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The relationship of stress hypermetabolism to essential protein needs

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

The relationship of stress hypermetabolism to essential protein needs

A Second Look at the Transthyretin Nutrition Inflammatory Conundrum

Subtitle: Transthyretin and the Systemic Inflammatory Response

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FACP, Clinical Pathologist, Biochemist, and Transfusion Physician
President, Triplex, Trumbull, CT 06611, USA

 

Brief introduction

Transthyretin  (also known as prealbumin) has been widely used as a biomarker for identifying protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and for monitoring the improvement of nutritional status after implementing a nutritional intervention by enteral feeding or by parenteral infusion. This has occurred because transthyretin (TTR) has a rapid removal from the circulation in 48 hours and it is readily measured by immunometric assay. Nevertheless, concerns have been raised about the use of TTR in the ICU setting, which prompted a review of the  benefit of using this test in acute and chronic care. TTR is easily followed in the underweight and the high risk populations in an ambulatory setting, which has a significant background risk of chronic diseases. It is sensitive to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and needs to be understood in the context of acute illness to be used effectively. There are a number of physiologic changes associated with SIRS and the injury/repair process that affect TTR. The most important point is that in the context of an ICU setting, the contribution of TTR is significant in a complex milieu.  A much better understanding of the significance of this program has emerged from studies of nitrogen and sulfur in health and disease.

Transthyretin protein structure

Transthyretin protein structure (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Age-standardised disability-adjusted life year...

Age-standardised disability-adjusted life year (DALY) rates from Protein-energy malnutrition by country (per 100,000 inhabitants). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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The systemic inflammatory response syndrome C-reactive protein and transthyretin conundrum.
Larry H Bernstein
Clin Chem Lab Med 2007; 45(11):0
ICID: 939932
Article type: Editorial

The Transthyretin Inflammatory State Conundrum
Larry H. Bernstein
Current Nutrition & Food Science, 2012, 8, 00-00

Keywords: Tranthyretin (TTR), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), C- reactive protein, cytokines, hypermetabolism, catabolism, repair.

Transthyretin has been widely used as a biomarker for identifying protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and for monitoring the improvement of nutritional status after implementing a nutritional intervention by enteral feeding or by parenteral infusion. This has occurred because transthyretin (TTR) has a rapid removal from the circulation in 48 hours and it is readily measured by immunometric assay. Nevertheless, concerns have been raised about the use of TTR in the ICU setting, which prompts a review of the actual benefit of using this test in a number of settings. TTR is easily followed in the underweight and the high risk populations in an ambulatory setting, which has a significant background risk of chronic diseases. It is sensitive to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and needs to be understood in the context of acute illness to be used effectively.

There are a number of physiologic changes associated with SIRS and the injury/repair process that affect TTR and  in the context of an ICU setting, the contribution of TTR is essential.  The only consideration is the timing of initiation since the metabolic burden is sufficiently high that a substantial elevation is expected in the first 3 days post admission, although the level of this biomarker is related to the severity of injury. Despite the complexity of the situation, TTR is not to be considered a test “for all seasons”. In the context of age, prolonged poor meal intake, chronic or acute illness, TTR needs to be viewed in a multivariable lens, along with estimated lean body mass, C-reactive protein, the absolute lymphocyte count, presence of neutrophilia, and perhaps procalcitonin if there is remaining uncertainty. Furthermore, the reduction of risk of associated complication requires a systematized approach to timely identification, communication, and implementation of a suitable treatment plan.

The most important point is that in the context of an ICU setting, the contribution of TTR is significant in a complex milieu.

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Title: The Automated Malnutrition Assessment
Accepted 29 April 2012. http://www.nutritionjrnl.com. Nutrition (2012), doi:10.1016/j.nut.2012.04.017.
Authors: Gil David, PhD; Larry Howard Bernstein, MD; Ronald R Coifman, PhD
Article Type: Original Article

Keywords: Network Algorithm; unsupervised classification; malnutrition screening; protein energy malnutrition (PEM); malnutrition risk; characteristic metric; characteristic profile; data characterization; non-linear differential diagnosis

We have proposed an automated nutritional assessment (ANA) algorithm that provides a method for malnutrition risk prediction with high accuracy and reliability.  The problem of rapidly identifying risk and severity of malnutrition is crucial for minimizing medical and surgical complications. These are not easily performed or adequately expedited. We characterized for each patient a unique profile and mapped similar patients into a classification. We also found that the laboratory parameters were sufficient for the automated risk prediction.

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Title: The Increasing Role for the Laboratory in Nutritional Assessment
Article Type: Editorial
Section/Category: Clinical Investigation
Accepted 22 May 2012. http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clinbiochem.
Clin Biochem (2012), doi:10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2012.05.024
Keywords: Protein Energy Malnutrition; Nutritional Screening; Laboratory Testing
Author: Dr. Larry Howard Bernstein, MD

The laboratory role in nutritional management of the patient has seen remarkable growth while there have been dramatic changes in technology over the last 25 years, and it is bound to be transformative in the near term. This editorial is an overview of the importance of the laboratory as an active participant in nutritional care.

The discipline emerged divergently along separate paths with unrelated knowledge domains in physiological chemistry, pathology, microbiology, immunology and blood cell recognition, and then cross-linked emerging into clinical biochemistry, hematology-oncology, infectious diseases, toxicology and therapeutics, genetics, pharmacogenomics, translational genomics and clinical diagnostics.

In reality, the more we learn about nutrition, the more we uncover of metabolic diversity of individuals, the family, and societies in adapting and living in many unique environments and the basic reactions, controls, and responses to illness. This course links metabolism to genomics and individual diversity through metabolomics, which will be enlightened by chemical and bioenergetic insights into biology and translated into laboratory profiling.

Vitamin deficiencies were discovered as clinical entities with observed features as a result of industrialization (rickets and vitamin D deficiency) and mercantile trade (scurvy and vitamin C)[2].  Advances in chemistry led to the isolation of each deficient “substance”.  In some cases, a deficiency of a vitamin and what is later known as an “endocrine hormone” later have confusing distinctions (vitamin D, and islet cell insulin).

The accurate measurement and roles of trace elements, enzymes, and pharmacologic agents was to follow within the next two decades with introduction of atomic absorption, kinetic spectrophotometers, column chromatography and gel electrophoresis.  We had fully automated laboratories by the late 1960s, and over the next ten years basic organ panels became routine.   This was a game changer.

Today child malnutrition prevalence is 7 percent of children under the age of 5 in China, 28 percent in sub-Saharan African, and 43 percent in India, while under-nutrition is found mostly in rural areas with 10 percent of villages and districts accounting for 27-28 percent of all Indian underweight children. This may not be surprising, but it is associated with stunting and wasting, and it has not receded with India’s economic growth. It might go unnoticed viewed alongside a growing concurrent problem of worldwide obesity.

The post WWII images of holocaust survivors awakened sensitivity to nutritional deprivation.

In the medical literature, Studley [HO Studley.  Percentage of weight loss. Basic Indicator of surgical risk in patients with chronic peptic ulcer.  JAMA 1936; 106(6):458-460.  doi:10.1001/jama.1936.02770060032009] reported the association between weight loss and poor surgical outcomes in 1936.  Ingenbleek et al [Y Ingenbleek, M De Vissher, PH De Nayer. Measurement of prealbumin as index of protein-calorie malnutrition. Lancet 1972; 300[7768]: 106-109] first reported that prealbumin (transthyretin, TTR) is a biomarker for malnutrition after finding very low TTR levels in African children with Kwashiorkor in 1972, which went unnoticed for years.  This coincided with the demonstration by Stanley Dudrick  [JA Sanchez, JM Daly. Stanley Dudrick, MD. A Paradigm ShiftArch Surg. 2010; 145(6):512-514] that beagle puppies fed totally through a catheter inserted into the superior vena cava grew, which method was then extended to feeding children with short gut.  Soon after Bistrian and Blackburn [BR Bistrian, GL Blackburn, E Hallowell, et al. Protein status of general surgical patients. JAMA 1974; 230:858; BR Bistrian, GL Blackburn, J Vitale, et al. Prevalence of malnutrition in general medicine patients, JAMA, 1976, 235:1567] showed that malnourished hospitalized medical and surgical patients have increased length of stay, increased morbidity, such as wound dehiscence and wound infection, and increased postoperative mortality, later supported by many studies.

Michael Meguid,MD, PhD, founding editor of Nutrition [Elsevier] held a nutrition conference “Skeleton in the Closet – 20 years later” in Los Angeles in 1995, at which a Beckman Prealbumin Roundtable was held, with Thomas Baumgartner and Michael M Meguid as key participants.  A key finding was that to realize the expected benefits of a nutritional screening and monitoring program requires laboratory support. A Ross Roundtable, chaired by Dr. Lawrence Kaplan, resulted in the first Standard of Laboratory Practice Document of the National Academy of Clinical Biochemists on the use of the clinical laboratory in nutritional support and monitoring. Mears then showed a real benefit to a laboratory interactive program in nutrition screening based on TTR [E Mears. Outcomes of continuous process improvement of a nutritional care program incorporating serum prealbumin measurements. Nutrition 1996; 12 (7/8): 479-484].

A later Ross Roundtable on Quality in Nutritional Care included a study of nutrition screening and time to dietitian intervention organized by Brugler and Di Prinzio that showed a decreased length of hospital stay with $1 million savings in the first year (which repeated), which included reduced cost for dietitian evaluations and lower complication rates.

Presentations were made at the 1st International Transthyretin Congress in Strasbourg, France by Mears [E Mears.  The role of visceral protein markers in protein calorie malnutrition. Clin Chem Lab Med 2002; 40:1360-1369] on the impact of TTR in screening for PEM in a public hospital in Louisiana, and by Potter [MA Potter, G Luxton. Prealbumin measurement as a screening tool for patients with protein calorie malnutrition in emergency hospital admissions: a pilot study.  Clin Invest Med. 1999; 22(2):44-52] that indicated a 17% in-hospital mortality rate in a Canadian hospital for patients with PCM compared with 4% without PCM (p < 0.02), while only 42% of patients with PCM received nutritional supplementation. Cost analysis of screening with prealbumin level projected a saving of $414 per patient screened.  Ingenbleek and Young [Y Ingenbleek, VR Young.  Significance of transthyretin in protein metabolism.  Clin Chem Lab Med. 2002; 40(12):1281–1291.  ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: 10.1515/ CCLM.2002.222, December 2002. published online: 01/06/2005] tied the TTR to basic effects reflected in protein metabolism.

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Transthyretin as a marker to predict outcome in critically ill patients.
Arun Devakonda, Liziamma George, Suhail Raoof, Adebayo Esan, Anthony Saleh, Larry H Bernstein
Clin Biochem 2008; 41(14-15):1126-1130
ICID: 939927
Article type: Original article

TTR levels correlate with patient outcomes and are an accurate predictor of patient recovery in non-critically ill patients, but it is uncertain whether or not TTR level correlates with level of nutrition support and outcome in critically ill patients. This issue has been addressed only in critically ill patients on total parenteral nutrition and there was no association reported with standard outcome measures. We revisit this in all patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit.

Serum TTR was measured on the day of admission, day 3 and day 7 of their ICU stay. APACHE II and SOFA score was assessed on the day of admission. A registered dietician for their entire ICU stay assessed the nutritional status and nutritional requirement. Patients were divided into three groups based on initial TTR level and the outcome analysis was performed for APACHE II score, SOFA score, ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, and mortality.

TTR showed excellent concordance with the univariate or multivariate classification of patients with PEM or at high malnutrition risk, and followed for seven days in the ICU, it is a measure of the metabolic burden.  TTR levels decline from day 1 to day 7 in spite of providing nutritional support. Twenty-five patients had an initial TTR serum concentration more than 17 mg/dL (group 1), forty-eight patients had mild malnutrition with a concentration between 10 and 17 mg/dL (group 2), Forty-five patients had severe malnutrition with a concentration less than 10 mg/dL (group 3).  Initial TTR level had inverse correlation with ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, and APACHE II score, SOFA score; and predicted mortality, especially in group 3.

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A simplified nutrition screen for hospitalized patients using readily available laboratory and patient
information.
Linda Brugler, Ana K Stankovic, Madeleine Schlefer, Larry Bernstein
Nutrition 2005; 21(6):650-658
ICID: 825623
Article type: Review article
The role of visceral protein markers in protein calorie malnutrition.
Linda Brugler, Ana Stankovic, Larry Bernstein, Frederick Scott, Julie O’Sullivan-Maillet
Clin Chem Lab Med 2002; 40(12):1360-1369
ICID: 636207
Article type: Original article

The Automated Nutrition Score is a data-driven extension of continuous quality improvement.

Larry H Bernstein
Nutrition 2009; 25(3):316-317
ICID: 939934

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Transthyretin: its response to malnutrition and stress injury. clinical usefulness and economic implications.
LH Bernstein, Y Ingenbleek
Clin Chem Lab Med 2002; 40(12):1344-1348
ICID: 636205
Article type: Original article

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THE NUTRITIONALLY-DEPENDENT ADAPTIVE DICHOTOMY (NDAD) AND STRESS HYPERMETABOLISM
Yves Ingenbleek  MD  PhD  and  Larry Bernstein MD
J CLIN LIGAND ASSAY  (out of print)

The acute reaction to stress is characterized by major metabolic, endocrine and immune alterations. According to classical descriptions, these changes clinically present as a succession of 3 adaptive steps – ebb phase, catabolic flow phase, and anabolic flow phase. The ebb phase, shock and resuscitation, is immediate, lasts several hours, and is characterized by hypokinesis, hypothermia, hemodynamic instability and reduced basal metabolic rate. The catabolic flow phase, beginning within 24 hours and lasting several days, is characterized by catabolism with the flow of gluconeogenic substrates and ketone bodies in response to the acute injury. The magnitude of the response depends on the acuity and the severity of the stress. The last, a reparative anabolic flow phase, lasts weeks and is characterized by the accretion of amino acids (AAs) to rebuilding lean body mass.

The current opinion is that the body economy is reset during the course of stress at novel thresholds of metabolic priorities. This is exemplified mainly by proteolysis of muscle, by an effect on proliferating gut mucosa and lymphoid tissue as substrates are channeled to support wound healing, by altered syntheses of liver proteins with preferential production of acute phase proteins (APPs) and local repair in inflamed tissues (3). The first two stages demonstrate body protein breakdown exceeding the rate of protein synthesis, resulting in a negative nitrogen (N) balance, muscle wasting and weight loss. In contrast, the last stage displays reversed patterns, implying progressive recovery of endogenous N pools and body weight.

These adaptive alterations undergo continuing elucidation. The identification of cytokines, secreted by activated macrophages/monocytes or other reacting cells, has provided further insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling energy expenditure, redistribution of protein pools, reprioritization of syntheses and secretory processes.

The free fraction of hormones bound to specific binding-protein(s) [BP(s)] manifests biological activities, and any change in the BP blood level modifies the effect of the hormone on the end target organ.  The efficacy of these adaptive responses may be severely impaired in protein-energy malnourished (PEM) patients. This is especially critical with respect to changes of the circulating levels of transthyretin (TTR), retinol-binding protein (RBP) and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) conveying thyroid hormones (TH), retinol and cortisol, respectively.  This reaction is characterized by cytokine mediated autocrine, paracrine and endocrine changes. Among the many inducing molecules identified, interleukins 1 and 6 (Il-1, Il-6) and tumor necrosis factor a (TNF) are associated with enhanced production of 3 counterregulatory hormonal families (cortisol, catecholamines and glucagon). Growth hormone (GH) and TH also have roles in these metabolic adjustments.

There is overproduction of cortisol mediated by several cytokines acting on both the adrenal cortex (10) and on the pituitary through hypothalamic CRH with loss of feedback regulation of ACTH production (11). Hypercortisolemia is a major finding observed after surgery (12), sepsis (13), and medical insults, usually correlated with severity of insult and of complications. Rising cortisol values parallel hyperglycemic trends, as an effect of both gluconeogenesis and insulin resistance. Working in concert with TNF, glucocorticoids govern the breakdown of muscle mass, which is regarded as the main factor responsible for the negative N balance.

Under normal conditions, GH exerts both lipolytic and anabolic influences in the whole body economy under the dual control of the hypothalamic hormones somatocrinin (GHRH) and somatostatin (SRIH). GH secretion is usually depressed by rising blood concentrations of glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs) but is paradoxicaly elevated despite hyperglycemia in stressed patients.

The oversecretion of counterregulatory hormones working in concert generates subtle equilibria between glycogenolytic/glycolytic/gluconeogenic adaptive processes. The net result is the neutralization of the main hypoglycemic and anabolic activities of insulin and the development of a persisting and controlled hyperglycemic tone in the stressed body. The molecular mechanisms whereby insulin resistance occurs in the course of stress refer to
cytokine-  and  hormone-induced  phosphorylation abnormalities affecting receptor signaling. The insulin-like anabolic processes of GH are mediated by IGF1 working as relay agent. The expected high IGF1 surge associated with GH oversecretion is not observed in severe stress as plasma values are usually found at the lower limit of normal or even in the subnormal range.  The end result of this dissociation between high GH and low IGF1 levels is to favor the proteolysis of muscle mass to release AAs for gluconeogenesis and the breakdown of adipose tissue to provide ketogenic substrates.

The acute stage of stress is associated with the onset of a low T3 syndrome typically delineated by the drop of both total (TT3) and free (FT3) triiodothyronine plasma levels in the subnormal range. In contrast, both total (TT4) and free (FT4) thyroxine values usually remain within normal ranges with declining trends observed for TT4 and rising tendencies for FT4 (44). This last free compound is regarded as the sensor reflecting the actual thyroid status and governing the release of TSH whereas FT3 works as the active hormonal mediator at nuclear receptor level. The maintenance of an euthyroid sick syndrome is compatible with the down-regulation of most metabolic and energetic processes in healthy tissues. These inhibitory effects , negatively affecting all functional steps of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis concern TSH production, iodide uptake, transport and organification into iodotyrosyl residues, peroxidase coupling activity as well as thyroglobulin synthesis and TH leakage. Taken together, the above-mentioned data indicate that the development of hyperglycemia and of insulin-resistance in healthy tissues – mainly in the muscle mass – are hallmarks resulting from the coordinated activities of the counterregulatory hormones.

A growing body of recent data suggest that the stressed territory, whatever the causal agent – bacterial or viral sepsis, auto-immune disorder, traumatic or toxic shock, burns, cancer – manifest differentiated metabolic and immune reactions. The amplitude, duration and efficacy of these responses are reportedly impaired along several ways in PEM patients. These last detrimental effects are accompanied by a number of medical, social and economical consequences, such as extended length of hospital stay and increased complication / mortality rates. It is therefore mandatory to correctly identify and follow up the nutritional status of hospitalized patients. Such approaches are prerequisite to timely and scientifically grounded nutritional and pharmacological mediated interventions.

Contrary to the rest of the body, energy requirements of the inflamed territory are primarily fulfilled by anaerobic glycolysis, an effect triggered by the inhibition of key-enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, notably pyruvate-dehydrogenase. This non-oxidative combustion of glucose reveals low conversion efficiency but offers the major advantage to maintain, in the context of hyperglycemia, fuel provision to poorly irrigated and/or edematous tissues. The depression of the 5’-monodeiodinating activity (5’-DA) plays a pivotal role in these adaptive changes, yielding inactive reverse T3 (rT3) as index of impaired T4 to T3 conversion rates, but at the same time there is an augmented supply of bioactive T3 molecules and local overstimulation of thyro-dependent processes characterized by thyroid down-regulation.  The same differentiated evolutionary pattern applies to IGF1. In spite of lowered plasma total concentrations, the proportion of IGF1 released in free form may be substantially increased owing to the proteolytic degradation of IGFBP-3 in the intravascular compartment. The digestion of  BP-3 results from the surge of several proteases occurring the course of stress, yielding biologically active IGF1 molecules available for the repair of damaged tissues. In contrast, healthy receptors oppose a strong resistance to IGF1 ligands freed in the general circulation, likely induced by an acquired phosphorylation defect very similar in nature to that for the insulin transduction pathway.

PEM is the generic denomination of a broad spectrum of nutritional disorders, commonly found in hospital settings, and whose extreme poles are identified as marasmus and kwashiorkor. The former condition is usually regarded as the result of long-lasting starvation leading to the loss of lean body mass and fat reserves but relatively well-preserved liver function and immune capacities. The latter condition is typically the consequence of (sub)acute deprivation predominantly affecting the protein content of staplefood, an imbalance causing hepatic steatosis, fall of visceral proteins, edema and increased vulnerability to most stressful factors. PEM may be hypometabolic or hypermetabolic, usually coexists with other diseased states and is frequently associated with complications. Identification of PEM calls upon a large set of clinical and analytical disciplines comprising anthropometry, immunology, hematology and biochemistry.

CBG, TTR and RBP share in common the transport of specific ligands exerting their metabolic effects at nuclear receptor level. Released from their specific BPs in free form, cortisol, FT4 and retinol immediately participe to the strenghtening of the positive and negative responses to stressful stimuli. CBG is a relatively weak responder to short-term nutritional influences (73)  although long-lasting PEM is reportedly capable of causing its significant diminution (74). The dramatic drop of CBG in the course of stress appears as the combined effect of Il-6-induced posttranscriptional blockade of its liver synthesis (75) and peripheral overconsumption by activated neutrophils (61). The divergent alterations outlined by CBG and total cortisolemia result in an increased disposal of free ligand reaching proportions considerably higher than the 4 % recorded under physiological conditions.

The appellation of negative APPs that was once given to the visceral group of carrier-proteins. The NDAD concept takes the opposite view, defending the opinion that their suppressed synthesis releases free ligands which positively contribute to strengthen all aspects of the stress reaction, justifying the ABR denomination. This implies that the role played by ABRs should no longer be interpreted in terms of concentrations but in terms of functionality.

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THE OXIDATIVE STRESS OF HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIA RESULTS FROM REDUCED BIOAVAILABILITY OF SULFUR-CONTAINING REDUCTANTS.
Yves Ingenbleek. The Open Clinical Chemistry Journal, 2011, 4, 34-44.

Vegetarian subjects consuming subnormal amounts of methionine (Met) are characterized by subclinical protein malnutrition causing reduction in size of their lean body mass (LBM) best identified by the serial measurement of plasma transthyretin (TTR). As a result, the transsulfuration pathway is depressed at cystathionine-β-synthase (CβS) level triggering the upstream sequestration of homocysteine (Hcy) in biological fluids and promoting its conversion to Met. Maintenance of beneficial Met homeostasis is counterpoised by the drop of cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) values downstream to CβS causing in turn declining generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from enzymatic sources. The biogenesis of H2S via non-enzymatic reduction is further inhibited in areas where earth’s crust is depleted in elemental sulfur (S8) and sulfate oxyanions. Combination of subclinical malnutrition and S8-deficiency thus maximizes the defective production of Cys, GSH and H2S reductants, explaining persistence of unabated oxidative burden. The clinical entity increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and stroke in underprivileged plant-eating populations regardless of Framingham criteria and vitamin-B status. Although unrecognized up to now, the nutritional disorder is one of the commonest worldwide, reaching top prevalence in populated regions of Southeastern Asia. Increased risk of hyperhomocysteinemia and oxidative stress may also affect individuals suffering from intestinal malabsorption or westernized communities having adopted vegan dietary lifestyles.

Metabolic pathways: Met molecules supplied by dietary proteins are submitted to TM processes allowing to release Hcy which may in turn either undergo Hcy – Met RM pathways or be irreversibly committed into TS decay. Impairment of CbS activity, as described in protein malnutrition, entails supranormal accumulation of Hcy in body fluids, stimulation of activity and maintenance of Met homeostasis. This last beneficial effect is counteracted by decreased concentration of most components generated downstream to CbS, explaining the depressed CbS- and CbL-mediated enzymatic production of H2S along the TS cascade. The restricted dietary intake of elemental S further operates as a limiting factor for its non-enzymatic reduction to H2S which contributes to downsizing a common body pool. Combined protein- and S-deficiencies work in concert to deplete Cys, GSH and H2S from their body reserves, hence impeding these reducing molecules to properly face the oxidative stress imposed by hyperhomocysteinemia.

see also …

McCully, K.S. Vascular pathology of homocysteinemia: implications for the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Am. J. Pathol., 1996, 56, 111-128.

Cheng, Z.; Yang, X.; Wang, H. Hyperhomocysteinemia and endothelial dysfunction. Curr. Hypertens. Rev., 2009, 5,158-165.

Loscalzo, J. The oxidant stress of hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. J. Clin.Invest., 1996, 98, 5-7.

Ingenbleek, Y.; Hardillier, E.; Jung, L. Subclinical protein malnutrition is a determinant of hyperhomocysteinemia. Nutrition, 2002, 18, 40-46.

Ingenbleek, Y.; Young, V.R. The essentiality of sulfur is closely related to nitrogen metabolism: a clue to hyperhomocysteinemia. Nutr. Res. Rev., 2004, 17, 135-153.

Hosoki, R.; Matsuki, N.; Kimura, H. The possible role of hydrogen sulfide as an endogenous smooth muscle relaxant in synergy with nitric oxide. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 1997, 237, 527-531.

Tang, B.; Mustafa, A.; Gupta, S.; Melnyk, S.; James S.J.; Kruger, W.D. Methionine-deficient diet induces post-transcriptional downregulation of cystathionine-􀀁-synthase. Nutrition, 2010, 26, 1170-1175.

Yves Ingenbleek. Plasma Transthyretin Reflects the Fluctuations of Lean Body Mass in Health and Disease. Chapter 20. In S.J. Richardson and V. Cody (eds.), Recent Advances in Transthyretin Evolution, Structure and Biological Functions, DOI: 10.1007/978‐3‐642‐00646‐3_20, # Springer‐Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009.

Transthyretin (TTR) is a 55-kDa protein secreted mainly by the choroid plexus and the liver. Whereas its intracerebral production appears as a stable secretory process allowing even distribution of intrathecal thyroid hormones, its hepatic synthesis is influenced by nutritional and inflammatory circumstances working concomitantly. Both morbid conditions are governed by distinct pathogenic mechanisms leading to the reduction in size of lean body mass (LBM). The liver production of TTR integrates the dietary and stressful components of any disease spectrum, explaining why it is the sole plasma protein whose evolutionary patterns closely follow the shape outlined by LBM fluctuations. Serial measurement of TTR therefore provides unequalled information on the alterations affecting overall protein nutritional status. Recent advances in TTR physiopathology emphasize the detecting power and preventive role played by the protein in hyperhomocysteinemic states, acquired metabolic disorders currently ascribed to dietary restriction in water-soluble vitamins. Sulfur (S)-deficiency is proposed as an additional causal factor in the sizeable proportion of hyperhomocysteinemic patients characterized by adequate vitamin intake but experiencing varying degrees of nitrogen (N)-depletion. Owing to the fact that N and S coexist in plant and animal tissues within tightly related concentrations, decreasing LBM as an effect of dietary shortage and/or excessive hypercatabolic losses induces proportionate S-losses. Regardless of water-soluble vitamin status, elevation of homocysteine plasma levels is negatively correlated with LBM reduction and declining TTR plasma levels. These findings occur as the result of impaired cystathionine-b-synthase activity, an enzyme initiating the transsulfuration pathway and whose suppression promotes the upstream accumulation and remethylation of homocysteine molecules. Under conditions of N- and S-deficiencies, the maintenance of methionine homeostasis indicates high metabolic priority.

Schematically, the human body may be divided into two major compartments, namely fat mass (FM) and FFM that is obtained by substracting
FM from body weight (BW). The fat cell mass sequesters about 80% of the total body lipids, is poorly hydrated and contains only small quantities of lean tissues and nonfat constituents. FFM comprises the sizeable part of lean tissues and minor mineral compounds among which are Ca, P, Na, and Cl pools totaling about 1.7 kg or 2.5% of BW in a healthy man weighing 70 kg. Subtraction of mineral mass from FFM provides LBM, a composite aggregation of organs and tissues with specific functional properties. LBM is thus nearly but not strictly equivalent to FFM. With extracellular mineral content subtracted, LBM accounts for most of total body proteins (TBP) and of TBN assuming a mean 6.25 ratio between protein and N content.

SM accounts for 45% of TBN whereas the remaining 55% is in nonmuscle lean tissues. The LBM of the reference man contains 98% of total
body potassium (TBK) and the bulk of total body sulfur (TBS). TBK and TBS reach equal intracellular amounts (140 g each) and share distribution patterns (half in SM and half in the rest of cell mass).  The body content of K and S largely exceeds that of magnesium (19 g), iron (4.2 g) and zinc (2.3 g). The average hydration level of LBM in healthy subjects of all age is 73% with the proportion of the intracellular/extracellular fluid spaces being 4:3. SM is of particular relevance in nutritional studies due to its capacity to serve as a major reservoir of amino acids (AAs) and as a dispenser of gluconeogenic substrates. An indirect estimate of SM size consists in the measurement of urinary creatinine, end-product of the nonenzymatic hydrolysis of phosphocreatine which is limited to muscle cells.

During ageing, all the protein components of the human body decrease regularly. This shrinking tendency is especially well documented for SM  whose absolute amount is preserved until the end of the fifth decade, consistent with studies showing unmodified muscle structure, intracellular K content and working capacit. TBN and TBK are highly correlated in healthy subjects and both parameters manifest an age-dependent curvilinear decline
with an accelerated decrease after 65 years.  The trend toward sarcopenia is more marked and rapid in elderly men than in elderly women decreasing strength and functional capacity. The downward SM slope may be somewhat prevented by physical training or accelerated by supranormal cytokine status as reported in apparently healthy aged persons suffering low-grade inflammation. 2002) or in critically ill patients whose muscle mass undergoes proteolysis and contractile dysfunction.

The serial measurement of plasma TTR in healthy children shows that BP values are low in the neonatal period and rise linearly with superimposable concentrations in both sexes during infant growth consistent with superimposable N accretion and protein synthesis rates. Starting from the sixties, TTR values progressively decline showing steeper slopes in elderly males. The lowering trend seems to be initiated by the attenuation of androgen influences and trophic stimuli with increasing age. The normal human TTR trajectory from birth to death has been well documented by scientists belonging to the Foundation for Blood Research. TTR is the first plasma protein to decline in response to marginal protein restricion, thus working as an early signal warning that adaptive mechanisms maintaining homeostasis are undergoing decompensation.

TTR was proposed as a marker of protein nutritional status following a clinical investigation undertaken in 1972 on protein-energy malnourished (PEM) Senegalese children (Ingenbleek et al. 1972). By comparison with ALB and transferrin (TF) plasma values, TTR revealed a much higher degree of sensitivity to changes in protein status that has been attributed to its shorter biological half-life (2 days) and to its unusual Trp richness (Ingenbleek et al. 1972, 1975a). Transcription of the TTR gene in the liver is directed by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) bound to hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) under the control of several other HNFs. The mechanism responsible for the suppressed TTR synthesis in PEM-states is a restricted AA and energy supply working as limiting factors (Ingenbleek and Young 2002). The rapidly turning over TTR protein is highly responsive to any change in protein flux and energy supply, being clearly situated on the cutting edge of the equipoise.

LBM shrinking may be the consequence of either dietary restriction reducing protein syntheses to levels compatible with survival or that of cytokine-induced tissue proteolysis exceeding protein synthesis and resulting in a net body negative N balance. The size of LBM in turn determines plasma TTR concentrations whose liver production similarly depends on both dietary provision and inflammatory conditions. In animal cancer models, reduced TBN pools were correlated with decreasing plasma TTR values and provided the same predictive ability. In kidney patients, LBM is proposed as an excellent predictor of outcome working in the same direction as TTR plasma levels.  High N intake, supposed to preserve LBM reserves, reduces significantly the mortality rate of kidney patients and is positively correlated with the alterations of TTR plasma concentrations appearing as the sole predictor of final outcome. It is noteworthy that most SELDI or MALDI workers interested in defining protein nutritional status have chosen TTR as a biomarker, showing that there exists a large consensus considering the BP as the most reliable indicator of protein depletion in most morbid circumstances.

Total homocysteine (tHcy) is a S-containing AA not found in customary diets but endogenously produced in the body of mammals by the enzymatic transmethylation of methionine (Met), one of the eight IAAs supplied by staplefoods. tHcy may either serve as precursor substrate for the synthesis of new Met molecules along the remethylation (RM) pathway or undergo irreversible kidney leakage through a cascade of derivatives defining the transsulfuration (TS) pathway. Hcy is thus situated at the crossroad of RM and TS pathways that are regulated by three water-soluble vitamins (pyridoxine, B6; folates, B9; cobalamins, B12).

Significant positive correlations are found between tHcy and plasma urea and plasma creatinine, indicating that both visceral and muscular tissues undergo proteolytic degradation throughout the course of rampant inflammatory burden. In healthy individuals, tHcy plasma concentrations maintain positive correlations with LBM and TTR from birth until the end of adulthood. Starting from the onset of normal old age, tHcy values become disconnected from LBM control and reveal diverging trends with TTR values. Of utmost importance is the finding that, contrary to all protein
components which are downregulated in protein-depleted states, tHcy values are upregulated.  Hyperhomocysteinemia is an acquired clinical entity characterized by mild or moderate elevation in tHcy blood values found in apparently healthy individuals (McCully 1969). This distinct morbid condition appears as a public health problem of increasing importance in the general population, being regarded as an independent and graded risk factor for vascular pathogenesis unrelated to hypercholesterolemia, arterial hypertension, diabetes and smoking.

Studies grounded on stepwise multiple regression analysis have concluded that the two main watersoluble vitamins account for only 28% of tHcy variance whereas vitamins B6, B9, and B12, taken together, did not account for more than 30–40% of variance. Moreover, a number of hyperhomocysteinemic conditions are not responsive to folate and pyridoxine supplementation. This situation prompted us to search for other causal factors which might fill the gap between the public health data and the vitamin triad deficiencies currently incriminated. We suggest that S – the forgotten element – plays central roles in nutritional epidemiology (Ingenbleek and Young 2004).

Aminoacidemia studies performed in PEM children, adult patients and elderly subjects have reported that the concentrations of plasma IAAs invariably display lowering trends as the morbid condition worsens. The depressed tendency is especially pronounced in the case of tryptophan and for the so-called branched-chain AAs (BCAAs, isoleucine, leucine, valine) the decreases in which are regarded as a salient PEM feature following the direction outlined by TTR (Ingenbleek et al. 1986). Met constitutes a notable exception to the above described evolutionary profiles, showing unusual stability in chronically protein depleted states.

Maintenance of normal methioninemia is associated with supranormal tHcy blood values in PEMadults (Ingenbleek et al. 1986) and increased tHcy leakage in the urinary output of PEM children. In contrast, most plasma and urinary S-containing compounds produced along the TS pathway downstream to CbSconverting step (Fig. 20.1) display significantly diminished values. This is notably the case for cystathionine (Ingenbleek et al. 1986), glutathione, taurine, and sulfaturia. Such distorted patterns are reminiscent of abnormalities defining homocystinuria, an inborn disease of Met metabolism characterized by CbS refractoriness to pyridoxine stimuli, thereby promoting the upstream retention of tHcy in biological fluids. It
was hypothesized more than 20 years ago (Ingenbleek et al. 1986) that PEM is apparently able to similarly depress CbS activity, suggesting that the enzyme is a N-status sensitive step working as a bidirectional lockgate, overstimulated by high Met intake (Finkelstein and Martin 1986) and downregulated under N-deprivation conditions (Ingenbleek et al. 2002). Confirmation that N dietary deprivation may inhibit CbS activity has recently provided. The tHcy precursor pool is enlarged in biological fluids, boosting Met remethylation processes along the RM pathway, consistent with studies showing overstimulation of Met-synthase activity in conditions of protein restriction. In other words, high tHcy plasma concentrations observed in PEM states are the dark side of adaptive mechanisms for maintaining Met homeostasis. This is consistent with the unique role played by Met in the preservation of N body stores.

The classical interpretation that strict vegans, who consume plenty of folates in their diet and manifest nevertheless higher tHcy plasma concentrations than omnivorous counterparts, needs to be revisited. On the basis of hematological and biochemical criteria, cobalamin deficiency is one of the most prevalent vitamin-deficiencies wordwide, being often incriminated as deficient in vegan subjects. It seems, however, likely that its true causal impact on rising tHcy values is substantially overestimated in most studies owing to the modest contribution played by cobalamins on tHcy
variance analyses. In contrast, there exists a growing body of converging data indicating that the role played by the protein component is largely underscored in vegan studies. It is worth recalling that S is the main intracellular anion coexisting with N within a constant mean S:N ratio (1:14.5) in animal tissues and dietary products of animal origin (Ingenbleek 2006). The mean S:N ratio found in plant items ranges from 1:20 to 1:35, a proportion that does not optimally meet human tissue requirements (Ingenbleek 2006), paving the way for borderline S and N deficiencies.

A recent Taiwanese investigation on hyperhomocysteinemic nuns consuming traditional vegetarian regimens consisting of mainly rice, soy products,
vegetables and fruits with few or no dairy items illustrates such clinical misinterpretation (Hung et al. 2002). The authors reported that folates and cobalamins, taken together, accounted for only 28.6% of tHcy variance in the vegetarian cohort whereas pyridoxine was inoperative (Hung et al. 2002). The daily vegetable N and Met intakes were situated highly significantly (p < 0.001) below the recommended allowances for humans (FAO/WHO/United Nations University 1985), causing a stage of unrecognized PEM documented by significantly depressed BCAA plasma
concentrations. Met levels escaped the overall decline in IAAs levels, emphasizing that efficient homeostatic mechanisms operate at the expense of an acquired hyperhomocysteinemic state. The diagnosis of subclinical PEM was missed because the authors ignored the exquisitely sensitive TTR detecting power. A proper PEM identification would have allowed the authors to confirm the previously described TTR–tHcy relationship that was established in Western Africa from comparable field studies involving country dwellers living on plant products.

The concept that acute or chronic stressful conditions may exert similar inhibitory effects on CbS activity and thereby promote hyperhomocysteinemic states is founded on previous studies showing that hypercatabolic states are characterized by increased urinary N and S losses maintaining tightly correlated depletion rates (Cuthbertson 1931; Ingenbleek and Young 2004; Sherman and Hawk 1900) which reflect the S:N ratio found in tissues undergoing cytokine induced proteolysis. This has been documented in coronary infarction and in acute pancreatitis where tHcy elevation evolves too rapidly to allow for a nutritional vitamin B-deficit explanation.  tHcy is considered stable in plasma and the two investigations report unaltered folate and cobalamin plasma concentrations.

The clinical usefulness of TTR as a nutritional biomarker, described in the early seventies (Ingenbleek et al. 1972) has been substantially disregarded by the scientific community for nearly four decades. This long-lasting reluctance expressed by many investigators is largely due to the fact that protein malnutrition and stressful disorders of various causes have combined inhibitory effects on hepatic TTR synthesis. Declining TTR plasma concentrations may result from either dietary protein and energy restrictions or from cytokine-induced transcriptional blockade (Murakami et al. 1988) of its hepatic synthesis. The proposed marker was therefore seen as having high sensitivity but poor specificity. Recent advances in protein metabolism settle the controversy by throwing further light on the relationships between TTR and the N-components of body composition.

The developmental patterns of LBM and TTR exhibit striking similarities. Both parameters rise from birth to puberty, manifest gender dimorphism during full sexual maturity then decrease during ageing. Uncomplicated PEM primarily affects both visceral and structural pools of LBM with distinct kinetics, reducing protein synthesis to levels compatible with prolonged survival. In acute or chronic stressful disorders, LBM undergoes muscle proteolysis exceeding the upregulation of protein syntheses in liver and injured areas, yielding a net body negative N balance. These adaptive responses are well identified by the measurement of TTR plasma concentrations which therefore appear as a plasma marker for LBM fluctuations.
Attenuation of stress and/or introduction of nutritional rehabilitation restores both LBM and TTR to normal values following parallel slopes. TTR fulfills, therefore, a unique position in assessing actual protein nutritional status, monitoring the efficacy of dietetic support and predicting the patient’s outcome (Bernstein and Pleban 1996).

see also…

Acosta PB, Yannicelli S, Ryan AS, Arnold G, Marriage BJ, Plewinska M, Bernstein L, Fox J, Lewis V, Miller M, Velazquez A (2005) Nutritional therapy improves growth and protein status of children with a urea cycle enzyme defect. Mol Genet Metab 86:448–455.

Arroyave G, Wilson D, Be´har M, Scrimshaw NS (1961) Serum and urinary creatinine in children with severe protein malnutrition. Am J Clin Nutr 9:176–179.

Bates CJ, Mansoor MA, van der Pols J, Prentice A, Cole TJ, Finch S (1997) Plasma total homocysteine in a representative sample of 972 British men and women aged 65 and over. Eur J Clin Nutr 51:691–697.

Battezzatti A, Bertoli S, San Romerio A, Testolin G (2007) Body composition: An important determinant of homocysteine and methionine concentrations in healthy individuals. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 17:525–534.

