omics profile (iPOP) and examine as many biological components as possible, (2) how these components change during healthy and diseased states, and (3) how this information can be combined with genomic information to estimate disease risk and gain new insights into diseased states, we performed extensive omics profiling of blood components from a generally healthy individual over a 14 month period (24 months total when including time points with other molecular analyses). We determined the whole-genome sequence (WGS) of the subject, and together with transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and autoantibody profiles, used this information to generate an iPOP. We analyzed the iPOP of the individual over the course of healthy states and two viral infections (Figure 1A). Our results indicate that disease risk can be estimated by a whole-genome sequence and by regularly monitoring health states with iPOP disease onset may also be observed. The wealth of information provided by detailed longitudinal iPOP revealed unexpected molecular complexity, which exhibited dynamic changes during healthy and diseased states, and provided insight into multiple biological processes. Detailed omics profiling coupled with genome sequencing can provide molecular and physiological information of medical significance. This approach can be generalized for personalized health monitoring and medicine.

     

    Read Full Post »


    ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) program: ‘Tragic’ Sequestration Impact on NHGRI Programs

    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    NHGRI’s Green Sees ‘Tragic’ Sequestration Impact on NHGRI Programs

    September 13, 2013

    NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The funding squeeze from the sequestration of the US federal budget, now more than half-a-year old, has already had a sizable impact at the National Human Genome Research Institute, leading to cuts to ongoing programs, scaling back of new ones, and the deferring of efforts that have not yet launched.

    The five percent cut in funding this year at NHGRI has led not only to trimmed-down renewal grants and fewer, smaller awards broadly, but also has chopped the budget for some of the institute’s important programs, according to NHGRI Director Eric Green.

    The programs that have either had their funding reduced, and in one case delayed, include the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) program, projects focused on using genome sequencing in newborns and in clinical medicine, and other initiatives, Green said in his Director’s Report to the National Advisory Council on Human Genomics Research this week.

    In addition, many renewal grants have been trimmed, and there are “numerous examples of detrimental cuts” to the institute’s intramural research program, said Green. These cuts to large and small NHGRI programs come at a pivotal time for genomics, he noted, as the products of such research are beginning to translate into clinical possibilities.

    “It is tragic. [That] is the word I would use,” Green told GenomeWeb Daily News this week.

    “[The field of genomics] is just so exciting. There are so many opportunities,” he said. “This is precisely the time that we should be pushing the accelerator hard, and we just cannot do it because we don’t have enough fuel in our fuel tank.

    “It’s frustrating. I think the opportunities now are just spectacular,” said Green. “It’s tragic because it is just so obvious that we could do some remarkable things in genomics and we are not being able to do it.”

    ENCODE, a decade-old flagship project at NIH that aims to identify all of the functional elements in the human genome, had its budget reduced by 16 percent.

    The Genomic Sequencing and Newborn Screening Disorders program was cut by half, which left the program to fund fewer research projects than planned and its research consortium to go forward without the benefit of a data coordinating center. This new initiative, an effort to support pioneering studies on how sequencing might be used in the care of newborns and in neonatal care that was created jointly with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, had its budget cut from $10 million to $5 million.

    The Genomic Medicine Pilot Demonstration Projects program had its budget cut by 20 percent, and NHGRI’s Bioinformatics Resources and Analysis Research Portfolio had $5 million sliced out of its budget. The new Genomics of Gene Regulation (GGR)request for applications was bumped out of this funding year entirely, and has been delayed until 2014, according to Green.

    Because the sequestration plan was concocted and agreed to well in advance of its arrival earlier this year, Green told GWDN that the institute did have some time to try to react to the sequestration and mitigate the pain from the cuts, spreading them around fairly and evenly while maintaining priorities. He said leadership at the institute tried to prepare for the possibility of sequestration by being conservative in its planning.

    Programs that were already ongoing, like ENCODE, were likely to take priority over those that were not yet launched, like GGR, in part because the infrastructure is already in place for ongoing projects and because it is easier to plan for how they operate and generate outputs, like data.

    “With ENCODE you know for every million dollars you invest you get so much back,” said Green. “With a program like newborn sequencing … we don’t totally know what it’s going to look like or play out like. We won’t know what we are missing because we won’t be able to launch it to the scale that we wanted to launch it originally.”

    Green said some of the projects being cut or delayed were created under NHGRI’sstrategic plan, a program it laid out in 2011 that involves restructuring of the institute’s divisions and some shifting in its research portfolio to include more efforts in applying genomics to medicine and healthcare.

    “Some of these RFAs that we delayed really represent key elements that we started to anticipate two years ago,” said Green. “We knew we wanted to do more in sequencing, we knew we wanted to do some pilot projects in genomic medicine. We knew we wanted to continue to accelerate efforts in understanding how the genome works … ENCODE, GGR, and so forth. It just had to be slowed down,” he said.

    Anastasia Wise, program director for the Genomic Sequencing and Newborn Screening Disorders program, told GWDN that the program was supposed to be much larger than the $5 million in awards unveiled last week, which funded a consortium of four research projects.

    Wise said NHGRI and NICHD were each initially planning to provide double the amount of funding they were actually awarded, which is now expected to be a total of $25 million over five years, although that total could be subject to the availability of funding.