Bernstein LH, Bachman TE, Meguid M, Ament M, Baumgartner T, Kinosian B, Martindale R, Spiekerman M (1995) Prealbumin in nutritional care Consensus Group. Measurement of visceral protein status in assessing protein and energy malnutrition: Standard of care. Nutrition 11:169–171

Bernstein LH, Ingenbleek Y (2002) Transthyretin: Its response to malnutrition and stress injury. Clinical usefulness and economical implications. Clin Chem Lab Med 40:1344–1348.

Boorsook H, Dubnoff JW (1947) The hydrolysis of phosphocreatine and the origin of creatinine. J Biol Chem 168:493–510.

Briend A, Garenne M, Maire B, Fontaine O, Dieng F (1989) Nutritional status, age and survival: The muscle mass hypothesis. Eur J Clin Nutr 43:715–726

Gray GE, Landel AM, Meguid MM (1994) Taurine-supplemented total parenteral nutrition and taurine status of malnourished cancer patients. Nutrition 10:11–15

Heymsfield SB, McManus C, Stevens V, Smith J (1982) Muscle mass: Reliable indicator of protein-energy malnutrition and outcome. Am J Clin Nutr 35:1192–1199

Ingenbleek Y (2006) The nutritional relationship linking sulfur to nitrogen in living organisms. J Nutr 136:S1641–S1651
Ingenbleek Y (2008) Plasma transthyretin indicates the direction of both nitrogen balance and retinoid status in health and disease. Open Clin Chem J 1:1–12
Ingenbleek Y, Bernstein LH (1999a) The stressful condition as a nutritionally dependent adaptive dichotomy. Nutrition 15:305–320
Ingenbleek Y, Bernstein LH (1999b) The nutritionally dependent adaptive dichotomy (NDAD) and stress hypermetabolism. J Clin Ligand Assay 22:259–267
Ingenbleek Y, Carpentier YA (1985) A prognostic inflammatory and nutritional index scoring critically ill patients. Internat J Vitam Nutr Res 55:91–101

Ingenbleek Y, Young VR (1994) Transthyretin (prealbumin) in health and disease: Nutritional implications. Annu Rev Nutr 14:495–533
Ingenbleek Y, Young VR (2002) Significance of transthyretin in protein metabolism. Clin Chem Lab Med 40:1281–1291
Ingenbleek Y, Young VR (2004) The essentiality of sulfur is closely related to nitrogen metabolism. Nutr Res Rev 17:135–151

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Simple representation of the toll-like recepto...

Sepsis, Multi-organ Dysfunction Syndrome, and Septic Shock: A Conundrum of Signaling Pathways Cascading Out of Control

Curator and Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

What is Septic Shock?
Scripps Research Professor Wolfram Ruf and colleagues have identified a key connection between the signaling pathways and the immune system spiraling out of control involving the coagulation system and vascular endothelium that, if disrupted may be a target for sepsis. (Science Daily, Feb 29, 2008). It may be caused by a bacterial infection that enters the bloodstream, but we now recognize the same cascade not triggered by bacterial invasion. These invading bacteria produce endotoxins and other toxins that trigger a widespread inflammatory response of the innate immune system–a response that is necessary, as it turns out, because without the inflammation, the body cannot fight off the bacterial infection. During sepsis, the inflammation triggers widespread coagulation in the bloodstream. This coagulation can block blood vessels in vital organs, starving the organs of oxygen and damaging them. The organs can be further damaged when the blood starts to flow again because the lining of the blood vessels remain leaky due to inflammatory cytokines and damage by intravascular coagulation.
What is the Pathogenesis of Sepsis?
The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been defined as a severe form of acute lung injury featuring pulmonary inflammation and increased capillary leak. ARDS is associated with a high mortality rate and accounts for 100,000 deaths annually in the United States. ARDS may arise in a number of clinical situations, especially in patients with sepsis. A well-described pathophysiological model of ARDS is one form of the acute lung inflammation mediated by neutrophils, cytokines, and oxidant stress. Neutrophils are major effect cells at the frontier of innate immune responses, and they play a critical role in host defense against invading microorganisms. The tissue injury appears to be related to proteases and toxic reactive oxygen radicals released from activated neutrophils. In addition, neutrophils can produce cytokines and chemokines that enhance the acute inflammatory response. Neutrophil accumulation in the lung plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury during sepsis. Directed movement of neutrophils is mediated by a group of chemoattractants, especially CXC chemokines. Local lung production of CXC chemokines is intensified during experimental sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Under these conditions of stimulation, activation of MAPKs (p38, p42/p44) occurs in sham neutrophils but not in CLP neutrophils, while under the same conditions phosphorylation of p38 and p42/p44 occurs in both sham and CLP alveolar macrophages. These data indicate that, under septic conditions, there is impaired signaling in neutrophils and enhanced signaling in alveolar macrophages, resulting in CXC chemokine production, and C5a appears to play a pivotal role in this process. As a result, CXC chemokines increase in lung, setting the stage for neutrophil accumulation in lung during sepsis.
Uncontrolled activation of the coagulation cascade following lung injury contributes to the development of lung inflammation and fibrosis in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) and fibrotic lung disease. This article reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to the activation of the coagulation cascade in response to lung injury and the evidence that excessive procoagulant activity is of pathophysiological significance in these disease settings. This is consistent with a pneumonia or lung injury preceding sepsis. On the other hand, it is not surprising that abdominal, cardiac bypass, and post cardiac revascularization may also lead to events resembling sepsis and/or cardiovascular collapse. The tissue factor-dependent extrinsic pathway is the predominant mechanism by which the coagulation cascade is locally activated in the lungs of patients with ALI/ARDS and pulmonary fibrosis. The cellular effects mediated via activation of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) may be of particular importance in influencing inflammatory and fibroproliferative responses in experimental models involving direct injury to the lung. In this regard, studies in PAR1 knockout mice have shown that this receptor plays a major role in orchestrating the interplay between coagulation, inflammation and lung fibrosis.
The activation of the coagulation cascade is one of the earliest events initiated following tissue injury. The prime function of this complex and highly regulated proteolytic system is to generate insoluble, crosslinked fibrin strands, which bind and stabilize weak platelet hemostatic plugs, formed at sites of tissue injury. The formation of this provisional clot is critically dependent on the action of thrombin, and is generated following the stepwise activation of coagulation proteinases via the extrinsic and intrinsic systems. Under normal circumstances, blood is not exposed to tissue factor (TF). However, upon tissue injury, exposure of plasma to TF expressed on non-vascular cells or on activated endothelial cells results in the formation of the TF-activated factor VII (FVIIa) complex. The TF–FVIIa complex subsequently catalyses the initial activation of FX to activated factor X (FXa) and FIX to activated factor IX. FXa in association with activated factor V catalyses the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. Sustained coagulation is achieved when thrombin synthesized through the initial TF–FVIIa–FXa complex catalyses the activation of FXI, FIX, FVIII and FX. In this manner, the intrinsic pathway is activated.
The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is the massive inflammatory reaction resulting from systemic mediator release that may lead to multiple organ dysfunction. I introduce an analysis of the roles of cytokines, cytokine production, and the relationship of cytokine production to the development of SIRS. The article postulates a three-stage development of SIRS, in which stage 1 is a local production of cytokines in response to an injury or infection. Stage 2 is the protective release of a small amount of cytokines into the body’s circulation. Stage 3 is the massive systemic reaction where cytokines turn destructive by compromising the integrity of the capillary walls and flooding end organs. While cytokines are generally viewed as a destructive development in the patient that generally leads to multiple organ dysfunction, cytokines also protect the body when localized. It will be necessary to study the positive effects of cytokines while also studying their role in causing SIRS. It will also be important to investigate the relationship between cytokines and their blockers in SIRS.
Monocyte/macrophage- and neutrophil-mediated inflammatory responses can be stimulated through a variety of receptors, including G protein-linked 7-transmembrane receptors (e.g., FPR1; MIM 136537), Fc receptors (see MIM 146790), CD14 (MIM 158120) and Toll-like receptors (e.g., TLR4; MIM 603030), and cytokine receptors (e.g., IFNGR1; MIM 107470). Engagement of these receptors can also prime myeloid cells to respond to other stimuli. Myeloid cells express receptors belonging to the Ig superfamily, such as TREM1, or to the C-type lectin superfamily. Depending on their transmembrane and cytoplasmic sequence structure, these receptors have either activating (e.g., KIR2DS1; MIM 604952) or inhibitory functions (e.g., KIR2DL1; MIM 604936).[supplied by OMIM].
TREM-1 associates with and signals via the adapter protein 12DAP12/12TYROBP, which contains an ITAM. To mediate activation, TREM-1 associates with the transmembrane adapter molecule 12DAP12. In sharp contrast to the effect by Ad-FDAP12, transgene expression in the liver of soluble form of extracellular domain of TREM-1 as an antagonist of 12DAP12 signaling, remarkably inhibited zymosan A-induced granuloma formation at every time point examined.
For signal transduction, 01TREM-1 couples to the ITAM-containing adapter DNAX activation protein of 12 kDa (23DAP12 ). MARV and EBOV activate TREM-1 on human neutrophils, resulting in 12DAP12 phosphorylation, TREM-1 shedding, mobilization of intracellular calcium, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and phenotypic changes. TREM-1 is the best-characterized member of a growing family of 12DAP12-associated receptors that regulate the function of myeloid cells in innate and adaptive responses. TREM-1 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells), a recently discovered receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, activates neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages by signaling through the adapter protein 12DAP12. 522Granulocyte TREM-1 expression was high at baseline and immediately down-regulated upon LPS exposure along with an increase in soluble TREM-1.
DIC is primarily a laboratory diagnosis, based on the combination of elevated fibrin-related markers (FRM), with decreased procoagulant factors and platelets. Non-overt DIC is observed in most patients with sepsis, whereas overt DIC is less frequent. Consumption coagulopathy is a bleeding disorder caused by low levels of platelets and procoagulant factors associated with massive coagulation activation. Treatment with drotrecogin alfa (activated) improves survival and other outcome parameters in severe sepsis, including a subgroup of patients fulfilling the laboratory criteria of overt DIC. No randomized trials demonstrating effective therapies in consumption coagulopathy have been published.
Sepsis is a complex syndrome characterized by simultaneous activation of inflammation and coagulation manifested as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)/sepsis symptoms through release of proinflammatory cytokines, procoagulants, and adhesion molecules from immune cells and/or damaged endothelium. Conventional treatments have focused on source control, antimicrobials, vasopressors, and fluid resuscitation; however, a new treatment paradigm exists: that of treating the host response to infection with adjunct therapies including early goal-directed therapy, drotrecogin alfa (activated), and immunonutrition. The drotrecogin alfa (activated) has been shown to reduce mortality in the severely septic patient when combined with traditional treatment. Therapies targeting improved oxygen and blood flow and reduction of apoptosis and free radicals are under investigation. Ultimately, intervention timing may be the most important factor in reducing severe sepsis mortality.

Cell Signaling in Sepsis
Recent data have shown stable patterns of activation among peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neutrophils in healthy human subjects. Although polymorphisms in Toll-like receptors play a contributory role in determining cellular activation, other factors are involved as well. In addition, circulating and locally released mediators of inflammation, including cytokines, complement fragments, and components of activated coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, that are generated in increased amounts during severe infection also interact with membrane-based receptors, leading to activation of intracellular path ways capable of further accelerating proinflammatory cascades. Circulating and organ-specific cell populations are activated to produce proinflammatory mediators during sepsis. Neutrophils and PBMCs bear TLR2 and TLR4, as well as other receptors, such as protein —coupled receptor, that induce increased generation of cytokines and other immunoregulatory proteins, as well as enhance release of proinflammatory mediators, including reactive oxygen species.
The expression of cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β is increased in sepsis, and engagement of TNF-α with type I(p55) and type II(p75) TNF receptors or IL-1β with IL-1 receptors belonging to the TLR/IL-1 receptor family produces activation of kinases (including Src, p38, extracellular signal—regulated kinase, and phosphoinositide 3–kinase) and transcriptional factors (such as nuclear factor [NF]–κB) important for further up-regulation of inflammatory proteins.
Genetic polymorphisms lead to alterations in TLR conformation (a small percentage of the variability in humans when their cells are exposed to bacterial products) that are accompanied by decreased cellular activation after exposure to bacterial products. The stable variability in cellular activation that is present among the genetically heterogeneous human population, only a limited number of studies have examined how such patterns may correlate with clinical outcome. A number of studies have examined the transcriptional factor NF-κB and kinases, including p38 and Akt, and provide insights into how heterogeneity in cell signaling may contribute to subsequent clinical course.
Increased activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase protein 38, Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)–κB in neutrophils and other cell populations obtained at early time points in the clinical course of sepsis-induced acute lung injury or after accidental trauma is associated with a more-severe clinical course, suggesting that a proinflammatory cellular phenotype contributes to organ system dysfunction in such settings. Identification of patients with cellular phenotypes characterized by increased activation of NF-κB, Akt, and protein 38, as well as discrete patterns of gene activation, may permit identification of patients with sepsis who are likely to have a worse clinical outcome, thereby permitting early institution of therapies that modulate deleterious signaling pathways before organ system dysfunction develops, reducing morbidity and improving survival.

NF-kB

The transcriptional regulatory factor NF-κB is a central participant in modulating the expression of many immuno regulatory mediators involved in the acute inflammatory response [30–35]. NF-κB/rel transcription factors function as dimers held latently in the cytoplasm of cells by inhibitory IκB proteins. Signaling pathways initiated by engagement of TLRs, such as TLR 2 and TLR 4, by microbial products and other inflammatory mediators lead to nuclear accumulation of NF-κB and enhanced transcription of genes responsible for the expression of cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and other mediators of the inflammatory response associated with infection. Association of NF-κB with the inhibitory protein κB-α in the cytoplasm blocks the nuclear localization sequence of NF-κB, inhibiting its movement into the nucleus. Phosphorylation events, in addition to those involving IKKα/β and IκB-α, and involving NF-κB subunits (such as p 65) and nuclear coactivator proteins (such as TATA box binding protein or cAMP-responsive element—binding protein) are mediated by p 38, Akt, and other kinases and play an important role in regulating the transcriptional activity of NF-κB.

Studies have shown that greater nuclear accumulation of NF-κB is accompanied by higher mortality and worse clinical course in patients with sepsis. These clinical series demonstrated that persistent activation of NF-κB was found in nonsurvivors, with surviving patients having lower nuclear concentrations of NF-κB at early time points in their septic course than did nonsurvivors as well as more rapid return of nuclear accumulation of NF-κB.  Although studies of patients with sepsis have generally shown that nuclear concentrations of NF-κB are higher in non survivors than in survivors, an unresolved issue is whether such changes occur early and, therefore, define the subsequent course of sepsis or whether pathophysiological changes that result in poor clinical outcome also produce NF-κB activation as a secondary event, so that such changes in NF-κB are simply associated with more severe organ system dysfunction but do not contribute directly to outcome. A study of surgical patients without sepsis supports the hypothesis that neutrophil phenotypes defined by NF-κB activation patterns predict clinical outcome [54]. In that clinical series of patients undergoing repair of aortic aneurysms, higher preoperative levels of NF-κB in peripheral neutrophils were associated with death and with the development of postoperative organ dysfunction.

NF-κB

NF-κB (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Stable high and low responder phenotypes in the healthy population, implies that the presence of a preexistent high responder neutrophil phenotype, as characterized by increased nuclear translocation of NF-κB after stimulation with TLR 2 or TLR 4 ligands, would be associated with more severe pulmonary inflammatory response and clinical course in response to infection. Conversely, persons whose neutrophils have diminished activation of NF-κB after stimulation would be expected to have less-intense neutrophil-driven inflammation, as well as organ dysfunction. In addition, Nuclear levels of nuclear factor (NF)–κB are significantly increased in neutrophils obtained within 24h of initiation of mechanical ventilation in patients whose clinical course from sepsis-induced acute lung injury is more severe (as defined by death or ventilation for >14 days—that is, ⩽14 ventilator-free days [VFD]), compared with patients with a less-severe course (as defined by mechanical ventilation for <14 days, or >14 VFD).  Baseline nuclear concentrations of NF-κB were lower in healthy volunteers than in patients with sepsis-induced acute lung injury, regardless of subsequent clinical course, demonstrating baseline activation of NF-κB in association with sepsis. *P <.05, vs. volunteers. †P< .05, vs. >14VFD.

Modulation of intracellular signaling cascades involving kinases, such as p 38 or Akt, or transcriptional factors, such as NF-κB, through specific inhibitory approaches has shown their pathophysiological importance in experimental models. However, the role of specific intra cellular pathways in contributing to clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis remains incompletely determined, primarily because such alterations in cellular activation patterns have not been examined at early time points before the onset of multiple organ dysfunction. Recent information shows that alterations in p38, Akt, and NF-κB among neutrophils and other cell populations not only precedes the development of organ system dysfunction but also has predictive value in identifying patients with a more severe subsequent clinical course.

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Abraham E.  Alterations in Cell Signaling in Sepsis. Clin Infect Dis 2005: 41 (Supplement 7): S459-S464. doi: 10.1086/431997

Yang KY, Arcaroli JJ, Abraham E. Early alterations in neutrophil activation are associated with outcome in acute lung injury. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003; 167:1567-74.

Abraham E. Neutrophils and Acute Lung Injury. Crit Care Med 2003; 31:195-9.

Abraham E, Carmody A, Shenkar R, Arcaroli J. Neutrophils as early immunologic effectors in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 2000; 279:1137-45.

Sepsis Bundles

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has highlighted sepsis as an area of focus and has identified several deficiencies that may cause suboptimal care of patients with severe sepsis.

These deficiencies include inconsistency in the early diagnosis of severe sepsis and septic shock, frequent inadequate volume resuscitation without defined endpoints, late or inadequate use of antibiotics, frequent failure to support the cardiac output when depressed, frequent failure to control hyperglycemia adequately, frequent failure to use low tidal volumes and pressures in acute lung injury, and frequent failure to treat adrenal inadequacy in refractory shock.

To address these deficiencies, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and IHI have revised and added to the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines and created 2 sepsis treatment bundles (resuscitation and management) to guide therapy for patients with severe sepsis.

“Implicit in the use of the bundles is the need to adopt all the elements contained in the bundle,” the authors write. “One cannot choose to apply only selected items from the bundle and expect to achieve comparable benefit. The IHI sepsis website provides tools to screen patients for severe sepsis, as well as to measure success with adherence to implementing the bundles (http://www.ihi.org/IHI/Topics/CriticalCare/Sepsis/).” (The authors are employees of Eli Lilly and Co, the maker of drotrecogin alfa (activated). South Med J. 2007;100:594-600.

The sepsis resuscitation bundle, which should be accomplished as soon as possible and scored during the first 6 hours

Prealbumin (Transthyretin)

Discharge prealbumin and the change in prealbumin were positively correlated with protein and energy intake and inversely correlated with markers of inflammation, particularly CRP and IL-6. When all covariates were included in a multivariable regression analysis, the markers of inflammation predominantly accounted for the variance in prealbumin change (56%), whereas discharge protein intake accounted for 6%.

These authors propose an updated approach that incorporates current understanding of the systemic inflammatory response to help guide assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. An appreciation of a continuum of inflammatory response in relation to malnutrition syndromes is described. This discussion serves to highlight a research agenda to address deficiencies in diagnostics, biomarkers, and therapeutics of inflammation in relation to malnutrition.

Procalcitonin

The most frequent indication for antibiotic prescriptions in the northwestern hemisphere is lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs),which range in severity from self-limited acute bronchitis to severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to life-threatening bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).4 Clinical signs and symptoms, as well as commonly used laboratory markers, are unreliable in distinguishing viral from bacterial LRTI. As many as 75% of patients with LRTI are treated with antibiotics, despitethe predominantly viral origin of their infection. An approach to estimate the probability of bacterial origin in LRTI is the measurement of serum procalcitonin (PCT).

In patients with LRTIs, a strategy of PCT guidance compared with standard guidelines resulted in similar rates of adverse outcomes, as well as lower rates of antibiotic exposure and antibiotic-associated adverse effects. (Trial Registration isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN95122877)

Neutrophil CD64

Despite improvements in the treatment of sepsis in recent years, there have been few diagnostic innovations which improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis or facilitate therapeutic monitoring. The clinical reliance on the CBC and leukocyte differential with associated band count to indicate myeloid left shift of immaturity is not accurate, and it is not comparable to the measurement of the metamyeloctes and myelocytes. Only the introduction of a test which measures procalcitonin (PCT), an acute phase marker which is claimed to be more specific for bacterial infections than for viral infections, can be cited as a new diagnostic for the evaluation of patients with suspected infection. A need still persists for improved diagnostic indictors of infection or sepsis, as well as better tests to facilitate monitoring of therapy in the treatment of infection, so that use of antibiotics might be less empirical.

Studies have indicated that quantitative neutrophil CD64 expression is a sensitive and specific laboratory indicator of sepsis or the presence of a systemic acute inflammatory response.  Neutrophil CD64 is a highly sensitive marker for neonatal sepsis. Prospective studies incorporating CD64 into a sepsis scoring system are warranted. Studies have indicated that quantitative neutrophil CD64 (high affinity Fc receptor) expression is a worth­while candidate for evaluation as a more sensitive and specific laboratory indi­cator of sepsis or the presence of a systemic acute inflammatory response than available diagnostics . Neutrophil (PMN) CD64 is one of many activa­tion-related antigenic changes manifested by neutrophils during the normal pathophysiological acute inflammatory or innate immune response. PMN expression of CD64 is up-regulated under the influence of inflammatory relat­ed cytokines such as interleukin 12 (IL-12), interferon gamma (IFN-y) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

The first commercially available assay for PMN CD64, developed by Trillium Diagnostics, LLC is a fluorescence based, no wash flow cytometric assay, namely the Leuko64. The assay kit contains a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies includ­ing two monoclonal antibodies to CD64 and a monoclonal antibody to CD163, red cell lysis buffer, fluorescence quantitation beads, and a software program for automated analysis of the flow cytometric data that reports PMN CD64 as a CD64 index. The PMN CD64 index is designed so that normal inactivated PMNs yield values of < 1.00 and blood samples from individuals with docu­mented infection or sepsis typically show values > 1.50. Using clinical flow cytometers, the assay can be completed within 30 minutes. While this initial assay format was developed for multiparameter flow cytometers, a new version of the assay has been developed to give nearly identical results on the CD4000 and Sapphire (manufactured by Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA) blood cell counters, which are equipped with laser light sources and fluorescence detection capabilities. If these blood cell counters are available in diagnostic haematology laboratories, the Leuko64 assay can be utilised on a 24 hour basis, in contrast to the more typical daytime operation hours of flow cytometric diagnostic laboratories.

Leukocare and Trillium Diagnostics entered an agreement to develop and market Leukocare’s method for detecting inflammatory activity using circulating cell-free DNA. Trillium aims to create a cf-DNA test as a “simple and cost effective” tool that healthcare professionals can use to obtain clinically relevant data on patients who are suspected of having sepsis. The companies said that they expect to finish developing the assay and market it in two years.

B Casserly, R Read, MM Levy. Multimarker Panels  in Sepsis. Crit Care Clin 27 (2011) 391–405 doi:10.1016/j.ccc.2010.12.011 criticalcare.theclinics.com

Dennis RA, Johnson LE, Roberson PK, Heif M, Bopp MM, et al.  Changes in prealbumin, nutrient intake, and systemic inflammation in elderly recuperative care patients.  J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008; 56(7):1270-5. Epub 2008 Jun 10. PMID: 18547360

Jensen GL, Bistrian B, Roubenoff R, Heimburger DC.  Malnutrition Syndromes: A Conundrum vs Continuum.

Bernstein LH. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome C-reactive protein and transthyretin conundrum. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Medicine 2007; 45(11):1566–1567, ISSN (Online) 14374331, ISSN (Print) 14346621, DOI: 10.1515/CCLM.2007.334.

Schuetz P, Christ-Crain M, Thomann R, Falconnier C, Wolbers M, et al.  for the ProHOSP Study Group. Effect of Procalcitonin-Based Guidelines vs Standard Guidelines on Antibiotic Use in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: The ProHOSP Randomized Controlled Trial.  JAMA  2009; 302(10): 1059

Bhandari V, Wang C, Rinder C, Rinder H. Hematologic Profile of Sepsis in Neonates: Neutrophil CD64 as a Diagnostic Marker. Pediatrics 2007; 31:4005.   (ISSN Numbers: Print, 0031-4005; Online, 1098-4275). doi:10.1542/peds.2007-1308

Davis BH.  Neutrophil CD64 expression in infection and sepsis. CLI Ocober 2006.

Chapter 1 Statement of Inferential    Second Opinion

Realtime Clinical Expert Support

Gil David and Larry Bernstein have developed, in consultation with Prof. Ronald Coifman, in the Yale University Applied Mathematics Program, a software system that is the equivalent of an intelligent Electronic Health Records Dashboard that provides empirical medical reference and suggests quantitative diagnostics options.

Keywords: Entropy, Maximum Likelihood Function, separatory clustering, peripheral smear, automated hemogram, Anomaly, classification by anomaly, multivariable and multisyndromic, automated second opinion

Abbreviations: Akaike Information Criterion, AIC;  Bayes Information Criterion, BIC, Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, SIRS.

Background: The current design of the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) is a linear presentation of portions of the record by services, by diagnostic method, and by date, to cite examples.  This allows perusal through a graphical user interface (GUI) that partitions the information or necessary reports in a workstation entered by keying to icons.  This requires that the medical practitioner finds the history, medications, laboratory reports, cardiac imaging and EKGs, and radiology in different workspaces.  The introduction of a DASHBOARD has allowed a presentation of drug reactions, allergies, primary and secondary diagnoses, and critical information about any patient the care giver needing access to the record.  The advantage of this innovation is obvious.  The startup problem is what information is presented and how it is displayed, which is a source of variability and a key to its success.

Intent: We are proposing an innovation that supercedes the main design elements of a DASHBOARD and utilizes the conjoined syndromic features of the disparate data elements.  So the important determinant of the success of this endeavor is that it facilitates both the workflow and the decision-making process with a reduction of medical error. Continuing work is in progress in extending the capabilities with model datasets, and sufficient data because the extraction of data from disparate sources will, in the long run, further improve this process.  For instance, the finding of  both ST depression on EKG coincident with an elevated cardiac biomarker (troponin), particularly in the absence of substantially reduced renal function. The conversion of hematology based data into useful clinical information requires the establishment of problem-solving constructs based on the measured data.

The most commonly ordered test used for managing patients worldwide is the hemogram that often incorporates the review of a peripheral smear.  While the hemogram has undergone progressive modification of the measured features over time the subsequent expansion of the panel of tests has provided a window into the cellular changes in the production, release or suppression of the formed elements from the blood-forming organ to the circulation.  In the hemogram one can view data reflecting the characteristics of a broad spectrum of medical conditions.

Progressive modification of the measured features of the hemogram has delineated characteristics expressed as measurements of size, density, and concentration, resulting in many characteristic features of classification. In the diagnosis of hematological disorders proliferation of marrow precursors, the domination of a cell line, and features of suppression of hematopoiesis provide a two dimensional model.  Other dimensions are created by considering the maturity of the circulating cells.  The application of rules-based, automated problem solving should provide a valid approach to the classification and interpretation of the data used to determine a knowledge-based clinical opinion. The exponential growth of knowledge since the mapping of the human genome enabled by parallel advances in applied mathematics that have not been a part of traditional clinical problem solving.  As the complexity of statistical models has increased the dependencies have become less clear to the individual.  Contemporary statistical modeling has a primary goal of finding an underlying structure in studied data sets.  The development of an evidence-based inference engine that can substantially interpret the data at hand and convert it in real time to a “knowledge-based opinion” could improve clinical decision-making by incorporating multiple complex clinical features as well as duration of onset into the model.

An example of a difficult area for clinical problem solving is found in the diagnosis of SIRS and associated sepsis.  SIRS (and associated sepsis) is a costly diagnosis in hospitalized patients.   Failure to diagnose sepsis in a timely manner creates a potential financial and safety hazard.  The early diagnosis of SIRS/sepsis is made by the application of defined criteria (temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and WBC count) by the clinician.   The application of those clinical criteria, however, defines the condition after it has developed and has not provided a reliable method for the early diagnosis of SIRS.  The early diagnosis of SIRS may possibly be enhanced by the measurement of proteomic biomarkers, including transthyretin, C-reactive protein and procalcitonin.  Immature granulocyte (IG) measurement has been proposed as a more readily available indicator of the presence of granulocyte precursors (left shift).  The use of such markers, obtained by automated systems in conjunction with innovative statistical modeling, provides a promising approach to enhance workflow and decision making.   Such a system utilizes the conjoined syndromic features of disparate data elements with an anticipated reduction of medical error.  This study is only an extension of our approach to repairing a longstanding problem in the construction of the many-sided electronic medical record (EMR).  In a classic study carried out at Bell Laboratories, Didner found that information technologies reflect the view of the creators, not the users, and Front-to-Back Design (R Didner) is needed.

Costs would be reduced, and accuracy improved, if the clinical data could be captured directly at the point it is generated, in a form suitable for transmission to insurers, or machine transformable into other formats.  Such data capture, could also be used to improve the form and structure of how this information is viewed by physicians, and form a basis of a more comprehensive database linking clinical protocols to outcomes, that could improve the knowledge of this relationship, hence clinical outcomes.

How we frame our expectations is so important that it determines the data we collect to examine the process.   In the absence of data to support an assumed benefit, there is no proof of validity at whatever cost.   This has meaning for hospital operations, for nonhospital laboratory operations, for companies in the diagnostic business, and for planning of health systems.

In 1983, a vision for creating the EMR was introduced by Lawrence Weed,  expressed by McGowan and Winstead-Fry (J J McGowan and P Winstead-Fry. Problem Knowledge Couplers: reengineering evidence-based medicine through interdisciplinary development, decision support, and research. Bull Med Libr Assoc. 1999 October; 87(4): 462–470.)   PMCID: PMC226622    Copyright notice

They introduce Problem Knowledge Couplers as a clinical decision support software tool that  recognizes that functionality must be predicated upon combining unique patient information, but obtained through relevant structured question sets, with the appropriate knowledge found in the world’s peer-reviewed medical literature.  The premise of this is stated by LL WEED in “Idols of the Mind” (Dec 13, 2006): “ a root cause of a major defect in the health care system is that, while we falsely admire and extol the intellectual powers of highly educated physicians, we do not search for the external aids their minds require”.  HIT use has been focused on information retrieval, leaving the unaided mind burdened with information processing.

The data presented has to be comprehended in context with vital signs, key symptoms, and an accurate medical history.  Consequently, the limits of memory and cognition are tested in medical practice on a daily basis.  We deal with problems in the interpretation of data presented to the physician, and how through better design of the software that presents this data the situation could be improved.  The computer architecture that the physician uses to view the results is more often than not presented as the designer would prefer, and not as the end-user would like.  In order to optimize the interface for physician, the system would have a “front-to-back” design, with the call up for any patient ideally consisting of a dashboard design that presents the crucial information that the physician would likely act on in an easily accessible manner.  The key point is that each item used has to be closely related to a corresponding criterion needed for a decision.  Currently, improved design is heading in that direction.  In removing this limitation the output requirements have to be defined before the database is designed to produce the required output.  The ability to see any other information, or to see a sequential visualization of the patient’s course would be steps to home in on other views.  In addition, the amount of relevant information, even when presented well, is a cognitive challenge unless it is presented in a disease- or organ-system structure.  So the interaction between the user and the electronic medical record has a significant effect on practitioner time, ability to minimize errors of interpretation, facilitate treatment, and manage costs.  The reality is that clinicians are challenged by the need to view a large amount of data, with only a few resources available to know which of these values are relevant, or the need for action on a result, or its urgency. The challenge then becomes how fundamental measurement theory can lead to the creation at the point of care of more meaningful actionable presentations of results.  WP Fisher refers to the creation of a context in which computational resources for meeting the challenges will be incorporated into the electronic medical record.  The one which he chooses is a probabilistic conjoint (Rasch) measurement model, which uses scale-free standard measures and meets data quality standards. He illustrates this by fitting a set of data provided by Bernstein (19)(27 items for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to a Rasch multiple rating scale model testing the hypothesis that items work together to delineate a unidimensional measurement continuum. The results indicated that highly improbable observations could be discarded, data volume could be reduced based on internal, and increased ability of the care provider to interpret the data.

 

Classified data a separate issue from automation

 Feature Extraction. This further breakdown in the modern era is determined by genetically characteristic gene sequences that are transcribed into what we measure.  Eugene Rypka contributed greatly to clarifying the extraction of features in a series of articles, which set the groundwork for the methods used today in clinical microbiology.  The method he describes is termed S-clustering, and will have a significant bearing on how we can view hematology data.  He describes S-clustering as extracting features from endogenous data that amplify or maximize structural information to create distinctive classes.  The method classifies by taking the number of features with sufficient variety to map into a theoretic standard. The mapping is done by a truth table, and each variable is scaled to assign values for each: message choice.  The number of messages and the number of choices forms an N-by N table.  He points out that the message choice in an antibody titer would be converted from 0 + ++ +++ to 0 1 2 3.

Even though there may be a large number of measured values, the variety is reduced by this compression, even though there is risk of loss of information.  Yet the real issue is how a combination of variables falls into a table with meaningful information.  We are concerned with accurate assignment into uniquely variable groups by information in test relationships. One determines the effectiveness of each variable by its contribution to information gain in the system.  The reference or null set is the class having no information.  Uncertainty in assigning to a classification is only relieved by providing sufficient information.  One determines the effectiveness of each variable by its contribution to information gain in the system.  The possibility for realizing a good model for approximating the effects of factors supported by data used for inference owes much to the discovery of Kullback-Liebler distance or “information”, and Akaike found a simple relationship between K-L information and Fisher’s maximized log-likelihood function. A solid foundation in this work was elaborated by Eugene Rypka.  Of course, this was made far less complicated by the genetic complement that defines its function, which made  more accessible the study of biochemical pathways.  In addition, the genetic relationships in plant genetics were accessible to Ronald Fisher for the application of the linear discriminant function.    In the last 60 years the application of entropy comparable to the entropy of physics, information, noise, and signal processing, has been fully developed by Shannon, Kullback, and others,  and has been integrated with modern statistics, as a result of the seminal work of Akaike, Leo Goodman, Magidson and Vermunt, and unrelated work by Coifman. Dr. Magidson writes about Latent Class Model evolution:

The recent increase in interest in latent class models is due to the development of extended algorithms which allow today’s computers to perform LC analyses on data containing more than just a few variables, and the recent realization that the use of such models can yield powerful improvements over traditional approaches to segmentation, as well as to cluster, factor, regression and other kinds of analysis.

Perhaps the application to medical diagnostics had been slowed by limitations of data capture and computer architecture as well as lack of clarity in definition of what are the most distinguishing features needed for diagnostic clarification.  Bernstein and colleagues had a series of studies using Kullback-Liebler Distance  (effective information) for clustering to examine the latent structure of the elements commonly used for diagnosis of myocardial infarction (CK-MB, LD and the isoenzyme-1 of LD),  protein-energy malnutrition (serum albumin, serum transthyretin, condition associated with protein malnutrition (see Jeejeebhoy and subjective global assessment), prolonged period with no oral intake), prediction of respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn (RDS), and prediction of lymph nodal involvement of prostate cancer, among other studies.   The exploration of syndromic classification has made a substantial contribution to the diagnostic literature, but has only been made useful through publication on the web of calculators and nomograms (such as Epocrates and Medcalc) accessible to physicians through an iPhone.  These are not an integral part of the EMR, and the applications require an anticipation of the need for such processing.

Gil David et al. introduced an AUTOMATED processing of the data available to the ordering physician and can anticipate an enormous impact in diagnosis and treatment of perhaps half of the top 20 most common causes of hospital admission that carry a high cost and morbidity.  For example: anemias (iron deficiency, vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, and hemolytic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome); pneumonia; systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with or without bacteremia; multiple organ failure and hemodynamic shock; electrolyte/acid base balance disorders; acute and chronic liver disease; acute and chronic renal disease; diabetes mellitus; protein-energy malnutrition; acute respiratory distress of the newborn; acute coronary syndrome; congestive heart failure; disordered bone mineral metabolism; hemostatic disorders; leukemia and lymphoma; malabsorption syndromes; and cancer(s)[breast, prostate, colorectal, pancreas, stomach, liver, esophagus, thyroid, and parathyroid].

Extension of conditions and presentation to the electronic medical record (EMR)

We have published on the application of an automated inference engine to the Systemic Inflammatory Response (SIRS), a serious infection, or emerging sepsis.  We can report on this without going over previous ground.  Of considerable interest is the morbidity and mortality of sepsis, and the hospital costs from a late diagnosis.  If missed early, it could be problematic, and it could be seen as a hospital complication when it is not. Improving on previous work, we have the opportunity to look at the contribution of a fluorescence labeled flow cytometric measurement of the immature granulocytes (IG), which is now widely used, but has not been adequately evaluated from the perspective of diagnostic usage.  We have done considerable work on protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), to which the automated interpretation is currently in review.  Of course, the

cholesterol, lymphocyte count, serum albumin provide the weight of evidence with the primary diagnosis (emphysema, chronic renal disease, eating disorder), and serum transthyretin would be low and remain low for a week in critical care.  This could be a modifier with age in providing discriminatory power.

Chapter  3           References

The Cost Burden of Disease: U.S. and Michigan. CHRT Brief. January 2010. @www.chrt.org

The National Hospital Bill: The Most Expensive Conditions by Payer, 2006. HCUP Brief #59.

Rudolph RA, Bernstein LH, Babb J: Information-Induction for the diagnosis of

myocardial infarction. Clin Chem 1988;34:2031-2038.

Bernstein LH (Chairman). Prealbumin in Nutritional Care Consensus Group.

Measurement of visceral protein status in assessing protein and energy malnutrition: standard of care. Nutrition 1995; 11:169-171.

Bernstein LH, Qamar A, McPherson C, Zarich S, Rudolph R. Diagnosis of myocardial infarction: integration of serum markers and clinical descriptors using information theory. Yale J Biol Med 1999; 72: 5-13.

Kaplan L.A.; Chapman J.F.; Bock J.L.; Santa Maria E.; Clejan S.; Huddleston D.J.; Reed R.G.; Bernstein L.H.; Gillen-Goldstein J. Prediction of Respiratory Distress Syndrome using the Abbott FLM-II amniotic fluid assay. The National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Fetal Lung Maturity Assessment Project.  Clin Chim Acta 2002; 326(8): 61-68.

Bernstein LH, Qamar A, McPherson C, Zarich S. Evaluating a new graphical ordinal logit method (GOLDminer) in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction utilizing clinical features and laboratory data. Yale J Biol Med 1999; 72:259-268.

Bernstein L, Bradley K, Zarich SA. GOLDmineR: Improving models for classifying patients with chest pain. Yale J Biol Med 2002; 75, pp. 183-198.

Ronald Raphael Coifman and Mladen Victor Wickerhauser. Adapted Waveform Analysis as a Tool for Modeling, Feature Extraction, and Denoising. Optical Engineering, 33(7):2170–2174, July 1994.

R. Coifman and N. Saito. Constructions of local orthonormal bases for classification and regression. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, 319 Série I:191-196, 1994.

Chapter 4           Clinical Expert System

Realtime Clinical Expert Support and validation System

We have developed a software system that is the equivalent of an intelligent Electronic Health Records Dashboard that provides empirical medical reference and suggests quantitative diagnostics options. The primary purpose is to gather medical information, generate metrics, analyze them in realtime and provide a differential diagnosis, meeting the highest standard of accuracy. The system builds its unique characterization and provides a list of other patients that share this unique profile, therefore utilizing the vast aggregated knowledge (diagnosis, analysis, treatment, etc.) of the medical community. The main mathematical breakthroughs are provided by accurate patient profiling and inference methodologies in which anomalous subprofiles are extracted and compared to potentially relevant cases. As the model grows and its knowledge database is extended, the diagnostic and the prognostic become more accurate and precise. We anticipate that the effect of implementing this diagnostic amplifier would result in higher physician productivity at a time of great human resource limitations, safer prescribing practices, rapid identification of unusual patients, better assignment of patients to observation, inpatient beds, intensive care, or referral to clinic, shortened length of patients ICU and bed days.

The main benefit is a real time assessment as well as diagnostic options based on comparable cases, flags for risk and potential problems as illustrated in the following case acquired on 04/21/10. The patient was diagnosed by our system with severe SIRS at a grade of 0.61 .

The patient was treated for SIRS and the blood tests were repeated during the following week. The full combined record of our system’s assessment of the patient, were derived from the further Hematology tests.  Following treatment, the SIRS risk as a major concern was eliminated and the system provides a positive feedback for the treatment of the physician.

 

Method for data organization and classification via characterization metrics.

Our database organized to enable linking a given profile to known profiles. This is achieved by associating a patient to a peer group of patients having an overall similar profile, where the similar profile is obtained through a randomized search for an appropriate weighting of variables. Given the selection of a patients’ peer group, we build a metric that measures the dissimilarity of the patient from its group. This is achieved through a local iterated statistical analysis in the peer group.

We then use this characteristic metric to locate other patients with similar unique profiles, for each of whom we repeat the procedure described above. This leads to a network of patients with similar risk condition. Then, the classification of the patient is inferred from the medical known condition of some of the patients in the linked network. Given a set of points (the database) and a newly arrived sample (point), we characterize the behavior of the newly arrived sample, according to the database. Then, we detect other points in the database that match this unique characterization. This collection of detected points defines the characteristic neighborhood of the newly arrived sample. We use the characteristic neighbor hood in order to classify the newly arrived sample. This process of differential diagnosis is repeated for every newly arrived point.   The medical colossus we have today has become a system out of control and beset by the elephant in the room – an uncharted complexity. We offer a method that addresses the complexity and enables rather than disables the practitioner.  The method identifies outliers and combines data according to commonality of features.

Summary and Perspectives: Impairments in Pathological States: Endocrine Disorders, Stress Hypermetabolism and Cancer

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/11/09/summary-and-perspectives-impairments-in-pathological-states-endocrine-disorders-stress-hypermetabolism-cancer/

This summary is the last of a series on the impact of transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics on disease investigation, and the sorting and integration of genomic signatures and metabolic signatures to explain phenotypic relationships in variability and individuality of response to disease expression and how this leads to  pharmaceutical discovery and personalized medicine.  We have unquestionably better tools at our disposal than has ever existed in the history of mankind, and an enormous knowledge-base that has to be accessed.  I shall conclude here these discussions with the powerful contribution to and current knowledge pertaining to biochemistry, metabolism, protein-interactions, signaling, and the application of the -OMICS to diseases and drug discovery at this time.

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

Deriving physiologic first principles By John S. Torday | The Scientist Nov 1, 2014
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/41282/title/The-Ever-Transcendent-Cell/

Both the developmental and phylogenetic histories of an organism describe the evolution of physiology—the complex of metabolic pathways that govern the function of an organism as a whole. The necessity of establishing and maintaining homeostatic mechanisms began at the cellular level, with the very first cells, and homeostasis provides the underlying selection pressure fueling evolution.

While the events leading to the formation of the first functioning cell are debatable, a critical one was certainly the formation of simple lipid-enclosed vesicles, which provided a protected space for the evolution of metabolic pathways. Protocells evolved from a common ancestor that experienced environmental stresses early in the history of cellular development, such as acidic ocean conditions and low atmospheric oxygen levels, which shaped the evolution of metabolism.

The reduction of evolution to cell biology may answer the perennially unresolved question of why organisms return to their unicellular origins during the life cycle.

As primitive protocells evolved to form prokaryotes and, much later, eukaryotes, changes to the cell membrane occurred that were critical to the maintenance of chemiosmosis, the generation of bioenergy through the partitioning of ions. The incorporation of cholesterol into the plasma membrane surrounding primitive eukaryotic cells marked the beginning of their differentiation from prokaryotes. Cholesterol imparted more fluidity to eukaryotic cell membranes, enhancing functionality by increasing motility and endocytosis. Membrane deformability also allowed for increased gas exchange.

Acidification of the oceans by atmospheric carbon dioxide generated high intracellular calcium ion concentrations in primitive aquatic eukaryotes, which had to be lowered to prevent toxic effects, namely the aggregation of nucleotides, proteins, and lipids. The early cells achieved this by the evolution of calcium channels composed of cholesterol embedded within the cell’s plasma membrane, and of internal membranes, such as that of the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, and other cytoplasmic organelles, which hosted intracellular chemiosmosis and helped regulate calcium.

As eukaryotes thrived, they experienced increasingly competitive pressure for metabolic efficiency. Engulfed bacteria, assimilated as mitochondria, provided more bioenergy. As the evolution of eukaryotic organisms progressed, metabolic cooperation evolved, perhaps to enable competition with biofilm-forming, quorum-sensing prokaryotes. The subsequent appearance of multicellular eukaryotes expressing cellular growth factors and their respective receptors facilitated cell-cell signaling, forming the basis for an explosion of multicellular eukaryote evolution, culminating in the metazoans.

Casting a cellular perspective on evolution highlights the integration of genotype and phenotype. Starting from the protocell membrane, the functional homolog for all complex metazoan organs, it offers a way of experimentally determining the role of genes that fostered evolution based on the ontogeny and phylogeny of cellular processes that can be traced back, in some cases, to our last universal common ancestor.  ….

As eukaryotes thrived, they experienced increasingly competitive pressure for metabolic efficiency. Engulfed bacteria, assimilated as mitochondria, provided more bioenergy. As the evolution of eukaryotic organisms progressed, metabolic cooperation evolved, perhaps to enable competition with biofilm-forming, quorum-sensing prokaryotes. The subsequent appearance of multicellular eukaryotes expressing cellular growth factors and their respective receptors facilitated cell-cell signaling, forming the basis for an explosion of multicellular eukaryote evolution, culminating in the metazoans.

Casting a cellular perspective on evolution highlights the integration of genotype and phenotype. Starting from the protocell membrane, the functional homolog for all complex metazoan organs, it offers a way of experimentally determining the role of genes that fostered evolution based on the ontogeny and phylogeny of cellular processes that can be traced back, in some cases, to our last universal common ancestor.

Given that the unicellular toolkit is complete with all the traits necessary for forming multicellular organisms (Science, 301:361-63, 2003), it is distinctly possible that metazoans are merely permutations of the unicellular body plan. That scenario would clarify a lot of puzzling biology: molecular commonalities between the skin, lung, gut, and brain that affect physiology and pathophysiology exist because the cell membranes of unicellular organisms perform the equivalents of these tissue functions, and the existence of pleiotropy—one gene affecting many phenotypes—may be a consequence of the common unicellular source for all complex biologic traits.  …

The cell-molecular homeostatic model for evolution and stability addresses how the external environment generates homeostasis developmentally at the cellular level. It also determines homeostatic set points in adaptation to the environment through specific effectors, such as growth factors and their receptors, second messengers, inflammatory mediators, crossover mutations, and gene duplications. This is a highly mechanistic, heritable, plastic process that lends itself to understanding evolution at the cellular, tissue, organ, system, and population levels, mediated by physiologically linked mechanisms throughout, without having to invoke random, chance mechanisms to bridge different scales of evolutionary change. In other words, it is an integrated mechanism that can often be traced all the way back to its unicellular origins.

The switch from swim bladder to lung as vertebrates moved from water to land is proof of principle that stress-induced evolution in metazoans can be understood from changes at the cellular level.

http://www.the-scientist.com/Nov2014/TE_21.jpg

A MECHANISTIC BASIS FOR LUNG DEVELOPMENT

The switch from swim bladder to lung as vertebrates moved from water to land is proof of principle that stress-induced evolution in metazoans can be understood from changes at the cellular level.

http://www.the-scientist.com/Nov2014/TE_21.jpg

A MECHANISTIC BASIS FOR LUNG DEVELOPMENT: Stress from periodic atmospheric hypoxia (1) during vertebrate adaptation to land enhances positive selection of the stretch-regulated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in the pituitary and adrenal glands. In the pituitary (2), PTHrP signaling upregulates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) (3), which stimulates the release of glucocorticoids (GC) by the adrenal gland (4). In the adrenal gland, PTHrP signaling also stimulates glucocorticoid production of adrenaline (5), which in turn affects the secretion of lung surfactant, the distension of alveoli, and the perfusion of alveolar capillaries (6). PTHrP signaling integrates the inflation and deflation of the alveoli with surfactant production and capillary perfusion.  THE SCIENTIST STAFF

From a cell-cell signaling perspective, two critical duplications in genes coding for cell-surface receptors occurred during this period of water-to-land transition—in the stretch-regulated parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) receptor gene and the β adrenergic (βA) receptor gene. These gene duplications can be disassembled by following their effects on vertebrate physiology backwards over phylogeny. PTHrP signaling is necessary for traits specifically relevant to land adaptation: calcification of bone, skin barrier formation, and the inflation and distention of lung alveoli. Microvascular shear stress in PTHrP-expressing organs such as bone, skin, kidney, and lung would have favored duplication of the PTHrP receptor, since sheer stress generates radical oxygen species (ROS) known to have this effect and PTHrP is a potent vasodilator, acting as an epistatic balancing selection for this constraint.

Positive selection for PTHrP signaling also evolved in the pituitary and adrenal cortex (see figure on this page), stimulating the secretion of ACTH and corticoids, respectively, in response to the stress of land adaptation. This cascade amplified adrenaline production by the adrenal medulla, since corticoids passing through it enzymatically stimulate adrenaline synthesis. Positive selection for this functional trait may have resulted from hypoxic stress that arose during global episodes of atmospheric hypoxia over geologic time. Since hypoxia is the most potent physiologic stressor, such transient oxygen deficiencies would have been acutely alleviated by increasing adrenaline levels, which would have stimulated alveolar surfactant production, increasing gas exchange by facilitating the distension of the alveoli. Over time, increased alveolar distension would have generated more alveoli by stimulating PTHrP secretion, impelling evolution of the alveolar bed of the lung.

This scenario similarly explains βA receptor gene duplication, since increased density of the βA receptor within the alveolar walls was necessary for relieving another constraint during the evolution of the lung in adaptation to land: the bottleneck created by the existence of a common mechanism for blood pressure control in both the lung alveoli and the systemic blood pressure. The pulmonary vasculature was constrained by its ability to withstand the swings in pressure caused by the systemic perfusion necessary to sustain all the other vital organs. PTHrP is a potent vasodilator, subserving the blood pressure constraint, but eventually the βA receptors evolved to coordinate blood pressure in both the lung and the periphery.

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The biochemistry of S amino acids

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

Amino Acid and Sulfur Metabolism

Dr. Rainer Höfgen

http://www.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/5892/2hoefgen

 Sulfur is together with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium a plant macronutrient and a crucial element affecting plant growth, plant performance and yield. The group of Dr. Rainer Hoefgen focuses on characterising the regulation of cysteine and methionine as a result of sulfate uptake and assimilation in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

Cysteine and methionine are two essential amino acids which contain sulfur. We are also looking at interconnections between sulfur metabolism and other plant nutrients. Further, we are investigating means of improving the nutritional quality of crops, with a current focus on rice (Oryza sativa) with respect to a balanced amino acid composition.

In our studies of plant sulfur metabolism, we use two mutually supporting approaches as the basis of our research portfolio. The first is a targeted, pathway-oriented approach aimed at understanding pathway architecture and coordination, and the regulation of the sulfur-containing metabolites as such. The second is a non-biased approach in which functional genomics is used to work out how sulfur metabolism is embedded and controlled within the whole plant system.

sulfur uptake and assimilation

sulfur uptake and assimilation

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Sulfur is a required macronutrient, sulfur uptake and assimilation are crucial determinants in how quickly plants grow and cope with various stresses, and therefore, in how well crops yield.

Inorganic sulfate is taken up through plant roots and, via cysteine biosynthesis, incorporated as organic sulfur. Our investigations focus on fundamental questions about cysteine (cys) and methionine (met) biosynthesis and on the possibility of engineering crop plants enriched in these sulfur-containing amino acids. Methionine is essential for non-ruminant mammals (including man) and uptake of cysteine reduces the methionine requirement. We have used transgenic strategies to generate many plant lines affected in cysteine and methionine biosynthesis, and subjected them to detailed molecular and biochemical analyses. Recently, we embarked on a course to study sulfur metabolism in a holistic way, rather than focusing on single pathways as such. By applying functional genomic tools like transcript, metabolite, and protein profiling in our analysis of transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) and of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we are heading for a better understanding of the sulfur metabolism network in plants.

To learn about the control mechanisms involved in sulfur-containing amino acid biosynthesis, we are isolating and studying the involved genes and their promoters. The model plant systems of our investigations are potato and Arabidopsis, although a limited amount of work is also dedicated to rice (Oryza sativa), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Various transgenic plants exhibiting reduced or increased expression of relevant genes in the pathway have been produced and analysed. Fundamental knowledge of pathway regulation has been obtained as well as an improvement of the nutritional quality of a crop plant: Nutritional quality is largely determined by methionine, which is often the most limited of the essential amino acids.

The main thrust of our research recently shifted to analysing sulfur metabolism networks. In a systems biology approach, we investigate the response of Arabidopsis to different periods or degrees of sulfur starvation by applying non-biased, multiparallel tools including transcript, protein, and metabolite profiling. Our results are integrated to form working models for further detailed investigations with a focus on regulatory aspects of metabolism. This work entails the detailed analysis of Arabidopsis mutants and pulls many of our earlier results together into biological context (eg. the increased thiol levels seen during SAT over-expression, glutathione involvement in stress response mechanisms towards active oxygen species, etc.). Our long-term goal is to imbed sulfur metabolism in a broader context such as carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolic networks, which will occur through close collaborations with external and in house research groups.

 

metabolite profiling

metabolite profiling

http://www.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/12388/teaser_image_horizontal.jpg

 

Plants are sessile organisms; if they are to survive and reproduce, they must adapt to the growth conditions in which they find themselves. We use variations in sulfur levels as a stimulus and analyse the complex response using diverse multiparallel techniques, particularly transcript and metabolite profiling, trying to piece together the total system response. The plant of choice here is, obviously, Arabidopsis thaliana, although results obtained in this model system are likely to be transferable to other plant species and crop plants. The goal is to provide a consistent and holistic description of plant sulfur metabolism and its regulation.

H Hesse and R Höfgen (2001) Application of Genomics in Agriculture. In: Molecular analysis of plant adapatation to the environment. Eds: Malcolm J. Hawkesford, Peter Buchner. Kluwer AP, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 61-79

V Nikiforova, J Freitag, S Kempa, M Adamik, H Hesse, R Hoefgen (2003) Transcriptome analysis of sulfur depletion in Arabidopsis thaliana: Interlacing of biosynthetic pathways provides response specificity. The Plant Journal, 33, 633-650.

 

Regulation

Plants adapt to available sulfur soil levels by regulating gene expression and protein activity to maintain homeostasis. Sulfur availability in the environment is not static, nor is the plant’s dependence on sulfur at various developmental stages. Thus, one can assume not only that the activities of regulatory proteins are dynamic, but also that changes in the expression of transcription factors involved in triggering downstream gene expression change temporally. Sulfur deprivation triggers a slow adaptive process that resets the level of sulfur homeostasis. Using transcript profiling, we have been able to identify a number of transcription factors involved in this process, which are now the target of further investigations.

 

Metabolome analysis and bioinformatics

system response

system response

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http://www.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/12342/Figure_2_Sulfur_Metabolism1.jpg

Gene expression, metabolite spectrum and enzyme activities change under sulfur-limiting conditions.

The response of steady state transcription levels to the sulfur stimulus is but the first chapter of the story. To understand the system response, we have to turn the page and look at protein profiles – levels and activities – and before closing the book, at metabolite profiles, which adjust rapidly in response to changes in protein expression. We are now focusing on metabolome analysis: The same samples used for transcriptome analysis are examined using element analysis (ICP-AES) and metabolite analyses (HPLC, CE, GC/MS, GC/TOF, LC/MS), either in house or in collaboration with outside research groups.

Malcolm J. Hawkesford, Rothamsted Research, UK

As these analyses are refined and data accumulates, it will become more and more important to overlay and compare transcript and metabolite profiles in order to try to generate an in silico representation of the plant sulfur regulatory complement. Various approaches are and will be followed here: bioinformatic tools have to be developed and/or adapted to fully mine the data. Otherwise, it will not be possible to fully describe the system: by looking only at the most highly expressed genes in isolation, we would simply be scratching at the surface.

 

Transcriptome Analysis

gene expression

gene expression

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Scatterplots of gene expression of the ratio -/+ S

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Plants and some photoautotrophic bacteria assimilate inorganic sulfur from sulfates into cysteine, the first sulfur-containing organic compound and, effectively, the sole molecular doorway for reduced sulfur in all living beings. This essential process has been as finely tuned through millennia of evolution as photosynthesis. Cysteine is subsequently converted to methionine, and then into a variety of other sulfur-containing organic compounds. Sulfur assimilation is even more spendy in terms of reduction equivalents than nitrogen assimilation. Obviously, such a costly enterprise is highly controlled in juxtaposition with the rest of metabolism.

To elucidate this network of interactions, we stimulate Arabidopsis with sulfur (i.e. sulfate) at its rhizosphere with various concentrations and at different developmental stages to institute periods of starvation and replenishment. The plant tissue samples (roots, shoots) are then subjected to array hybridisation/transcript profiling after RNA extraction using either macro-arrays of 7,200 non-redundant genes on nylon filters and now full genome chips. The expression profiles are processed to select differentially expressed genes. Depending on the duration of treatment, anything between a handful and thousands of genes exhibit altered expression mirroring the gradual response of the system to conditions of altered sulfur availability. Among these responsive genes we expect to find sulfur-regulated genes; genes involved in perception, signalling, and immediate responses; and genes further down the line involved in more pleiotropic mechanisms like general stress responses. Since they arise in response to sulfur stimulation, the latter are still regarded as sulfur-responsive genes.

Sulfur-responsive genes are grouped by functional category or biosynthetic pathway. As expected, genes of the sulfur assimilation pathway are altered in expression. Furthermore, genes involved in the flavonoid, auxin, and jasmonate biosynthesis pathways are up regulated when sulfur is limiting. We focus most of our attention, however, on the regulatory elements, transcription factors.

V Nikiforova, J Freitag, S Kempa, M Adamik, H Hesse, R Hoefgen (2003) Transcriptome analysis of sulfur depletion in Arabidopsis thaliana: Interlacing of biosynthetic pathways provides response specificity. The Plant Journal, 33, 633-650

Further reading

MY Hirai, T Fujiwara, M Awazuhara, T Kimura, M Noji, K Saito (2003) Global expression profiling of sulfur-starved Arabidopsis by DNA macroarray reveals the role of O-acetyl-L-serine as a general regulator of gene expression in response to sulfur nutrition. Plant Journal. 33(4)651-663

A Maruyama-Nakashita, E Inoue, A Watanabe-Takahashi, T Yarnaya, and H Takahashi (2003) Transcriptome profiling of sulfur-responsive genes in Arabidopsis reveals global effects of sulfur nutrition on multiple metabolic pathways. Plant Physiology. 132(2)597-605

Sulfur and Other Plant Nutrients

The plant sulfur assimilation pathway is intricately interconnected with various other pathways and regulatory circuits.

Systems Analysis of Plant Sulfur Metabolism

Every organism is a complex, multi-elemental, multi-functional system living in an ever-changing environment. The viability of the system is provided by, and likewise dependent upon, flexible, effective control circuits of multiple informational fluxes, which interconnect in a dense network of metabolic physiological responses.

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L-cysteine L-Met

L-cysteine L-Met

Methionine is synthesised from cysteine and phosphohomoserine

Methionine is synthesised from cysteine and phosphohomoserine

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Pathway Analysis of Sulfur Containing Amino Acids

To learn about the control mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing amino acids, we are isolating and studying genes involved and their promoters. Methionine is synthesised from cysteine and phosphohomoserine via the enzymes cystathionine gamma-synthase (CgS), cystathionine beta-lyase (CbL), and methionine synthase (MS); we have cloned and characterised these three genes in potato.

Biosynthesis of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids

Biosynthesis of Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids

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Genes from Arabidopsis and potato and, when appropriate, E. coli involved in cysteine and methionine biosynthesis have also been cloned, including various isoforms of O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyase, the enzyme that converts O-acetylserine to cys; ATP-sulfurylase, the enzyme activating the inert sulfate through binding to ATP; and serine acetyltransferase (SAT), the enzyme catalysing the activation of serine to O-acetylserine. We manipulated the expression of these genes in an attempt to create conditions in which flux to either cysteine or methionine is increased.

For example, the over-expression of SAT using an E. coli gene targeted to plastids resulted in cysteine and glutathione (a tripeptide containing glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine) levels almost twice as high as usual. By blocking the competing pathway to threonine using the partial antisense inhibition of threonine synthase in Arabidopsis and potato, we were able to increase leaf and tuber methionine levels significantly. Moreover, analysis of these transformants made it clear that there are species-specific differences in the regulation of methionine biosynthesis.

Our results in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and potato have established the essential, but not rate-limiting, role of CbL in plant methionine biosynthesis. Furthermore, we found that regulation at the level of CgS differs between the plant species Arabidopsis and potato. Our objective now is to deepen our understanding of the regulation of methionine biosynthesis and to exploit what we learn in order to improve the nutritional quality of crop plants, which is largely determined by methionine content.

Cysteine Biosynthesis

Cysteine biosynthesis represents the essential step in the incorporation of inorganic sulfide to organic sulfur in plants. In order to gain insight into the control mechanisms involved in cysteine biosynthesis, we are isolating and studying the involved genes and their promoters, including genes coding for O-acetylserine(thiol)-lyase (OAS-TL), the enzyme which converts O-acetylserine to cysteine, and serine acetyltransferase (SAT), the enzyme catalysing the activation of serine to O-acetylserine.

Serine acetyltransferase

Serine acetyltransferase

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Serine acetyltransferase

http://www.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/12602/Figure_6_Serine_Acetyltransferase1.jpg

In addition, spatial and developmental aspects of regulation are investigated with respect to gene expression and enzyme activity. We are manipulating the expression of various genes in transgenic potato plants in an attempt to create conditions in which flux to either cysteine or methionine is increased. For example, the heterologous over-expression of an E. coli SAT gene targeted to plastids resulted in a doubling of both cysteine and glutathione (a tripeptide containing glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine that is involved in stress tolerance) levels. However, these alterations had no effect on outward plant appearance or on the expression and enzymatic activity of OAS-TL. This example demonstrates the importance of SAT in plant cysteine biosynthesis and shows that the accumulation of cysteine and related sulfur-containing compounds is limited by the supply of activated carbon backbones derived from serine. We are currently investigating this and other transgenic plants affected in cysteine and methionine biosynthesis in respect to sulfur assimilation and glutathione-mediated stress tolerance.

Despite the increase of reduced organic sulfur in our potato SAT over-producers, we did not observe an increase in methionine, although other groups reported methionine increases when using a similar approach in maize (Tsakraklides et al., 2002). Again, species specific differences, probably as a result of adaptation to specific environmental or physiological conditions, have to be taken into account, especially when generalising and transferring these data to plant breeding.

V Nikiforova, S Kempa, M Zeh, S Maimann, O Kreft, A P Casazza, K Riedel, E Tauberger, R Hoefgen, H Hesse. (2002) Engineering of cysteine and methionine biosynthesis in potato. Amino Acids 22(259-278).

K Harms, P von Ballmoos, C Brunold, R Höfgen, and H Hesse (2000) Expression of a bacterial serine acetyltransferase in transgenic potato plants leads to increased levels of cysteine and glutathione. Plant J. 22, 335-343

Further reading

MJ Hawkesford (2003) Transporter gene families in plants: the sulphate transporter gene family – redundancy or specialization? Physiologia Plantarum, 117,155-163

G Tsakraklides, M Martin, R Chalam,, MC Tarczynski, A Schmidt, and T Leustek (2002) Sulfate reduction is increased in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing 5′-adenylylsulfate reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plant J. 32, 879

Annu Rev Nutr. 1986;6:179-209.
Metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids.

Met metabolism occurs primarily by activation of Met to AdoMet and further metabolism of AdoMet by either the transmethylation-transsulfuration pathway or the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. The catabolism of the methyl group and sulfur atom of Met ultimately appears to be dependent upon the transmethylation-transsulfuration pathway because the MTA formed as the co-product of polyamine synthesis is efficiently recycled to Met. On the other hand, the fate of the four-carbon chain of Met appears to depend upon the initial fate of the Met molecule. During transsulfuration, the carbon chain is released as alpha-ketobutyrate, which is further metabolized to CO2. In the polyamine pathway, the carboxyl carbon of Met is lost in the formation of dAdoMet, whereas the other three carbons are ultimately excreted as polyamine derivatives and degradation products. The role of the transamination pathway of Met metabolism is not firmly established. Cys (which may be formed from the sulfur of Met and the carbons of serine via the transsulfuration pathway) appears to be converted to taurine and CO2 primarily by the cysteinesulfinate pathway, and to sulfate and pyruvate primarily by desulfuration pathways in which a reduced form of sulfur with a relatively long biological half-life appears to be an intermediate. With the exception of the nitrogen of Met that is incorporated into polyamines, the nitrogen of Met or Cys is incorporated into urea after it is released as ammonium [in the reactions catalyzed by cystathionase with either cystathionine (from Met) or cystine (from Cys) as substrate] or it is transferred to a keto acid (in Cys or Met transamination). Many areas of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism need further study. The magnitude of AdoMet flux through the polyamine pathway in the intact animal as well as details about the reactions involved in this pathway remain to be determined. Both the pathways and the possible physiological role of alternate (AdoMet-independent) Met metabolism, including the transamination pathway, must be elucidated. Despite the growing interest in taurine, investigation of Cys metabolism has been a relatively inactive area during the past two decades. Apparent discrepancies in the reported data on Cys metabolism need to be resolved. Future work should consider the role of extrahepatic tissues in amino acid metabolism as well as species differences in the relative roles of various pathways in the metabolism of Met and Cys.

The Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids: An Overview1,2

John T. Brosnan3 and Margaret E. Brosnan

J. Nutr. June 2006; 136(6): 1636S-1640S

http://jn.nutrition.org/content/136/6/1636S.full

Methionine and cysteine may be considered to be the principal sulfur-containing amino acids because they are 2 of the canonical 20 amino acids that are incorporated into proteins. However, homocysteine and taurine also play important physiological roles (Fig. 1). Why does nature employ sulfur in her repertoire of amino acids? The other canonical amino acids are comprised only of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms. Because both sulfur and oxygen belong to the same group (Group 6) of the Periodic Table and, therefore, are capable of making similar covalent linkages, the question may be restated: why would methionine and cysteine analogs, in which the sulfur atom is replaced by oxygen, not serve the same functions? One of the critical differences between oxygen and sulfur is sulfur’s lower electronegativity. Indeed, oxygen is the second most electronegative element in the periodic table. This accounts for the use of sulfur in methionine; replacement of the sulfur with oxygen would result in a much less hydrophobic amino acid. Cysteine readily forms disulfide linkages because of the ease with which it dissociates to form a thiolate anion. Serine, on the other hand, which differs from cysteine only in the substitution of an oxygen for the sulfur, does not readily make dioxide linkages. The difference results from the fact that thiols are much stronger acids than are alcohols, so that the alcohol group in serine does not dissociate at physiological pH. Substitution of oxygen for sulfur inS-adenosylmethionine would produce so powerful a methylating agent that it would promiscuously methylate cellular nucleophiles without the need for an enzyme.

FIGURE 1 

Structures of the sulfur-containing amino acids.

Methionine and cysteine in proteins.

Although both methionine and cysteine play critical roles in cell metabolism, we suggest that, in general, the 20 canonical amino acids were selected for the roles they play in proteins, not their roles in metabolism. It is important, therefore, to review the role played by these amino acids in proteins. Methionine is among the most hydrophobic of the amino acids. This means that most of the methionine residues in globular proteins are found in the interior hydrophobic core; in membrane-spanning protein domains, methionine is often found to interact with the lipid bilayer. In some proteins a fraction of the methionine residues are somewhat surface exposed. These are susceptible to oxidation to methionine sulfoxide residues. Levine et al. (1) regard these methionine residues as endogenous antioxidants in proteins. In E. coli glutamine synthetase, they tend to be arrayed around the active site and may guard access to this site by reactive oxygen species. Oxidation of these methionine residues has little effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These residues may be reduced to methionine by means of the enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase (2). Thus, an oxidation–reduction cycle occurs in which exposed methionine residues are oxidized (e.g., by H2O2) to methionine sulfoxide residues, which are subsequently reduced:FormulaFormula

It is considered that the impaired activity of methionine sulfoxide reductase and the subsequent accumulation of methionine sulfoxide residues are associated with age-related diseases, neurodegeneration, and shorter lifespan (2).

Methionine is the initiating amino acid in the synthesis of eukaryotic proteins; N-formyl methionine serves the same function in prokaryotes. Because most of these methionine residues are subsequently removed, it is apparent that their role lies in the initiation of translation, not in protein structure. In eukaryotes, translation initiation involves the association of the initiator tRNA (met-tRNAimet) with eIF-2 and the 40S ribosomal subunit together with a molecule of mRNA. Drabkin and Rajbhandary (3) suggest that the hydrophobic nature of methionine is key to the binding of the initiator tRNA to eIF-2. Using appropriate double mutations (in codon and anticodon), they were able to show that the hydrophobic valine could be used for initiation in mammalian cells but that the polar glutamine was very poor.

Cysteine plays a critical role in protein structure by virtue of its ability to form inter- and intrachain disulfide bonds with other cysteine residues. Most disulfide linkages are found in proteins destined for export or residence on the plasma membrane. These disulfide bonds can be formed nonenzymatically; protein disulfide isomerase, an endoplasmic reticulum protein, can reshuffle any mismatched disulfides to ensure the correct protein folding (4).

S-Adenosylmethionine.

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)4 is a key intermediate in methionine metabolism. Discovered in 1953 by Cantoni (5) as the “active methionine” required for the methylation of guanidioacetate to creatine, it is now evident that SAM is a coenzyme of remarkable versatility (Fig. 2). In addition to its role as a methyl donor, SAM serves as a source of methylene groups (for the synthesis of cyclopropyl fatty acids), amino groups (in biotin synthesis), aminoisopropyl groups (in the synthesis of polyamines and, also, in the synthesis of ethylene, used by plants to promote plant ripening), and 5′-deoxyadenosyl radicals. SAM also serves as a source of sulfur atoms in the synthesis of biotin and lipoic acid (6). In mammals, however, the great bulk of SAM is used in methyltransferase reactions. The key to SAM’s utility as a methyl donor lies in the sulfonium ion and in the electrophilic nature of the carbon atoms that are adjacent to the sulfur atom. The essence of these methyltransferase reactions is that the positively charged sulfonium renders the adjoining methyl group electron-poor, which facilitates its attack on electron-rich acceptors (nucleophiles).

Metabolic versatility of S-adenosylmethionine.

Metabolic versatility of S-adenosylmethionine.

FIGURE 2 

Metabolic versatility of S-adenosylmethionine.

SAM can donate its methyl group to a wide variety of acceptors, including amino acid residues in proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and even to a metal, the methylation of arsenite (7,8). At present, about 60 methyltransferases have been identified in mammals. However, the number is almost certainly much larger. A bioinformatic analysis of a number of genomes, including the human genome, by Katz et al. (9) has suggested that Class-1 SAM-dependent methyltransferases account for 0.6–1.6% of open reading frames in these genomes. This would indicate about 300 Class 1 methyltransferases in humans, in addition to a smaller number of Class 2 and 3 enzymes. In humans, it appears that guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (responsible for creatine synthesis) and phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (synthesis of phosphatidylcholine) are the major users of SAM (10). In addition, there is substantial flux through the glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) when methionine intakes are high (11). An important property of all known SAM-dependent methyltransferases is that they are inhibited by their product, S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH).

Methionine metabolism.

Methionine metabolism begins with its activation to SAM (Fig. 3) by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). The reaction is unusual in that all 3 phosphates are removed from ATP, an indication of the “high-energy” nature of this sulfonium ion. SAM then donates its methyl group to an acceptor to produce SAH. SAH is hydrolyzed to homocysteine and adenosine by SAH hydrolase. This sequence of reactions is referred to as transmethylation and is ubiquitously present in cells. Homocysteine may be methylated back to methionine by the ubiquitously distributed methionine synthase (MS) and, also, in the liver as well as the kidney of some species, by betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT). MS employs 5-methyl-THF as its methyl donor, whereas BHMT employs betaine, which is produced during choline oxidation as well as being provided by the diet (10). Both MS and BHMT effect remethylation, and the combination of transmethylation andremethylation comprise the methionine cycle, which occurs in most, if not all, cells.

FIGURE 3 
Major pathways of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism.

Major pathways of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism.

Major pathways of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism.

The methionine cycle does not result in the catabolism of methionine. This is brought about by the transsulfuration pathway, which converts homocysteine to cysteine by the combined actions of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL). The transsulfuration pathway has a very limited tissue distribution; it is restricted to the liver, kidney, intestine, and pancreas. The conversion of methionine to cysteine is an irreversible process, which accounts for the well-known nutritional principle that cysteine is not a dietary essential amino acid provided that adequate methionine is available, but methionine is a dietary essential amino acid, regardless of cysteine availability. This pathway for methionine catabolism suggests a paradox: is methionine catabolism constrained by the need for methylation reactions? If this were so, the methionine in a methionine-rich diet might exceed the methylation demand so that full catabolism could not occur via this pathway. GNMT methylates glycine to sarcosine, which may, in turn, be metabolized by sarcosine dehydrogenase to regenerate the glycine and oxidize the methyl group to 5,10-methylene-THF.

Application of sophisticated stable isotope tracer methodology to methionine metabolism in humans has yielded estimates of transmethylation, remethylation, and transsulfuration. Such studies reveal important points of regulation. For example, the sparing effect of cysteine on methionine requirements is evident as an increase in the fraction of the homocysteine pool that is remethylated and a decrease in the fraction that undergoes transsulfuration (12). In young adults ingesting a diet containing 1–1.5 g protein·kg−1·d−1, about 43% of the homocysteine pool was remethylated, and 57% was metabolized through the transsulfuration pathway (transmethylation = 9.7, transulfuration = 5.4, remethylation = 4.4 μmol·kg−1·h−1) (13).

Methionine metabolism affords a remarkable example of the role of vitamins in cell chemistry. MS utilizes methylcobalamin as a prosthetic group, 1 of only 2 mammalian enzymes that are known to require Vitamin B-12. The methyl group utilized by MS is provided from the folic acid 1-carbon pool. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which reduces 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF, contains FAD as a prosthetic group. Both of the enzymes in the transsulfuration pathway (CBS and CGL) contain pyridoxal phosphate. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that deficiencies of each of these vitamins (Vitamin B-12, folic acid, riboflavin, and pyridoxine) are associated with elevated plasma homocysteine levels. The oxidative decarboxylation of the α-ketobutyrate produced by CGL is brought about by pyruvate dehydrogenase so that niacin (NAD), thiamine (thiamine pyrophosphate), and pantothenic acid (coenzyme A) may also be regarded as being required for methionine metabolism.

Not only are vitamins required for methionine metabolism, but methionine metabolism plays a crucial role in the cellular assimilation of folate. MS has 2 principal functions. In addition to its role in methionine conservation, MS converts 5-methyl-THF to THF, thereby making it available to support DNA synthesis and other functions. Because 5-methyl-THF is the dominant circulating form that is taken into cells, MS is essential for cellular folate assimilation. Impaired MS activity (e.g., brought about by cobalamin deficiency) results in the accumulation of the folate coenzymes as 5-methyl-THF, the so-called methyl trap (14). This hypothesis explains the fact that Vitamin B-12 deficiency causes a functional cellular folate deficiency.

The combined transmethylation and transsulfuration pathways are responsible for the catabolism of the great bulk of methionine. However, there is also evidence for the occurrence of a SAM-independent catabolic pathway that begins with a transamination reaction (15). This is a very minor pathway under normal circumstances, but it becomes more significant at very high methionine concentrations. Because it produces powerful toxins such as methane thiol, it has been considered to be responsible for methionine toxicity. The identity of the initiating transaminase is uncertain; the glutamine transaminase can act on methionine, but it is thought to be unlikely to do so under physiological conditions (15). In view of the likelihood that this pathway plays a role in methionine toxicity, more work is warranted on its components, tissue distribution, and physiological function.

Regulation of methionine metabolism.

The major means by which methionine metabolism is regulated are 1) allosteric regulation by SAM and 2) regulation of the expression of key enzymes. In the liver, SAM exerts powerful effects at a variety of loci. The liver-specific MAT has a highKm for methionine and, therefore, is well fitted to remove excess dietary methionine. It exhibits the unusual property of feedback activation; it is activated by its product, SAM (16). This property has been incorporated into a computer model of hepatic methionine metabolism, and it is clear that it renders methionine disposal exquisitely sensitive to the methionine concentration (17). SAM is also an allosteric activator of CBS and an allosteric inhibitor of MTHFR (18). Therefore, elevated SAM promotes transsulfuration (methionine oxidation) and inhibits remethylation (methionine conservation). Many of the enzymes involved in methionine catabolism (MAT 1, GNMT, CBS) are increased in activity on ingestion of a high-protein diet (18).

In addition to its function in methionine catabolism, the transsulfuration pathway also provides cysteine for glutathione synthesis. Cysteine availability is often limiting for glutathione synthesis, and it appears that in a number of cells (e.g., hepatocytes), at least half of the cysteine required is provided by transsulfuration, even in the presence of physiological concentrations of cysteine (19). Transsulfuration is sensitive to the balance of prooxidants and antioxidants; peroxides increase the transsulfuration flux, whereas antioxidants decrease it (20). It is thought that redox regulation of the transsulfuration pathway occurs at the level of CBS, which contains a heme that may serve as a sensor of the oxidative environment (21).

Taurine.

Taurine is remarkable, both for its high concentrations in animal tissues and because of the variety of functions that have been ascribed to it. Taurine is the most abundant free amino acid in animal tissues. Table 1 shows that, although taurine accounts for only 3% of the free amino acid pool in plasma, it accounts for 25%, 50%, 53%, and 19%, respectively, of this pool in liver, kidney, muscle, and brain. The magnitude of the intracellular taurine pool deserves comment. For example, skeletal muscle contains 15.6 μmol of taurine per gram of tissue, which amounts to an intracellular concentration of about 25 mM. In addition to its role in the synthesis of the bile salt taurocholate, taurine has been proposed, inter alia, to act as an antioxidant, an intracellular osmolyte, a membrane stabilizer, and a neurotransmitter. It is an essential nutrient for cats; kittens born to mothers fed taurine-deficient diets exhibit retinal degeneration (24). Taurine is found in mother’s milk, may be conditionally essential for human infants, and is routinely added to most infant formulas. Recent work has begun to reveal taurine’s action in the retina. It appears that taurine, via an effect on a glycine receptor, promotes the generation of rod photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells (25).

View this table:

TABLE 1

Taurine concentrations in rat tissues (22,23)

Perspective.

The sulfur-containing amino acids present a fascinating subject to the protein chemist, the nutritionist, and the metabolic scientist, alike. They play critical roles in protein synthesis, structure, and function. Their metabolism is vital for many critical functions. SAM, a remarkably versatile molecule, is said to be second, only to ATP, in the number of enzymes that require it. Vitamins play a crucial role in the metabolism of these amino acids, which, in turn, play a role in folic acid assimilation. Despite the great advances in our knowledge of the sulfur-containing amino acids, there are important areas where further work is required. These include methionine transamination and the molecular basis for the many functions of taurine.

Disorders of Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism

  • Generoso Andria,  Brian Fowler,  Gianfranco Sebastio

Chapter  Inborn Metabolic Diseases  pp 224-231

Editors

http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-662-04285-4_18

http://dx.doi.org:/10.1007/978-3-662-04285-4_18

Several defects can exist in the conversion of the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine to cysteine and the ultimate oxidation of cysteine to inorganic sulfate (Fig. 18.1). Cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) deficiency is the most important. It is associated with severe abnormalities of four organs or organ systems: the eye (dislocation of the lens), the skeleton (dolichostenomelia and arachnodactyly), the vascular system (thromboembolism), and the central nervous system (mental retardation, cerebrovascular accidents). A low-methionine, highcystine diet, pyridoxine, folate, and betaine in various combinations, and antithrombotic treatment may halt the otherwise unfavorable course of the disease. Methionine adenosyltransferase deficiency and γ-cystathionase deficiency usually do not require treatment. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency leads (in its severe form) to refractory convulsions, lens dislocation, and early death. No effective treatment exists.

  1. 1.

    Rubba P, Faccenda F, Pauciullo P, Carbone L, Mancini M, Strisciuglio P, Carrozzo R, Sartorio R, Del Giudice E, Andria G (1990) Early signs of vascular disease in homocystinuria: a noninvasive study by ultrasound methods in eight families with cystathionine ß-synthase deficiency. Metabolism 39: 1191–1195 PubMedCrossRef

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    Kang S-S, Wong PWK, Malinow MR (1992) Hyperhomocyst(e)inemia as a risk factor for occlusive vascular disease. Annu Rev Nutr 12: 279–288 PubMedCrossRef

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    Boushey CJ, Beresford SA, Omenn GS, Motulsky AG (1995) A quantitative assessment of plasma homocysteine as a risk factor for vascular disease. Probable benefits of increasing folic acid intakes. JAMA 274: 1049–1057

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    Mudd SH, Skovby F, Levy HL, Pettigrew KD, Wilcken B, Pyeritz RE, Andria G, Boers GHJ, Bromberg IL, Cerone R, Fowler B, Grobe H, Schmidt H, Schweitzer L (1985) The natural history of homocystinuria due to cystathionine (3-synthase deficiency. Am J Hum Genet 37: 1–31 PubMed

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    de Franchis R, Sperandeo MP, Sebastio G, Andria G. The Italian Collaborative Study Group on Homocystinuria (1998) Clinical aspects of cystathionine ß-synthase deficiency: how wide is the spectrum? Eur J Pediatr 157: S67–7o

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    Kraus JP (1994) Molecular basis of phenotype expression in homocystinuria. J Inherited Metab Dis 17: 383–390 PubMedCrossRef

  7. more…

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The relationship of S amino acids to marasmic and kwashiorkor PEM

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

Sulfur is perhaps the most abundant element in the human body.  It is found in most proteins in the sulfur-containing amino acids, along with phosphorus and nitrogen.  These three elements form a triad of important elements needed as building blocks or structural components of all animal tissues.  The sulfur gives animal tissues their strength, and their resiliency.