    “There were definitely more scientifically meritorious applications than we were able to fund,” she said. “Even the four awards that we made ended up being cut an additional five percent because of the sequestration.”

    She said the program “wanted to be able to make more awards, and we wanted to be able to fund a coordinating center to be able to bring the network together and help provide some harmonization of data and coordination of logistics between the different members of the consortium,” but it was unable to fund that part of the effort.

    Although the fractured fiscal culture in Washington engenders caution at NHGRI as the agency looks forward, Green sees many scientific opportunities right now, as genomics begins to hit the clinic.

    “Some people are saying we are not even going fast enough,” he said. “Lots of people have been discussing what the world is going to look like when somebody gets their genome sequenced in the newborn period, and [they] think about what the implications of that are for the patient for the rest of their lives. We want to start studying this,” he said.

    “And we are starting to … but we’re not starting as aggressively as we wanted to,” Green said. “I mean, we took a big hit this year.”

    Matt Jones is a staff reporter for GenomeWeb Daily News. He covers public policy, legislation, and funding issues that affect researchers in the genomics field, as well as the operations of research institutes. E-mail Matt Jones or follow GWDN’s headlines at @DailyNewsGW.

    Related Stories

    SOURCE

    http://www.genomeweb.com//node/1280236?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Sequestration%20Impact%20on%20NHGRI;%20Adaptive%20Biotechnologies%20Gets%20$2.5M%20SBIR%20Grant;%20In%20Brief;%20People%20-%2009/13/2013%2004:10:00%20PM

    Read Full Post »


    ASHG to Maintain Information of to shut down National Genetics Coalition

    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

     

    National Genetics Coalition to Shut Down,

    July 30, 2013

    NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics (NCHPEG), an interdisciplinary group of leaders from a range of public and private organizations funded by the National Institutes of Health, will shut down next month due to funding constraints, according to the National Human Genome Research Institute.

    The genetics and genomics education information that NCHPEG has compileds and made available via its website will be maintained by the American Society of Human Genetics, ASHG executive VP and former NCHPEG executive director Joseph McInerney said.

    NCHPEG launched in 1996 after current NIH Director Francis Collins and Kathy Hudson, current NIH director for science, outreach, and policy, began talking with the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association about the need for educating healthcare providers about genetics and genomics. Those discussions led to the creation of the group, which has been funded by NHGRI, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases, and several other government agencies and non-profit foundations.

    NCHPEG is slated to close down on Aug. 31. When the coalition began, there were few applications for genomics-related applications in healthcare that doctors encountered.

    “A lot has changed since then,” NCHPEG Executive Director Joan Scott said in a statement. “There are many more clinical applications of genomics available and a growing awareness within the healthcare provider community that they need to be thinking about incorporating them into practice. We see more institutions and organizations developing initiatives to bring genomics into the clinic.”

    The coalition’s core aim has been to provide genetics and genomics professional education tools through partnerships with specific communities and collaborations.

    To that end, it has developed a number of documents, products, and programs to provide core competencies and educational programs in genetics, genomics, and family history for healthcare professionals.

    The group has developed special programs aimed at helping physicians recognize increased genetic risk for cancer, and helping nutritionists, physician’s assistants, dentists, nurses, and others understand genetics and genomics.

    McInerney said that ASHG will work over the next six months to determine whether the society wants to become more deeply involved in offering educational programs to healthcare providers.

    “But we have to be thoughtful. NCHPEG is closing as a direct result of the current funding climate. We have to determine where our funding for education programs would come from if our board decides to take this on,” he explained.

    McInerney said that during his time at NCHPEG, the group distributed thousands of publications on genomics education.

    “Our premise was that healthcare professionals want to be up-to-date on all areas of medicine. Many of them already felt like the field of genetics and genomics was snowballing and they wanted to be ready,” he said.

    SOURCE

    http://www.genomeweb.com//node/1259986?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Health%20Genetics%20Program%20to%20Shutter;%20Foundation%20Medicine%20Files%20for%20IPO;%20Intrexon%20Prices%20IPO;%20More%20-%2007/30/2013%2004:05:00%20PM

     

     

    Read Full Post »


    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    Genome.gov National Human Genome Research Institute National Institutes of Health

    Online Research Resources

    Contents

    From NHGRI
    Online Research Resources Developed at NHGRI
    NHGRI Reports and Publications
    The NHGRI Genome Sequencing Program (GSP)
    Beyond NHGRI
    The Completed Human Sequence
    Other Federal Agencies Involved in Genomics
    Human Genome Sequence Assemblies and Other Genomic Data Resources
    Underlying Map Information
    Sequencing Centers of the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium
    Model Organism Genome Projects
    Archaea and Bacteria
    Eukaryotes
    Databases
    National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Databases and Tools
    Nucleotide Sequence Databases
    Trace Archives (Raw Sequence Data Repositories)
    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs)
    cDNAs and Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)
    Model Organism Databases
    Additional Sequence, Gene and Protein Databases
    Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Information
    Funding Agencies
    Additional Genome Resources
    Biology Resources
    Selected Journals

    From NHGRI

    Online Research Resources Developed at NHGRI
    Software, databases and research project Web sites from NHGRI’s Division of Intramural Research (DIR).

    NHGRI Reports and Publications

    The NHGRI Genome Sequencing Program (GSP) 
    Genome sequencing projects currently in production and funded by NHGRI.