Sulfur and nutritional balancing.  Suflur is not supplemented in pill form because it is plentiful in foods.  However, nutiritonal balancing emphasizes it and we find if one wishes to be healthy then one must eat meat, eggs and cooked vegetables and then your sulfur needs will be taken care of.

In Metabolic Reactions in the Nervous System, 1970; pp 225-287

Medical Research Council, Neuropsychiatric Research Unit, Carshalton, Surrey, England

http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4615-7160-5_8

http://dx.doi.org:/10.1007/978-1-4615-7160-5_8

Several sulfur amino acids and sulfur compounds are found in mammalian tissues. While some find their origin in the diet, other sulfur amino acids are formed in vivo from methionine in the tissues. Thus it is known that methionine is converted into homocysteine, cystathionine, cysteine, hypotaurine, and taurine. These metabolites are formed in the course of transferring a methyl group to other compounds. The mechanism of demethylation and the subsequent metabolism of the demethylated product, homocysteine, is now well established. The enzyme systems in most cases were first studied in liver preparations. The demonstration that 35S-methionine is converted into 35S-cysteine and 35S-taurine by rat brain in vitro and in vivo gave evidence that the sulfur amino acids are metabolized also in the mammalian brain. Several subsequent studies have shown similarities between the metabolism of methionine in liver and in brain, but they have also revealed some characteristic differences in the metabolism of sulfur amino acids in the brain: (1) the cystathionine and taurine concentrations are much higher in the brain than in the liver, (2) the enzyme cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase is predominantly a particulate deaminated to form isethionic acid by rat brain and heart and not by liver. An interesting feature of sulfur amino acid metabolism is that many of the enzyme systems involved in the conversion of methionine into its several metabolites require pyridoxal phosphate (vitamin B6) as a cofactor. Whereas in liver this cofactor is tightly bound to some of these enzymes, the corresponding enzymes in the brain are bound loosely to this cofactor, and their activity in the brain can be demonstrated in vitro only by adding the cofactor.

Sulfur-Containing Amino Acids

The sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine and methionine) are generally considered to be nonpolar and hydrophobic. In fact, methionine is one of the most hydrophobic amino acids and is almost always found on the interior of proteins. Cysteine on the other hand does ionize to yield the thiolate anion. Even so, it is uncommon to find cysteine on the surface of a protein. There are several reasons. First, sulfur has a low propensity to hydrogen bond, unlike oxygen. A consequence of this fact is that H2S is a gas under conditions that H2O is a liquid. Second, the thiol group of cysteine can react with other thiol groups in an oxidation reaction that yields a disulfide bond. Perhaps as a consequence, cysteine residues are most frequently buried inside proteins.


http://www.biology.arizona.edu/biochemistry/problem_sets/aa/Graphics/MolStruct/L-methionine.jpg

When in its natural L-form, methionine is a proteinogen amino acid. It is classed as an essential amino acid and cannot be synthesized by the body itself. This means that a sufficient supply of methionine in the diet or as a dietary supplement is of particular importance.

Sulphur compounds occur in all living creatures and have a multitude of functions. Besides cysteine, methionine is the only sulphur-containing amino acid. Furthermore methionine plays an important role in the synthesis of other proteins, such as carnitine or melatonine. Methionine has a fat-dissolving effect and reduces the depositing of fat in the liver.

Methionine is an important cartilage-forming substance

The cartilage in the joints requires sulphur for its production. If there is not enough sulphur available in the body, this can have negative effects for the healthy individual over the long term. People who suffer from arthritis can experience negative effects such as a prolonged healing process for the damaged tissue, if there is a sulphur deficiency at the beginning of the illness.

Studies have shown that the cartilage from healthy people contains approximately three times more suphur than in arthritis patients.To make things more complicated, various arthritis medications connect sulphur, which are the salts in the sulphuric acid. The demand for sulphur is increasing to more than average levels.

J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6 Suppl):1636S-1640S.

The sulfur-containing amino acids: an overview.

Brosnan JT1Brosnan ME.

Author information

Abstract

Methionine, cysteine, homocysteine, and taurine are the 4 common sulfur-containing amino acids, but only the first 2 are incorporated into proteins. Sulfur belongs to the same group in the periodic table as oxygen but is much less electronegative. This difference accounts for some of the distinctive properties of the sulfur-containing amino acids. Methionine is the initiating amino acid in the synthesis of virtually all eukaryotic proteins; N-formylmethionine serves the same function in prokaryotes. Within proteins, many of the methionine residues are buried in the hydrophobic core, but some, which are exposed, are susceptible to oxidative damage. Cysteine, by virtue of its ability to form disulfide bonds, plays a crucial role in protein structure and in protein-folding pathways. Methionine metabolism begins with its activation to S-adenosylmethionine. This is a cofactor of extraordinary versatility, playing roles in methyl group transfer, 5′-deoxyadenosyl group transfer, polyamine synthesis, ethylene synthesis in plants, and many others. In animals, the great bulk of S-adenosylmethionine is used in methylation reactions. S-Adenosylhomocysteine, which is a product of these methyltransferases, gives rise to homocysteine. Homocysteine may be remethylated to methionine or converted to cysteine by the transsulfuration pathway. Methionine may also be metabolized by a transamination pathway. This pathway, which is significant only at high methionine concentrations, produces a number of toxic endproducts. Cysteine may be converted to such important products as glutathione and taurine. Taurine is present in many tissues at higher concentrations than any of the other amino acids. It is an essential nutrient for cats.

Sulfur

http://www.encognitive.com/node/1144

Sulfur is an essential nutrient (micro-mineral). It is a nonmetallic element that is essential for life. In most animals it represents about 0.25% of the body weight. However, sulfur is normally present as part of larger compounds, and the requirement for pure sulfur has not been determined for most species. In recent years, sulfur toxicity has become more common because of its high concentration in many byproduct feeds. The use of these feeds in ruminant diets is increasing, which in turn may increase the trace mineral requirement. The purpose of this article is to review our current understanding of sulfur nutrition and to look at how sulfur level in the diet may influence the copper requirement.

Essential Functions

Compounds containing sulfur play a variety of essential functions in the body. They act as structural entities (collagen), as catalysts (enzymes), as oxygen carriers (hemoglobin), as hormones (insulin), and as vitamins (thiamine and biotin). Sulfur is present in four amino acids: methionine, cystine, cysteine and taurine. The secondary structure of many proteins is determined by the cross linkage or folding due to covalent disulfide bonds between amino acids.

Sulfur is the element that gives many key compounds their unique functional properties. For example, acetate is linked to coenzyme A by a thioester linkage to form acetyl coenzyme A. This compound is required for the formation of key metabolic intermediates such as citrate, acetoacetate and malonate. The sulfur in thiamine allows it to serve as a molecule which transfers carbonyl groups. Thiamine plays a key role in the formation of pentose sugars which are required for ribonucleic acids synthesis and photosynthesis. Biotin, another sulfur-containing B vitamin, acts a carrier for carbon dioxide in carboxylation reactions.

Inorganic vs. Organic Sulfur

Despite the fact that sulfur is a key mineral in many compounds essential for life, dietary inorganic sulfur is not necessary for the health of most animals. Pigs and poultry can do quite well with only organic sulfur (sulfur amino acids, thiamine, biotin, etc.) sources in their diets. The total absence of inorganic sulfur from the diet may increase the sulfur-amino acid requirement, which suggest that sulfur from the amino acids is used to synthesize other organic compounds containing sulfur.

In contrast, ruminants may respond to inorganic sulfur supplementation, especially if the diet is high in nonprotein nitrogen. Block et al., (1951) showed that ruminal microorganism are capable of synthesizing all organic sulfur containing compounds essential for life from inorganic sulfur. When urea or other nonprotein nitrogen sources are fed, the diet may become deficient in sulfur. Goodrich et. al., (1978) reported that the nitrogen to sulfur ratio in rumen microbial protein averages 14.5:1. The common recommendation for the nitrogen:sulfur ratio is 10:1 in diets containing high levels of urea.

Sulfur Source

The source of sulfur can influence its bioavailability. Goodrich et. al,. (1978) gave the following rankings from the most available to the least available: L-methionine> calcium sulfate >ammonium sulfate> sodium sulfate>molasses sulfur>sodium sulfide>lignin sulfonate>elemental sulfur. The recommend concentration of sulfur in beef cattle diets is 0.15% (NRC, 1996). However, this assumes the sulfur source is highly bioavailable.

The type of forage in the diet may also influence sulfur requirement. For example, Archer and Wheeler, (1978) showed that increasing the sulfur concentration from 0.08% to 0.12% in cattle grazing sorghum sudangrass increased weight gains by 12%. Sulfur requirements may be higher for cattle grazing sorghum sudangrass because sulfur is required in the detoxification of the cyanogenic glucosides found in most sorghum forages. Sulfur bioavailability varies with the type of forage; fescue has a lower sulfur availability than other grasses. Cattle consuming fescue hay will often respond with improved intake and fiber digestion following sulfur supplementation. Forages usually contain between 0.1-0.3% sulfur, except for corn silage which is often lower.

Zinn et al., (1997) reported that when ammonium sulfate was used to produce diets containing 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25% sulfur (DM basis), feedlot performance was reduced with the higher sulfur concentration. The diets were based on steam-flaked corn and fed to heifers weighing 845 pounds initially. Increasing dietary sulfur above 0.20%, caused a strong trend (P <.10) for decreased gains, feed intake and gain per unit of feed intake. The excess sulfur also caused a reduction (P <.05) in the ribeye area which is an important factor determining the yield grade of the carcass. Sulfur intake from the drinking water was not reported.

PEM

Another problem that can occur when high dietary sulfur leads to the production of excess sulfides in the rumen is polioencephalomalacia, or PEM (Gould et al., 1991; Lowe et al., 1996). The most defining sign of PEM is the necrosis of the cerebrocortical region of the brain. Animals with PEM will often press their head against a wall or post. In some instances they become “star gazers,” where they stand with their head back over their shoulders looking up at the sky. If not treated with thiamine, most animals with PEM will die within 48 hours.

A thiamine deficiency has been considered the most common cause of PEM in ruminants. However, recent research suggests that sulfur may play a key role in many instances of PEM. PEM has often been seen in animals that have had access to plants containing high amounts of thiaminase such as bracken fern (Merck, 1991). Thiamine is a B vitamin that plays a key role in the tri-carboxcylic acid cycle and pentose shunt. When thiamine is deficient, key tissues that require large amounts of thiamine, such as the brain and heart, are the first to show lesions.

The exact interaction between dietary sulfur, thiaminase production, and PEM is not understood. Kung et al. (1998) postulated that sulfates in the feed or water are converted to hydrogen sulfide in the rumen. When the hydrogen sulfide is eructated with the other rumen gases, it is inhaled and can damage lung and brain tissues. Several researchers (Oliveria et al., 1996; Brent and Bartley, 1994 and Olkowski, et al., 1992) have suggested that high sulfide levels could cause the brain lesions associated with PEM.

Kung et al., (1998) summarized six different reports in the literature where high sulfur intakes were associated with PEM. In these studies thiamine status was within normal ranges and giving thiamine did not prevent the signs in all cases. In these cases sulfur intakes from feed and water would have ranged from 0.40 to over 0.80% of the diet dry matter.

Drinking Water

Sulfates in the water can be a major source of sulfur intake. For example, in one of the cases cited by Kung et al., (1998), sulfates in the drinking water ranged from 2,200 to 2,800 ppm. When the water sulfur intake was expressed as a percent of the dry matter consumed, it averaged 0.67%. Digesti and Weeth (1976) proposed that the maximum safe concentration of sulfates in drinking water for cattle was 2,500 ppm. Water sulfate concentrations as high as 5,000 ppm have been reported (Veenhuizen et al., 1992).

Accurately estimating water intake in these situations can also be a challenge. Water meters can be used for confined livestock to estimate the average intake, but with grazing animals drinking from ponds or streams, one can only estimate the intake. Usually water consumption will be 3-5 times the dry matter intake. Dry matter intake for grazing beef cattle and sheep will normally be between 1.5 and 2.5% of their body weight. Lactating dairy cows may consume over 3.5% of their body weight when grazing high quality forage. Although this is not a precise means of measuring water sulfur intake, it does allow one to estimate the relative contributions of the feed and water.

Excess Sulfur

Excess sulfur can also impair animal performance by reducing the availability of other minerals. For example, hydrogen sulfide in the rumen binds with molybdenum to form thiomolybdates. Thiomolybdates bind with copper in the rumen to form an insoluble complex. Some thiomolybdates are absorbed and impair the metabolism of copper in the body. For example, Gooneratne et al. (1989) reported that certain thiomolybdates cause copper to be bound to blood albumins which renders the copper unavailable for biochemical reactions in the body. Price et al., (1987) showed that tri- and tetrathiomolybdates were the sulfur-molybdenum complexes responsible for reducing copper absorption, while the di- and trithiomolybdates had the greatest effect on copper metabolism in the body.

Sulfur also reduces copper absorption by the formation of insoluble copper sulfide in the rumen, independent of the formation of thiomolybdates. Rumen protozoa degrade sulfur amino acids to sulfide which binds to copper to form an insoluble complex. Smart et al., (1986) reported that decreasing the sulfate concentration of drinking water from 500 to 42 ppm, improved the copper status of cattle. These same researchers reported that the 10 ppm copper recommended by the Beef NRC (1996) was not adequate when cattle drank high-sulfur water, which resulted in a total dietary sulfur intake of 0.35%.

Copper Supplement

The optimum level of copper supplementation required to combat high sulfur intakes has not been determined. The maximum tolerable level of copper for cattle has been estimated at 100 ppm (NRC 1980). Although this level is being fed in diets that are high in sulfur, certain breeds of dairy cattle such as the Jersey and Guernsey are susceptible to copper toxicity at concentrations below 100 ppm.

In these situations, the source of copper is also important. Although copper sulfate is a common copper source, it would not be recommended if the diet is already high in sulfur. Copper oxide would not contribute to the sulfur problem, but because of its poor availability is not recommended. Copper carbonate is probably the best copper source for this situation. It has a bioavailability similar to copper sulfate, with out increasing sulfur intake.

The Importance of Macro Minerals: Sulfur

K.E. Lanka, Ph.D., P.A.S.

http://agriking.com/uploads/2013/12/Advantage_Jan2014.pdf

Sulfur (S) is one of seven generally recognized macro minerals needed in the diets of dairy cattle and other animals. Sulfur is a mineral that is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine (cystine), homocysteine and in taurine. It is also in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. It is an important component of healthy cartilage. As a part of the specified amino acids, it is key to the structure of proteins. Heating protein s u p p l e m e n t s can rearrange the structures of proteins, due to the sulfurcontaining amino acids, which can determine whether these nutrients are soluble and rumen degradable or if they will resist rumen degradation in cattle. Heating also affects the essential amino acid, lysine, when carbohydrates are present in a supplement. An example of this change by heating can be observed when an egg is boiled.

Animals have a need for essential sulfur-containing nutrients, such as methionine and cysteine. However, the microbes in the rumens of cattle and other ruminants can use mineral sources of sulfur to produce some of these important nutrients for dairy and beef cattle. Thus, it is important to feed sulfur at recommended dietary levels to meet the needs of the microbes, as well as the animals. In dairy cattle, it is needed in the diet at the level of 0.20%. For beef cattle, the recommended concentration is a minimum of 0.15% of dietary dry matter (DM). Since about 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur, commercial concentrations in typical beef cattle rations range from 0.18 to 0.24%. Sulfur is essential when a nonprotein nitrogen source, such as urea, is fed. The total Nitrogen:Sulfur (N:S) ratio in a diet should range from 10:1 to 12:1, and the rumen soluble N:S ratio should be 4.0:1 to 5.5:1. Common sources of sulfur for livestock include:

• potassium sulfate

• magnesium sulfate

• sodium sulfate

• ammonium sulfate

• calcium sulfate

• corn gluten feed, distillers grains and other corn coproducts.

Sulfate forms of macro and trace minerals are among the most digestible and easily absorbed forms in the digestive tract. Elemental sulfur in water and feed is not a readily available source for animals. A deficiency of sulfur in the diets of animals can have detrimental effects on their performance. Marginal deficiency symptoms include:

• reduced microbial synthesis

• reduced fiber digestion due to slow microbial growth in ruminants

• slow growth

• reduced milk production

• reduced feed efficiency

• reduced intakes

Severe deficiencies can cause the following symptoms:

• unwillingness to eat

• weight loss

• dullness and slow movement

• excessive salivation

• death

For ruminants, the maximum tolerable level of sulfur in diets is .40% of their dry matter intakes. Excess sulfur will interfere with the digestion and absorption of other minerals, particularly the trace minerals, copper and selenium. Even though these minerals may be adequate in the diet, secondary deficiency symptoms can be observed, simply because the trace minerals were made unavailable, due to too much sulfur in the feed. Other toxicity symptoms or problems that can occur from high levels of sulfur include:

• reduced intakes

• overloading the urinary system, leading to kidney failure

• interference with nerve impulses, including blindness, coma, muscle twitches and intestinal inflammation or bleeding

• The breath of cattle may smell like “rotten eggs,” due to the toxic form of sulfur, hydrogen sulfide.

• polioencephalomalacia (PEM)

With recent increased usage of distillers grains in dairy and feedlot diets, the association between sulfur and PEM has been noted and documented. One of the causes of PEM in ruminants is the interference by sulfur with the B-vitamin, thiamin. Supplementation with thiamine may help to alleviate PEM. This is one reason why thiamin is included in Agri-King base mineral products. The symptoms of PEM include: • excessive salivation • nervousness and twitching (hypersensitivity) • poor muscle coordination and dullness • tilting the head to the side and walking in circles (star gazing) • head pressing • blindness • death Sulfur is an important element in the pH balance of the blood of animals. Sulfates are some of the anionic salts that are used to adjust PCI (Pre-Fresh Cow Index) that affects calcium utilization in cows prior to calving. This can be a key factor in the prevention of milk fevers and retained placentae in fresh cows. In summary, sulfur is needed in dairy rations at a minimum level of .20% of dry matter for a TMR. It is a key macro mineral in maintaining life and production in animals, and it is an essential component of some amino acids, vitamins and other nutrients needed by all animals. Like all required nutrients, too much S can become toxic. The maximum level of sulfur is .40% of the dry matter intake for cattle. Agri-King, Inc is a leader and innovator in animal nutrition. AgriKing rations are balanced to meet the nutrient needs of the animals that are fed by clients. For more information about Agri-King nutrition, contact a representative near you or visit the website at www.agriking.com.

Protein Malnutrition

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/01/protein-malnutrition/

A large part of  the world’s population is undernourished by the standards of Western Europe and North America. Scientists and nonscientists alike recognize as one of the major challenges of our time the problem of how to ensure that the production and distribution of food keep pace with the increasing number of mouths to be fed. In the world as a whole the most widespread and serious dietary deficiency is that of protein. This fact emerges clearly from the reports of the expert committees of WHO and FAO (World Health Organization, 1951, 1953). Nevertheless, many protein chemists, even those associated with medical research, may not realize the extent and severity of protein malnutrition, because it occurs chiefly in the technically underdeveloped countries far from where they work.

Dietary histories and response to treatment point to deficiency of total protein as the primary cause of the clinical syndrome kwashiorkor. The level of calorie intake has an important influence on the pattern of the disease. Deficiency of one or more specific amino acids, or amino acid imbalances in the diet, may perhaps be responsible for some of the symptoms and signs, particularly those whose incidence varies from one part of the world to another. All these variations on a theme are covered by the general term protein malnutrition. The onset is often precipitated by the added burden of diarrhea, infection, and parasitic infestation. The nutritional state influences the resistance to infection, and conversely the presence of an infection affects the state of nutrition. A further contributory factor may be the psychological upheaval in the child when the next baby in the family is born. At the root of all these causes lie poverty, ignorance, and disruption of the family life.

The planning of preventive measures cannot be effective unless it is based on some knowledge of the magnitude of the problem to be tackled. At a very rough estimate, in some countries perhaps 10% of the children suffer from severe protein malnutrition at some age between birth and 4 years. The marginal deficiency states must be much more common, Clinical signs and biochemical changes are of little value in diagnosing the early case; a deficit in body weight still seems to be the best criterion. Prevention ideally would be by greater production and consumption of animal protein, and by the increased use of skim milk and of surplus fish at present often wasted. However, animal protein is likely to remain scarce and expensive. Plant sources are being investigated with a view to encouraging not only domestic production, but also the production on an industrial scale of cheap foodstuffs rich in protein. A preventive program that is nutritionally sound may fail if account is not taken of local food habits, traditions, and customs. Protein requirements are affected by the quality of protein, the intake of calories, and by the state of the body (growth, the presence of disease, etc.). The maintenance requirement and the amount required for growth in children can be estimated, but the requirement for health is still unknown. For the time being, the allowances of protein recommended for people in the world as a whole are based empirically on the known physiological requirement with an arbitrarily added wide margin of safety.

The absorption of nitrogen is remarkably efficient even in severely malnourished infants. In general the nitrogen of plant proteins is less well absorbed than that of milk. When a baby receives a diet in which the protein is derived entirely from vegetabIe sources, incomplete absorption of nitrogen may play a significant part in the production of protein malnutrition. The malnourished baby who responds to treatment is able to retain and utilize nitrogen very efficiently; there is no evidence of any impairment in the mechanisms of protein synthesis. It is possible, however, that these mechanisms may be irreversibly damaged in babies who die, and that this may be the cause of death. The level of calorie intake has an important influence on the efficiency of utilization of nitrogen. An adequate calorie intake promotes conservation of nitrogen in the body as a whole when supplies of protein are short, but this protective effect may not be exerted equally in all organs. In this way the level of calorie intake may modify the pattern of protein depletion. A greater than normal calorie intake is needed for the restoration of depleted protein stores.

The discussion of protein metabolism in protein malnutrition has been purposely limited to a narrow field-to studies made on man, and to the few animal experiments that have a direct bearing on those studies. For technical reasons most of the work discussed relates to plasma proteins. There is a conflict of evidence between results obtained in man and animals about the effect of protein depletion or a low protein diet on the rate of catabolism of plasma albumin. It is of great importance to settle this point. A priori there seems no reason why the rate of protein catabolism should be affected by nutritional state. Preliminary studies with radioactive methionine in infants suggest, as working hypotheses, that in protein malnutrition there may be an increase in the reutilization of amino acids liberated by tissue catabolism, and an apparent concentration of protein synthesis in the more essential organs at the expense of the less essential. There is some experimental support for both these ideas, but further work is badly needed. The concept of protein stores or reserve protein is based entirely on dynamic and not on chemical considerations. It is suggested that the essential difference between a “labile” and a “fixed” protein is a difference in turnover rate. An attempt is made to show that the changes produced by protein depletion in the protein content of organs such as liver and muscle are a necessary consequence of the metabolic characteristics of proteins in those organs. There may be no need to invoke the help of homeostatic or compensatory regulations to explain the changes found in protein depletion.

Aging and growth are processes during which some metabolic adjustments must take place. It is believed that it may be better to regard the changes which are found in protein malnutrition in a similar light: as evidence of an alteration in functional pattern, rather than of damage or disease. Protein malnutrition in man has two aspects-a practical and a theoretical one. From the practical point of view it is an extremely common disease with a high mortality, and there is every reason to believe that it will become more common unless urgent preventive measures are taken. Theoretically it raises many questions that are of interest in relation to other branches of medicine and biochemistry. It is believed that the two aspects are linked, and that progress towards prevention is still impeded by our lack of basic knowledge as well as by our failure to apply what is already known. In protein malnutrition there is no sharp line between health and disease. The simple concept of specific deficiency diseases that grew from the discovery of vitamins is not applicable. We have to go back instead to the ideas of an earlier era, when nutrition was regarded as a branch of physiology, concerned with the functions, fate, and metabolic interrelationships of the major nutrients.

It is a characteristic of protein metabolism that nitrogen balance can be maintained at many different levels of protein intake. These different steady states are achieved by adjustments of the amount and distribution of proteins in the body as a whole, in organs, and in cells. It is believed that these changes in amount and distribution of proteins must result in alterations of metabolic pattern, with a gradation of change from an optimum, which cannot be defined, to a state of irreversible breakdown incompatible with life. In the intermediate stages function is modified and efficiency perhaps impaired. It seems possible that variations in diet, and particularly in the amount and quality of the protein, may underlie many of the differences in incidence and symptomatology of disease which are gradually being uncovered in different parts of the world.

Source References:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0065323308603095#

Voluntary and Involuntary S- Insufficiency

Writer and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/07/transthyretin-and-the-stressful-condition/

Transthyretin and the Stressful Condition

Introduction

This article is written among a series of articles concerned with stress, obesity, diet and exercise, as well as altitude and deep water diving for extended periods, and their effects.  There is a reason that I focus on transthyretin (TTR), although much can be said about micronutients and vitamins, and fat soluble vitamins in particular, and iron intake during pregnancy.    While the importance of vitamins and iron are well accepted, the metabolic basis for their activities is not fully understood.  In the case of a single amino acid, methionine, it is hugely important because of the role it plays in sulfur metabolism, the sulfhydryl group being essential for coenzyme A, cytochrome c, and for disulfide bonds.  The distribution of sulfur, like the distribution of iodine, is not uniform across geographic regions.  In addition, the content of sulfur found in plant sources is not comparable to that in animal protein.  There have been previous articles at this site on TTR, amyloid and sepsis.

Transthyretin and Lean Body Mass in Stable and Stressed State

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/01/transthyretin-and-lean-body-mass-in-stable-and-stressed-state/

A Second Look at the Transthyretin Nutrition Inflammatory Conundrum

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/03/a-second-look-at-the-transthyretin-nutrition-inflammatory-conundrum/

Stabilizers that prevent transthyretin-mediated cardiomyocyte amyloidotic toxicity

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/02/stabilizers-that-prevent-transthyretin-mediated-cardiomyocyte-amyloidotic-toxicity/

Thyroid Function and Disorders

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/05/thyroid-function-and-disorders/

Proteomics, Metabolomics, Signaling Pathways, and Cell Regulation: a Compilation of Articles in the Journal http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/09/01/compilation-of-references-in-leaders-in-pharmaceutical-intelligence-about-proteomics-metabolomics-signaling-pathways-and-cell-regulation-2/

Malnutrition in India, high newborn death rate and stunting of children age under five years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/15/malnutrition-in-india-high-newborn-death-rate-and-stunting-of-children-age-under-five-years/

Vegan Diet is Sulfur Deficient and Heart Unhealthy

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/17/vegan-diet-is-sulfur-deficient-and-heart-unhealthy/

How Methionine Imbalance with Sulfur-Insufficiency Leads to Hyperhomocysteinemia

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/04/sulfur-deficiency-leads_to_hyperhomocysteinemia/

Amyloidosis with Cardiomyopathy

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/31/amyloidosis-with-cardiomyopathy/

Advances in Separations Technology for the “OMICs” and Clarification of Therapeutic Targets

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/22/advances-in-separations-technology-for-the-omics-and-clarification-of-therapeutic-targets/

Sepsis, Multi-organ Dysfunction Syndrome, and Septic Shock: A Conundrum of Signaling Pathways Cascading Out of Control

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/13/sepsis-multi-organ-dysfunction-syndrome-and-septic-shock-a-conundrum-of-signaling-pathways-cascading-out-of-control/

Automated Inferential Diagnosis of SIRS, sepsis, septic shock

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/01/automated-inferential-diagnosis-of-sirs-sepsis-septic-shock/

Transthyretin and the Systemic Inflammatory Response 

Transthyretin has been widely used as a biomarker for identifying protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and for monitoring the improvement of nutritional status after implementing a nutritional intervention by enteral feeding or by parenteral infusion. This has occurred because transthyretin (TTR) has a rapid removal from the circulation in 48 hours and it is readily measured by immunometric assay. Nevertheless, concerns have been raised about the use of TTR in the ICU setting, which prompts a review of the actual benefit of using this test in a number of settings. TTR is easily followed in the underweight and the high risk populations in an ambulatory setting, which has a significant background risk of chronic diseases.  It is sensitive to the systemic inflammatory response syndrom (SIRS), and needs to be understood in the context of acute illness to be used effectively. There are a number of physiologic changes associated with SIRS and the injury/repair process that will affect TTR and will be put in context in this review. The most important point is that in the context of an ICU setting, the contribution of TTR is significant in a complex milieu.  copyright @ Bentham Publishers Ltd. 2009.

Transthyretin as a marker to predict outcome in critically ill patients.
Arun Devakonda, Liziamma George, Suhail Raoof, Adebayo Esan, Anthony Saleh, Larry H. Bernstein.
Clin Biochem Oct 2008; 41(14-15): 1126-1130

A determination of TTR level is an objective method od measuring protein catabolic loss of severly ill patients and numerous studies show that TTR levels correlate with patient outcomes of non-critically ill patients. We evaluated whether TTR level correlates with the prevalence of PEM in the ICUand evaluated serum TTR level as an indicator of the effectiveness of nutrition support and the prognosis in critically ill patients.

TTR showed excellent concordance with patients classified with PEM or at high malnutrition risk, and followed for 7 days, it is a measure of the metabolic burden. TTR levels did not respond early to nutrition support because of the delayed return to anabolic status. It is particularly helpful in removing interpretation bias, and it is an excellent measure of the systemic inflammatory response concurrent with a preexisting state of chronic inanition.

 The Stressful Condition as a Nutritionally Dependent Adaptive Dichotomy

Yves Ingenbleek and Larry Bernstein
Nutrition 1999;15(4):305-320 PII S0899-9007(99)00009-X

The injured body manifests a cascade of cytokine-induced metabolic events aimed at developing defense mechanisms and tissue repair. Rising concentrations of counterregulatory hormones work in concert with cytokines to generate overall insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), postreceptor resistance and energy requirements grounded on lipid dependency. Dalient features are self-sustained hypercortisolemia persisting as long as cytokines are oversecreted and down-regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis stabilized at low basal levels. Inhibition of thyroxine 5’deiodinating activity (5’DA) accounts for the depressed T3 values associated with the sparing of both N and energy-consuming processes. Both the liver and damaged territories adapt to stressful signals along up-regulated pathways disconnected from the central and peripheral control systems. Cytokines stimulate 5’DA and suppress the synthesis of TTR, causing the drop of retinol-binding protein (RBP) and the leakage of increased amounts of T4 and retinol in free form. TTR and RBP thus work as prohormonal reservoirs of precursor molecules which need to be converted into bioactive derivatives (T3 and retinoic acids) to reach transcriptional efficiency. The converting steps (5’DA and cellular retinol-binding protein-1) are activated to T4 and retinol, themselves operating as limiting factors to positive feedback loops. …The suicidal behavior of TBG, CBG, and IGFBP-3 allows the occurrence of peak endocrine and mitogenic influences at the site of inflammation. The production rate of TTR by the liver is the main determinant of both the hepatic release and blood transport of holoRBP, which explains why poor nutritional status concomitantly impairs thyroid- and retinoid-dependent acute phase responses, hindering the stressed body to appropriately face the survival crisis.  …
abbreviations: TBG, thyroxine-binding globulain; CBG, cortisol-binding globulin; IGFBP-3, insulin growth factor binding protein-3; TTR, transthyretin; RBP, retionol-binding protein.

Why Should Plasma Transthyretin Become a Routine Screening Tool in Elderly Persons? 

Yves Ingenbleek.
J Nutrition, Health & Aging 2009.

The homotetrameric TTR molecule (55 kDa as MM) was first identified in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).  The initial name of prealbumin (PA)  was assigned based on the electrophoretic migration anodal to albumin. PA was soon recognized as a specific binding protein for thyroid hormone. and also of plasma retinol through the mediation of the small retinol-binding protein (RBP, 21 kDa as MM), which has a circulating half-life half that of TTR (24 h vs 48 h).

There exist at least 3 goos reasons why TTR should become a routine medical screening test in elderly persons.  The first id grounded on the assessment of protein nutritional status that is frequently compromized and may become a life threatening condition.  TTR was proposed as a marker of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) in 1972. As a result of protein and energy deprivation, TTR hepatic synthesis is suppressed whereas all plasma indispensable amino acids (IAAs) manifest declining trends with the sole exception of methionine (Met) whose concentration usually remains unmodified. By comparison with ALB and transferrin (TF) plasma values, TTR did reveal a much higher degree of reactivity to changes in protein status that has been attributed to its shorter biological half-life and to its unusual tryptophan richness. The predictive ability of outcome offered by TTR is independent of that provided by ALB and TF. Uncomplicated PEM primarily affects the size of body nitrogen (N) pools, allowing reduced protein syntheses to levels compatible with survival.  These adaptiver changes are faithfully identified by the serial measurement of TTR whose reliability has never been disputed in protein-depleted states. On the contrary, the nutritional relevance of TTR has been controverted in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions due to the cytokine-induced transcriptional blockade of liver synthesis which is an obligatory step occurring independently from the prevailing nutritional status. Although PEM and stress ful disorders refer to distinct pathogenic mechanisms, their combined inhibitory effects on TTR liber production fueled a long-lasting strife regarding a poor specificity.  Recent body compositional studies have contributed to disentagling these intermingled morbidities, showing that evolutionary patterns displayed by plasma TTR are closely correlated with the fluctuations of lean body mass (LBM).

The second reason follows from advances describing the unexpected relationship established between TTR and homocysteine (Hcy), a S-containing AA not found in customary diets but resulting from the endogenous transmethylation of dietary methionine.  Hcy may be recycled to Met along a remethylation pathway (RM) or irreversibly degraded throughout the transsulfuration (TS) cascade to relase sulfaturia as end-product. Hcy is thus situated at the crossrad of RM and TS pathways which are in equilibrium keeping plasma Met values unaltered.  Three dietary water soluble B viatamins are implicated in the regulation of the Hcy-Met cycle. Folates (vit B9) are the most powerful agent, working as a supplier of the methyl group required for the RM process whereas cobalamines (vit B12) and pyridoxine (vit B6) operate as cofactors of Met-synthase and cystathionine-β-synthase.  Met synthase promotes the RM pathway whereas the rate-limiting CβS governs the TS degradative cascade. Dietary deficiency in any of the 3 vitamins may upregulate Hcy plasma values, an acquied biochemiucal anomaly increasingly encountered in aged populations.

The third reason refers to recent and fascinating data recorded in neurobiology and emphasizing the specific properties of TTR in the prevention of brain deterioration. TTR participates directly in the maintenance of memory and normal cognitive processes during the aging process by acting on the retinoid signaling pathway.  Moreover, TTR may bind amyloid β peptide in vitro, preventing its transformation into toxic amyloid fibrils and amyloid plaques.  TTR works as a limiting factor for the plasma transport of retinoid, which in turn operates as a limiting determinant of both physiologically active retinoic acid (RA) derivatives, implying that any fluctuation in protein status might well entail corresponding  alterations in cellular bioavailability of retinoid compounds.  Under normal aging circumstances, the concentration of retinoid compounds declines in cerebral tissues together with the downregulation of RA receptor expression. In animal models, depletion of RAs causes the deposition of amyloid-β peptides, favoring the formation of amyloid plaques.

Prealbumin and Nutritional Evaluation

Larry Bernstein, Walter Pleban
Nutrition Apr 1996; 12(4):255-259.
http://nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(96)90852-7

We compressed 16-test-pattern classes of albumin (ALB), cholesterol (CHOL), and total protein (TPR) in 545 chemistry profiles to 4 classes by conveerting decision values to a number code to separate malnourished (1 or 2) from nonmalnourished (NM)(0) patients using as cutoff values for NM (0), mild (1), and moderate (2): ALB 35, 27 g/L; TPR 63, 53 g/L; CHOL 3.9, 2.8 mmol/L; and BUN 9.3, 3.6 mmol/L. The BUN was found to have  to have too low an S-value to make a contribution to the compressed classification. The cutoff values for classifying the data were assigned prior to statistical analysis, after examining information in the structured data. The data was obtained by a natural experiment in which the test profiles routinely done by the laboratory were randomly extracted. The analysis identifies the values used that best classify the data and are not dependent on distributional assumptions. The data were converted to 0, 1, or 2 as outcomes, to create a ternary truth table (eaxch row in nnn, the n value is 0 to 2). This allows for 3(81) possible patterns, without the inclusion of prealbumin (TTR). The emerging system has much fewer patterns in the information-rich truth table formed (a purposeful, far from random event). We added TTR, coded, and examined the data from 129 patients. The classes are a compressed truth table of n-coded patterns with outcomes of 0, 1, or 2 with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) increasing from an all-0 to all-2 pattern.  Pattern class (F=154), PAB (F=35), ALB (F=56), and CHOL (F=18) were different across PEM class and predicted PEM class (R-sq. = 0.7864, F=119, p < E-5). Kruskall-Wallis analysis of class by ranks was significant for pattern class E-18), TTR (6.1E-15) ALB (E-16), CHOL (9E-10), and TPR (5E-13). The medians and standard error (SEM) for TTR, ALB, and CHOL of four TTR classes (NM, mild, mod, severe) are: TTR = 209, 8.7; 159, 9.3; 137, 10.4; 72, 11.1 mg/L. ALB – 36, 0.7; 30.5, 0.8; 25.0, 0.8; 24.5, 0.8 g/L. CHOL = 4.43, 0.17; 4.04, 0.20; 3.11, 0.21; 2.54, 0.22 mmol/L. TTR and CHOL values show the effect of nutrition support on TTR and CHOL in PEM. Moderately malnourished patients receiving nutrition support have TTR values in the normal range at 137 mg/L and at 159 mg/L when the ALB is at 25 g/L or at 30.5 g/L.

An Informational Approach to Likelihood of Malnutrition 

Larry Bernstein, Thomas Shaw-Stiffel, Lisa Zarney, Walter Pleban.
Nutrition Nov 1996;12(11):772-776.  PII: S0899-9007(96)00222-5.
http://dx.doi.org:/nutritionjrnl.com/article/S0899-9007(96)00222-5

Unidentified protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is associated with comorbidities and increased hospital length of stay. We developed a model for identifying severe metabolic stress and likelihood of malnutrition using test patterns of albumin (ALB), cholesterol (CHOL), and total protein (TP) in 545 chemistry profiles…They were compressed to four pattern classes. ALB (F=170), CHOL (F = 21), and TP (F = 5.6) predicted PEM class (R-SQ = 0.806, F= 214; p < E^-6), but pattern class was the best predictor (R-SQ = 0.900, F= 1200, p< E^-10). Ktuskal-Wallis analysis of class by ranks was significant for pattern class (E^18), ALB (E^-18), CHOL (E^-14), TP (@E^-16). The means and SEM for tests in the three PEM classes (mild, mod, severe) were; ALB – 35.7, 0.8; 30.9, 0.5; 24.2, 0.5 g/L. CHOL – 3.93, 0.26; 3.98, 0.16; 3.03, 0.18 µmol/L, and TP – 68.8, 1.7; 60.0, 1.0; 50.6, 1.1 g/L. We classified patients at risk of malnutrition using truth table comprehension.

Downsizing of Lean Body Mass is a Key Determinant of Alzheimer’s Disease

Yves Ingenbleek, Larry Bernstein
J Alzheimer’s Dis 2015; 44: 745-754.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.3233/JAD-141950

Lean body mass (LBM) encompasses all metabolically active organs distributed into visceral and structural tissue compartments and collecting the bulk of N and K stores of the human body. Transthyretin (TTR)  is a plasma protein mainly secreted by the liver within a trimolecular TTR-RBP-retinol complex revealing from birth to old age strikingly similar evolutionary patterns with LBM in health and disease. TTR is also synthesized by the choroid plexus along distinct regulatory pathways. Chronic dietary methionine (Met) deprivation or cytokine-induced inflammatory disorders generates LBM downsizing following differentiated physiopathological processes. Met-restricted regimens downregulate the transsulfuration cascade causing upstream elevation of homocysteine (Hcy) safeguarding Met homeostasis and downstream drop of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairing anti-oxidative capacities. Elderly persons constitute a vulnerable population group exposed to increasing Hcy burden and declining H2S protection, notably in plant-eating communities or in the course of inflammatory illnesses. Appropriate correction of defective protein status and eradication of inflammatory processes may restore an appropriate LBM size allowing the hepatic production of the retinol circulating complex to resume, in contrast with the refractory choroidal TTR secretory process. As a result of improved health status, augmented concentrations of plasma-derived TTR and retinol may reach the cerebrospinal fluid and dismantle senile amyloid plaques, contributing to the prevention or the delay of the onset of neurodegenerative events in elderly subjects at risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic transthyretin variants interact differently with human cardiomyocytes: insights into early events of non-fibrillar tissue damage

Pallavi Manral and Natalia Reixach
Biosci.Rep.(2015)/35/art:e00172 http://dx.doi.org:/10.1042/BSR20140155

TTR (transthyretin) amyloidosis are diseases characterized by the aggregation and extracellular deposition of the normally soluble plasma protein TTR. Ex vivo and tissue culture studies suggest that tissue damage precedes TTR fibril deposition, indicating that early events in the amyloidogenic cascade have an impact on disease development. We used a human cardiomyocyte tissue culture model system to define these events. We previously described that the amyloidogenic V122I TTR variant is cytotoxic to human cardiac cells, whereas the naturally occurring, stable and non-amyloidogenic T119M TTR variant is not. We show that most of the V122I TTR interacting with the cells is extracellular and this interaction is mediated by a membraneprotein(s). In contrast, most of the non-amyloidogenic T119M TTR associated with the cells is intracellular where it undergoes lysosomal degradation. The TTR internalization process is highly dependent on membrane cholesterol content. Using a fluorescent labelled V122I TTR variant that has the same aggregation and cytotoxic potential as the native V122I TTR, we determined that its association with human cardiomyocytes is saturable with a KD near 650nM. Only amyloidogenic V122I TTR compete with fluorescent V122I force ll-binding sites. Finally, incubation of the human cardiomyocytes with V122I TTR but not with T119M TTR, generates superoxide species and activates caspase3/7. In summary, our results show that the interaction of the amyloidogenic V122I TTR is distinct from that of a non-amyloidogenic TTR variant and is characterized by its retention at the cell membrane, where it initiates the cytotoxic cascade.

Emerging roles for retinoids in regeneration and differentiation in normal and disease states

Lorraine J. Gudas
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1821 (2012) 213–221
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.bbalip.2011.08.002

The vitamin (retinol) metabolite, all-transretinoic acid (RA), is a signaling molecule that plays key roles in the development of the body plan and induces the differentiation of many types of cells. In this review the physiological and pathophysiological roles of retinoids (retinol and related metabolites) in mature animals are discussed. Both in the developing embryo and in the adult, RA signaling via combinatorial Hoxgene expression is important for cell positional memory. The genes that require RA for the maturation/differentiation of T cells are only beginning to be cataloged, but it is clear that retinoids play a major role in expression of key genes in the immune system. An exciting, recent publication in regeneration research shows that ALDH1a2(RALDH2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of RA from retinaldehyde, is highly induced shortly after amputation in the regenerating heart, adult fin, and larval fin in zebrafish. Thus, local generation of RA presumably plays a key role in fin formation during both embryogenesis and in fin regeneration. HIV transgenic mice and human patients with HIV-associated kidney disease exhibit a profound reduction in the level of RARβ protein in the glomeruli, and HIV transgenic mice show reduced retinol dehydrogenase levels, concomitant with a greater than 3-fold reduction in endogenous RA levels in the glomeruli. Levels of endogenous retinoids (those synthesized from retinol within cells) are altered in many different diseases in the lung, kidney, and central nervous system, contributing to pathophysiology.

The Membrane Receptor for Plasma Retinol-Binding Protein, A New Type of Cell-Surface Receptor

Hui Sun and Riki Kawaguchi
Intl Review Cell and Molec Biol, 2011; 288:Chap 1. Pp 1:34
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/B978-0-12-386041-5.00001-7

Vitamin A is essential for diverse aspects of life ranging from embryogenesis to the proper functioning of most adul torgans. Its derivatives (retinoids) have potent biological activities such as regulating cell growth and differentiation. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP) is the specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood that binds to vitamin A with high affinity and delivers it to target organs. A large amount of evidence has accumulated over the past decades supporting the existence of a cell-surface receptor for RBP that mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. Using an unbiased strategy, this specific cell-surface RBP receptor has been identified as STRA6, a multi-transmembrane domain protein with previously unknown function. STRA6 is not homologous to any protein of known function and represents a new type of cell-surface receptor. Consistent with the diverse functions of vitamin A, STRA6 is widely expressed in embryonic development and in adult organ systems. Mutations in human STRA6 are associated with severe pathological phenotypes in many organs
such as the eye, brain, heart, and lung. STRA6 binds to RBP with high affinity and mediates vitamin A uptake into cells. This review summarizes the history of the RBP receptor research, its expression in the context of known functions of vitamin A in distinct human organs, structure/function analysis of this new type of membrane receptor, pertinent questions regarding its very existence, and its potential implication in treating human diseases.

Choroid plexus dysfunction impairs beta-amyloid clearance in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

Ibrahim González-Marrero, Lydia Giménez-Llort, Conrad E. Johanson, et al.
Front Cell Neurosc  Feb2015; 9(17): 1-10
http://dx.doi.org:/10.3389/fncel.2015.00017

Compromised secretory function of choroid plexus (CP) and defective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production, along with accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides at the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), contribute to complications of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD) at 16 month-old mimics critical hallmarks of the human disease: β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) with a temporal-and regional-specific profile. Currently, little is known about transport and metabolic responses by CP to the disrupted homeostasis of CNS Aβ in AD. This study analyzed the effects of highly-expressed AD-linked human transgenes (APP, PS1 and tau) on lateral ventricle CP function. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry revealed an increase only of Aβ42 isoform in epithelial cytosol and in stroma surrounding choroidal capillaries; this buildup may reflect insufficient clearance transport from CSF to blood. Still, there was increased expression, presumably compensatory, of the choroidal Aβ transporters: the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein1 (LRP1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE). A thickening of the epithelial basal membrane and greater collagen-IV deposition occurred around capillaries in CP, probably curtailing solute exchanges. Moreover, there was attenuated expression of epithelial aquaporin-1 and transthyretin(TTR) protein compared to Non-Tg mice. Collectively these findings indicate CP dysfunction hypothetically linked to increasing Aβ burden resulting in less efficient ion transport, concurrently with reduced production of CSF (less sink action on brain Aβ) and diminished secretion of TTR (less neuroprotection against cortical Aβ toxicity). The putative effects of a disabled CP-CSF system on CNS functions are discussed in the context of AD.

Endoplasmic reticulum: The unfolded protein response is tangled In neurodegeneration

Jeroen J.M. Hoozemans, Wiep Scheper
Intl J Biochem & Cell Biology 44 (2012) 1295–1298
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2012.04.023

Organelle facts•The ER is involved in the folding and maturation ofmembrane-bound and secreted proteins.•The ER exerts protein quality control to ensure correct folding and to detect and remove misfolded proteins.•Disturbance of ER homeostasis leads to protein misfolding and induces the UPR.•Activation of the UPR is aimed to restore proteostasis via an intricate transcriptional and (post)translational signaling network.•In neurodegenerative diseases classified as tauopathies the activation of the UPR coincides with the pathogenic accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau.•The involvement of the UPR in tauopathies makes it a potential therapeutic target.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in the folding and maturation of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. Disturbed homeostasis in the ER can lead to accumulation of misfolded proteins, which trigger a stress response called the unfolded protein response (UPR). In neurodegenerative diseases that are classified as tauopathies, activation of the UPR coincides with the pathogenic accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau. Several lines of evidence indicate that UPR activation contributes to increased levels of phosphorylated tau, a prerequisite for the formation of tau aggregates. Increased understanding of the crosstalk between signaling pathways involved in protein quality control in the ERand tau phosphorylation will support the development of new therapeutic targets that promote neuronal survival.

Chemical and/or biological therapeutic strategies to ameliorate protein misfolding diseases

Derrick Sek Tong Ong and Jeffery W Kelly
Current Opin Cell Biol 2011; 23:231–238
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.ceb.2010.11.002

Inheriting a mutant misfolding-prone protein that cannot be efficiently folded in a given cell type(s) results in a spectrum of human loss-of-function misfolding diseases. The inability of the biological protein maturation pathways to adapt to a specific misfolding-prone protein also contributes to pathology. Chemical and biological therapeutic strategies are presented that restore protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, either by enhancing the biological capacity of the proteostasis network or through small molecule stabilization of a specific misfolding-prone protein. Herein, we review the recent literature on therapeutic strategies to ameliorate protein misfolding diseases that function through either of these mechanisms, or a combination thereof, and provide our perspective on the promise of alleviating protein misfolding diseases by taking advantage of proteostasis adaptation.

Vegan Diet is Sulfur Deficient and Heart Unhealthy

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013-11-17/larryhbern/Vegan Diet is Sulfur Deficient and Heart Unhealthy

The following is a reblog of “Heart of the Matter: Plant-Based Diets Lead to High Homocysteine, Low Sulfur and Marginal B12 Status”
Posted on September 26, 2011 by Dr Kaayla Daniel in WAPF Blog and tagged B12, Forks over Knives, Kaayla T. Daniel, Kilmer S. McCully, Yves Ingenbleek

It is a report of a scientific study carried out by Kilmer S. Cully and Yves Ingenbleek, Harvard Pathology and Univ Louis Pasteur.  I have previously written about the conundrum of transthyretin as an accurate marker of malnutrition, but also being lowered by the septic state.  This is accounted for by the catabolic state that sets off autocannabalization of skeletal muscle and lean body mass to provide gluconeogenic precursors to sustain life.  While serum albumin and transthyretin both decline, the former has a half-life of 20 days, while the latter is 48 hours.  Much work has been done to gain a better understand this rapid turnover protein that transports thyroxine, and the immediate result of the decline in concentration is a shift the the hormone protein binding equilibrium increasing the free thyroxine, a euthyroid hyperthyroid effect.  However, much work by Prof. Inglenbleek, some ion collaboration with Vernon Young, at MIT, showed that transthyretin reflects the sulfur stores of animals.  The sulfur to nitrogen ratio of plants is 1:20, but it is 1:12 in man, so the dietary intake would affect an omnivorous animal.  Recall that S is carried on amino acids that take part in disulfide linkage.  A deficiency in S containing amino acids would have a negative health effect.  The story is presented here.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that 16.7 million deaths occur worldwide each year due to cardiovascular disease, and more than half of those deaths occur in developing countries where plant-based diets high in legumes and starches are eaten by the vast majority of the people.

Yet “everyone knows” plant-based diets prevent heart disease.  Indeed this myth  is repeated so often that massive numbers of educated, health-conscious individuals in first world countries are consciously adopting third world style diets in the hope of preventing disease, optimizing health and maximizing longevity.   But if the WHO statistics are correct, plant-based diets might not be protective at all.   And today’s fashionable experiment in veganism could end very badly indeed.

A study out August 26 in the journal Nutrition makes a strong case against plant-based diets for prevention of heart disease.  The title alone  –  “Vegetarianism produces subclinical malnutrition, hyperhomocysteinemia and atherogenesis” — sounds a significant warning.   The article establishes  why subjects who eat mostly vegetarian diets develop morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease unrelated to vitamin B status and Framingham criteria.

Co-author Kilmer S. McCully, MD, “Father of the Homocysteine Theory of Heart Disease,” is familiar to WAPF members as winner of the Linus Pauling Award, WAPF’s Integrity in Science Award, and author of numerous articles published in peer-reviewed journals as well as the popular books The Homocysteine Revolution and The Heart Revolution.   In 2009 Dr. McCully was one of the signers of the Weston A. Price Foundation’s petition to the FDA in which we asked the agency to retract its unwarranted 1999 soy/heart disease health claim.  (http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/soy-heart-health-claim)

Dr. McCully teamed up with Yves Ingenbleek, MD, of the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg, France, which funded the research.   Dr. Ingenbleek is well known for his work on malnutrition, the essential role of sulfur to nitrogen, and sulfur deficiency as a cause of  hyperhomocysteinemia.

The study took place in Chad, and involved 24 rural male subjects age 18 to 30, and 15 urban male controls, age 18-29.   (Women in this region of Chad could not be studied because of their animistic beliefs and proscriptions against collecting their urine.)

The rural men were apparently healthy, physically active farmers with good lipid profiles.  Their staple foods included cassava, sweet potatoes, beans, millet and ground nuts.   Cassava leaves, cabbages and carrots provided good levels of carotenes, folates and pyridoxine (B6).  The diet is plant-based there because of a shortage of grazing lands and livestock, but subjects occasionally consume  some B12-containing foods, mostly poultry and eggs, though very little dairy or meat.   Their diet could be described as high carb, high fiber,  low in both protein and fat, and low in the sulfur containing amino acids.    In brief, the very diet recommended by many of today’s nutritional “experts” for overall good health and heart disease prevention.

The urban controls were likewise healthy and ate a similar diet, but with beef, smoked fish and canned or powdered milk regularly on the menus.  Their diet was thus higher in protein, fat and the sulfur-containing amino acids though roughly equivalent in calories.

Dr. McCully’s research over the past 40 years on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has shown the role of homocysteine in free radical damage and the protective effect of  vitamins B6, B12 and folate.   Indeed, many doctors today recommend taking this trio of B vitamins as an inexpensive heart disease “insurance policy.”

In Chad, both groups showed adequate levels of B6 and folate.  The B12 levels of the vegetarian group were lower, but the difference was only of “borderline significance.”   However, as the researchers point out, ”A previous study undertaken in the same Chadian area in a larger group of 60 rural participants did demonstrate a weak inverse correlation between B12 and homocysteine concentrations in the 20 subjects most severely protein depleted .  .  .  It is therefore likely that the hyperhomocysteinemia status of some of our rural subjects in the present survey might have resulted from combined B12 and protein deficiencies.   The correlation of B12 deficiency with hyperhomocysteinemia could well reach statistical significance if a larger groups of subjects were studied.”

Clearly it’s wise for people on plant-based diets to supplement their diets with B12, but protein malnutrition must also be addressed.   And the issue is not just getting enough protein to eat, but the right kind.   Quality, not just quantity.   The bottom line is we must eat  protein rich in bioavailable, sulfur-containing amino acids — and that means animal products.   (Vegans at this point will surely claim the issue is insufficient protein and trot out soy as the solution.   Soy is indeed a  complete plant based protein, but notoriously low in methionine.  It does contain decent levels of cysteine, but the cysteine is bound up in protease inhibitors, making it largely  biounavailable. (For more information, read  my book The Whole Soy Story: The Dark Side of America’s Favorite Health Food, endorsed by Dr. McCully, as well as our petition to the FDA noted above.)

So what did  Drs. Ingenbleek and  McCully find among the study group of protein-deficient people?   Higher levels of homocysteine, of course.  Also significant alterations in body composition,  lean body mass, body mass index and plasma transthyretin levels.  In plain English, the near-vegetarian subjects were thinner, with poorer muscle tone and showed subclinical signs of protein malnutrition.   (So much for popular ideas of extreme thinness being healthy. )

The plant-based diet of the study group was low in all of the sulfur-containing amino acids.   As would be expected, labwork on these men showed lower plasma cysteine and glutathione levels compared to the controls.  Methionine levels, however,  tested comparably.   The explanation for this is  “adaptive response.”   In brief, mammals trying to function with insufficient sulfur-containing amino acids will do whatever’s necessary to survive.   Given the essential role of methionine in metabolic processes, that means deregulating the transsulfuration pathway, increasing homocysteine levels, and methylating homocysteine to make methionine.

Ultimately, it all boils down to our need for sulfur.   As Stephanie Seneff, PhD, and many others have written in Wise Traditions and on this website, sulfur is vital for disease prevention and maintenance of good health.   In terms of heart disease, Drs. Ingenbleek and McCully have shown sulfur deficiency not only leads to high homocysteine levels, but is the likeliest reason some clinical trials using B6, B12 and folate interventions have proved ineffective for the prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.    Over the past few years, headlines from such studies have led to widespread dismissal of Dr. McCully’s  “Homocysteine Theory of Heart Disease” and renewed media focus on cholesterol, c-reactive protein and other possible culprits that can be treated by statins and other profitable drugs.   In contrast, Drs. McCully and Ingenbleek research suggests we can better prevent heart disease with three inexpensive B vitamins and traditional diets rich in the sulfur-containing amino acids found in animal foods.

In the blaze of publicity surrounding Forks Over Knives and other blasts of vegan propaganda, few people are likely to hear about this study.   That’s sad, for it provides an important missing piece in our knowledge of heart disease development, a strong argument against the plant-based fad, and a bright new chapter in what the New York Times has called “The Fall and Rise of Kilmer McCully.”

*  *  *  *  *

Thanks to Sylvia Onusic PhD who was able to access a full text copy of this article to share with  me.

This entry was posted in WAPF Blog and tagged B12, Forks over Knives, Kaayla T. Daniel, Kilmer S. McCully, Naughty Nutritionist, soy, sulfur, Yves Ingenbleek. Bookmark the permalink.

Food Insecurity in Africa and GMOs

Reporter and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/13/food-insecurity-in-africa-and-gmos/

In the GMO-free future, farming still looks pretty much the same. Without insect-resistant crops, farmers spray more broad-spectrum insecticides, which do some collateral damage to surrounding food webs. Without herbicide-resistant crops, farmers spray less glyphosate, which slows the spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds and perhaps leads to healthier soil biota. Farmers also till their fields more often, which kills soil biota, and releases a lot more greenhouse gases.

The banning of GMOs hasn’t led to a transformation of agriculture because GM seed was never a linchpin supporting the conventional food system: Farmers could always do fine without it. Eaters no longer worry about the small potential threat of GMO health hazards, but they are subject to new risks: GMOs were neither the first, nor have they been the last, agricultural innovation, and each of these technologies comes with its own potential hazards. Plant scientists will have increased their use of mutagenesis and epigenetic manipulation, perhaps. We no longer have biotech patents, but we still have traditional seed-breeding patents. Life goes on.

In the other alternate future, where the pro-GMO side wins, we see less insecticide, more herbicide, and less tillage. In this world, with regulations lifted, a surge of small business and garage-biotechnologists got to work on creative solutions for the problems of agriculture.

Genetic engineering is just one tool in the tinkerer’s belt. Newer tools are already available, and scientists continue to make breakthroughs with traditional breeding. So in this future, a few more genetically engineered plants and animals get their chance to compete. Some make the world a little better, while others cause unexpected problems. But the science has moved beyond basic genetic engineering, and most of the risks and benefits of progress are coming from other technologies. Life goes on.

In many ways he’s right. GMOs on the market today – and most of the ones planned – are about making agriculture more efficient and profitable for farmers and seed providers. This is not a trivial thing, but would global agriculture collapse without these GMOs? Of course not.

We rarely see transformative technologies coming. And remember that we are still in the very early days of genetic engineering of crops and animals. I suspect that you could go back and look at the early days of almost any new technology and convincingly downplay its transformative potential.

Metabolomics, Metabonomics and Functional Nutrition: the next step in nutritional metabolism and biotherapeutics

Reviewer, Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/22/metabolomics-metabonomics-and-functional-nutrition-the-next-step-in-nutritional-metabolism-and-biotherapeutics/

The new era of nutrition research translates empirical knowledge to evidence-based molecular science (9). Modern nutrition research focuses on

  • promoting health,
  • preventing or delaying the onset of disease,
  • optimizing performance, and
  • assessing risk.

Personalized nutrition is a conceptual analogue to personalized medicine and means adapting food to individual needs. Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics

  • build the science foundation for understanding human variability in
  • preferences, requirements, and responses to diet and
  • may become the future tools for consumer assessment

motivated by personalized nutritional counseling for health maintenance and disease prevention.

The primary aim of ―omic‖ technologies is

  • the non-targeted identification of all gene products (transcripts, proteins, and metabolites) present in a specific biological sample.

By their nature, these technologies reveal unexpected properties of biological systems.

A second and more challenging aspect of ―omic‖ technologies is

  • the refined analysis of quantitative dynamics in biological systems (10).

For metabolomics, gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry are well suited for coping with

  • high sample numbers in reliable measurement times with respect to
  • both technical accuracy and the identification and quantitation of small-molecular-weight metabolites.

This potential is a prerequisite for the analysis of dynamic systems. Thus, metabolomics is a key technology for systems biology.

In modern nutrition research, mass spectrometry has developed into a tool

  • to assess health, sensory as well as quality and safety aspects of food.

In this review, we focus on health-related benefits of food components and, accordingly,

  • on biomarkers of exposure (bioavailability) and bioefficacy.

Current nutrition research focuses on unraveling the link between

  • dietary patterns,
  • individual foods or
  • food constituents and

the physiological effects at cellular, tissue and whole body level

  • after acute and chronic uptake.

The bioavailability of bioactive food constituents as well as dose-effectcorrelations are key information to understand

  • the impact of food on defined health outcomes.

Both strongly depend on appropriate analytical tools

  • to identify and quantify minute amounts of individual compounds in highly complex matrices–food or biological fluids–and
  • to monitor molecular changes in the body in a highly specific and sensitive manner.

Based on these requirements,

  • mass spectrometry has become the analytical method of choice
  • with broad applications throughout all areas of nutrition research (11).

Read Full Post »


The good, the bad and the ugly of sulfur and volcanic activity

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Climate change deniers have promulgated much ignorance about the planet and our life on earth.  Nevertheless, I shall deal with geophysical and geochemical issues and indirectly, climate change in this portion of the discussion.  The good, the bad, and the ugly has everything to due with the elements and to life on earth.  This is the case, regardless of claims propagated by the tobacco and the carbon fuels interests.  I shall proceed as I have done in the previous discussions.

Is a Lack of Water to Blame for the Conflict in Syria?

A 2006 drought pushed Syrian farmers to migrate to urban centers, setting the stage for massive uprisings

By Joshua Hammer

SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/is-a-lack-of-water-to-blame-for-the-conflict-in-syria-72513729

 

An Iraqi girl stands on former marshland, drained in the 1990s because of politically motivated water policies. (Essam Al-Sudani / AFP / Getty Images)
http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/Scare-Tactics-Iraqi-girl-631.jpg__800x600_q85_crop.jpg

The world’s earliest documented water war happened 4,500 years ago, when the armies of Lagash and Umma, city-states near the junction of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, battled with spears and chariots after Umma’s king drained an irrigation canal leading from the Tigris. “Enannatum, ruler of Lagash, went into battle,” reads an account carved into an ancient stone cylinder, and “left behind 60 soldiers [dead] on the bank of the canal.”

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Water loss documented by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), a pair of satellites operated by NASA and Germany’s aerospace center, suggests water-related conflict could be brewing on the riverbank again. GRACE measured groundwater usage between 2003 and 2009 and found that the Tigris-Euphrates Basin—comprising Turkey, Syria, Iraq and western Iran—is losing water faster than any other place in the world except northern India . During those six years, 117 million acre-feet of stored freshwater vanished from the region as a result of dwindling rainfall and poor water management policies. That’s equal to all the water in the Dead Sea. GRACE’s director, Jay Famiglietti, a hydrologist at the University of California, Irvine, calls the data “alarming.”

While the scientists captured dropping water levels, political experts have observed rising tensions. In Iraq, the absence of a strong government since 2003, drought and shrinking aquifers have led to a recent spate of assassinations of irrigation department officials and clashes between rural clans. Some experts say that these local feuds could escalate into full-scale armed conflicts .

In Syria, a devastating drought beginning in 2006 forced many farmers to abandon their fields and migrate to urban centers. There’s some evidence that the migration fueled the civil war there, in which 80,000 people have died. “You had a lot of angry, unemployed men helping to trigger a revolution,” says Aaron Wolf, a water management expert at Oregon State University, who frequently visits the Middle East.

Tensions between nations are also high. Since 1975, Turkey’s dam and hydro­power construction has cut water flow to Iraq by 80 percent and to Syria by 40 percent. Syria and Iraq have accused Turkey of hoarding water.

Hydrologists say that the countries need to find alternatives to sucking the aquifers dry—perhaps recycling wastewater or introducing desalination—and develop equitable ways of sharing their rivers. “Water doesn’t know political boundaries. People have to get together and work,” Famiglietti says. One example lies nearby, in an area not known for cross-border cooperation. Israeli and Jordanian officials met last year for the first time in two decades to discuss rehabilitating the nearly dry Jordan River, and Israel has agreed to release freshwater down the river.

“It could be a model” for the Tigris-Euphrates region, says Gidon Bromberg, a co-director of Friends of the Earth Middle East, who helped get the countries together. Wolf, too, remains optimistic, noting that stress can encourage compromise.

History might suggest a way: The world’s first international water treaty, a cuneiform tablet now hanging in the Louvre, ended the war between Lagash and Umma.

 

http://static.guim.co.uk/ni/1404220722088/Iraq_water_dams.svg

“Rebel forces are targeting water installations to cut off supplies to the largely Shia south of Iraq,” says Matthew Machowski, a Middle East security researcher at the UK houses of parliament and Queen Mary University of London.

“It is already being used as an instrument of war by all sides. One could claim that controlling water resources in Iraq is even more important than controlling the oil refineries, especially in summer. Control of the water supply is fundamentally important. Cut it off and you create great sanitation and health crises,” he said

Isis now controls the Samarra barrage west of Baghdad on the River Tigris and areas around the giant Mosul Dam, higher up on the same river. Because much of Kurdistan depends on the dam, it is strongly defended by Kurdish peshmerga forces and is unlikely to fall without a fierce fight, says Machowski.

Iraqi troops were rushed to defend the massive 8km-long Haditha Dam and its hydroelectrical works on the Euphrates to stop it falling into the hands of Isis forces. Were the dam to fall, say analysts, Isis would control much of Iraq’s electricity and the rebels might fatally tighten their grip on Baghdad.

Isis fighters in Fallujah captured the smaller Nuaimiyah Dam on the Euphrates and deliberately diverted its water to “drown” government forces in the surrounding area. Millions of people in the cities of Karbala, Najaf, Babylon and Nasiriyah had their water cut off but the town of Abu Ghraib was catastrophically flooded along with farms and villages over 200 square miles. According to the UN, around 12,000 families lost their homes.

Earlier, Kurdish forces reportedly diverted water supplies from the Mosul Dam. Equally, Turkey has been accused of reducing flows to the giant Lake Assad, Syria’s largest body of fresh water, to cut off supplies to Aleppo, and Isis forces have reportedly targeted water supplies in the refugee camps set up for internally displaced people.

Iraqis fled from Mosul after Isis cut off power and water and only returned when they were restored, says Machowski. “When they restored water supplies to Mosul, the Sunnis saw it as liberation. Control of water resources in the Mosul area is one reason why people returned,” said Machowski.

Both Isis forces and President Assad’s army are said to have used water tactics to control the city of Aleppo. The Tishrin Dam on the Euphrates, 60 miles east of the city, was captured by Isis in November 2012.

“The deliberate targeting of water supply networks … is now a daily occurrence in the conflict. The water pumping station in Al-Khafsah, Aleppo, stopped working on 10 May, cutting off water supply to half of the city.

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/static/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2014/7/2/1404300629581/

A satellite view showing the two main rivers running from Turkey through Syria and Iraq. Credits: MODIS/NASA

The Euphrates River, the Middle East’s second longest river, and the Tigris, have historically been at the centre of conflict. In the 1980s, Saddam Hussein drained 90% of the vast Mesopotamian marshes that were fed by the two rivers to punish the Shias who rose up against his regime. Since 1975, Turkey’s dam and hydropower constructions on the two rivers have cut water flow to Iraq by 80% and to Syria by 40%. Both Syria and Iraq have accused Turkey of hoarding water and threatening their water supply.

http://www.irinnews.org/photo/

The Barada River, shown here in Damascus, is the only notable river flowing entirely within Syrian territory. The city’s water supplies are under huge strain

DAMASCUS, 25 March 2010 (IRIN) – Poor planning and management, wasteful irrigation systems, intensive wheat and cotton farming and a rapidly growing population are straining water resources in Syria in a year which has seen unprecedented internal displacement as a result of drought in eastern and northeastern parts of the country.

In 2007 Syria consumed 19.2 billion cubic metres of water – 3.5 billion more than the amount of water replenished naturally, with the deficit coming from groundwater and reservoirs, according to the Ministry of Irrigation.

Agriculture accounts for almost 90 percent of the country’s water consumption, according to government and private sector.

Agricultural policies encourage water-hungry wheat and cotton cultivation, and inefficient irrigation methods mean much water is wasted.

 

South Asia is a desperately water-insecure region, and India’s shortages are part of a wider continental crisis. According to a recent report authored by UN climate scientists, coastal areas in Asia will be among the worst affected by climate change. Hundreds of millions of people across East, Southeast and South Asia, the report concluded, will be affected by flooding, droughts, famine, increases in the costs of food and energy, and rising sea levels.

Groundwater serves as a vital buffer against the volatility of monsoon rains, and India’s falling water table therefore threatens catastrophe. 60 percent of north India’s irrigated agriculture is dependent on ground water, as is 85 percent of the region’s drinking water. The World Bank predicts that India only has 20 years before its aquifers will reach “critical condition” – when demand for water will outstrip supply – an eventuality that will devastate the region’s food security, economic growth and livelihoods.

Analysts fear that growing competition for rapidly dwindling natural resources will trigger inter-state or intra-state conflict. China and India continue to draw on water sources that supply the wider region, and a particularly concerning flashpoint is the Indus River Valley basin that spans India and Pakistan. The river’s waters are vital to the economies of areas on both sides of the border and a long-standing treaty, agreed by Pakistan and India in 1960, governs rights of access. But during the “dry season,” between October and March, water levels fall to less than half of those seen during the remainder of the year. The fear is that cooperation over access to the Indus River will fray as shortages become more desperate.

http://cdn1.pri.org/sites/default/files/styles/story_main/public/story/images/IMG_5937.jpeg

Farm worker heading for the paddy fields at Gubinder Singh’s farm

The Indo-Gangetic Basin, which lies at the foothills of the Himalayas, is one of the areas in the world facing a huge water crisis.  The Basin spans from Pakistan, across Northern India into Bangladesh. Apart from runoff from mountainous streams and glaciers, it also holds one of the largest underground bodies of water in the world. But it’s also in one of the most populous regions of the world, with more than a billion people living on the subcontinent.  Still, parts of the region are well-resourced when it comes to water supplies – like the Indian state of Punjab, which has three rivers running through it and a network of canals in some parts.

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NASA Satellites Unlock Secret to Northern India’s Vanishing Water

08.12.09

 

NASA Hydrologist Matt Rodell discusses vanishing groundwater in India. Credit:NASA
› Watch Video

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html

 

soil moisture belt

soil moisture belt

 

Groundwater resides beneath the soil surface in permeable rock, clay and sand as illustrated in this conceptual image. Many aquifers extend hundreds of feet underground and in some instances have filled with water over the course of thousands of years. Credit: NASA
http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/378067main_water_table%20illus_226.jpg

groundwater withdrawals as a percentage of groundwater recharge

groundwater withdrawals as a percentage of groundwater recharge

 

 

The map, showing groundwater withdrawals as a percentage of groundwater recharge, is based on state-level estimates of annual withdrawals and recharge reported by India’s Ministry of Water Resources. The three states included in this study are labeled. Credit:NASA/Matt Rodell

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/378381main_MattRodell_vid_226.jpg

The averaging function (spatial weighting) used to estimate terrestrial water storage changes from GRACE data is mapped. Warmer colors indicate greater sensitivity to terrestrial water storage changes. Credit: NASA/Matt Rodell

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/378067main_water_table%20illus_226.jpg

Beneath northern India’s irrigated fields of wheat, rice, and barley … beneath its densely populated cities of Jaiphur and New Delhi, the groundwater has been disappearing. Halfway around the world, hydrologists, including Matt Rodell of NASA, have been hunting for it.

Where is northern India’s underground water supply going? According to Rodell and colleagues, it is being pumped and consumed by human activities — principally to irrigate cropland — faster than the aquifers can be replenished by natural processes. They based their conclusions — published in the August 20 issue of Nature — on observations from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE).

“If measures are not taken to ensure sustainable groundwater usage, consequences for the 114 million residents of the region may include a collapse of agricultural output and severe shortages of potable water,” said Rodell, who is based at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

 

https://www.quora.com/Why-are-there-no-earthquakes-or-volcanos-in-the-Himalayas

The Himalayas are representative of a modern and active mountain-building event, called anorogeny in geologic parlance. Both the Himalayas and the Cascade Range are the result of plate-to-plate collision in the Theory of Plate Tectonics.
The difference between the Himalayas and the Cascade Range volcanoes is based on density of the lithospheric plates. Yes. The Cascade Range is caused by subduction of more dense ocean crust into and underneath lighter, lower density continental crust. As the oceanic plate dives deeper and deeper, the ocean crust warms, melts, and rises upward through the overriding continental crust “inland” from the plate collision boundary. As that molten rock punches through the continental crust, a curvilinear series of volcanoes, generally parallel to the plate collision boundary, begins to form.

Cascade Range Subduction

Cascade Range Subduction

 

Cascade Range Subduction from J. Wiley & Sons – 2010
In the case of the Cascade Range, the name of this type of volcanic formation is unique in process, as well as geochemistry, and has been referred to as an Andesitic-type after the Andes Mountains. Regardless, the Cascade Range is comprised of intermediate igneous rocks, with a fairly high silica content. High silica makes for high siliceous acid. That creates “sticky” igneous extrusions that often have quite dramatic eruptions [May 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption].

 

Igneous Rock Classification

Igneous Rock Classification

Igneous Rock Classification Chart – Public Domain

The Himalayas are also a plate-to-plate collision tectonic boundary. In this case, the Indian Plate [of the Indian Subcontinent] is colliding head-on with the Eurasian Plate. Both plates are comprised of continental lithospheric crust, so there is no appreciable distinction in density. Both have a density of approximately 2.7 g/cm³. This as opposed to ocean crust with a mean density of 3.3 g/cm³. The plates try to compete in the plate-to-plate collision but the equal densities of the two plates cannot push one under the other very deep like that in a subduction zone.  The result is large-scale thickening of the continental crust in the region at and surrounding the collision boundary. Other processes occurring in the Himalayas region associated with the orogeny are metamorphism, thrust [compression] faulting, and plateau uplift.

Depiction of Himalayan Collision

Depiction of Himalayan Collision

Generalized Depiction of Himalayan Collision from FHSU – 2010
A perfect analogy is two trucks of the same make and model colliding head-on. The Himalayan Orogeny is the oft mentioned “crumple zone”. Metal does not deform in a brittle sense like competent rock does, so don’t confuse that too much.

With all that being said, there are tremendous temperatures attained at a continental plate-to-plate collision boundary. However, the crust is simply too thick, and too “squashed together” to allow anything to squeeze up and break through to the surface as volcanic eruptions.
References:

FHSU,  2010.  Image of Himalayan Collision.  Fort Hays State University.  Hays, Kansas.  2010.
Wiley & Sons, J.,  2010.  Image of Cascade Range Subduction Zone.  J. Wiley & Sons.  Hoboken, New Jersey.  2010.

 

Mt. Everest was formed (is forming) by two tectonic plates colliding–the Indo-Australian Plate and the Eurasian plate.

Sometimes, when two tectonic plates collide, volcanoes form (such as the Juan de Fuca plate and the North American Plate forming the Cascades). However, this has to do with one plate–in this case the Juan de Fuca Plate sliding or subducting beneath another–the North American Plate. This happens because the oceanic plate (the Juan de Fuca Plate) is more dense than than the continental plate (the NA Plate). For reasons I won’t get into here, magma forms between the two plates as one subducts beneath the other and volcanoes are formed.

Mt. Everest is formed by two continental plates colliding. Continental plates are generally too buoyant to subduct beneath each other. While some subduction occurred during this collision, most of what happened was crustal shortening. Think about what happens when you have a rug on a wood floor and push two ends toward each other. It buckles and folds up in itself. This is a simplified version of what happened in the Himalaya.

Because little to no subduction is occurring, no magma is forming and Mt. Everest will not become a volcano.

The Himalayas were created by two continental plates colliding. What happens when two masses of rocks with some similarities, like in density, collide? Both of them rise. There is a lot of heat produced. However, there isn’t enough heat to melt rocks completely. For there to be a volcano, there has to be a source of molten rock.

This material can occur if the two masses of rocks have vastly different densities. In this case, the heavier mass will slide above the other. The mass on the bottom will melt. This molten rock material will rise and create a volcano. or two or more. This, however can not happen in the HImalayas. The two masses in action are the Indian Plate and the Eurasian Plate, which have similar rock density.

 

Volcanic Eruptions and the Role of Sulfur Dioxide in Climate Change

In March and April of this year, a series of severe volcanic eruptions shook Alaska’s Mount Redoubt.1  To date, the largest of the eruptions produced an ash plume that reached 50,000 feet above sea level and released a significant amount of sulfur dioxide (CAS Registry Number® 7446-09-5) into the earth’s atmosphere.  According to the Alaska Volcano Observatory, “The main concerns for human health in volcanic haze consist of ash, sulfur dioxide gas (SO2), and sulfuric acid droplets (H2SO4), which forms when volcanic SO2 oxidizes in the atmosphere.”1

While there is obvious reason for alarm among local populations, sulfur dioxide from the Mount Redoubt eruption could also have more widespread impacts, particularly on the climate.  According to a 1997 article published in the Journal of Geology, “The mechanism by which large eruptions affect climate is generally accepted: injection of sulfur into the stratosphere and conversion to sulfate aerosol, which in turn reduces the solar energy reaching the earth’s surface.”2

In the years following a volcanic eruption, sulfate aerosol that remains in the atmosphere is thought to cause surface cooling by reflecting the sun’s energy back into space.  In fact, sulfate aerosol from the massive eruption of Indonesia’s Mount Tambora in 1815 is blamed, at least in part, for the “year without a summer” reported in Europe and North America in 1816:

  • “Daily temperatures (especially the daily minimums) were in many cases abnormally low from late spring through early fall; frequent northwest winds brought snow and frost to northern New England and Canada, and heavy rains fell in western Europe.  Many crops failed to ripen, and the poor harvests led to famine, disease, and social distress…”3

Supporting this claim, sulfate aerosol-related climate changes were also reported after the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines.4  An article published inScience in 2002 summarizes a decade’s worth of research on Pinatubo’s effects on the global climate, highlighting impacts far more widespread and complex than previously thought:

You can use SciFinder® or STN® to search the CAS databases for additional information about sulfur dioxide from volcanic eruptions.  If your organization is enabled to use the web version of SciFinder, you can click the links in this article to directly access details of the substances and references.

 

Volcanic ash vs sulfur aerosols

The primary role of volcanic sulfur aerosols in causing short-term changes in the world’s climate following some eruptions, instead of volcanic ash, was hypothesized by scientists in the early 1980’s. They based their hypothesis on the effects of several explosive eruptions in Indonesia and the world’s largest historical effusive eruption in Iceland.

Scientists studied three historical explosive eruptions of different sizes in Indonesia–Tambora (1815), Krakatau (1883), and Agung (1963). They noted that decreases in surface temperatures after the eruptions were of similar magnitude (0.18-1.3 °C). The amount of material injected into the stratosphere, however, differed greatly. By comparing the estimated amount of ash vs. sulfur injected into the stratosphere by each eruption, it was suggested that the longer residence time of sulfate aerosols, not the ash particles which fall out within a few months of an eruption, was the paramount controlling factor (Rampino and Self, 1982).

In contrast to these explosive eruptions, one of the most severe volcano-related climate effects in historical times was associated with a largely nonexplosive eruption that produced very little ash–the 1783 eruption of Laki crater-row in Iceland. The eruption lasted 8-9 months and extruded about 12.3 km3 of basaltic lava over an area of 565 km2. A bluish haze of sulfur aerosols all over Iceland destroyed most summer crops in the country; the crop failure led to the loss of 75% of all livestock and the deaths of 24% of the population (H. Sigurdsson, 1982). The bluish haze drifted east across Europe during the 1783-1784 winter, which was unusually severe.

Clearly, these examples suggested that the explosivity of an eruption and the amount of ash injected into the stratosphere are not the main factors in causing a change in Earth’s climate. Instead, scientists concluded that it must be the amount of sulfur in the erupting magma.

The eruption of El Chichon, Mexico, in 1982 conclusively demonstrated this idea was correct. The explosive eruption injected at least 8 Mt of sulfur aerosols into the atmosphere, and it was followed by a measureable cooling of parts of the Earth’s surface and a warming of the upper atmosphere. A similar-sized eruption at Mount St. Helens in 1980, however, injected only about 1 Mt of sulfur aerosols into the stratosphere. The eruption of Mount St. Helens injected much less sulfur into the atmosphere–it did not result in a noticeable cooling of the Earth’s surface. The newly launched TOMS satellite (in 1978) made it possible to measure these differences in the eruption clouds. Such direct measurements of the eruption clouds combined with surface temperatures make it possible to study the corrleation between volcanic sulfur aerosols (instead of ash) and temporary changes in the world’s climate after some volcanic eruptions.

 

Hazards Of Volcanic Ash

A multitude of dangerous particals and gases, such as aerosols, are carried in volcanic ash. Some of these include;

  • Carbon dioxide
  • Sulfates (sulfur dioxide)
  • Hydrochloric acid
  • Hydroflouric acid

These each have different but serious effects on human health if exposed, which will be discussed later.