    Beyond NHGRI

    The Completed Human Sequence:
    Other Federal Agencies Involved in Genomics
    Human Genome Sequence Assemblies and Other Genomic Data Resources

     

    Underlying Map Information
    Sequencing Centers of the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium

    (Listed in order of total sequence contributed to the draft human sequence published February 15, 2001, Nature, 409:860-921)

    Model Organism Genome Projects

    Archaea and Bacteria

    Eukaryotes

    Databases

    National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Databases and Tools

    Nucleotide Sequence Databases

    Trace Archives (Raw Sequence Data Repositories)

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs)

    cDNAs and Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)

    Model Organism Databases

    Additional Sequence, Gene and Protein Databases

    • InterPro protein sequence analysis & classification [ebi.ac.uk]
      An integrated database of predictive protein signatures used for the classification and automatic annotation of proteins and genomes.
    • Eukaryotic Promoter Database [epd.isb-sib.ch]
    • PROSITE [expasy.org]
      A database of protein families and domains.
    • SWISS-PROT [web.expasy.org]
      A protein knowledgebase.
    • BioMagResBank [bmrb.wisc.edu]
      NMR spectroscopy data on proteins, peptides, and nucleic acids.
    • Protein Data Bank (PDB) [rcsb.org]
      The repository for 3-D biological macromolecular structure data.
    • DSSP [swift.cmbi.ru.nl]
      A database of secondary structure protein assignments.
    • FSSP [biocenter.helsinki.fi]
      A database of fold classifications based on structure-structure alignment of proteins.
    • HSSP [cmbi.kun.nl]
      A database of homology-derived secondary structure of proteins.
    • Nucleic Acid Database Project (NDB) [ndbserver.rutgers.edu]
      Structural information about nucleic acids.
    • The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium [image.hudsonalpha.org]
      A public collection of genes.
    Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Research Program
    Funding Agencies
    Additional Genome Resources
    Biology Resources
    Selected Journals

    Last Updated: October 16, 2012

    SOURCE:

    http://www.genome.gov/10000375

    Read Full Post »


    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    The reader is encourage to review the following ANALYSIS of this subject matter:

    Genomics & Genetics of Cardiovascular DiseaseDiagnoses: A Literature Survey of AHA’s Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics, 3/2010 – 3/2013

    and

    10 Years On, Still Much To Be Learned From Human Genome Map

    Advances made in genetics of disease, but creating new drugs more complex than first thought

    By Amanda Gardner
    HealthDay Reporter

    FRIDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) — As scientists mark the 10th anniversary Sunday of the completion of the Human Genome Project, they will note how that watershed effort has led to the discovery of the genetic underpinnings of almost 5,000 diseases.

    And it has made it possible to develop personalized treatments that have prolonged the lives of many.

    But the scientists will also acknowledge that, while the project has unlocked many mysteries that once shrouded diseases, there’s still much to be learned before new drugs can be developed to target illness-causing mutations in human DNA.

    “What we’ve learned over the past 10 years is that we’re still far from really understanding the complexity of the human genome,” said Eric Schadt, chairman of genetics and genomic sciences at Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine in New York City. “Human disease is way more complicated than the old view that single hits to single genes cause diseases.

    “In most forms of diseases, it’s whole constellations of genes operating in networks,” Schadt explained. “That becomes a much harder problem. How do you target networks with a single drug?

    “We keep learning how much we really don’t know and how much further we need to go,” he added. “That’s the big story.”

    A decade ago, the Human Genome Project was hailed as a major milestone because researchers identified all of the nearly 25,000 genes in human DNA and sequenced the 3 billion chemical base pairs comprising that DNA.

    The feat took 13 years and cost close to $3 billion, but the genetic information gleaned from the project gave scientists the tools needed to pinpoint how changes in specific genes could kick-start some diseases.

    One of the most tangible benefits of the project has been the development of ever more sophisticated sequencing technology and a dramatic lowering of the cost of using that technology.

    Today, the cost of sequencing one human genome is closer to $5,000 and can be done in a day or two, said Dr. Eric Green, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Md.

    What that means is that the pace of research, and its attendant discoveries, has been accelerated.

    When the project first began, scientists knew the genetic basis of about 53 diseases. Today, that number is close to 5,000, Green noted. That means doctors can now test patients to see if they carry gene mutations that raise their risk for certain diseases, and counsel them accordingly on ways they might prevent or delay illness. There are currently almost 2,000 genetic tests for specific diseases or conditions, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

    There have also been breakthroughs with some rare diseases.

    In 2011, 6-year-old Nicholas Volker became the first child to be saved by the new technology. He had undergone a hundred surgeries, including the removal of his colon, as doctors tried to identify his mysterious bowel disease. Genomic sequencing uncovered a genetic mutation that could be treated with a bone marrow transplant consisting of cells from umbilical cord blood.

    “Knowing more of the basic genetics that makes up an individual has allowed us to diagnose far more genetic diseases,” said Dr. Barbara Pober, a medical geneticist at the Frank H. Netter, M.D. School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in North Haven, Conn.

    Once a diagnosis has been made, doctors can now use gene sequencing to determine treatment for some diseases. For instance, breast cancer patients can be tested to see how they will respond to the drug Herceptin. HIV patients can be tested to determine their response to the drug abacavir. And those on the widely used blood thinner warfarin can be tested to determine the most effective dose, according to the NIH.

    The field of pharmacogenetics, still in its infancy, enables doctors to use a patient’s genetic information to figure out which cancer drugs the patient will best respond to before treatment even starts.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration now includes genetic information on labeling for more than 100 drugs, up from just four 10 years ago, Green said.

    The goal of developing new drugs to target diseases with genetic roots, however, will take much longer to realize.

    Although the NIH states that there are roughly 350 biotechnological products currently being tested in clinical trials, new drugs take a decade or more to develop. Not only that, the knowledge gained from the Human Genome Project has actually made the field of genetic medicine even more complex. Scientists are finding that many diseases are triggered by interaction involving multiple gene variants, making it difficult to design a treatment that targets all the culprits in a particular illness.

    And the complexities don’t end there.

    Not long ago, scientists discovered that so-called “junk” DNA, which makes up 98 percent of the genome, is not junk at all but serves critical regulatory functions.

    What’s more, about 10 percent of the human genome still hasn’t been sequenced and can’t be sequenced by existing technology, Green added. “There are parts of the genome we didn’t know existed back when the genome was completed,” he said.

    More information

    For more on developments over the past 10 years, visit the Human Genome Projectwebsite.

    SOURCES: Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., director, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Md.; Barbara Pober, M.D., professor, medical sciences, Frank H. Netter, M.D., School of Medicine, Quinnipiac University, North Haven, Conn.; Eric Schadt, Ph.D., professor and chairman, department of genetics and genomic sciences, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York City

    Last Updated: April 12, 2013

    Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

    http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=675381

    Read Full Post »


    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    Centers of Excellence in Genomic Sciences (CEGS): NHGRI to Fund New Center (CEGS) on the Brain: Mental Disorders and the Nervous System

    April 16, 2013

    NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The National Human Genome Research Institute plans to fund new Centers of Excellence in Genomic Sciences, or CEGS, to create interdisciplinary teams that pursue innovative genome-based approaches to address biomedical problems and to understanding the basis of biological systems.

    NHGRI, along with support from the National Institute of Mental Health, expects to provide up to $2 million per year for each of the new CEGS it funds, and plans to award up to four new awards each year.

    Although these CEGS may pursue a wide range of research objectives, NIMH will support the program because it wants to fund research using novel genomic approaches that can accelerate the understanding of the genetic basis of mental disorders and the nervous systemNHGRI said on Friday.

    The CEGS program was created to use the new knowledge and technologies that resulted from the Human Genome Project and subsequent genomics research to develop new tools, methods, and concepts that apply to human biology and disease.
    CEGS grantees are expected to be innovative, to focus on a critical issue in genomic science, to use multiple investigators working under one leader, to work toward a specific outcome, and to tackle challenging aspects of problems that may have impeded previous research efforts.

    Further, they are supposed to bolster the pool of professional scientists and engineers who are trained in genomics through offering educational programs, and they are expected to address the shortage of scientists from underrepresented minority communities by developing recruiting programs that encourage minority community members to become independent genomics investigators.

    The technologies and methods the CEGS investigators develop should be applicable to a wide range of cell types and organisms, and they should be scalable and expandable so they may apply to other model systems, according to NHGRI’s funding opportunity announcement.

    Recent CEGS centers include

    • Caltech’s Center for In Toto Genomic Analysis of Vertebrate Development;
    • Harvard University’s Center for Transcriptional Consequences of Human Genetic Variation;
    • Johns Hopkins University’s Center for the Epigenetics of Common Human Disease;
    • Stanford University’s Center for the Genomic Basis of Vertebrate Diversity;
    • Arizona State University’s Microscale Life Sciences Center;
    • Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee’s Center of Excellence in Genomics Science;
    • The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill‘s CISGen center;
    • The Broad Institute’s Center for Cell Circuits;
    • Yale University’s Center for the Analysis of Human Genome Using Integrated Technologies; and
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute‘s Center for Genomic Analysis of Network Perturbations in Human Disease.

     http://www.genomeweb.com/nhgri-fund-new-centers-excellence-genomic-sciences

    Center for In Toto Genomic Analysis of Vertebrate Development

    P50 HG004071
    Marianne Bronner-Fraser
    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.

    This Center of Excellence in Genomic Science (CEGS) assembles a multidisciplinary group of investigators to develop innovative technologies with the goal of imaging and mutating every developmentally important vertebrate gene. Novel “in toto imaging” tools make it possible to use a systems-based approach for analysis of gene function in developing vertebrate embryos in real time and space. These tools can digitize in vivo data in a systematic, high-throughput, and quantitative fashion. Combining in toto imaging with novel gene traps permits a means to rapidly screen for developmentally relevant expression patterns, followed by the ability to immediately mutagenize genes of interest. Initially, key technologies will be developed and tested in the zebrafish embryo due to its transparency and the ability to obtain rapid feedback. Once validated, these techniques will be applied to an amniote, the avian embryo, due to several advantages including accessibility and similarity to human embryogenesis. Finally, to monitor alterations in gene expression in normal and mutant embryos, we will develop new techniques for in situ hybridization that permit simultaneous analysis of multiple marker genes in a sensitive and potentially quantitative manner. Our goal is to combine real time analysis of gene expression on a genome-wide scale coupled with the ability to mutate genes of interest and examine global alterations in gene expression as a result of gene loss. Much of the value will come from the development of new and broadly applicable technologies. In contrast to a typical technology development grant, however, there will be experimental fruit emerging from at least two vertebrate systems (zebrafish and avian). The following aims will be pursued: Specific Aim 1: Real-time “in toto” image analysis of reporter gene expression; Specific Aim 2: Comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis of gene function of the developing vertebrate embryo using the FlipTrap approach for gene trapping; Specific Aim 3: Design of quantitative, multiplexed ‘hybridization chain reaction’ (HCR) amplifiers for in vivo imaging with active background suppression; Specific Aim 4: Data analysis and integration of data sets to produce a “digital” fish and a “digital” bird. The technologies and the resulting atlases will be made broadly available via electronic publication.