In addition, volcanic ash can cause reduced visibility, and it is recommended that precautions are taken when driving.

Sources: Where Does It Come From?

Figure 1

volcanoes found all over the Earth, particularly at plate boundaries

volcanoes found all over the Earth, particularly at plate boundaries

There are volcanoes found all over the Earth, particularly at plate boundaries (see figure 1). This is due to the collision of plates, which causes uplift in the overlying crust. This uplift results in the formation of mountainous landforms; melting of the crust due to frictional heating is what creates magma, which can erupt out of these mountains when pressure gets too high.

Some of the most notable volcanic eruptions are:

  • the 1783 eruption of Mt. Laki in Iceland
    • released clouds of poisonous flourine and sulfur dioxide which killed off about 50% of the livestock population
    • that summer in Great Britain was known as “sand-summer” due to ash carried over the Atlantic
    • poisonous clouds spread over Europe, and a buildup of aerosols caused a cooling effect in the entire Northern Hemisphere
  • the 1815 eruption of Mt. Tambora in Indonesia
    • gas releases caused the Stratosphere to change drastically
    • noxious ash and poisoned rain clouds killed off vegetation
  • the 1902 eruption of Mt. Pelee in Martinique
    • spewed toxic clouds traveling at speeds of 600mph
    • largest eruption in the 20th century

For further information on volcanoes around the world, visit http://www.mapsofworld.com/major-volcanoes.htm.

http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/webprojects2003/silvester/Page6Famous.htm

 

  • EEA-33 emissions of sulphur oxides (SOX) have decreased by 74% between 1990 and 2011. In 2011, the most significant sectoral source of SOX emissions was ‘Energy production and distribution’ (58% of total emissions), followed by emissions occurring from ‘Energy use in industry’ (20%) and in the ‘Commercial, institutional and households’ (15%) sector.
  • The reduction in emissions since 1990 has been achieved as a result of a combination of measures, including fuel-switching in energy-related sectors away from high-sulphur solid and liquid fuels to low-sulphur fuels such as natural gas, the fitting of flue gas desulphurisation abatement technology in industrial facilities and the impact of European Union directives relating to the sulphur content of certain liquid fuels.
  • All of the EU-28 Member States have reduced their national SOX emissions below the level of the 2010 emission ceilings set in the National Emission Ceilings Directive (NECD)[1]. Emissions in 2011 for the three EEA countries having emission ceilings set under the UNECE/CLRTAP Gothenburg protocol (Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland) were also below the level of their respective 2010 ceilings.
  • Environmental context: Typically, sulphur dioxide is emitted when fuels or other materials containing sulphur are combusted or oxidised. It is a pollutant that contributes to acid deposition, which, in turn, can lead to changes in soil and water quality. The subsequent impacts of acid deposition can be significant, including adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems in rivers and lakes and damage to forests, crops and other vegetation. SO2 emissions also aggravate asthma conditions and can reduce lung function and inflame the respiratory tract. They also contribute, as a secondary particulate pollutant, to the formation of particulate matter in the atmosphere, an important air pollutant in terms of its adverse impact on human health. Furthermore, the formation of sulphate particles in the atmosphere following the release of SO2 results in reflection of solar radiation, which leads to net cooling of the atmosphere.
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Protein folding

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Innovation

Series E. 2; 4.8

Protein folding is the process by which a protein structure assumes its functional shape or conformation. It is the physical process by which a polypeptide folds into its characteristic and functional three-dimensional structure from random coil.

The importance of protein folding

Joachim Pietzsch

Proteins are the biological workhorses that carry out vital functions in every cell. To carry out their task, proteins must fold into a complex three-dimensional structure, but what tells a protein which shape it should be and how does it achieve this?

Of all the molecules found in living organisms, proteins are the most important. They are used to support the skeleton, control senses, move muscles, digest food, defend against infections and process emotions. Proteins come in all shapes and sizes (Fig. 1)

  • they can be round (like haemoglobin), long (like collagen), strong (like spectrin c which protects erythrocytes (the cells that carry oxygen from the lungs to our tissues) from the powerful shearing forces they’re exposed to), or elastic (like titin, which controls muscle stretching and contraction). The name protein is derived from the Greek word prôtos, meaning – primary, or first rank of importance, and with good reason.

These are the most abundant component within a cell, more than half the dry weight of a cell is made up of proteins, and they have a range of indispensable roles; for example, enzymes, the biocatalysts that carry out crucial biochemical reactions in every cell that would otherwise be too slow to sustain life.

What is remarkable is that the more than 100,000 proteins in our bodies are produced from a set of only 20 building blocks, known as amino acids. All amino acids have the same basic structure, an amino group, a carboxyl group and a hydrogen atom, but differ due to the presence of a side-chain (known as R; (Fig. 2)). This side-chain varies dramatically between amino acids, from a simple hydrogen atom in the amino acid glycine to a complex structure found in tryptophan. Depending on the nature of the side-chain, an amino acid can be hydrophilic (water-attracting) or hydrophobic (water-repelling), acidic or basic; and it is this diversity in side-chain properties that gives each protein its specific character.

Creating a functional protein

The sequence of amino acids in a protein defines its primary structure. The blueprint for each amino acid is laid down by sets of three letters known as base triplets that are found in the coding regions of genes. These base triplets are recognized by ribosomes, the protein building sites of the cell, which create and successively join the amino acids together. This is a remarkably quick process: a protein of 300 amino acids will be made in little more than a minute.

The result is a linear chain of amino acids, but this only becomes a functional protein when it folds into its three-dimensional (tertiary structure) form. This occurs through an intermediate form, known as secondary structure, the most common of which are the rod-like a-helix and the plate-like b-pleated sheet (Fig. 3). These secondary structures are formed by a small number of amino acids that are close together, which then, in turn, interact, fold and coil to produce the tertiary structure that contains its functional regions (called domains).

Although it is possible to deduce the primary structure of a protein from a gene’s sequence, its tertiary structure cannot be determined (although it should become possible to make predictions when more tertiary sequences are submitted to databases). It can only be determined by complex experimental analyses and, at present, this information is only known for about 10% of proteins. It is therefore not yet known how an amino-acid chain folds into its tertiary structure in the short time scale (fractions of a second) that occurs in the cell. So, there is a huge gap in our knowledge of how we move from protein sequence to function in living organisms: the line of sight from the genetic blueprint for a protein to its biological function is blocked by the impenetrable jungle of protein folding, and some researchers believe that clearing this jungle is the most important task in biochemistry at present.

The quest to understand protein folding

One of the most important results in understanding the process of protein folding was a thought-provoking experiment that was carried out by Christian Anfinsen and colleagues in the early 1960s. They investigated a protein called ribonuclease, which they isolated from the pancreatic tissue of cattle. This enzyme, made up of 124 amino acids, cleaves any ribonucleic acid (RNA) that could be harmful to the cell, such as truncated RNA that would not make a fully operational protein. To do this, although this was not known in Anfinsen’s time, it briefly binds RNA in a binding site and requires several sulphur-containing amino-acid cysteine residues in the protein, which form bonds with each other (called disulphide bridges) and hold the protein structure together.

Ribonuclease can be denatured by adding certain chemicals or by heat. The disulphide bridges break and other forces of attraction between amino acids disappear, which makes the enzyme collapse into a tangled, useless ball. In various studies, Anfinsen showed that this denaturation process could be completely reversed by removing these denaturing chemicals or by lowering the temperature. The ribonuclease then folds back to its natural functional state on its own. So, Anfinsen concluded that the amino-acid sequence determines the shape of a protein, a finding for which Anfinsen received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1972.

But, if this is true, how do proteins find the right conformation out of the simply endless number of potential three-dimensional forms that it could randomly fold into? After all, the folding of a protein is not a chemical reaction, with a bond breaking here and a new one forming there. It is more like the weaving of an intertwined molecular pattern, the stability of which is defined by innumerable forces between atoms. Indeed, Cyrus Levinthal calculated in 1969 that finding the strongest attraction by simple trial and error would be impossible. He said that even if a protein only consisted of 100 amino acids and each of these flexible residues could only take on two different spatial orientations, the protein could theoretically adopt as many as 1030 possible conformations. Assuming a protein could try out 100 billion different conformations per second, it would still take 100 billion years to try all possibilities. So, Levinthal suggested that nature must have devised more effective methods to achieve this and postulated the existence of defined sets of folding pathways by which protein folding can take place rapidly.

However, we now know that such fixed protein folding pathways do not seem to exist. Various protein folding pathways that have been investigated experimentally and theoretically in recent years have thrown up interesting hypotheses, but have remained hard to prove in working models. In the case of proteins of less than 100 amino acids, only two levels of folding can be observed, the unfolded protein (which occurs in numerous forms) and the finished, folded, functional protein. For larger proteins, three steps can be observed. The intermediate is either a so-called molten globule, which is formed by a process called hydrophobic collapse (in which all hydrophobic side-chains suddenly slide inside the protein or clump together) or a structure in which the secondary structures of the protein are already fully formed. However, there is disagreement about whether these intermediates are formed en route to the correct folding pattern, or whether they represent structural cul-de-sacs.

Finding the energy to fold

As with all processes in nature, protein folding also needs energy, the process has to obey the laws of thermodynamics. A protein always folds so that it achieves the lowest possible energy, just as we always try to adopt the most comfortable position, in which we need to move about least, when going to sleep. It is thought that this is achieved by using an energy gradient or funnel along the path from the random tangle to the folded protein. Alan Fersht of Cambridge University used the following analogy to illustrate this model: if you blindfold a golfer and let him hit the ball in any direction he likes, the probability that he will hole the ball is almost infinitesimal. The same is true of a protein finding the right form by chance. However, if all parts of the golf course slope toward the hole, which is at the lowest point in the area, even a blindfolded golfer has a good chance of finding the hole. So, fixed reaction pathways are not necessary, as each protein seeks out its natural shape through a funnel of declining energy; it can take many folding routes and still reach its target of the completed tertiary structure.

A helping hand

This understanding of protein folding was obtained from computer models (in silico) or from experiments in the laboratory (in vitro) in which an individual protein was denatured to observe it folding back into its original form. But, the situation is considerably more complex in the living cell (in vivo). Although the fundamental energy rules also apply here, folding at least of large proteins rarely takes place spontaneously, as the ribosomes do not synthesize only one protein at a time. Instead, cells contain a vast number of proteins and other biomolecules at the extraordinarily high concentration of 340 grams per litre. Ordered protein folding in this cramped chaos is only possible under the supervision of specialized molecules, called chaperones, which accompany proteins and make sure that those that are being formed at the ribosomes do not clump together prematurely (Fig. 4). Chaperones do not merely oversee the folding of the protein, they also protect its tertiary structure in situations in which the cell is under stress; for example, elevated body temperature, so these chaperones have also been classified as heat-shock proteins (HSPs).

The HSP70s, so called because they have a molecular weight of 70 kilodaltons, are the most important class of chaperones. They bind to the developing protein chain and protect those parts of the newly formed protein that are particularly sensitive to premature reaction with the environment and therefore to malformation. When they let go of the new protein chain it is ready to fold. It is now taken over by a chaperonin, a molecule shaped like a double ring, which fits round the protein chain like a cylinder so that it can fold undisturbed inside (Fig. 4). Although the cylindrical folding cage opens every ~10 seconds, the protein only leaves the chaperonin when it has achieved its required form.

We now understand better than ever how protein folding, both in vitro and in vivo, takes place. And this, in turn, has given us a better understanding of the origin and course of diseases that are associated with defective protein folding. But why the normal folding of every protein always runs towards a predetermined goal and what this goal looks like, that is, what the instructions in the primary structure are that determine the correct tertiary structure is still a great mystery, even though the number of proposed models has dramatically increased. Computer simulations cannot yet solve the folding code that is hidden in the primary structure by simply calculating the molecular dynamics atom by atom, as to work through just 50 milliseconds of folding would take even the fastest computer around 30,000 years. Any realistic hope of cracking the folding code, such as to produce special designer proteins that evolution had not planned, is probably a very long way off. However, our improved understanding of the route that a protein must take from its synthesis to the correct folded form already enables us to contemplate better treatments or even cures for diseases in which proteins have departed from the correct folding route (see Treating protein folding diseases).

The Anfinsen Experiment in Protein Folding

http://sandwalk.blogspot.com/2007/02/anfinsen-experiment-in-protein-folding.html

Chaperones, which help proteins find their native, active conformation

Kazutoshi Mori and Peter Walter

PNAS 2014; 111(50): 17696–17697 http://dx.doi.org:/10.1073/pnas.1419343111

Kazutoshi Mori and Peter Walter

Albert Lasker
Basic Medical Research Award

For discoveries concerning the unfolded protein response — an intracellular quality control system that detects harmful misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and signals the nucleus to carry out corrective measures.

http://www.laskerfoundation.org/awards/2014_b_interview_mori.htm

Proteins that are secreted from the cell or inserted into the plasma membrane, transit through the endoplasmic reticulum where they are properly folded and assembled and may undergo post-translational modification. Walter tells the story of the exciting discovery made in his lab of the “unfolded protein response”, a feedback pathway that ensures that the cell makes enough ER to properly modify all the secreted proteins in the cell.

https://youtu.be/cvE6Kia0T9E

Kazutoshi Mori and Peter Walter
For discoveries concerning the unfolded protein response — an intracellular quality control system that detects harmful misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and signals the nucleus to carry out corrective measures.

The 2014 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award honors two scientists for their discoveries concerning the unfolded protein response, an intracellular quality-control system that detects harmful misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and signals the nucleus to carry out corrective measures. Kazutoshi Mori (Kyoto University) and Peter Walter (University of California, San Francisco) identified core components of this process and unveiled unexpected aspects of its mechanism.

Approximately one third of cellular proteins pass through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a netlike labyrinth of membrane-bound tubes and flattened sacs inside the cell. Work in the 1960s revealed that the ER sorts and transports proteins that are destined for export or the cell’s surface, and we now know that the ER allows cargo to pass only after applying stringent standards. In particular, proteins must assume correct three-dimensional shapes to perform their jobs, and the ER fosters this outcome. Furthermore, when unfolded proteins accumulate in this compartment, the cell bolsters the ER’s folding capacity. This phenomenon forms the linchpin of the unfolded protein response (UPR).

The first clues about this system’s existence emerged in the late 1970s, when researchers discovered that glucose starvation drives cells to boost production of particular proteins. Amy Lee (University of Southern California) reported in 1983 that the rise stems from an increase in the quantity of messenger RNA (mRNA) templates for these glucose-regulated proteins, or GRPs.

Three years later, Hugh Pelham (Medical Research Council, Cambridge) established that one of the GRPs, GRP78, resides in the ER and resembles a protein that prevents heat-damaged proteins from clumping. When glucose supplies drop, sugars that normally decorate some proteins are no longer available. Pelham proposed that the resulting sugar-deficient proteins stick together, perhaps because they misfold, and that GRP78, like its molecular relative, thwarts protein aggregation. Pelham also found that GRP78 was identical to another protein, BiP, that associates with partially assembled antibody molecules in the ER. In parallel, Mary-Jane Gething and Joseph Sambrook (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center) showed that BiP attaches to misfolded forms of a different protein in the ER.

These findings hinted that BiP helps proteins fold; if true, manufacture of BiP in response to unfolded proteins would serve a clear benefit. The connection between glucose starvation and folding remained murky, however, and the model relied on that link. In 1988, Gething and Sambrook established that misfolded protein rather than sugar-adornment defects sends the alert to ramp up BiP output.

In 1989, yeast BiP surfaced. Its quantities also climb in response to unfolded ER proteins. Mori joined Gething and Sambrook’s lab as a postdoctoral fellow, and the group identified a short series of DNA letters that abuts the BiP gene. This sequence spurs molecular machinery to copy, or transcribe, the BiP DNA into mRNA when unfolded proteins accumulate in the ER; the sequence, when placed next to a different gene, similarly turns on its transcription.

Together, these observations suggested that cells must somehow monitor the abundance of unfolded proteins in the ER and transmit that information to the nucleus, which houses the genes. These events spark production of BiP and other proteins that promote folding, which reverse the problem. But no one knew how the nuclear equipment senses the ER environment.

The complexity of Ire1
Independently, Mori, in Texas, and Walter, in San Francisco, placed the DNA stretch that Mori had uncovered next to a gene whose product makes a blue substance. When unfolded proteins accumulate in the ER and the engineered yeast cells send the usual signal to the nucleus, it stimulates not only typical UPR targets, but also the gene that turns the yeast blue. Yeast with defects in the UPR system would not change color, the researchers reasoned.

In 1993, the investigators used this scheme to isolate white yeast strains and thus tracked down the faulty genes whose normal versions presumably contribute to the UPR. One encodes a protein called Ire1.

Sequence analysis of Ire1 suggested that it is a kinase—an enzyme that adds phosphates to itself and/or other proteins. Additional work by Walter and Mori confirmed and extended this prediction. They found that Ire1 lies in the ER membrane with its kinase portion in the cytoplasm. In this orientation, the ER region could detect an unfolded protein signal and the other end could convey the message to cytoplasmic partners.

Mammalian kinases were well known to monitor environmental cues and, by adding phosphates to themselves or other molecules, trigger adaptive physiological changes. Perhaps, Mori and Walter reasoned, Ire1 would behave similarly.

To figure out how Ire1 delivers the unfolded-protein message, Walter and Mori (by then an independent investigator in Japan) set out to identify the presumptive courier that picks up the signal and carries it to the nucleus. They sought a protein that binds to the DNA sequences adjacent to UPR target genes and provokes transcription. The investigators captured the component they sought, a protein that previously had been named Hac1.

Their results, reported in 1996, contradicted expectation. In the simplest scenario, the theoretical protein to which Ire1 affixes a phosphate would be ready for action upon stimulation. Hac1, however, is not ready for anything; rather, it is manufactured only after the UPR alarm rings.

A crucial clue to explain this result came from the observation that the Hac1-encoding mRNA shrinks when unfolded proteins accumulate. Instead of adding a phosphate to another protein, Ire1 prompts removal of a chunk of Hac1’s mRNA. Additional work by Walter, which was confirmed and extended by Mori, established thatHAC1 precursor mRNA contains an internal stretch of 252 genetic letters that is eliminated to supply the blueprint for active Hac1.

A canonical molecular machine splices sequences from precursor mRNAs and operates in the nucleus. The plot thickened when Walter showed that this apparatus does not act on HAC1 mRNA. Instead, he found, the severed HAC1 mRNA is stitched together by a cytoplasmic enzyme—tRNA ligase—that normally joins the two components of a different type of RNA, transfer RNA.

The search was now on for an enzyme that excises the middle piece of the HAC1 precursor mRNA. Inspired by a related protein’s behavior, Walter showed that the cytoplasmic segment of Ire1, which contains the kinase and an additional stretch of protein, could cut HAC1 precursor mRNA at the expected sites. Then he demonstrated that the splicing reaction could occur in the test tube with only two enzymes: Ire1 cleaves the HAC1 precursor mRNA at both splice junctions, and the transfer RNA ligase sews them together.

Mammalian systems unfold
As these details of the yeast UPR were materializing, researchers were struggling to gain traction in the mammalian system. In 1998, Mori unearthed a sequence that was common only to genes that fire up in response to unfolded ER proteins. This element rouses several UPR target genes, he found. Furthermore, a human protein called ATF6 binds to this DNA motif and activates adjacent genes.

Mori noticed that an overabundance of unfolded proteins incites conversion of full-length ATF6 to a smaller version; the large form dwells in the ER, whereas the trimmed one resides in the nucleus. This and other work suggested that excess unfolded proteins trigger release of a portion of ER membrane-bound ATF6. The liberated fragment travels to the nucleus and activates transcription of UPR target genes.

While Mori was discovering and elucidating ATF6’s role in the UPR, David Ron (New York University School of Medicine) and Randal Kaufman (University of Michigan Medical Center) found mammalian versions of Ire1, which share fundamental functional features with their yeast cousin. Three years later, Mori and Ron identified the human and worm versions of yeast Hac1, a protein known as XBP1.

In the meantime, near the beginning of 1999, David Ron and Ron Wek (Indiana University School of Medicine) had independently uncovered a third arm of the UPR, which depends on a protein called PERK. Like Ire1 and ATF6, PERK also lies across the ER membrane. Furthermore, its ER domain resembles that of Ire1. On the cytoplasmic side, a protein kinase segment of PERK adds phosphates to a particular protein, which then impedes translation of mRNAs. As a result, fewer proteins enter the ER, thus lightening the folding load.

Strength in numbers
In the last ten years, Walter, with UCSF colleague Robert Stroud, has peered more closely at Ire1 activation with X-ray crystallography. Previous work by Mori, Walter, and others had suggested that UPR induction causes Ire1 molecules to snuggle up in the membrane. By studying yeast Ire1, Walter and Stroud provided an atomic-level rationale for those results and illuminated details of the reaction.

In addition to providing assistance during protein folding, BiP attaches to Ire1 on the side that lies within the ER; when BiP falls off, naked Ire1 molecules pair up and create grooves that bind the unfolded proteins, Walter and Stroud suggest. Multiple Ire1 duos then congregate to form higher order structures; such association rearranges their cytoplasmic segments, positioning them so they can grab and then snip the HAC1/XBP1 mRNA, according to the model.

Researchers are still uncovering layers in the UPR. For example, Ire1 governs ER membrane synthesis and a system that shuttles recalcitrant unfolded proteins from the ER to a cellular incinerator. Even with these additional components, the unfolded protein burden sometimes surpasses the cell’s management capacity. That situation can trigger cell suicide, which obliterates unhealthy cells that might otherwise wreak havoc. Investigators are deciphering how the Ire1, ATF6, and PERK branches of the pathway help cells make life-and-death decisions.

Many scientists are now pursuing ways to harness the UPR for medical advantage. Certain forms of some inherited diseases that cause elevated cholesterol levels, cystic fibrosis, and retinitis pigmentosa produce abnormal proteins that do not fold properly and overwhelm the UPR.

Walter and Mori have unraveled a process with numerous unusual features. Their work has unlocked a multi-layered, highly choreographed system that lies at the heart of normal cellular function.

by Evelyn Strauss

http://www.laskerfoundation.org/awards/2014_b_description.htm

http://www.jci.org/articles/view/78419

Peter Walter: Winner of the 2015 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science

https://youtu.be/3lSsNdP_Mmc

Kazutoshi Mori of Kyoto University in Japan and Peter Walter of the University of California, San Francisco, have won the 2014 Lasker Award for basic medical research. Mori and Walter are being honored by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation for their work related to the unfolded protein response—a cellular stress response that has been implicated in several protein-folding diseases.

In its announcement, the foundation said that “Mori and Walter’s work has led to a better understanding of inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and certain elevated cholesterol conditions in which unfolded proteins overwhelm the unfolded protein response.”

Three years ago, the Lasker Foundation honored Franz-Ulrich Hartl and Arthur Horwich for their protein-folding work with its 2011 basic research award.

Meanwhile, Alim Louis Benabid of Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, France, and Mahlon DeLong of the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, have won the this year’s Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their deep-brain stimulation work that has been used to help restore and motor function in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease.

And the University of Washington’s Mary-Claire King has won the 2014 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science for “bold, imaginative, and diverse contributions to medical science and human rights” related to her work to reunite missing persons or their remains with their families, as well as her discovery of the cancer-related BRCA1 gene locus. In a commentary published in JAMA today (September 8), King and her colleagues advocated for population-based screening for cancer-related genetic variants. “Population-wide screening will require significant efforts to educate the public and to develop new counseling strategies, but this investment will both save women’s lives and provide a model for other public health programs in genomic medicine,” they wrote.

This year’s recipients will receive a $250,000 honorarium per category. The awards will be presented on Friday, September 19, in New York City.

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/40946/title/Lasker-Winners-Announced/

2014Life Science and MedicineProfessor Kazutoshi Mori and Professor Peter Walter

http://www.shawprize.org/en/shaw.php?tmp=4&twoid=97&threeid=238&fourid=428

https://youtu.be/NgW6WvMgj2s

World’s Largest Protein Interaction Map Created

GEN News  Sep 8, 2015
http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/world-s-largest-protein-interaction-map-created/81251700/

A veritable tree-of-life investigation shows how proteins fit together and interact. [iStock/xrender]

http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/GENHighlight/thumb_Sep8_2015_iStock_26507385_protein5412011712.jpg

An international research team reports that it has studied cells from numerous organisms, from amebae to worms to mice to humans, to show how proteins fit together to build different tissues and bodies. They say they uncovered tens of thousands of new protein interactions, accounting for about a quarter of all estimated protein contacts in a cell.

When even a single one of these interactions is lost it can lead to disease, and the map is already helping scientists spot individual proteins that could be at the root of complex human disorders, the team points out in an article (“Panorama of ancient metazoan macromolecular complexes”) in Nature. They add that their data will be available through open access databases.

Proteins work in teams by sticking to each other to carry out their jobs. Many proteins come together to form so called molecular machines that play key roles, such a building new proteins or recycling those no longer needed by literally grinding them into reusable parts. But for the vast majority of proteins, and there are tens of thousands of them in human cells, we still don’t know what they do.

This is where the map created by researchers led by Andrew Emili, Ph.D., from the University of Toronto’s Donnelly Centre and Edward Marcotte, Ph.D., from the University of Texas at Austin map comes in. Using a technique developed by the groups, the scientists were able to fish thousands of protein machineries out of cells and count individual proteins they are made of. They then built a network that, similar to social networks, offers clues into protein function based on which other proteins they hang out with. For example, a new and unstudied protein, whose role we don’t yet know, is likely to be involved in fixing damage in a cell if it sticks to cell’s known “handymen” proteins.

The study gathered information on protein machineries from nine species that represent the tree of life: baker’s yeast, amebae, sea anemones, flies, worms, sea urchins, frogs, mice, and humans. The new map expands the number of known protein associations over 10-fold, and gives insights into how they evolved over time.

“For me the highlight of the study is its sheer scale. We have tripled the number of protein interactions for every species. So across all the animals, we can now predict, with high confidence, more than 1 million protein interactions [which is] a fundamentally ‘big step’ moving the goal posts forward in terms of protein interactions networks,” says Dr. Emili, who is also Ontario Research Chair in Biomarkers in Disease Management and a professor in the department of molecular genetics.

The researchers discovered that tens of thousands of protein associations remained unchanged since the first ancestral cell appeared, one billion years ago, preceding all of animal life on Earth.

“Protein assemblies in humans were often identical to those in other species. This not only reinforces what we already know about our common evolutionary ancestry, it also has practical implications, providing the ability to study the genetic basis for a wide variety of diseases and how they present in different species,” says Dr. Marcotte, who notes that the map is already proving useful in pinpointing possible causes of human disease.

One example is a newly discovered molecular machine, dubbed Commander, which consists of about a dozen individual proteins. Genes that encode some of Commander’s components had previously been found to be mutated in people with intellectual disabilities but it was not clear how these proteins worked.

Because Commander is present in all animal cells, the scientists went on to disrupt its components in tadpoles, revealing abnormalities in the way brain cells are positioned during embryo development and providing a possible origin for a complex human condition.

“With tens of thousands of other new protein interactions, our map promises to open many more lines of research into links between proteins and disease, which we are keen to explore in depth over the coming years,” says Dr. Emili.

Hormone Injections May Have Spread ‘Seeds’ of Alzheimer’s

by Seth Augenstein

http://www.biosciencetechnology.com/news/2015/09/hormone-injections-may-have-spread-seeds-alzheimers-study-says?et_cid=4808735&et_rid=535648082&type=cta

The “seeds” of Alzheimer’s and related brain diseases may be transmitted by direct tissue transplantation, according to a new study.

The brains of eight people showed development of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, caused by treatments with contaminated growth hormones from human cadavers decades before, said the scientists, who published their findings in this week’sNature. Six of the eight also had the amyloid buildup that is a tell-tale sign of Alzheimer’s.

“This is the first evidence of real-world transmission of amyloid pathology,” John Hardy, a University College London molecular neuroscientist, reportedly told the journal.

The hormone treatments were administered to people who were short in height. The samples were taken from cadavers’ pituitary glands that contaminated with prions. The treatments started in 1958, and were halted in 1985 due to reports of Creutzfeldt-Jakob. By the year 2000, 38 of the patients had developed the disease. By 2012, the number had grown to 450 cases among the recipients of the cadaver-derived HGH and some other medical procedures, like transplants and brain surgery.

The study last week showed that the newly-understood Multiple System Atrophy could be spread by direct contact with re-used surgical instruments.

“You can’t kill a protein, and it can stick tightly to stainless steel, even when the surgical instrument is cleaned,” said Kurt Giles, a UCSF researcher and one of the authors of that MSA study.

Brain-eating cannibals from Papua New Guinea were the subject of a June study analyzing their genetic adaptations allowing them to survive a prion disease called kuru. The authors of the newest paper on the hormone spread of Creutzfeldt-Jakob were also cautious in pointing out particular dangers. 

Researchers Uncover More About The Elusive Pericyte-Tumour Interaction.

Sept 11, 2015     by Healthinnovations       Reported by Aviva Lev-Avi, PhD, RN

Tumours are known to evade the immune system by a variety of mechanisms, one of which is the recruitment of ‘myeloid-derived suppressor cells’ (MDSC). MDSCs suppress the ability of the immune system’s killer T-cells to destroy cancer cells. It is known that the more MDSCs present, the worse the prognosis or therapy response of the patient. Tumours secrete signal molecules such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) that help in recruiting MDSCs, however; the mechanisms behind IL-6 tumour secretion are quite unknown.

Now, a study from researchers at Karolinska Institutet is the first to suggest that cells in the tumour blood vessels contribute to a local environment that protects the cancer cells from these tumour-killing immune cells. The team state that their study can contribute to the development of better immune-based cancer therapies.  The study is published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Chemists solve major piece of cellular mystery

08/28/2015 Kimm Fesenmaier, California Institute of Technology

http://www.rdmag.com/videos/2015/08/chemists-solve-major-piece-cellular-mystery?et_cid=4775862&et_rid=535648082&location=top

Not just anything is allowed to enter the nucleus, the heart of eukaryotic cells where, among other things, genetic information is stored. A double membrane, called the nuclear envelope, serves as a wall, protecting the contents of the nucleus.

The NPC is targeted by a number of diseases, including some aggressive forms of leukemia and nervous system disorders such as a hereditary form of Lou Gehrig’s disease. Now a team led by André Hoelz, assistant professor of biochemistry at Caltech, has solved a crucial piece of the puzzle.

Hoelz and his colleagues published a paper describing the atomic structure of the NPC’s coat nucleoporin complex, a subcomplex that forms what they now call the outer rings. The team has now solved the architecture of the pore’s inner ring, a subcomplex that is central to the NPC’s ability to serve as a barrier and transport facilitator. They built up the complex and then systematically dissected it. Then they validated how it works in vivo, in a species of fungus.

“Using an interdisciplinary approach, we solved the architecture of this subcomplex and showed that it cannot change shape significantly,” says Hoelz. “It is a relatively rigid scaffold that is incorporated into the pore and basically just sits as a decoration, like pom-poms on a bicycle. It cannot dilate.”

 

Folding Funnels Reveal Protein’s Inner Life

Tue, 03/22/2016 – 12:17pm
Rick Kubetz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
http://www.rdmag.com/news/2016/03/folding-funnels-reveal-proteins-inner-life
The molecular folding funnel contains all of the stable molecular states and folding pathways between them, providing important information about structure and mechanisms that can reveal how a polymer or protein folds, or aid in the design of drug molecule or ligands with a particular shape.
The molecular folding funnel contains all of the stable molecular states and folding pathways between them, providing important information about structure and mechanisms that can reveal how a polymer or protein folds, or aid in the design of drug molecule or ligands with a particular shape.

Proteins are the molecules of life. They are chemically programmed by their amino acid sequence to fold into highly organized conformations that underpin all of biological structure (e.g., hair, scales) and function (e.g., enzymes, antibodies). Understanding the sequence-structure-function relationship—the “protein folding problem”—is one of the great, unsolved problems in physical chemistry, and is of inestimable scientific value in exposing the inner workings of life and the rational design of molecular machines.

“This work lays the foundations to recover the protein folding landscapes directly from experimental data, providing a route to new understanding and rational design of proteins,” explained Andrew Ferguson, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. “While we remain far from this goal, our understanding of protein folding was revolutionized by the ‘new view’ that envisages molecular folding as a conformational search over a funneled free energy surface.”

According to Ferguson, the single-molecule free energy surface encodes all of the thermodynamics and pathways of folding, dictating protein structure and dynamics. Each point on the landscape corresponds to an ensemble of similar protein conformations, and the height of the landscape prescribes their stability. It is a key goal of physical chemistry to determine molecular folding landscapes.

“Molecular folding landscapes can be inferred from long computer simulations in which the positions of all atoms in the molecule are known,” said Jiang Wang, a graduate research assistant and first author of the paper, “Nonlinear reconstruction of single-molecule free energy surfaces from univariate time series,” published in the March 21, 2016 issue of Physical Review E.

“Experimental techniques such as single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can measure distances between covalently-grafted fluorescent dye molecules to track the size of the molecule as a function of time, but it has so far not been possible to reconstruct folding funnels from experimental measurements of single coarse-grained observables,” Ferguson explained. “In this work, we have integrated nonlinear machine learning and statistical thermodynamics with Takens’ Theorem from dynamical systems theory to demonstrate in computer simulations of a hydrophobic polymer chain that it is possible to determine molecular folding landscapes from time series of a single experimentally-accessible observable.”

“The information loss associated with its reconstruction from a single observable means that the topography of the reconstructed funnel may be perturbed—the heights and depths of the free energy peaks and valleys may be altered—but it faithfully preserves the topology of the true funnel—the locality, continuity, and connectivity of molecular configurations,” Wang noted. “This means that the folding funnel determined from measurements of, in this case, the head-to-tail distance of the chain is geometrically and topologically identical and contains precisely the same molecular states and transition pathways as that computed from knowledge of all the atomic positions,” Ferguson added.

“We are very excited by this idealized proof of principle for computer simulations of a polymer chain, and are currently working to extend our analyses to simulations of biologically realistic peptides and proteins, and partner with single molecule biophysicists to apply our technique to experimental measurements of real proteins,” Ferguson said.

 

Nonlinear reconstruction of single-molecule free-energy surfaces from univariate time series

Jiang Wang and Andrew L. Ferguson
Phys. Rev. E 93, 032412 – Published 21 March 2016     http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.93.032412
The stable conformations and dynamical fluctuations of polymers and macromolecules are governed by the underlying single-molecule free energy surface. By integrating ideas from dynamical systems theory with nonlinear manifold learning, we have recovered single-molecule free energy surfaces from univariate time series in a single coarse-grained system observable. Using Takens’ Delay Embedding Theorem, we expand the univariate time series into a high dimensional space in which the dynamics are equivalent to those of the molecular motions in real space. We then apply the diffusion map nonlinear manifold learning algorithm to extract a low-dimensional representation of the free energy surface that is diffeomorphic to that computed from a complete knowledge of all system degrees of freedom. We validate our approach in molecular dynamics simulations of a C24H50 n-alkane chain to demonstrate that the two-dimensional free energy surface extracted from the atomistic simulation trajectory is – subject to spatial and temporal symmetries – geometrically and topologically equivalent to that recovered from a knowledge of only the head-to-tail distance of the chain. Our approach lays the foundations to extract empirical single-molecule free energy surfaces directly from experimental measurements.

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Turning genetic information into working proteins

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Intelligence

Series 2; 3.3

James E. Darnell Jr. (1930— )
Vincent Astor Professor Emeritus
2002 Albert Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science

Responsible for the various tasks required in turning genetic information into working proteins, ribonucleic acids are one of the most essential players in the life of a cell. First discovered in 1868, RNA today remains the subject of intense scientific scrutiny. Over the course of a career dedicated to understanding the intricate workings of gene transcription, Rockefeller University scientist James E. Darnell Jr. has revealed some of RNA’s most secretive and surprising mechanisms. For his half-century of illuminating research, Dr. Darnell received the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science.

In 1963, Dr. Darnell described a phenomenon he termed “RNA processing,” a step in the process of gene transcription, which had only recently been elucidated in bacterial systems. Working with mammalian cells — which differ from bacterial cells in that they contain a nucleus, where RNA is created — Dr. Darnell observed that very long strings of RNA disappear from the cell nucleus and that subsequently, shorter RNAs resembling the absent longer ones appear in the cytoplasm. Mammalian cells, he concluded, must distill their massive, immature nuclear RNA into shorter, mature forms that are individually coded for specific purposes by specific segments of the genome.

Dr. Darnell carried the principles of his finding — which he made in ribosomal RNA, part of the construction crew that builds cellular proteins — to other long nuclear RNA, including the longest one, which he named heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA). His hypothesis, that hnRNA is the precursor of the better known messenger RNA — which carries the genetic blueprint for protein building — soon bore fruit when he found a structural correlation between the two. Certain hnRNAs and nearly all messenger RNAs have a “tail” of adenine nucleotides at one end. Dr. Darnell followed this discovery with the observation that when an hnRNA string with an adenine tail disappears from the nucleus, a messenger RNA with the same tail then appears in the cytoplasm, suggesting a causal link between the two. When he found a second similarity — a cap at the end of the string opposite the adenine tail — he faced a conundrum. Scientific dogma had it that the order of nucleotides in any RNA mirrors that of DNA, whether the RNA is modeled from somewhere in the middle of the DNA or from one of the ends. The matching of a nuclear RNA to its cytoplasmic product by two end pieces glued together was surprising, but the concept was soon proven by colleagues at other institutions and called RNA splicing.

After a brief sojourn in Paris to work in François Jacob’s lab, Darnell worked at MIT, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Rockefeller University on the relationship between mRNA and hnRNA. hnRNA was believed to be the precursor to mRNA, and despite making some key discoveries, Darnell admits that he could not free his imagination from the idea of colinearity and envision an hnRNA spliced to produce a smaller mRNA.

At this time, Darnell turned his attention to the question he had pondered since Paris: how were genes regulated in animal cells? This led to the discovery of the STAT and the Jak-STAT pathway of transcription control.

With the knowledge of RNA processing and splicing, Dr. Darnell next examined how cells begin the process of transcription and how they activate particular segments of DNA. Having moved to Rockefeller University in 1974, he found in the early 1980s that cells retain their specificity only in the context of their natural environment. Away from other liver cells, for example, a single liver cell stops producing liver-specific RNA, though it continues to make RNA for more generic cellular tasks. To pinpoint the signals responsible, which he believed must be coming from outside the cell, Dr. Darnell took a closer look at interferons (IFN), proteins that warn a cell when it’s time to raise its genetic defenses against harmful microbes.

Dr. Darnell’s laboratory studies how signals from the cell surface affect transcription of genes in the nucleus. Originally using interferon as a model cytokine, the Darnell group discovered that cell transcription was quickly changed by binding of cytokines to the cell surface. Introducing IFNβ into cell cultures, he watched as a particular type of mRNA accumulated in the cytoplasm, unaccompanied by any new protein synthesis. Analyzing the mRNA led him to the segment of DNA that had been activated, and the lack of new proteins told him that the cell contained its own, usually dormant, IFN-responsive transcription factor. By isolating a particular stretch of DNA from IFN-treated cells, he was able to call out of hiding the proteins that make up that factor, which, partly because they respond to signals very quickly, he called “STATs.” Dr. Darnell then traced the chemical relay that activates the STATs after IFN contact, called the Jak-Stat pathway.

The bound interferon led to the tyrosine phosphorylation of latent cytoplasmic proteins now called STATs (signal transducers and activators of transcription) that dimerize by reciprocal phosphotyrosine-SH2 interchange. They accumulate in the nucleus, bind DNA and drive transcription. This pathway has proved to be of wide importance, with seven STATs now known in mammals that take part in a wide variety of developmental and homeostatic events in all multicellular animals. Crystallographic analysis defined functional domains in the STATs, and current attention is focused on two areas: how the STATs complete their cycle of activation and inactivation, which requires regulated tyrosine dephosphorylation; and how persistent activation of STAT3 that occurs in a high proportion of many human cancers contributes to blocking apoptosis in cancer cells. Current efforts are devoted to inhibiting STAT3 with modified peptides that can enter cells.

 

Dr. Darnell received his M.D. in 1955 from the Washington University School of Medicine. His career has included poliovirus research with Harry Eagle at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, research with François Jacob at the Pasteur Institute in Paris and academic appointments at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Columbia University. In 1974 Dr. Darnell joined Rockefeller as Vincent Astor Professor, and from 1990 to 1991 he was vice president for academic affairs.

A member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1973, he has received numerous awards, including the 2012 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research, the 2003 National Medal of Science, the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science, the 1997 Passano Award, the 1994 Paul Janssen Prize in Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine and the 1986 Gairdner Foundation International Award.