    Center Web Site: California Institute of Technology Center of Excellence in Genomic Science

    Top of page

    Causal Transcriptional Consequences of Human Genetic Variation

    P50 HG005550
    George M. Church
    Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

    The Center for Transcriptional Consequences of Human Genetic Variation (CTCHGV) will develop innovative and powerful genetic engineering methods and use them to identify genetic variations that causally control gene transcription levels. Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) find many variations associated with disease and other phenotypes, but the variations that may actually cause these conditions are hard to identify because nearby variations in the same haplotype blocks consistently co-occur with them in human populations, so that specifically causative ones cannot be distinguished. About 95% of GWAS variations are not in gene coding regions, and many of these presumably associate with altered gene expression levels. CTCHGV will identify the variations that directly control gene expression by engineering precise combinations of changes to gene regulatory regions that break down the haplotype blocks, allowing each variations’ effect on gene expression to be discerned independently of the others. To perform this analysis, CTCHGV will extract ~100kbps gene regulatory regions from human cell samples, create precise variations in them in E. coli, and re-introduce the altered regions back into human cells, using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) to efficiently induce recombination. CTCHGV will target 1000 genes for this analysis (Aim 1), and will use human induced Pluripotent Stem cells (iPS) to study the effects of variations in diverse human cell types (Aim 2). To explore the effects of variations in complex human tissues, CTCHGV will develop methods of measuring gene expression at transcriptome-wide levels in many single cells, including in situ in structured tissues (Aim 3). Finally, CTCHGV will develop novel advanced technologies that integrate DNA sequencing and synthesis to construct thousands of large DNA constructs from oligonucleotides, that enable very precise targeting and highly efficient performance of ZFNs, and that enable cells to be sorted on the basis of morphology as well as fluorescence and labeling (Aim 4). CTCHGV will also develop direct oligo-mediated engineering of human cells, and create “marked allele” iPS that will enable easy ascertainment of complete exon distributions for many pairs of gene alleles in many cell types.

    Center Web Site: Center for Causal Transcriptional Consequences of Human Genetic Variation (CTCHGV)

    Top of page

    Center for the Epigenetics of Common Human Disease

    P50 HG003233
    Andrew P. Feinberg
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
    (co-funded by National Institute of Mental Health)

    Epigenetics, the study of non-DNA sequence-related heredity, is at the epicenter of modern medicine because it can help to explain the relationship between an individual’s genetic background, the environment, aging, and disease. The Center for the Epigenetics of Common Human Disease was created in 2004 to begin to develop the interface between epigenetics and epidemiologic-based phenotype studies, recognizing that epigenetics requires new ways of thinking about disease. We created a highly interdisciplinary group of faculty and trainees, including molecular biologists, biostatisticians, epidemiologists, and clinical investigators. We developed novel approaches to genome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm) analysis, allele-specific expression, and new statistical epigenetic tools. Using these tools, we discovered that most variable DNAm is in neither CpG islands nor promoters, but in what we term “CpG island shores,” regions of lower CpG density up to several kb from islands, and we have found altered DNAm in these regions in cancer, depression and autism. In the renewal period, we will develop the novel field of epigenetic epidemiology, the relationship between epigenetic variation, genetic variation, environment and phenotype. We will continue to pioneer genome-wide epigenetic technology that is cost effective for large scale analysis of population-based samples, applying our knowledge from the current period to second-generation sequencing for epigenetic measurement, including DNAm and allele-specific methylation. We will continue to pioneer new statistical approaches for quantitative and binary DNAm assessment in populations, including an Epigenetic Barcode. We will develop Foundational Epigenetic Epidemiology, examining: time-dependence, heritability and environmental relationship of epigenetic marks; heritability in MZ and DZ twins; and develop an epigenetic transmission disequilibrium test. We will then pioneer Etiologic Epigenetic Epidemiology, by integrating novel genome-wide methylation scans (GWMs) with existing Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) and epidemiologic phenotype data, a design we term Genome-Wide Integrated Susceptibility (GWIS), focusing on bipolar disorder, aging, and autism as paradigms for epigenetic studies of family-based samples, longitudinal analyses, and parent-of-origin effects, respectively. This work will be critical to realizing the full value of previous genetic and phenotypic studies, by developing and applying molecular and statistical tools necessary to integrate DNA sequence with epigenetic and environmental causes of disease.

    Center Web Site: Center of Excellence in Genomic Science at Johns Hopkins

    Top of page

    Genomic Basis of Vertebrate Diversity

    P50 HG002568
    David M. Kingsley
    Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.

    The long-term goal of this project is to understand the genomic mechanisms that generate phenotypic diversity in vertebrates. Rapid progress in genomics has provided nearly complete sequences for several organisms. Comparative analysis suggests many fundamental pathways and gene networks are conserved between organisms. And yet, the morphology, physiology, and behavior of different species are obviously and profoundly different. What are the mechanisms that generate these key differences? Are unique traits controlled by few or many genetic changes? What kinds of changes? Are there particular genes and mechanisms that are used repeatedly when organisms adapt to new environments? Can better understanding of these mechanisms help explain dramatic differences in disease susceptibility that also exist between groups? The Stanford CEGS will use an innovative combination of approaches in fish, mice, and humans to identify the molecular basis of major phenotypic change in natural populations of vertebrates. Specific aims include: 1) cross stickleback fish and develop a genome wide map of the chromosomes, genes, and mutations that control a broad range of new morphological, physiological, and behavioral traits in natural environments; 2) test which population genetic measures provide the most reliable “signatures of selection” surrounding genes that are known to have served as the basis of parallel adaptive change in many different natural populations around the world; 3) assemble the stickleback proto Y chromosome and test whether either sex or autosomal rearrangements play an important role in generating phenotypic diversity, or are enriched in genomic regions that control phenotypic change; 4) test whether particular genes and mechanisms are used repeatedly to control phenotypic change in many different vertebrates. Preliminary data suggests that mechanisms identified as the basis of adaptive change in natural fish populations may be broadly predictive of adaptive mechanisms across a surprisingly large range of animals, including humans. Genetic regions hypothesized to be under selection in humans will be compared to genetic regions under selection in fish. Regions predicted to play an important role in natural human variation and disease susceptibility will be modeled in mice, generating new model systems for confirming functional variants predicted from human population genetics and comparative genomics.

    Center Web Site: Stanford Genome Evolution Center

    Top of page

    Microscale Life Sciences Center

    P50 HG002360
    Deirdre R. Meldrum
    Arizona State University, Tempe

    Increasingly, it is becoming apparent that understanding, predicting, and diagnosing disease states is confounded by the inherent heterogeneity of in situ cell populations. This variation in cell fate can be dramatic, for instance, one cell living while an adjacent cell dies. Thus, in order to understand fundamental pathways involved in disease states, it is necessary to link preexisting cell state to cell fate in the disease process at the individual cell level.

    The Microscale Life Sciences Center (MLSC) at the University of Washington is focused on solving this problem, by developing cutting-edge microscale technology for high throughput genomic-level and multi-parameter single-cell analysis, and applying that technology to fundamental problems of biology and health. Our vision is to address pathways to disease states directly at the individual cell level, at increasing levels of complexity that progressively move to an in vivo understanding of disease. We propose to apply MLSC technological innovations to questions that focus on the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. The top three killers in the United States, cancer, heart disease and stroke, all involve an imbalance in this cellular decision-making process. Because of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity in the live/die decision, this fundamental cellular biology problem is an example of one for which analysis of individual cells is essential for developing the link between genomics, cell function, and disease. The specific systems to be studied are proinflammatory cell death (pyroptosis) in a mouse macrophage model, and neoplastic progression in the Barrett’s Esophagus (BE) precancerous model. In each case, diagnostic signatures for specific cell states will be determined by measuring both physiological (cell cycle, ploidy, respiration rate, membrane potential) and genomic (gene expression profiles by single-cell proteomics, qRT-PCR and transcriptomics; LOH by LATE-PCR) parameters. These will then be correlated with cell fate via the same sets of measurements after a challenge is administered, for instance, a cell death stimulus for pyroptosis or a predisposing risk factor challenge (acid reflux) for BE. Ultimately, time series will be taken to map out the pathways that underlie the live/die decision.

    Finally, this information will be used as a platform to define cell-cell interactions at the single-cell level, to move information on disease pathways towards greater in vivo relevance. New technology will be developed and integrated into the existing MLSC Living Cell Analysis cassette system to support these ambitious biological goals including 1) automated systems for cell placement, off-chip device interconnects, and high throughput data analysis with user friendly interfaces; 2) new optical and electronic sensors based on a new detection platform, new dyes and nanowires; and 3) new micromodules for single-cell qRT-PCR, LATE-PCR for LOH including single-cell pyrosequencing, on-chip single-cell proteomics, and single-cell transcriptomics using barcoded nanobeads.

    Collaborating InstitutionsFred Hutchison Cancer Research Center, Brandeis University, University of Washington.