He is the coauthor with S.E. Luria of General Virology and the founding author with Harvey Lodish and David Baltimore of Molecular Cell Biology, now in its seventh edition. His book RNA, Life’s Indispensable Molecule was published in July 2011 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a foreign member of The Royal Society and The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

 

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Metabolic Genomics and Pharmaceutics, Vol. 1 of BioMed Series D available on Amazon Kindle


Metabolic Genomics and Pharmaceutics, Vol. 1 of BioMed Series D available on Amazon Kindle

Reporter: Stephen S Williams, PhD

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence would like to announce the First volume of their BioMedical E-Book Series D:

Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics, Vol. I

SACHS FLYER 2014 Metabolomics SeriesDindividualred-page2

which is now available on Amazon Kindle at

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B012BB0ZF0.

This e-Book is a comprehensive review of recent Original Research on  METABOLOMICS and related opportunities for Targeted Therapy written by Experts, Authors, Writers. This is the first volume of the Series D: e-Books on BioMedicine – Metabolomics, Immunology, Infectious Diseases.  It is written for comprehension at the third year medical student level, or as a reference for licensing board exams, but it is also written for the education of a first time baccalaureate degree reader in the biological sciences.  Hopefully, it can be read with great interest by the undergraduate student who is undecided in the choice of a career. The results of Original Research are gaining value added for the e-Reader by the Methodology of Curation. The e-Book’s articles have been published on the Open Access Online Scientific Journal, since April 2012.  All new articles on this subject, will continue to be incorporated, as published with periodical updates.

We invite e-Readers to write an Article Reviews on Amazon for this e-Book on Amazon.

All forthcoming BioMed e-Book Titles can be viewed at:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, launched in April 2012 an Open Access Online Scientific Journal is a scientific, medical and business multi expert authoring environment in several domains of  life sciences, pharmaceutical, healthcare & medicine industries. The venture operates as an online scientific intellectual exchange at their website http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com and for curation and reporting on frontiers in biomedical, biological sciences, healthcare economics, pharmacology, pharmaceuticals & medicine. In addition the venture publishes a Medical E-book Series available on Amazon’s Kindle platform.

Analyzing and sharing the vast and rapidly expanding volume of scientific knowledge has never been so crucial to innovation in the medical field. WE are addressing need of overcoming this scientific information overload by:

  • delivering curation and summary interpretations of latest findings and innovations on an open-access, Web 2.0 platform with future goals of providing primarily concept-driven search in the near future
  • providing a social platform for scientists and clinicians to enter into discussion using social media
  • compiling recent discoveries and issues in yearly-updated Medical E-book Series on Amazon’s mobile Kindle platform

This curation offers better organization and visibility to the critical information useful for the next innovations in academic, clinical, and industrial research by providing these hybrid networks.

Table of Contents for Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics, Vol. I

Chapter 1: Metabolic Pathways

Chapter 2: Lipid Metabolism

Chapter 3: Cell Signaling

Chapter 4: Protein Synthesis and Degradation

Chapter 5: Sub-cellular Structure

Chapter 6: Proteomics

Chapter 7: Metabolomics

Chapter 8:  Impairments in Pathological States: Endocrine Disorders; Stress

                   Hypermetabolism and Cancer

Chapter 9: Genomic Expression in Health and Disease 

 

Summary 

Epilogue

 

 

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Protein-binding, Protein-Protein interactions & Therapeutic Implications

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

7.3  Protein-binding, Protein-Protein interactions & Therapeutic Implications

7.3.1 Action at a Distance. Allostery_Delabarre_allostery review

7.3.2 Chemical proteomics approaches to examine novel histone modifications

7.3.3 Misfolded Proteins – from Little Villains to Little Helpers… Against Cancer

7.3.4 Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) in epithelial cancer

7.3.5 Putting together structures of epidermal growth factor receptors

7.3.6 Complex Relationship between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

7.3.7 IGFBP-2.PTEN- A critical interaction for tumors and for general physiology

7.3.8 Emerging-roles-for-the-Ph-sensing-G-protein-coupled-receptor

7.3.9 Protein amino-terminal modifications and proteomic approaches for N-terminal profiling

7.3.10 Protein homeostasis networks in physiology and disease

7.3.11 Proteome sequencing goes deep

7.3.1 Action at a Distance. Allostery_Delabarre_allostery review

DeLaBarre B1Hurov J1Cianchetta G1Murray S1Dang L2.
Chem Biol. 2014 Sep 18; 21(9):1143-61
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.chembiol.2014.08.007

Cancer cells must carefully regulate their metabolism to maintain growth and division under varying nutrient and oxygen levels. Compelling data support the investigation of numerous enzymes as therapeutic targets to exploit metabolic vulnerabilities common to several cancer types. We discuss the rationale for developing such drugs and review three targets with central roles in metabolic pathways crucial for cancer cell growth: pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme splice variant 2 (PKM2) in glycolysis, glutaminase in glutaminolysis, and mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 isozymes (IDH1/2) in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These targets exemplify the drugging approach to cancer metabolism, with allosteric modulation being the common theme. The first glutaminase and mutant IDH1/2 inhibitors have entered clinical testing, and early data are promising. Cancer metabolism provides a wealth of novel targets, and targeting allosteric sites promises to yield selective drugs with the potential to transform clinical outcomes across many cancer types.

Based on knowledge acquired to date, there is no doubt that cancer metabolism provides a wealth of novel therapeutic targets and multiple innovative ways in which to exploit metabolic vulnerabilities for therapeutic benefit. More comprehensive reviews cover the breadth of metabolic targets that are currently under investigation (Stine and Dang, 2013; Vander Heiden, 2011). The following sections of this review focus on PKM2, glutaminase, and mutated IDH1/2 as exemplary metabolism targets under investigation for development of cancer therapies.
Drugging Glycolysis: Targeting Pyruvate Kinase Muscle Isozyme Alternative Splice Variant 2 PK catalyzes the last step of glycolysis, converting phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, while producing one molecule of ATP. The reaction encompasses two chemical steps: the first involves a phosphoryl transfer from PEP to ADP, forming an enolate intermediate and ATP, and the second involves protonation of the enolate intermediate, forming pyruvate (Robinson and Rose, 1972). PKM2 is one of four PK isoforms in humans. PKM1 and PKM2 result from the alternative splicing of exons 9 and 10 of the PKM gene, which encode a stretch of amino acids that differ at 23 positions between PKM1 and PKM2. PKM1 is constitutively active in skeletal muscle and brain tissue, but is not allosterically regulated. PKM2 is expressed in fetal and proliferating tissues, has low basal activity compared with PKM1, and is allosterically regulated. R-type pyruvate kinase (PKR) and L-type pyruvate kinase (PKL) are transcribed via different promoters from the PKLR gene. PKR is expressed in erythrocytes and PKL in the liver. PKR, PKL, and PKM1 exist as stable tetramers,whereas PKM2 forms tetramers (high activity form), dimers (low activity form), and monomers (Mazurek, 2011).

Figure 1. Central Metabolic Pathways Utilized by Cancer Cells *denotes mutated isoenzyme.

Pyruvate Kinase Muscle Isozyme Alternative Splice Variant 2 in Cancer Cell Metabolism Cancer cells predominantly express PKM2, which can be downregulated by tyrosine kinase growth factor signaling pathways, allowing metabolic flexibility. Phosphotyrosine peptides have been shown to suppress PKM2 activity by binding tightly to PKM2, thereby catalyzing the release of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), resulting in a switch to the low activity dimer state (Christofk et al., 2008b; Hitosugi et al., 2009). This downregulation is thought to support tumor growth and proliferation by allowing for the shunting of glycolytic intermediates toward other biosynthetic pathways (i.e., pentose phosphate and serine pathways). In keeping with this model, the activation of PKM2 in cancer cells using small molecule agonists resulted in serine auxotrophy (Kung et al., 2012). Consistent with the hypothesis that PKM2 is a critical metabolic switch, there is growing evidence that, depending on the cellular stress environment, PKM2activity canberegulated byposttranslational modification such as acetylation (Lv et al., 2011), phosphorylation (Hitosugi et al., 2009), cysteine oxidation (Anastasiou et al., 2011), and proline hydroxylation (Luo et al., 2011). The utility of PKM2 activators in the clinic has yet to be determined, but recent work with tumor xenografts with a PKM2 activator suggests that this may be a viable approach (Parnell et al., 2013). As PKM2 tetramers show greater than 50-fold higher activity than PKM2 monomers (Anastasiou et al., 2012), one consideration when designing drugs to activate PKM2 for therapeutic means would be the need for small-molecule ligands capable of driving the enzyme toward its optimally active tetrameric form, thus forcing cancer cells into a less flexible metabolic state.

Structure of Pyruvate Kinase Muscle Isozyme Alternative Splice Variant 2 The structure of the PKM2 tetramer is summarized in Figure 2A. PKM2 is allosterically activated in a ‘‘feedforward’’ manner by the upstream glycolytic metabolite, FBP, which induces a shift to the active tetrameric conformation (Christofk et al., 2008b; Dombrauckas et al., 2005). PKM2 can be independently allosterically activated by serine (Chaneton et al., 2012), which binds in a distinct pocket that can also accommodate the inhibitor phenylalanine (Protein Data Bank [PDB] ID: 4FXJ). The binding of phenylalanine results in a tetrameric form distinct from the active conformer (Morgan et al., 2013). It is not clear how the change from serine to phenylalanine elicits such a dramatic change in protein behavior, or whether there is any biological interaction between serine activation and phenylalanine inhibition of PKM2 in cancer cells. Of note, PKM1 and PKL/R are not activated by serine, despite the conservation of the serine binding site in all PK isoforms.
Figure 2. Three Different Metabolic Enzymes and Their Allosteric Inhibitors Protomers are depicted as cartoon ribbons in blue, green, yellow, and cyan. Synthetic allostery is depicted in stick format with red highlight. (A) Structure of tetrameric PKM2:AGI-980 (4:2 complex) from PDB 4G1N. AGI-980 is shown in stick rendering near the center of tetramer. Each PK monomer consists of four domains, usually designated A, B, C, and N (Dombrauckas et al., 2005). The tetramer is a dimer-of-dimers with approximate D2 symmetry. The dimer is formed between the A domains of each monomer, while the tetramer is formed via dimerization along the C subunit interfaces of each dimer. The active site of PKM2 lies within a cleft between the A and B domain, illustrated by a PEP analog (red spheres). The FBP binding pocket is located entirely within the C domain (pink spheres). The natural allosteric site of serine is also shown (black spheres). (B)Tetrameric GAC:BPTES (4:2 complex) from PDB 3UO9. Glutamate molecules are shown as spheres. (C) Dimeric IDH2R140Q:AGI-6780 (2:1 complex) from PDB 4JA8 (Wang et al., 2013). NADP molecules are shown as spheres.
Discovery of Allosteric Activators of Pyruvate Kinase Muscle Isozyme Alternative Splice Variant 2 A number of small molecules that potently activate PKM2 have been discovered by various groups (Table 1). Interestingly, all seven X-rayco-complexescurrentlyavailableshowcompoundsbound at a novel binding pocket distinct from the FBP and serine binding sites, which would otherwise allow cells to overcome negative regulation by phosphotyrosines (Kung et al., 2012). The compounds found in structures 3GQY, 3GR4 (Boxer et al., 2010), 3H6O (Jiang et al., 2010), 3ME3, and 3U2Z (Anastasiou et al., 2012) were identified by screening the NIH Small Molecule Repository, and can be classified into two distinct chemical series, both of which establish very similar interactions with PKM2 (Table 1). Analogues in these two classes selectively activated PKM2 allosterically with good selectivity against PKM1, PKL, and PKR (Anastasiou et al., 2012; Boxer et al., 2010; Jiang et al., 2010). The molecule found in the structure 4JPG (Guo et al., 2013) is similar to the two series described above, where the pyrimidone ring is found between the two Phe26 residues (Table 1). Interestingly, the activator found in the 4G1N structure (Kung et al., 2012) sits in the same pocket as the NIH compounds. However, the interactions are quite different, with the side chains of the two Phe26 that line the pocket assuming distinct conformations. This activator wraps around the two aromatic residues, which pushes it closer to the walls of the pocket, allowing for a richer series of interactions with PKM2 (Table 1). There are two additional series of PKM2 activators that have been reported for which no structural information is available (Table 1)(Parnell et al., 2013; Xu et al., 2014; Yacovan et al., 2012). Members of this series were shown to have an activation level comparable to that of FBP, with selectivity for PKM2 over PKL, PKR, and PKM1. PKM2 offers a very interesting example of an allosterically regulated enzyme. Different allosteric sites have so far been identified for three different types of activator (FBP, serine, and small-molecule ligands) and all activate PKM2 by stabilizing the tetrameric form. It is remarkable that molecules as small as serine can dramatically alter this protein’s conformational landscape and aggregation state and lead to an active enzyme. This unusual allosteric site revealed by the small-molecule ligands is of particular curiosity, largely because neither its function nor its native ligands are known. All of the drug-like activators described above bind at the dimer–dimer interface and seem to act by displacing water from the mainly apolar pocket, thus contributing to the stabilization of the tetramer. While these PKM2 activators show promising preclinical data, none have yet entered clinical development.

Table 1. Biochemical Properties of Small Molecule PKM2 Inhibitors Series PDB ID Ligand Reference Binding Characteristics

Substituted N,N’diarylsulfonamide 3GQY (Boxer et al., 2010)

  •  All completely buried within A-A’ interface, 35A ˚ from FBP pocket
  •  Binding pocket lined with residues equivalent to those of PKM2 molecules forming A-A’ interface
  •  All sandwiched between phenyl rings of the two Phe26 from different monomers
  •  All additionally interact with side chain of Phe26 through slightly distorted T-shaped p-p interactions (two such interactions for substituted N,N0diarylsulfonamides and one for thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole[3,2-] pyridazinones)
  1. 3GR4 (Boxer et al., 2010) 3ME3 (Anastasiou et al., 2012)
  2. Thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole [3,2-d]pyridazinone 3H6O (Jiang et al., 2010)
  3. 3U2Z (Anastasiou et al., 2012)
  4. 2-((1H-benzo[d]imidazol1-yl)methyl)-4H-pyrido [1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-ones
  5. 4JPG (Guo et al., 2013)
  • Pyrimidone ring found between the two Phe26 residues forming p-p interactions with the aromatic rings
  • Carbonyl interacts with a bridging water molecule
  • Benzimidazole reaches a region of the activator pocket that is not occupied in any of the published crystal structures
  • One of the imidazole nitrogens forms an H-bond with Lys311, which is normally part of a salt bridge to Asp354

Quinolone sulfonamides 4G1N (Kung et al., 2012)

  •  Quinoline moiety sits on a flat, mainly apolar surface defined by Phe26, Leu27 and Met30 from chain A and Phe26, Tyr390 and Leu394 from chain A’
  •  One of the two oxygen atoms of the sulfonamide accepts an H bond from the backbone oxygen of Tyr390, the other interacts with a water molecule
  •  The oxygen of the amide moiety forms an H-bond with side-chain nitrogen of Lys311
  •  Terminal aromatic ring sits in the other copy of the quinoline pocket d Aromatic rings of the side chains of the two Phe26 lining the pocket almost perpendicular (not parallel); activator wrapped around the two aromatic residues

3-(trifluoromethyl)-1Hpyrazole-5-carboxamide (Parnell et al., 2013; Xu et al., 2014)

  • Cocrystal structure of one compound bound to tetrameric PKM2 obtained but file not available for download from PDB: described as bound to the allosteric site at the dimer–dimer interface

5-((2,3-dihydrobenzo[b] [1,4]dioxin-6-yl)sulfonyl)-2methyl-1-(methylsulfonyl) indoline scaffold (Yacovan et al., 2012)

  • Cocrystal structure of one compound bound to PKM2 obtained but not available for download from the PDB: described as bound to dimer interface
  • Interactions very similar to those established by thieno [3,2-b]pyrrole[3,2-d]pyridazinone series above

Drugging Glutaminolysis: Targeting the Glutaminase C Variant Glutaminase catalyzes the conversion of glutamine to glutamate and ammonia. Glutamate can be oxidized to a-ketoglutarate (aKG), which then anaplerotically feeds into the TCA cycle as a means of providing proliferating cells with biosynthetic intermediates and ATP (Figure 1); glutamate is also used as a substrate for the generation of glutathione, which provides protection from redox stress (Hensley et al., 2013; Shanware et al., 2011). The ammonia produced during the reaction can be used in certain tissues like the kidney to provide pH homeostasis, and nitrogen derived from glutamine is utilized in nucleotide biosynthetic and glycosylation pathways.

Table 2. Characteristics of Small Molecule Glutaminase Inhibitors

BPTES N-(5–[1,3,4]thiadiazol-2yl)-2-phenylacetamide 6 (Shukla et al., 2012)

  • Similar potency but better water solubility vs. BPTES d Attenuated growth of P493 human lymphoma B cells in vitro d Diminished tumor growth in P493 tumor xenograft SCID mice with no apparent toxicity

CB-839 (Calithera) (Gross et al., 2014)

  • Orally bioavailable d Binds at allosteric sites of GLS1 KGA and GAC d Potent, selective, time-dependent reversible inhibition with slow recovery time
  • Anti-proliferative activity (double-digit nM potency) in cellular proliferation assays in wide range of tumors
  • Currently in Phase I trials of locally-advanced/metastatic refractory solid tumors (triple negative breast cancer, NSCLC, RCC, mesothelioma) and hematological cancers [Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02071927, NCT02071862, NCT02071888]

Dibenzophenanthridines Compound 968 (Katt et al., 2012; Wang et al., 2010)

  • Modest potency in the low mM concentrations d Loses all inhibitory activity against glutaminase activated by preincubation with inorganic phosphate (phosphate does not affect BPTES potency)
  • Anti-proliferative activity in breast cancer cell line at 10 mmol/L concentration

There are three isoforms of IDH. IDH1 is located in both the peroxisome and the cytosol, whereas IDH2 and IDH3 are located in mitochondria. It is unclear what the relative contributions of the IDH2 and IDH3 isoforms are to overall mitochondrial TCA function. IDH1 and IDH2 are both obligatory homodimeric proteins and use NADP+ as a cofactor, whereas IDH3 uses NAD+ as a cofactor and is a heterotrimeric protein comprising alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. All three isozymes require either Mg2+ or Mn2+ asdivalent metal cofactors for catalysis.The dimeric structure of IDH2 is shown in Figure 2C.

Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase in Cancer Cell Metabolism The role of IDH mutations in cancer metabolism was recognized following the observation of frequent and recurrent mutations of IDH1 and IDH2 in patients with glioma and AML, initially identified by genomic deep sequencing and subsequent comparative genetic analyses (Parsons et al., 2008; Yan et al., 2009). These mutations were originally characterized as loss of function (Mardis etal.,2009; Parsonsetal.,2008; Yanet al.,2009), suggesting that mutated IDH acts as a tumor suppressor due to the loss of catalytic conversion of isocitrate to aKG (Zhaoetal., 2009). However, with the exception of cases of haploinsufficiency, the heterozygous mutation pattern of IDH is more consistent with an oncogene role. Subsequently, IDH mutations were shown to possess the neomorphic activity to generate the oncometabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) (Dang et al., 2009; Gross et al., 2010; Ward et al., 2010). With a single codon substitution, the kinetic properties of the mutant IDH isozyme are significantly altered, resulting in an obligatory sequential ordered reaction in the reverse direction (Rendina et al., 2013). Indeed, the critical kinetic observation of mutant IDH was not only the loss of affinity for isocitrate, but also a dramatic increase in NADPH affinity by three orders of magnitude (Dang et al.,2009), suggesting a substantial change in protein dynamics imparted by the mutation. The only known homeostatic 2HG clearance mechanism is the relatively inefficient reconversion of 2HG back to aKG by D-2hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase. Therefore, 2HG accumulates when over-produced by mutant IDH. 2HG itself has been shown to be sufficient to drive the malignant phenotype (Rakheja et al., 2013). Abnormally high 2HG levels impair aKG-dependent dioxygenases through competitive inhibition, including those that modify DNA and histones (i.e., Jumonji domain-containing histone demethylases and the ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of 50-methylcytosine hydroxylases) (Chowdhury et al., 2011; Figueroa et al., 2010), as well as EglN prolyl hydroxylase in regulating hypoxia-inducible factor (Losman et al., 2013). This results in altered epigenetic status that blocks cell differentiation. These findings, combined with the inhibitory effects of fumarate and succinate on the same families of aKG-dependent enzymes, highlight a critical and fascinatingnetwork that ties together central metabolic pathways and epigenetic control. Remarkably, mutations in TET2 are mutually exclusive with IDH mutations in AML, strongly suggesting that, in this context, the tumorigenic effects of 2HG are at least in part driven by inhibition of TET2. The precise targets of IDH mutations with associated 2HG production (and TET2 mutations) that promote tumorigenesis are currentlyunknown;however,itisclearthatIDH1/2andTET2mutations lead to a block in hematopoietic cell differentiation (Figueroa et al., 2010; Lu et al., 2012; Moran-Crusio et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2013). To date, no IDH3 mutation associated with cancer has been reported (Krell et al., 2011; Reitman and Yan, 2010), suggesting that the role of IDH1/2 has a greater impact on tumorigenesis. Targeting mutated isoforms of IDH1/2 therefore presents a logical approach to cancer therapy. A consideration in designing suchdrugsistheheterozygoussomaticnatureoftheIDH1/2mutation, which likely yields a mixture of homo- and heterodimers; statistically, heterodimers should be the major species in vivo. Mutant homodimers and wild-type-mutant heterodimers both efficiently catalyze the production of 2HG from aKG (Dang et al., 2009; Rendina et al., 2013). However, the heterodimer is potentially more oncogenic, as it is more efficient at producing 2HG than homodimeric mutants (Pietrak et al., 2011) due to an increased local concentration of substrate while conserving NADPH. The heterodimer as a molecular target therefore becomes an important consideration in this scenario.

Structure of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Structurally, both IDH1 and IDH2 comprise three main domains: the large domain, the small domain, and the clasp region (Yang et al., 2010). A simplified description of protein motion is provided in Figure 3 (Rendina et al., 2013; Xu et al., 2004). The dynamic of motion may differ slightly between IDH1 and IDH2 mutants. IDH1 mutants appear to open wider than IDH2 mutants to the point of unwinding a helix termed ‘‘seg2’’ (Yang et al., 2010). In contrast, the open form of IDH2 does not involve the melting of any secondary structure, and as a consequence has a much narrower range of motion (Taylor et al., 2008; Wang et al., 2013). This differential in protein dynamics could possibly explain the differential responses of IDH1 and IDH2 to inhibitors. X-ray structures of IDH3 have not yet been reported, but it appears to be distinct from IDH1 and IDH2 in terms of primary sequence and predicted quaternary organization (Kim et al., 1995; Ramachandran and Colman, 1980). There are three arginine residues in the enzyme active site that are predicted to play a central role in electrostatic stabilization and proper geometric orientation of isocitrate via its acidic moieties as the substrate binds in the active site. With the exception of the novel G97D or G97N codon mutation (Ward et al., 2012), virtually all confirmed IDH mutations that generate high levels of 2HG occur in one of these arginines (i.e., IDH1-R132 and IDH2-R172/R140) (Losman and Kaelin, 2013) and have in common a substitution of one of the diffuse positive charges of the respective arginine’s guanidinium moiety.
Discovery of Inhibitors against Mutated Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Several inhibitors of mutant IDH isoforms that block 2HG production in vitro and in vivo have been recently described. The first potent and specific IDH1 inhibitors reported were the phenylglycine series, specifically AGI-5198 (Popovici-Muller et al., 2012; Rohle et al., 2013) and subsequently ML309 (Davis et al., 2014)(Table 3), which were shown to be rapid-equilibrium inhibitors specific for IDH1-R132-codon mutations. These compounds inhibited IDH1-R132H competitively with respect to aKG and uncompetitively with respect to NADPH, suggesting that they preferably bind to the enzyme-NADPH ternary complex. Notably, they do not appreciably cross-react against the IDH2-R140Q mutant isozyme, suggesting a unique binding mode in IDH1-R132 that does not favorably exist in IDH2R140. Because no X-ray co-complex has been reported for this series, the exact mode of binding cannot be ascertained at this time. Preclinical data indicated 2HG inhibition and antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo (Table 3). These phenylglycine compounds appear to be excellent chemical tools for tumor biology investigation, but optimization of their properties is likely required for further therapeutic development. Co-complexes of IDH1-R132H with two different 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one inhibitors have been reported (Zheng et al., 2013), but the quality of the crystal structure data supporting the mechanism of inhibition is poor. AG-120, a selective, potent inhibitor of mutated IDH1, is currently in clinical development for the treatment of cancers with IDH1 mutations (Table 3), but there is currently no published information on this inhibitor. Another inhibitor of mutated IDH1 has been reported recently (Table 3) (Deng et al., 2014). Co-complex X-ray studies revealed that Compound1 binds mutated IDH1 allosterically at the dimer interface resulting in an asymmetric open conformation. Distinctively, Compound 1 displaces the conserved catalytic Tyr139 and further disrupts the Mg2+ binding network, consistent with kinetic results of competitive inhibition with respect to Mg2+, but not with aKG substrate. Others have reported modeling of inhibitors into the active site of IDH1, but experimental evidence is lacking (Chaturvedi et al., 2013; Davis et al., 2014). The first reported potent and selective IDH2 inhibitor was the urea-sulfonamide series, AGI-6780 (Wang et al., 2013), a timedependent slow-tight binder to IDH2-R140Q exhibiting noncompetitive inhibition with respect to substrate and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to NADPH, and nanomolar potency for 2HG inhibition (Table 3). This compound showed good inhibitory selectivity for IDH2-R140Q, with no effect on the closely related IDH1 and IDH1-R132H isozymes. At doses that effectively blocked 2HG to basal levels, AGI-6780 induced differentiation of TF-1 erythroleukemia and primary human AML cells in vitro, suggesting potential to reverse leukemic phenotype in AML tumors harboring the IDH2 mutation. Unlike the case of IDH1 above, the published structure of AGI-6780 co-complexed with IDH2-R140Q allows for detailed analysis of its inhibitory mechanism (Wang et al., 2013). In the X-ray structure, a single molecule
of AGI-6780 binds at the interface of two protomers (Figure 2C). The allosteric inhibition appears to arise from the ability of AGI6780 to keep the IDH2-R140Q mutant enzyme in an open orientation, thereby preventing the NADPH cofactor and substrate aKG from coming close to the catalytic Mg2+ binding site (see Figure 3). The highly symmetric AGI-6780 binding pocket extends deep into the protein interface and is closed over by loops composed of residues 152–167, which also fold over the binding pocket, providing anexplanation for the time-dependent inhibition kinetics. AGI-6780 makes several direct H-bond interactions from its urea group and amide nitrogen to Gln316, but a significant amount of binding energy arises from van der Waals contacts between the protein and hydrophobic surfaces of AGI-6780. The in vivo potential for this compound is not known, since its pharmacokinetic properties were not reported. Nevertheless, this effective mode of inhibition serves as an important molecular model for the design of bioisosteric compounds. OtherIDH2inhibitorsareunderdevelopment,notablyAG-221, a first-in-class, orally available inhibitor (Table 3) which demonstrated a survival advantage in a preclinical study of a primary human IDH2 mutant AML xenograft mouse model (Yen et al., 2013). Early phase I clinical trial data for AG-221 show promise, with meaningful clinical responses in evaluable AML patients harboring IDH2 mutations (Stein et al., 2014). To date, there is no published example of a molecule that inhibits both IDH1 and IDH2 mutant isoforms with equipotency.

Table 3.Characteristics of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Mutant IDH

PhenylglycineAGI-5198 (Popovici-Mulleretal., 2012; Rohleetal.,2013)
N-cyclohexyl-2-(N-(3-fluorophenyl)-2(2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)acetamido)2-(o-tolyl)acetamide IDH1-R132H

  • Good potency against enzyme and in U87cell line overexpressing R132H mutation (IC50= 70nM)
  • Good oral exposure in rodents at high doses (>300mg/kg), which were likely at levels saturating hepatic clearance mechanisms
  • Plasma 2HG inhibition > 90% (BID dosing) in xenograft model of U87-R132H tumors
  • Promoted differentiation of glioma cells via induced demethylation of histone H3K9me3 and expression of genes associated with gliogenic differentiation at near-complete 2HG inhibition
  • inhibited plasma 2HG and delayed growth of IDH1-mutant but not wild-type glioma xenografts in mice

ML309 (Davis et al.,2014)
2-(2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-1-yl)-N-(3fluorophenyl)acetamido)-N-cyclopentyl2-o-tolylacetamide IDH1-R132H IDH1-R132C dIC50=68nM(R132H)

  • Inhibited 2HG production in glioblastoma cell line (IC50 = 250 nM) with minimal cytotoxicity
  • 1-hydroxypyridin2-one Compounds2and3 (Zhengetal.,2013)
    6-substituted1-hydroxypyridin-2-oneIDH1-R132H IDH1-R132C
  • K i= 190 and 280 nM (forR132H)
  • Inhibited production of 2HG in IDH1 mutated cells

Undisclosed
AG-120 (Agios)
Undisclosed
IDH1

  • Orally available, selective, potent inhibitor
  • PhaseI studies ongoing in advanced solid tumors (NCT02073994; NCT02074839)

Allostery as an Approach to Drugging Metabolic Enzymes Is Important in Cancer All enzymes discussed in this article are allosterically targeted by small molecule modulators. With the exception of the enzymes of lipid metabolism, it is striking that there are very few examples of the regulation of metabolic enzymes by drug-like molecules at the catalytic site. We believe that this observation will hold true for the wider set of metabolic enzymes. Metabolic pathways are typically regulated by upstream and downstream metabolites through feedforward and feedback mechanisms. This regulation occurs typically through binding at allosteric sites, which have distinctly different properties relative to active sites. Therefore regulation can come from effectors that may have very different properties to the substrate. This review describes the potential therapeutic impact of specific allosteric regulators of PKM2, glutaminase, and IDH. Additionally, preclinical studies of tool compounds demonstrated that allosteric regulators of other enzymes involved in cancer cell metabolism could provide more therapeutic opportunities (Table 4). Substrates and products of metabolic enzymes tend to be small and very polar, and often include crucial metal ions and their ligands, so it is likely that targeting their catalytic pockets will yield molecules with similar properties. From a drug-discovery point of view, targeting allosteric sites is appealing as hydrophilic substrate-binding sites are generally not hospitable to strong interactions with small molecule drugs, which gain potency to a large extent through hydrophobic interactions. In addition, as activity of most metabolic enzymes is regulated by multimerization, the formation of multimers provides opportunity for binding sites to form at protein–protein interfaces.

Table 4. Examples of Allostery in Cancer Cell Metabolism

TH           Tyrosine hydroxylase         Haloperidol                                           Activator             Catecholamine metabolism               (Casu and Gale, 1981)
PDK1      Pyruvate dehydrogenase
kinase isozyme1                  3,5-diphenylpent-2-enoicacids                         Activator             TCAcycle                                                (Stroba et al., 2009)
BCKDK  Branched chain keto acid
dehydrogenase kinase   (S)-a-chloro-phenylpropionicacid[(S)-CPP]     Inhibitor              Branch-chain amino acid                   (Tso et al., 2013)
ACACA   Acetyl-CoA carboxylase
alpha                                 5-tetradecyloxy-2-furoicacid (TOFA)                  Inhibitor              Fatty acid  synthesis                            (Wang et al.,2009)

FBP1     Fructose-1,6
bisphosphatase1               Benzoxazole benzene sulfonamide1                    Inhibitor              Glycolysis                                        (von Geldern et al., 2006)
ALADA minolevulinate
dehydratase                     wALAD in1 benzimidazoles                                     Inhibitor              Haem synthesis                                    (Lentz et al., 2014)
TYR       Tyrosinase         2,3-dithiopropanol                                                   Inhibitor              Melanin metabolism                    (Wood and Schallreuter, 1991)
DBHD  opamine beta
hydroxylase-2H-phthalazinehydrazone (hydralazine;HYD)
2-1H-pyridinonehydrazone (2-hydrazinopyridine;HP)
2-quinoline-carboxylicacid (QCA)
1H-imidazole-4-aceticacid (imidazole-4-aceticacid;IAA)                             Inhibitor         Neurotransmitter synthesis                    (Townes et al.,1990)
DCTD   dCMP
deaminase        5-iodo-2’-deoxyuridine5’-triphosphate                                 Inhibitor          Nucleotide metabolism                      (Prusoff and Chang, 1968)
TYMP  Thymidine
phosphorylase     5’-O-tritylinosine (KIN59)                                                    Inhibitor          Nucleotide metabolism                         (Casanova et al.,2006)
TYMS Thymidylate
synthase         1,3-propanediphosphonicacid (PDPA)                                     Inhibitor          Nucleotide   metabolism                        (Lovelace et al.,2007)

Figure 3. Simplified Description of IDH Protein Motion The large domain (residues 1–103 and 286–414) forms nearly all of the NADPH cofactor binding residues and roughly half of the substrate binding residues.The small domain(residues 104–136 and 186–285) contains the remaining substrate binding residues and the metal binding residues. The interface between the two protomers is formed by both the small domain and the clasp region (residues 137–185). The large domain moves away from the small domain to facilitate NADPH cofactor exchange and substrate binding. The large domain then closes up against the small domain, thereby completing the substrate binding pocket and bringing the cofactor, substrate, and metal into close contact with each other and with the key catalytic residues to facilitate hydride transfer between substrate and cofactor and enzyme-assisted carboxylation/decarboxylation. Subsequent opening of the large domain from the small domain would enable product release and cofactor exchange to complete the catalytic cycle (Rendina et al., 2013; Xu et al., 2004).

7.3.2 Chemical proteomics approaches to examine novel histone modifications

Xin LiXiang David Li
Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Feb 2015; 24:80–90
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.10.015

Highlights

  • A variety of novel histone PTMs have been identified by MS-based methods.
  • Regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of most novel histone PTMs remain unknown, due to lack of knowledge about their readers, erasers and writers.
  • Chemical proteomics approaches provide valuable tools to characterize novel histone PTMs.
  • The application of photoaffinity probes helps the profiling of histone PTMs’ readers, erasers and writers.

Histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play key roles in the regulation of many fundamental cellular processes, such as gene transcription, DNA damage repair and chromosome segregation. Significant progress has been made on the detection of a large variety of PTMs on histones. However, the identification of these PTMs’ regulating enzymes (i.e. ‘writers’ and ‘erasers’) and functional binding partners (i.e. ‘readers’) have been a relatively slow-paced process. As a result, cellular functions and regulatory mechanisms of many histone PTMs, particularly the newly identified ones, remain poorly understood. This review focuses on the recent progress in developing chemical proteomics approaches to profile readers, erasers and writers of histone PTMs. One of such efforts involves the development of the Cross-Linking-Assisted and SILAC-based Protein Identification (CLASPI) approach to examine PTM-mediated protein–protein interactions.

Table 1    Novel histone PTMs                      functions
1             Lysine formylation             Arising from oxidative damage of DNA modification sites overlap with lysine acetylation and methylation, potentially interfere with normal regulation of these PTMs

2      Lysine propionylation  p300,c CREB-binding protein,c Sirt1,c Sirt2,c Sirt3c
Structurally similar with lysine acetylation, regulated by same set of enzymes, H3K23pr may be regulatory for cell metabolism
3    Lysine butyrylation       p300,c CREB-binding protein,c Sirt1,c Sirt2,c Sirt3c
Structurally similar with lysine acetylation, regulated by same set of enzymes
4    Lysine malonylation    Sirt5c
Changing the positively charged lysine to negatively charged residue, likely to affect the chromatin structure
5   Lysine succinylation    Sirt5c
A  mutation to mimic crotonyl lysine that changes lysine to glutamic acid of histone H4K31, reduces cell viability
6  Lysine crotonylation   Sirt1,c Sirt2,c Sirt3
Enriched at active gene promoters potential enhancers in mammalian genomes, male germ cell differentiation
7 Lysine 2-hydroxyiso
butyrylation                     HDAC1-3c
Associated with gene transcription
8  Lysine 4-oxononoylation    Modified by 4-oxo-2-nonenal, generated under oxidative stress, prevents nucleosome assembly in vitro
9 Lysine 5-hydroxylation   JMJD6
suppress lysine acetylation and methylation
10 Glutamine methylation   Nop1  (yeast), fibrillarin (huma)
human histone H2AQ105
11 Serine and
threonine GlcNAcylation  O-GlcNAc transferase
H2BS112 GlcNAcylation promotes K120 monoubiquitination, H3S10 GlcNAcylation suppresses phosphorylation of site
12 Serine and threonine acetylation
13 Serine palmitoylation   Lpcat1
catalyzed H4S47 palmitoylation, Ca2+-dependent, regulates global RNA synthesis
14  Cysteine glutathionylation
H3.2 and H3.3
conserved cysteine, but not H3.1, destabilize the nucleosomal structure
15 Cysteine fatty-acylation
H3.2 C110
16 Tyrosine hydroxylation

Fig. 1. Schematic description of a MS-based method for the identification of novel histone PTMs.

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1367593114001562-gr1.sml

Fig. 2. Chemical proteomics approaches to profile readers and erasers of histone PTMs.
(a) Photo-cross-linking strategy to capture proteins recognizing histone PTMs.
(b) Chemical structure of photoaffinity peptide probes.
Modifications of interest were labeled in green; photo-cross-linkers were labeled in red; chemical handles (alkyne) were labeled in blue; the sequence of probe C and probes 1–5 were derived from the
histone H3 1–15 amino acids residues, the sequence of probe 6 was derived from the histone H4 1–19 amino acids residues.
(c) Schematic for the CLASPI strategy to profile proteins that bind certain histone mark in whole-cell proteomes

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1367593114001562-gr2.sml

Consistent with our findings, Tate and coworkers [57] recently reported the development of a photoaffinity probe based on a succinylated glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) peptide for capturing Sirt5
as the corresponding desuccinylase. In addition to the application of photo-cross-linking strategy for examining the histone PTMs with known erasers, we recently used CLASPI with a photoaffinity
probe (probe 5, Figure 2b) to profile proteins that recognize a novel histone mark, crotonylation at histone H3K4 (H3K4cr, Table 1, Entry 6) [25], whose erasers were unknown. This study revealed,
for the first time, that Sirt3 can recognize the H3K4cr mark and efficiently catalyze the removal of histone crotonylation marks. More importantly, Sirt3 was found to regulate histone Kcr level in
cells and may potentially modulate gene transcription through its decrotonylase activity [58]. By converting bisubstrate inhibitors of HATs (histone peptides with certain lysine residues covalently
attached to Ac-CoA) to clickable photoaffinity probes (for example, probe 6, Figure 2b), they carried out the first systematic profiling of HATs in whole-cell proteomes [59].  We  anticipate  that  similar methods can be used to search for writers of novel histone PTMs such as Kmal, Ksucc, Kcr and Khib (Table 1) since the corresponding acyl-CoAs are presumed to be the acyl donors.

We have shown, in this review, the applications and recent advances of chemical tools, in combination with MS-based proteomics approaches, for the detection and characterization of histone
PTMs and their readers, erasers and writers.

This article belongs to a special issue

Omics Edited By Benjamin F Cravatt and Thomas Kodadek

Editorial overview: Omics: Methods to monitor and manipulate biological systems: recent advances in ‘omics’

Benjamin F Cravatt, Thomas Kodadek
Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Feb 2015; 24:v–vii
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.12.023

7.3.3 Misfolded Proteins – from Little Villains to Little Helpers… Against Cancer

Ansgar Brüning1,* and Julia Jückstock
Front Oncol. 2015; 5: 47
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389.2Ffonc.2015.00047

The application of cytostatic drugs targeting the high proliferation rates of cancer cells is currently the most commonly used treatment option in cancer chemotherapy. However, severe side effects and resistance mechanisms may occur as a result of such treatment, possibly limiting the therapeutic efficacy of these agents. In recent years, several therapeutic strategies have been developed that aim at targeting not the genomic integrity and replication machinery of cancer cells but instead their protein homeostasis. During malignant transformation, the cancer cell proteome develops vast aberrations in the expression of mutated proteins, oncoproteins, drug- and apoptosis-resistance proteins, etc. A complex network of protein quality-control mechanisms, including chaperoning by heat shock proteins (HSPs), not only is essential for maintaining the extravagant proteomic lifestyle of cancer cells but also represents an ideal cancer-specific target to be tackled. Furthermore, the high rate of protein synthesis and turnover in certain types of cancer cells can be specifically directed by interfering with the proteasomal and autophagosomal protein recycling and degradation machinery, as evidenced by the clinical application of proteasome inhibitors. Since proteins with loss of their native conformation are prone to unspecific aggregations and have proved to be detrimental to normal cellular function, specific induction of misfolded proteins by HSP inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, hyperthermia, or inducers of endoplasmic reticulum stress represents a new method of cancer cell killing exploitable for therapeutic purposes. This review describes drugs – approved, repurposed, or under investigation – that can be used to accumulate misfolded proteins in cancer cells, and particularly focuses on the molecular aspects that lead to the cytotoxicity of misfolded proteins in cancer cells.

Introduction:

How Do Proteins Fold and What Makes Misfolded Proteins Dangerous?

For an understanding of misfolded proteins, it is necessary to understand how cellular proteins attain and then further maintain their native conformation and how mature proteins and unfolded proteins are generated and converted into each other.