    Center Web Site: Microscale Life Sciences Center

    Top of page

    Wisconsin Center of Excellence in Genomics Science

    P50 HG004952
    Michael Olivier
    Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    The successful completion of the human genome and model organism sequences has ushered in a new era in biological research, with attention now focused on understanding the way in which genome sequence information is expressed and controlled. The focus of this proposed Wisconsin Center of Excellence in Genomics Science is to facilitate understanding of the complex and integrated regulatory mechanisms affecting gene transcription by developing novel technology for the comprehensive characterization and quantitative analysis of proteins interacting with DNA. This new technology will help provide for a genome-wide functional interpretation of the underlying mechanisms by which gene transcriptional regulation is altered during biological processes, development, disease, and in response to physiological, pharmacological, or environmental stressors. The development of chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches has allowed identification of the specific DNA sequences bound by proteins of interest. We propose to reverse this strategy and develop an entirely novel technology that will use oligonucleotide capture to pull down DNA sequences of interest, and mass spectrometry to identify and characterize the proteins and protein complexes bound and associated with particular DNA regions. This new approach will create an invaluable tool for deciphering the critical control processes regulating an essential biological function. The proposed interdisciplinary and multi-institutional Center of Excellence in Genomics Science combines specific expertise at the Medical College of Wisconsin, the University of Wisconsin Madison, and Marquette University. Technological developments in four specific areas will be pursued to develop this new approach: (1) cross-linking of proteins to DNA and fragmentation of chromatin; (2) capture of the protein-DNA complexes in a DNA sequence-specific manner; (3) mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify bound proteins; and (4) informatics to develop tools enabling the global analysis of the relationship between changes in protein-DNA interactions and gene expression. The Center will use carefully selected biological systems to develop and test the technology in an integrated genome-wide analysis platform that includes efficient data management and analysis tools. As part of the Center mission, we will combine our technology development efforts with an interdisciplinary training program for students and fellows designed to train qualified scientists experienced in cutting-edge genomics technology. Data, technology, and software will be widely disseminated by multiple mechanisms including licensing and commercialization activities.

    Collaborating InstitutionsUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison, Marquette University

    Center Web Site: Wisconsin Center of Excellence in Genomic Science

    Top of page

    CISGen

    P50 MH090338
    Fernando Pardo-Manuel de Villena
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    p>In this application, we propose a highly ambitious yet realistically attainable goal: to align existing expertise at UNC-Chapel Hill into a CEGS called CISGen. The overarching purpose of CISGen is to develop as a resource and to exploit the utility of the murine Collaborative Cross (CC) mouse model of the heterogeneous human population to delineate genetic and environmental determinants of complex phenotypes drawn from psychiatry, which are among the most intractable set of problems in all of biomedicine. Psychiatric disorders present a paradox – the associated morbidity, mortality, and costs are enormous and yet, despite over a century of scientific study, there are few hard facts about the etiology of the core diseases. Although our GWAS meta- analyses are in progress, early results suggest that strong and replicable findings may be elusive. Therefore, our proposal provides a complementary approach to the study of fundamental psychiatric phenotypes.

    We propose a particularly challenging definition of success – we will identify high probability etiological models (which can be realistically complex) and then prove the predictive capacity of these models by generating novel strains of mice predicted to be at very high risk for the phenotype. Once validated, these high confidence models can then be tested in subsequent human studies – we do not propose human extension studies in CISGen but this is achievable for the investigators and their colleagues. Data collected in CISGen would be a valuable resource to the wider scientific community and could be applied to a large set of biological problems and these data can rapidly add to the knowledge base for any new genomewide association study (GWAS) finding. Delivery of sophisticated and user-friendly databases are a key component of CISGen.

    Accomplishing this overarching goal requires an exceptional diversity of scientific expertise – psychiatry, human genetics, mouse behavior, mouse genetics, statistical genetics, computational biology, and systems biology. Experts in these disciplines are deeply involved in CISGen and are committed to the projects described herein. Successful integration of these diverse fields is non-trivial; however, all scientists on this application have had extensive interactions over the past five years, already know how to work together, and have a working knowledge of their colleagues’ expertise. UNC-Chapel Hill has an intense commitment to inter- disciplinary genomics research and provides a fertile backdrop for 21st century projects like CISGen.

    Collaborating InstitutionsThe Jackson Laboratory, North Carolina State University, University of Texas at Arlington

    Center Web Site: Center for Integrated Systems Genomics at UNC (CISGen)

    Top of page

    Center for Cell Circuits

    P50 HG006193
    Aviv Regev
    The Broad Institute, Inc., Cambridge, Mass.

    Systematic reconstruction of genetic and molecular circuits in mammalian cells remains a significant, largescale and unsolved challenge in genomics. The urgency to address it is underscored by the sizeable number of GWAS-derived disease genes whose functions remain largely obscure, limiting our progress towards biological understanding and therapeutic intervention. Recent advances in probing and manipulating cellular circuits on a genomic scale open the way for the development of a systematic method for circuit reconstruction. Here, we propose a Center for Cell Circuits to develop the reagents, technologies, algorithms, protocols and strategies needed to reconstruct molecular circuits. Our preliminary studies chart an initial path towards a universal strategy, which we will fully implement by developing a broad and integrated experimental and computational toolkit. We will develop methods for comprehensive profiling, genetic perturbations and mesoscale monitoring of diverse circuit layers (Aim 1). In parallel, we will develop a computational framework to analyze profiles, derive provisional models, use them to determine targets for perturbation and monitoring, and evaluate, refine and validate circuits based on those experiments (Aim 2). We will develop, test and refine this strategy in the context of two distinct and complementary mammalian circuits. First, we will produce an integrated, multi-layer circuit of the transcriptional response to pathogens in dendritic cells (Aim 3) as an example of an acute environmental response. Second, we will reconstruct the circuit of chromatin factors and non-coding RNAs that control chromatin organization and gene expression in mouse embryonic stem cells (Aim 4) as an example of the circuitry underlying stable cell states. These detailed datasets and models will reveal general principles of circuit organization, provide a resource for scientists in these two important fields, and allow computational biologists to test and develop algorithms. We will broadly disseminate our tools and methods to the community, enabling researchers to dissect any cell circuit of interest at unprecedented detail. Our work will open the way for reconstructing cellular circuits in human disease and individuals, to improve the accuracy of both diagnosis and treatment.

    Top of page

    Analysis of Human Genome Using Integrated Technologies

    P50 HG002357
    Michael P. Snyder
    Yale University, New Haven, Conn.

    We propose to establish a center to build genomic DNA arrays and develop novel technologies that will use these arrays for the large-scale functional analysis of the human genome. 0.3-1.4 kb fragments of nonrepetitive DNA from each of chromosomes 22, 21, 20, 19,7, 17, and perhaps the X chromosome will be prepared by PCR and attached to microscope slides. The arrays will be used to develop technologies for the large-scale mapping of 1) Transcribed sequences. 2) Binding sites of chromosomal proteins. 3) Origins of replication. 4) Genetic mutation and variation. A web-accessible database will be constructed to house the information generated in this study; data from other studies will also be integrated into the database. The arrays and technologies will be made available throughout both the Yale University and the larger scientific community. They will be integrated into our training programs for postdoctoral fellows, graduate students and undergraduates at Yale. We expect these procedures to be applicable to the analysis of the entire human genome and the genomes of many other organisms.

    Center Web Site: Yale University Center for Excellence in Genomic Science

    Top of page

    Genomic Analysis of the Genotype-Phenotype Map

    P50 HG002790
    Simon Tavaré
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles

    Our Center, which started in 2003, focused on implications of haplotype structure in the human genome. Since that time, there have been extraordinary advances in genomics: Genome-wide association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variants are now commonplace, and we are rapidly moving towards whole-genome sequence data for large samples of individuals. Our Center has undergone similar dramatic changes. While the underlying theme remains the same — making sense of genetic variation — our focus is now explicitly on how we can use the heterogeneous data produced by modern genomics technologies to achieve such an understanding. The overall goal of our proposal is to develop an intellectual framework, together with computational and statistical analysis tools, for illuminating the path from genotype to phenotype, and for predicting the latter from the former. We will address three broad questions related to this problem: 1) How do we infer mechanisms by which genetic variation leads to changes in phenotype? 2) How do we improve the design, understanding and interpretation of association studies by exploiting prior information? 3) How do we identify general principles about the genotype-phenotype map? We will approach these questions through a series of interrelated projects that combine computational and experimental methods, explored in Arabidopsis, Drosophila and human, and involve a wide range of researchers including molecular biologists, population geneticists, genetic epidemiologists, statisticians, computer scientists, and mathematicians.

    Collaborating InstitutionsUniversity of Utah

    Center Web Site: The USC Center of Excellence in Genomic Science

    Top of page

    Genomic Analysis of Network Perturbations in Human Disease

    P50 HG004233
    Marc Vidal
    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston

    Genetic differences between individuals can greatly influence their susceptibility to disease. The information originating from the Human Genome Project (HGP), including the genome sequence and its annotation, together with projects such as the HapMap and the Human Cancer Genome Project (HCGP) have greatly accelerated our ability to find genetic variants and associate genes with a wide range of human diseases. Despite these advances, linking individual genes and their variations to disease remains a daunting challenge. Even where a causal variant has been identified, the biological insight that must precede a strategy for therapeutic intervention has generally been slow in coming. The primary reason for this is that the phenotypic effects of functional sequence variants are mediated by a dynamic network of gene products and metabolites, which exhibit emergent properties that cannot be understood one gene at a time. Our central hypothesis is that both human genetic variations and pathogens such as viruses influence local and global properties of networks to induce “disease states.” Therefore, we propose a general approach to understanding cellular networks based on environmental and genetic perturbations of network structure and readout of the effects using interactome mapping, proteomic analysis, and transcriptional profiling. We have chosen a defined model system with a variety of disease outcomes: viral infection. We will explore the concept that one must understand changes in complex cellular networks to fully understand the link between genotype, environment, and phenotype. We will integrate observations from network-level perturbations caused by particular viruses together with genome-wide human variation datasets for related human diseases with the goal of developing general principles for data integration and network prediction, instantiation of these in open-source software tools, and development of testable hypotheses that can be used to assess the value of our methods. Our plans to achieve these goals are summarized in the following specific aims: 1. Profile all viral-host protein-protein interactions for a group of viruses with related biological properties. 2. Profile the perturbations that viral proteins induce on the transcriptome of their host cells. 3. Combine the resulting interaction and perturbation data to derive cellular network-based models. 4. Use the developed models to interpret genome-wide genetic variations observed in human disease, 5. Integrate the bioinformatics resources developed by the various CCSG members within a Bioinformatics Core for data management and dissemination. 6. Building on existing education and outreach programs, we plan to develop a genomic and network centered educational program, with particular emphasis on providing access for underrepresented minorities to internships, workshop and scientific meetings.

    Center Web SiteCenter for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) Center of Excellence in Genomic Science

    Read Full Post »

    Older Posts »