The principles and mechanisms of protein folding were one of the major research topics and achievements of biochemical research in the last century. For decades, Anfinsen’s model, which explained protein structure by thermodynamic principles applying to the polypeptide’s inherent amino acid sequence (1), was to be found in the introductory sections of all textbooks in protein biochemistry. According to Anfinsen’s thermodynamic hypothesis, the structure with the lowest conformational Gibbs free energy was finally taken by each single polypeptide due to a thermodynamic and stereochemical selection for side chain relations that form most stable and effective enzymes or structural proteins (1). Beyond this individual selection for the energetically most optimized conformation, evolution also selected for amino acid sequences that energetically allowed the smoothest and most “frustration-free” folding processes via a thermodynamic “folding funnel” (1–3).

Whereas Anfinsen’s model preferred the side chain elements as preferential organizing structures, recent hypotheses have inversely proposed the backbone hydrogen bonds as the driving force behind protein folding (4). According to the former theory, the finally folded protein was assumed to attain a single defined structure and shape (1, 4), and the unfolded conditions were described as being represented by a structureless statistical coil with nearly indefinite conformations – a so-called “featureless energy landscape” (4). The latter model assumes that a protein selects during its folding process from a limited repertoire of stable scaffolds of backbone hydrogen bond-satisfied α-helices and β-strands (4). This also implies that unfolded proteins are not structureless, shoelace-like linear amino acid alignments as often depicted in cartoons for graphical reasons, but actually, at least in part, retain discrete and stable scaffolds.

Once the protein has attained its final conformation, the problem of stabilizing this structure arises. Hydrophobic interactions that press non-polar side chains into the center of the protein are assumed to be a major force in protein stabilization (5, 6). At the protein surface, polar interactions, mainly by hydrogen bonds of polar side chains and backbone structure, are assumed to be of similar importance (6). Salt bridges and covalent disulfide bonds were identified as further forces supporting the stability of proteins (6). Accordingly, all conditions that interfere with these stabilizing forces, including extreme temperature, salt concentrations, and redox conditions, may lead to protein misfolding.

Another aspect that must be taken into account when studying protein folding relates to the very different conditions found in viable cells when compared to test tube conditions. Considering the life-cycle of a protein, each protein begins as a growing polypeptide chain protruding from the ribosomal exit tunnel and with several of its future interacting amino acid binding partners not even yet attached to the growing chain of the nascent polymer. In these ribosomal exit tunnels, first molecular interactions and helical structures are formed, and evidence exists to support the notion that the speed of translation is regulated by slow translating codon sequences just to optimize these first folding processes (7). After leaving the ribosomal tunnel, nascent polypeptides are also directly welcomed by chaperoning protein complexes, which facilitate and further guide the folding process of newly synthesized proteins (8). It is believed that a high percentage of nascent proteins are subject to immediate degradation due to early folding errors (9). Since many nascent proteins are synthesized in parallel at polysomes, the temporal and spatial proximity of unfolded peptides brings the additional risk of protein aggregation (10). Moreover, as mentioned above, even incomplete folding intermediates and partially folded states may form energetically but not physiologically active metastable structures (11, 12). An immediate, perinatal guidance and chaperoning of newborn proteins is therefore essential to creating functional, integrative proteins and to avoiding misfolded, function-less polypeptides with potentially cytotoxic features.

Since protein structure and function are coupled, misfolded proteins are, at first, loss-of-function proteins that might reduce cell viability, in particular when generated in larger quantities. A more dangerous feature of misfolded proteins, however, lies in their strong tendency toward abnormal protein–protein interactions or aggregations, which is reflected by the involvement of misfolded proteins and their aggregates in several amyloidotic diseases, including neurodegenerative syndromes such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease (13, 14). The fact that several of these intracellular and extracellular protein aggregates contain β-sheet-like structures and form filamentous structures also supports the notion that misfolded proteins are not necessarily structureless protein coils or unspecific aggregates, at least when they are formed by homogenous proteins as in the case of several neurodegenerative diseases (13). Paradoxically, these larger aggregates appear to reflect a cell protective mechanism so as to sequester or segregate smaller, but highly reactive, nucleation cores of condensing protein aggregates (13).

Unspecific hydrophobic interactions, in particular, have been held responsible for protein aggregations that form when terminally folded proteins lose their native conformation and expose buried hydrophobic side chains on their surface (15, 16). These hydrophobic interactions are also believed to be the most problematic issues with newly synthesized polypeptides on single ribosomes or polysomes (12). Once exposed to the surface, the hydrophobic structures will quickly find possible interaction partners. The intracellular milieu can be regarded as a “crowded environment” (17), fully packed with proteins in close contact and near to their solubility limit (8, 12). Thus, misfolded proteins not only aggregate among each other but may also attach to normal native proteins and inhibit their function and activity. Since such misfolding effects and interactions can also include nuclear DNA replication and repair enzymes (18), misfolded proteins may not only exert proteotoxic but also genotoxic effects, thereby endangering the entire cellular “interactome” (19) by interfering both with the integrity of the proteome (proteostasis) and the genome. Therefore, a misfolded protein is not simply a loss-of-function protein but also a promiscuous little villain that might act like a free radical, exerting uncontrolled danger to the cell.

The way in which cells deal with misfolded proteins strongly depends on the nature, strength, length, and location of the damage induced by the various insults. Management of misfolded proteins can be achieved by heat shock protein (HSP)-mediated protein renaturation (repair); proteasomal, lysosomal, or autophagosomal degradation (recycling); intracellular disposal (aggregation); or – in its last consequence if overwhelmed – by programed cell death (despair). In the following paragraphs, the cellular management of misfolded proteins is described and therapeutic options to induce misfolded proteins in cancer cells are presented.

Hsp90 and Hsp90 Inhibitors

The best-known and evolutionarily most-conserved mechanism to protect against protein misfolding is the binding and refolding process mediated by so-called heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs recognize unfolded or misfolded proteins and facilitate their restructuring in either an ATP-dependent (large HSPs) or energy-independent manner (low weight HSPs). HSP of 90 kDa (hsp90) is a constitutively expressed HSP and is regarded as the most common and abundantly expressed HSP in eukaryotic cells (20, 21). Although commonly referred to as hsp90, it consists of a variety of isoforms that are encoding for cytosolic (hsp90α1, α2, β), mitochondrial (TRAP1), or endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident (GRP94) forms. Its primary function is less that of a stress response protein and more to bind to a certain group of client proteins unable to maintain a stable configuration without being assisted by hsp90 (20, 22, 23). Steroid hormone receptors (estrogen receptor, glucocorticoid receptor), cell cycle regulatory proteins (CDK4, cyclin D, polo-like kinase), and growth factor receptors and their downstream targets (epidermal growth factor receptor 1, HER2, AKT) are among the best-studied client proteins of hsp90 (20–22). Also, several cancer-specific mutations generating otherwise instable oncoproteins, such as mutant p53 or bcr-abl, rely on hsp90 chaperoning to keep them in a soluble form, thereby facilitating the extravagant but vulnerable “malignant lifestyle” of hsp90-addicted cancer cells (21, 24). Accordingly, hsp90 has been assumed to be a prominent target, in particular for hormone-responsive and growth factor receptor amplification-dependent cancer types.

The microbial antibiotics geldanamycin and radicicol are the prototypes of hsp90 inhibitors. Based on intolerable toxicity, these molecules had to be chemically modified for application in humans, and most of the ongoing clinical studies with hsp90 inhibitors are aimed at identifying semi-synthetic derivatives of these lead compounds with an acceptable risk profile. Unfortunately, most recent studies using geldanamycin derivatives have provided disappointing results because of toxicities and insufficient efficacy (22, 25–27). Studies with radicicol (resorcinol) derivatives, in particular with ganetespib, appear to be more promising because of fewer adverse effects (22, 25–27). Liver and ocular (retinal) toxicities have been described as main adverse effects of hsp90 inhibition, and appeared to be experienced less with ganetespib than with most of the first generation hsp90 inhibitors (28).

Since both geldanamycin and radicicol target the highly conserved and unique ATP-binding domain of hsp90, new synthetic inhibitors have also been generated by rational drug design (22, 25–27). However, none of the various natural or synthetic hsp90 inhibitors under investigation have yet provided convincing clinical data, and future studies will show whether hsp90 can eventually be added to the list of effective cancer targets.

Hsp70, Hsp40, Hsp27, and HSF1

Hsp90 is assisted by several other HSPs and non-chaperoning co-factors, finally forming a large protein complex that recruits and releases client proteins in an energy-dependent manner (21, 22, 29). Client proteins for hsp90 are first bound to hsp70, which transfers the prospective client to hsp90 through the mediating help of an hsp70–hsp90 organizing protein (HOP). Binding of potential hsp90 client proteins to hsp70 is facilitated by its co-chaperone hsp40 (23, 30). Exposed hydrophobic amino acids, the typical feature of misfolded proteins, have been described as the main recognition signal for hsp70 proteins (15, 16, 31). Hsp70 proteins are not only supporter proteins for hsp90 but also represent a large chaperone family capable of acting independently of hsp90 and that can be found in all cellular compartments, including cytosol and nucleus (hsp70, hsp72, hsc70), mitochondria (GRP75 = mortalin), and the ER (GRP78 = BiP). Hsp70 chaperones may act on misfolded or nascent proteins either as “holders” or “folders” (31), which means that they prevent protein aggregation either by sheltering these aggregation-prone protein intermediates or by allowing these proteins to fold/refold into their native form in an assisted mechanism within a protected environment (31). Hsc70 (HSPA8) is a constitutively expressed major hsp70 isoform that is an essential factor for normal protein homeostasis even in unstressed cells (16). Misfolded proteins can also be destined by hsp70 proteins for their ultimate degradation. Proteins that expose KFERQ amino acid motifs on their surface during their unfolding process are preferentially bound by hsc70 and can be directed to lysosomes in a process called chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) (32, 33). In another mechanism of targeted protein degradation, interaction of hsc70 with the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) leads to ubiquitination of misfolded proteins and thus their destination of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation pathway (34, 35). Since hsc70 is essential for normal protein homeostasis and its knock-out is lethal in mice (16, 36), hsc70 inhibition might not be an optimal target for cancer-specific induction of misfolded proteins. This contrasts with the inducible forms of hsp70 such as hsp72 (HSPA1), which are upregulated in a cell stress-specific manner and are often found to be constitutively overexpressed in cancer tissues (16, 36). Transcriptional activation of these inducible HSPs is mediated by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which also regulates expression of hsp40 and the small HSP hsp27 by sharing a common promoter consensus sequence (heat shock response element) for HSF1 binding (37). HSF1 was also found to be constitutively activated in cancer tissues, modulating several cell cycle- and apoptosis-related pathways via its target genes (38–40). HSF1 itself is kept inactive in the cytosol by binding to hsp90, and the recruitment of hsp90 to misfolded proteins is considered a main activation mechanism to release monomeric HSF1 for its subsequent trimerization, post-translational activation, and nuclear translocation (24, 41). Also, since hsp90 inhibition causes hsp70 induction by HSF1 activation as a compensatory feed-back mechanism (24), combined inhibition of hsp90 and hsp70, or of hsp90 and HSF1 might be a more effective therapeutic approach for cancer treatment than single HSP targeting alone.

Indeed, several small-molecule inhibitors and aptamers for hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27 have been designed (16, 42–44), but most of them remain in pre-clinical development, or are either not applicable in humans or associated with intolerable side effects (16, 42–44). Notably, the natural bioflavonoid quercetin was shown to inhibit phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of the heat shock transcription factor HSF1, thus reducing HSP expression at its most basal level (45–48). This HSP and HSF1 inhibition may also contribute to the observed cancer-preventing effects of a flavonoid-rich diet, which includes fruits and vegetables. However, due to their low bioavailability, the concentrations of flavonoids needed to induce direct cytotoxic effects in cancer cells for (chemo-)therapeutic reasons are obviously not achievable in humans, even when applied as nutritional supplements (49). More effective and clinically more easily applicable inhibitors of HSF1 are therefore urgently sought. Promising HSF1 targeting strategies are currently under development, although are apparently not yet suited for clinical applications (24, 50, 51).

SP Williams Comment:

There is a new hsp90- inhibitor, ganetespib, which is active against ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Clinical trials are looking at this in cisplatin refractory cases. This was identified by a network analysis from a previous siRNA screen on ovarian cancer cells for pathways related to growth inhibition in an effort to find possible targets against CP resistance. The reference ishttp://www.researchgate.net/publication/253647952_Network_analysis_identifies_an_HSP90-central_hub_susceptible_in_ovarian_cancer

Protein Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation

Ubiquitin is a 76 amino acid polypeptide that can covalently be attached via its carboxy-terminus to free (lysyl) amino groups of proteins. Ubiquitination of proteins generates a cellular recognition motif that is involved in various functions ranging from transcription factor and protein kinase activation to DNA repair and protein degradation – depending on the extent and exact location of this post-translational modification (52, 53). Monoubiquitination of peptides of more than 20 amino acids was found to be a minimal requirement for protein degradation, but the canonical fourfold (poly-)ubiquitination with three further lysine (K48) side chain-linked ubiquitins appears to be most apt for an effective and rapid substrate recognition by the proteasome (54). This canonical polyubiquitin structure, as well as several other mixed polyubiquitin structures, can be recognized by the external 19S subunits of the 26S proteasome complex (54, 55). Prior to degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by the proteasomal 20S core subunit, the attached ubiquitin chains are released by the external 19S subunits for recycling, although they can also be co-degraded by the proteasome (56). After first passing the 19S subunit, the proteasomal target proteins are then unfolded in an energy-dependent manner and introduced into the narrow enzymatic cavity of proteasome for degradation. The barrel-shaped 20S proteasomal core complex contains three different proteolytic activities in duplicate (β1: caspase-like-, β2: tryptic-, and β5: chymotryptic activity), which initiate an efficient cleavage of the proteasomal target proteins into smaller peptides (57).

It is important to note that specific ubiquitination and ensuing proteasomal degradation is not an exclusive degradation mechanism of misfolded proteins but is also used to regulate the expression level of several native cell cycle regulatory proteins [cyclins, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), p53], signaling pathway molecules (β-catenin, IκB), and survival factors (mcl-1) during the course of normal protein homeostasis and cell cycle progression (53, 55, 57, 58). Moreover, proteasomes are involved in protein maturation, including the processing and maturation of the NF-κB transcription factor subunit p50 and the drug-resistant protein MDR1 (57). Therefore, targeting proteasomal activity has not only been of interest for the generation of misfolded, cytotoxic proteins but also for interfering with the expression of proteins involved in several hallmarks of cancer, including cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and apoptosis.

Proteasome Inhibitors

Bortezomib (PS-341, Velcade ™) has long been known as a paragon of a clinically applicable proteasome inhibitor. Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma (55, 59, 60). The great expectations of transferring the success of bortezomib to non-hematological solid cancer types have unfortunately not yet been fulfilled. It has been suggested that the high antibody-producing capacity of myeloma cells and thus the need for an efficient proteasomal degradation system to cope with the recycling process of misfolded ER-generated antibodies [ER-associated degradation process (ERAD); see below] might contribute to the high sensitivity of myeloma cells to bortezomib (9, 60, 61). Originally, bortezomib was developed to inhibit the proteasomal degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB, thus targeting the pro-inflammatory, but also cancer-promoting, effect of the NF-κB transcription factor (55, 60, 62). Recent insights indicate that the anti-tumoral effect of bortezomib is not only mediated by its NF-κB inhibitory activity but also by its ability to induce accumulation of misfolded proteins in the cytosol and the ER (60, 62–65). However, the use of bortezomib, even for highly sensitive multiple myeloma, is limited by its strong tendency to induce a proteasome inhibition-independent peripheral neuropathy by acting on neuronal mitochondria (61). Since neurodegenerative diseases are associated with protein misfolding and aggregation, the neuropathological effects of bortezomib might also be assumed to be mediated by the possible proteotoxic effects of bortezomib in neuronal cells. However, although proteasome inhibitor-induced neurodegeneration and inclusion body formation have been described in animal models, similarities between proteasome inhibitor-induced neurodegeneration and Parkinson’s disease-like histopathological features could not be established (66).

Table 1 Drugs described in this review and their mechanism of action (MOA), status of approval, and main adverse effects.

Aggresome Formation and Re-Solubilization: Role of HDAC6

As depicted above, proteasome and HSP inhibition will eventually lead to the accumulation of misfolded and polyubiquitinated proteins. Based on their inherent cohesive properties mediated by their exposed hydrophobic surfaces, both ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated misfolded proteins tend to adhere as small aggregates (Figure ​(Figure1).1). Individual ubiquitinated proteins and small ubiquitinated aggregates can be recognized by specific ubiquitin-binding proteins such as HDAC6 via its zinc finger ubiquitin-binding domain. HDAC6 is an unusual histone deacetylase located in the cytosol that regulates microtubule acetylation and is also able to bind ubiquitinated proteins. Based on HDAC6’s additional ability to bind to microtubule motor protein dynein, these aggregates are actively transported along the microtubular system into perinuclear aggregates around the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) (108384). Recognition of small, scattered ubiquitinated aggregates by HDAC6 has been described as being mediated by unanchored ubiquitin chains, which are generated by aggregate-attached ubiquitin ligase ataxin-3 (85). Whereas proteasomal target proteins are primarily tagged by K-48 (lysine-48) linked ubiquitins; K-63 linked ubiquitin chains appear to be a preferential modification for aggresomal targeting by HDAC6 and were assumed to mediate a redirection from proteasomal degradation to aggresome formation in the case of proteasomal inhibition or overload (86). Accordingly, aggresome formation is not an unspecific protein aggregation but a specific, ubiquitin-controlled sorting process. Furthermore, these aggresomes consist not only of misfolded and deposited proteins but have also been shown to contain a large amount of associated HSPs and ubiquitin-binding proteins, including HDAC6 [Figure ​[Figure1;1; (108384)]. Aggresomes contain, and are also surrounded by, large numbers of proteasomes (108384), which help to resolubilize these aggregates not only through their intrinsic proteasomal digestion but also by generating unanchored K63-branched polyubiquitin chains, which then stimulate HDAC6-mediated autophagy, another cellular disposal mechanism in involving HDAC6 (87). Notably, HDAC6 has also been shown to control further maturation of autophagic vesicles by stimulating autophagosome–lysosome fusion (Figure ​(Figure1)1) in a manner different from the normal autophagosome–lysosome fusion process (88).

Figure 1

Drugs that inhibit folding or disposal of misfolded proteins. Native mature proteins, nascent proteins, or misfolded proteins can be prevented from folding or refolding by small and large heat shock protein inhibitors, of which the hsp90 inhibitors based 

The HDAC6 multitalent also exerts its deacetylase activity on hsp90 and modifies hsp90 client binding by facilitating its chaperoning of steroid hormone receptors and HSF1 (8991). Recruitment of HDAC6 to ubiquitinated proteins leads to the dissociation of the repressive HDAC6/hsp90/HSF1 complex (91) and allows the release of transcriptionally active HSF1 to the nucleus. The engagement of HDAC6 at the aggresome–autophagy pathway hence also indirectly facilitates HSF1 activity. p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), another binding partner of HDAC6 and itself a multi-interactive, ATP-dependent chaperone (9294), is assumed to be involved not only in the specific separation of hsp90 and HSF1 by its “segregase” activity but also in the binding and remodeling of polyubiquitinated proteins before their delivery to the proteasome (9395). Additionally, p97/VCP dissociates polyubiquitinated proteins bound to HDAC6 (91). Accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins thus leads to HDAC6-dependent HSF1 activation and HSP induction, p97/VCP-dependent recruitment and “preparation” of polyubiquitinated proteins to proteasomes, and, in the case of pharmacological proteasome inhibition or physiological overload, to an HDAC6-dependent detoxification of polyubiquitinated proteins by the aggresome/autophagy pathway.

Pharmacological Inhibition of Aggresome Formation: HDAC6 Inhibitors

The central involvement of HDAC6 in aggresome formation and clearance makes HDAC6 one of the most interesting druggable targets for the induction of proteotoxicity in cancer cells. Also, HDAC6 has been found to be overexpressed in various cancer tissues, associated with advanced cancer stages and increased neoplastic transformation (96). Several pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors have been developed and tested in clinical studies for a variety of diseases, including different types of cancer (9798). Although hematological malignancies responded best to most of the already clinically tested pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors, the efficacy on solid cancer types was disappointingly poor and also associated with intolerable side effects (98). The unforeseeable pleiotropic epigenetic mechanism caused by non-specific (nuclear) histone deacetylase inhibitors may also limit their application for use in cancer treatment or HDAC6 inhibition, and has led to the search for selective HDAC6 inhibitors with no inhibitory effects on transcription modifying histone deacetylases. Through screening of small molecules under the rationale of selecting for tubulin deacetylase inhibitors with no cross-reactive histone deacetylase activity, the HDAC6 inhibitor tubacin was identified, and suggested for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases or to reduce cancer cell migration and angiogenesis (99). Hideshima et al. then proved the hypothesis that the combined use of bortezomib with tubacin leads to an accumulation of non-disposed cytotoxic proteins and aggregates in cancer cells (100). Indeed, a synergistic effect of these two drugs against multiple myeloma cells could be observed with no detectable toxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (100). This and follow-up studies also revealed the efficacy of tubacin as a single agent against leukemia cells (100101) and a chemo-sensitizing effect on cytotoxic drugs in breast- and prostate-cancer cells (102).

Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

Besides the cytosol, the ER is a major site for protein synthesis, in particular for those proteins destined for extracellular secretion, the cell membrane, or their retention within the endomembrane system. At the rough ER, nascent proteins are co-translationally transported across the ER membrane into the ER lumen (107), where they immediately encounter ER-resident chaperones, most prominently represented by hsp70 family member BiP/GRP78 and hsp90 family member GRP94 to help proper protein folding (15108). Most of these proteins also undergo post-translational modifications, including N- or O-linked glycosylation or protein disulfide bridge-building (109110), thereby adding further mechanisms of protein stabilization but also challenges for proper protein folding.

Similar to the situation in cytosolic protein biosynthesis, a large proportion of nascent proteins in the ER are assumed to misfold and to go “off-pathway” even under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, the ER lumen, narrowly sandwiched between two phospholipid membranes, has been described as an even more densely crowded environment than the cytosol, additionally facilitating unspecific protein attachments and aggregations (15). Since, with the exception of bulk reticulophagy, the lumen of the ER contains no endogenous protein degradation system, and the anterograde transport of ER proteins to the Golgi, lysosomes, endosomes, or the extracellular environment requires properly folded proteins, a retrograde transport of ER proteins into the cytosol remains the only possible mechanism of preventing misfolded protein accumulation within the ER. In this ERAD, misfolded proteins are re-exported across the ER membrane by a specific multi protein complex, ubiquitinated by ER membrane-integrated ubiquitin ligases, and finally become degraded by cytosolic proteasomes (111112). Notably, association of the cytosolic p97/VCP protein, an important interacting partner with HDAC6, has also been described as being an essential factor for driving the luminal proteins through the ER membrane pore complex into the cytosol (92,112).

Accordingly, all agents and conditions that interfere with these folding, maturation, and retranslocation processes can lead to protein misfolding and aggregation within this sensitive organelle. Chemicals that act as glycosylation inhibitors (tunicamycin), calcium ionophore inhibitors (A23187, thapsigargin), heavy metal ions (cadmium, lead), reducing agents (dithiothreitol), as well as conditions like hypoxia or oxidative stress, all lead to a phenomenon called ER stress (113116). In the ER-stress response, a triad of ER membrane-resident signaling receptors and transducers, IRE1, ATF6, and PERK1, become activated and lead to the transcriptional activation of cytosolic and ER-resident chaperones to cope with the increasing number of misfolded proteins. Induction of autophagy (reticulophagy; ER-phagy) may also occur and supports the removal of damaged regions of the ER (117). Under very intensive or even unmanageable ER-stress conditions, a variety of pro-apoptotic pathways ensue, including CHOP induction, c-JUN-kinase activation, and caspase cleavage (118120), which eventually prevails over the cytoprotective arm of the ER-stress response and may lead to apoptosis. Targeting of protein folding within the ER is therefore a very promising strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, in particular in those cancer cells characterized by an unphysiologically high protein secretion rate, such as, for example, multiple myeloma cells. Whereas the above-mentioned drugs such as tunicamycin or thapsigargin are valuable tools for cell biology studies, they display unacceptable toxicities in humans and are not suited for therapeutic applications. Interestingly, several already established drugs used for non-cancerous diseases have been described as inducing ER stress at pharmacologically relevant concentrations in humans as an off-target effect (113116). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib is an approved drug to treat various forms of arthritis and pain, but has also been described as exerting ER stress by functioning as a SERCA (sarco/ER Ca2+ ATPase) inhibitor (113116). However, although well tolerated in humans, the ER-stress-inducing ability of celecoxib seems to be weaker than that of direct SERCA inhibitors such as thapsigargin, and the usefulness of celecoxib against advanced cancer has been questioned (116). Various HIV protease inhibitors have been described as inducing ER stress in human tissue cells as a side effect (121123). In particular the HIV drugs lopinavir, saquinavir, and nelfinavir appear to be potent inducers of the ER-stress reaction, leading to a focused interest in these drugs for the induction of ER stress and apoptosis in cancer cells (116124128). In fact, with currently over 27 clinical studies in cancer patients2, nelfinavir, either used as a single agent or in combination therapy, is on the list of the most promising prospective candidates to induce selective proteotoxicity in cancer cells at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. Although the exact mechanism by which nelfinavir induces ER stress is not yet clear, it was shown that nelfinavir causes the upregulation of cytosolic and ER-resident HSPs, and induces apoptosis in cancer cells associated with caspase activation and induction of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor CHOP (125126). Nelfinavir was also shown to be combinable with bortezomib to enhance its activity on cancer cells (129). Since the retrograde transport of misfolded ER proteins is inhibited by the p97/VCP inhibitor eeyarestatin (130131), we recently tested the combination of eeyarestatin with nelfinavir but found no synergistic effect between these two agents in cervical cancer cells (132). In contrast, eeyarestatin markedly sensitized cervical cancer cells to bortezomib treatment (132), which was also observed in preceding studies in which eeyarestatin was used to augment the ER-stress-inducing ability of bortezomib in leukemia cells (131).

Induction of proteotoxicity through the accumulation of misfolded proteins has evolved as a new treatment modality in the fight against cancer. Clinically approved drugs such as bortezomib and carfilzomib provide evidence of the functionality of this approach. Newly developed agents like the HDAC6 inhibitor ACY-1215 or repurposed drugs like nelfinavir or disulfiram are currently being tested in clinical trials with cancer patients and will hopefully further broaden our arsenal of anti-cancer drugs. Notably, most proteotoxic agents that have been approved or are in clinical trials target the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) and are mainly effective in multiple myeloma cells, which rely on a functional ER/ERAD/UPS for excessive and proper antibody production. Similarly, it can be assumed that other cancer cell types with a marked secretory phenotype may also be affected by ER/ERAD/UPS inhibitors. In accordance with this notion, a recent dose-escalating Phase Ia study with nelfinavir as a single agent, that covered a large variety of solid cancer entities, revealed response rates primarily in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (140). In most other solid cancer types, however, the chemo-sensitizing or combination effects of proteotoxic drugs may prevail, and have become the focus of an increasing number of very promising clinical and pre-clinical studies.

7.3.4 Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) in epithelial cancer

Friend or Foe: Endoplasmic reticulum protein 29 (ERp29) in epithelial cancer

Chen S1Zhang D2

FEBS Open Bio. 2015 Jan 30; 5:91-8
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.fob.2015.01.004

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein 29 (ERp29) is a molecular chaperone that plays a critical role in protein secretion from the ER in eukaryotic cells. Recent studies have also shown that ERp29 plays a role in cancer. It has been demonstrated that ERp29 is inversely associated with primary tumor development and functions as a tumor suppressor by inducing cell growth arrest in breast cancer. However, ERp29 has also been reported to promote epithelial cell morphogenesis, cell survival against genotoxic stress and distant metastasis. In this review, we summarize the current understanding on the biological and pathological functions of ERp29 in cancer and discuss the pivotal aspects of ERp29 as “friend or foe” in epithelial cancer.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is found in all eukaryotic cells and is complex membrane system constituting of an extensively interlinked network of membranous tubules, sacs and cisternae. It is the main subcellular organelle that transports different molecules to their subcellular destinations or to the cell surface [10,85].

The ER contains a number of molecular chaperones involved in protein synthesis and maturation. Of the ER chaperones, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-like proteins are characterized by the presence of a thioredoxin domain and function as oxido-reductases, isomerases and chaperones [33]. ERp29 lacks the active-site double-cysteine (CxxC) motif and does not belong to the redox-active PDIs [5,47]. ERp29 is recognized as a characterized resident of the cellular ER, and it is expressed ubiquitously and abundantly in mammalian tissues [50]. Protein structural analysis showed that ERp29 consists of N-terminal and C-terminal domains [5]: N-terminal domain involves dimerization whereas the C-terminal domain is essential for substrate binding and secretion [78]. The biological function of ERp29 in protein secretion has been well established in cells [8,63,67].

ERp29 is proposed to be involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) as a factor facilitating transport of synthesized secretory proteins from the ER to Golgi [83]. The expression of ERp29 was demonstrated to be increased in cells exposed to radiation [108], sperm cells undergoing maturation [42,107], and in certain cell types both under the pharmacologically induced UPR and under the physiological conditions (e.g., lactation, differentiation of thyroid cells) [66,82]. Under ER stress, ERp29 translocates the precursor protein p90ATF6 from the ER to Golgi where it is cleaved to be a mature and active form p50ATF by protease (S1P and S2P) [48]. In most cases, ERp29 interacts with BiP/GRP78 to exert its function under ER stress [65].

ERp29 is considered to be a key player in both viral unfolding and secretion [63,67,77,78] Recent studies have also demonstrated that ERp29 is involved in intercellular communication by stabilizing the monomeric gap junction protein connexin43 [27] and trafficking of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator to the plasma membrane in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells [90]. It was recently reported that ERp29 directs epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) toward the Golgi, where it undergoes cleavage during its biogenesis and trafficking to the apical membrane [40]. ERp29 expression protects axotomized neurons from apoptosis and promotes neuronal regeneration [111]. These studies indicate a broad biological function of ERp29 in cells.

Recent studies demonstrated a tumor suppressive function of ERp29 in cancer. It was found that ERp29 expression inhibited tumor formation in mice [4,87] and the level of ERp29 in primary tumors is inversely associated with tumor development in breast, lung and gallbladder cancer [4,29].

However, its expression is also responsible for cancer cell survival against genotoxic stress induced by doxorubicin and radiation [34,76,109]. The most recent studies demonstrate other important roles of ERp29 in cancer cells such as the induction of mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) and epithelial morphogenesis [3,4]. MET is considered as an important process of transdifferentiation and restoration of epithelial phenotype during distant metastasis [23,52]. These findings implicate ERp29 in promoting the survival of cancer cells and also metastasis. Hence, the current review focuses on the novel functions of ERp29 and discusses its pathological importance as a “friend or foe” in epithelial cancer.

2. ERp29 regulates mesenchymal–epithelial transition

2.1. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and MET

The EMT is an essential process during embryogenesis [6] and tumor development [43,96]. The pathological conditions such as inflammation, organ fibrosis and cancer progression facilitate EMT [16]. The epithelial cells after undergoing EMT show typical features characterized as: (1) loss of adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) and apical–basal polarity; (2) cytoskeletal reorganization and distribution; and (3) gain of aggressive phenotype of migration and invasion [98]. Therefore, EMT has been considered to be an important process in cancer progression and its pathological activation during tumor development induces primary tumor cells to metastasize [95]. However, recent studies showed that the EMT status was not unanimously correlated with poorer survival in cancer patients examined [92].

In addition to EMT in epithelial cells, mesenchymal-like cells have capability to regain a fully differentiated epithelial phenotype via the MET [6,35]. The key feature of MET is defined as a process of transdifferentiation of mesenchymal-like cells to polarized epithelial-like cells [23,52] and mediates the establishment of distant metastatic tumors at secondary sites [22]. Recent studies demonstrated that distant metastases in breast cancer expressed an equal or stronger E-cadherin signal than the respective primary tumors and the re-expression of E-cadherin was independent of the E-cadherin status of the primary tumors [58]. Similarly, it was found that E-cadherin is re-expressed in bone metastasis or distant metastatic tumors arising from E-cadherin-negative poorly differentiated primary breast carcinoma [81], or from E-cadherin-low primary tumors [25]. In prostate and bladder cancer cells, the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like cells were interacted with metastatic epithelial-like cells to accelerate their metastatic colonization [20]. It is, therefore, suggested that the EMT/MET work co-operatively in driving metastasis.

2.2. Molecular regulation of EMT/MET

E-cadherin is considered to be a key molecule that provides the physical structure for both cell–cell attachment and recruitment of signaling complexes [75]. Loss of E-cadherin is a hallmark of EMT [53]. Therefore, characterizing transcriptional regulators of E-cadherin expression during EMT/MET has provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of cell–cell adhesion and the acquisition of migratory properties during carcinoma progression [73].

Several known signaling pathways, such as those involving transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Notch, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways, have been shown to trigger epithelial dedifferentiation and EMT [28,97,110]. These signals repress transcription of epithelial genes, such as those encoding E-cadherin and cytokeratins, or activate transcription programs that facilitate fibroblast-like motility and invasion [73,97].

The involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in controlling EMT has been emphasized [11,12,18]. MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs (∼23 nt) that silence gene expression by pairing to the 3′UTR of target mRNAs to cause their posttranscriptional repression [7]. MiRNAs can be characterized as “mesenchymal miRNA” and “epithelial miRNA” [68]. The “mesenchymal miRNA” plays an oncogenic role by promoting EMT in cancer cells. For instance, the well-known miR-21, miR-103/107 are EMT inducer by repressing Dicer and PTEN [44].

The miR-200 family has been shown to be major “epithelial miRNA” that regulate MET through silencing the EMT-transcriptional inducers ZEB1 and ZEB2 [13,17]. MiRNAs from this family are considered to be predisposing factors for cancer cell metastasis. For instance, the elevated levels of the epithelial miR-200 family in primary breast tumors associate with poorer outcomes and metastasis [57]. These findings support a potential role of “epithelial miRNAs” in MET to promote metastatic colonization [15].

2.3. ERp29 promotes MET in breast cancer

The role of ERp29 in regulating MET has been established in basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. It is known that myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation initiates to myosin-driven contraction, leading to reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and formation of stress fibers [55,56]. ERp29 expression in this type of cells markedly reduced the level of phosphorylated MLC [3]. These results indicate that ERp29 regulates cortical actin formation through a mechanism involved in MLC phosphorylation (Fig. 1). In addition to the phenotypic change, ERp29 expression leads to: expression and membranous localization of epithelial cell marker E-cadherin; expression of epithelial differentiation marker cytokeratin 19; and loss of the mesenchymal cell marker vimentin and fibronectin [3] (Fig. 1). In contrast, knockdown of ERp29 in epithelial MCF-7 cells promotes acquisition of EMT traits including fibroblast-like phenotype, enhanced cell spreading, decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of vimentin [3,4]. These findings further substantiate a role of ERp29 in modulating MET in breast cancer cells.

Fig. 1  ERp29 triggers mesenchymal–epithelial transition. Exogenous expression of ERp29 in mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells inhibits stress fiber formation by suppressing MLC phosphorylation. In addition, the overexpressed ERp29 decreases the 

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2.4. ERp29 targets E-cadherin transcription repressors

The transcription repressors such as Snai1, Slug, ZEB1/2 and Twist have been considered to be the main regulators for E-cadherin expression [19,26,32]. Mechanistic studies revealed that ERp29 expression significantly down-regulated transcription of these repressors, leading to their reduced nuclear expression in MDA-MB-231 cells [3,4] (Fig. 2). Consistent with this, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway which is an important up-stream regulator of Slug and Ets1 was highly inhibited [4]. Apparently, ERp29 up-regulates the expressions of E-cadherin transcription repressors through repressing ERK pathway. Interestingly, ERp29 over-expression in basal-like BT549 cells resulted in incomplete MET and did not significantly affect the mRNA or protein expression of Snai1, ZEB2 and Twist, but increased the protein expression of Slug [3]. The differential regulation of these transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin by ERp29 in these two cell-types may occur in a cell-context-dependent manner.

Fig. 2  ERp29 decreases the expression of EMT inducers to promote MET. Exogenous expression of ERp29 in mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells suppresses transcription and protein expression of E-cadherin transcription repressors (e.g., ZEB2, SNAI1 and Twist), ..

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2.5. ERp29 antagonizes Wnt/ β-catenin signaling

Wnt proteins are a family of highly conserved secreted cysteine-rich glycoproteins. The Wnt pathway is activated via a binding of a family member to a frizzled receptor (Fzd) and the LDL-Receptor-related protein co-receptor (LRP5/6). There are three different cascades that are activated by Wnt proteins: namely canonical/β-catenin-dependent pathway and two non-canonical/β-catenin-independent pathways that include Wnt/Ca2+ and planar cell polarity [84]. Of note, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has been extensively studied, due to its important role in cancer initiation and progression [79]. The presence of Wnt promotes formation of a Wnt–Fzd–LRP complex, recruitment of the cytoplasmic protein Disheveled (Dvl) to Fzd and the LRP phosphorylation-dependent recruitment of Axin to the membrane, thereby leading to release of β-catenin from membrane and accumulation in cytoplasm and nuclei. Nuclear β-catenin replaces TLE/Groucho co-repressors and recruits co-activators to activate expression of Wnt target genes. The most important genes regulated are those related to proliferation, such as Cyclin D1 and c-Myc [46,94], which are over-expressed in most β-catenin-dependent tumors. When β-catenin is absent in nucleus, the transcription factors T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factors (TCF/LEF) recruits co-repressors of the TLE/Groucho family and function as transcriptional repressors.

β-catenin is highly expressed in the nucleus of mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 cells. ERp29 over-expression in this type of cells led to translocation of nuclear β-catenin to membrane where it forms complex with E-cadherin [3] (Fig. 3). This causes a disruption of β-catenin/TCF/LEF complex and abolishes its transcription activity. Indeed, ERp29 significantly decreased the expression of cyclin D1/D2 [36], one of the downstream targets of activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling [94], indicating an inhibitory effect of ERp29 on this pathway. Meanwhile, expression of ERp29 in this cell type increased the nuclear expression of TCF3, a transcription factor regulating cancer cell differentiation while inhibiting self-renewal of cancer stem cells [102,106]. Hence, ERp29 may play dual functions in mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by: (1) suppressing activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling via β-catenin translocation; and (2) promoting cell differentiation via activating TCF3 (Fig. 3). Because β-catenin serves as a signaling hub for the Wnt pathway, it is particularly important to focus on β-catenin as the target of choice in Wnt-driven cancers. Though the mechanism by which ERp29 expression promotes the disassociation of β-catenin/TCF/LEF complex in MDA-MB-231 cells remains elusive, activating ERp29 expression may exert an inhibitory effect on the poorly differentiated, Wnt-driven tumors.

Fig. 3  ERp29 over-expression “turns-off” activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 cells, high expression of nuclear β-catenin activates its downstream signaling involved in cell cycles and cancer stem cell 

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3. ERp29 regulates epithelial cell integrity

3.1. Cell adherens and tight junctions

Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are composed of transmembrane proteins that adhere to similar proteins in the adjacent cell [69]. The transmembrane region of the TJs is composed mainly of claudins, tetraspan proteins with two extracellular loops [1]. AJs are mediated by Ca2+-dependent homophilic interactions of cadherins [71] which interact with cytoplasmic catenins that link the cadherin/catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton [74].

The cytoplasmic domain of claudins in TJs interacts with occludin and several zona occludens proteins (ZO1-3) to form the plaque that associates with the cytoskeleton [99]. The AJs form and maintain intercellular adhesion, whereas the TJs serve as a diffusion barrier for solutes and define the boundary between apical and basolateral membrane domains [21]. The AJs and TJs are required for integrity of the epithelial phenotype, as well as for epithelial cells to function as a tissue [75].

The TJs are closely linked to the proper polarization of cells for the establishment of epithelial architecture[86]. During cancer development, epithelial cells lose the capability to form TJs and correct apico–basal polarity [59]. This subsequently causes the loss of contact inhibition of cell growth [91]. In addition, reduction of ZO-1 and occludin were found to be correlated with poorly defined differentiation, higher metastatic frequency and lower survival rates [49,64]. Hence, TJs proteins have a tumor suppressive function in cancer formation and progression.

3.2. Apical–basal cell polarity

The apical–basal polarity of epithelial cells in an epithelium is characterized by the presence of two specialized plasma membrane domains: namely, the apical surface and basolateral surface [30]. In general, the epithelial cell polarity is determined by three core complexes. These protein complexes include: (1) the partitioning-defective (PAR) complex; (2) the Crumbs (CRB) complex; and (3) the Scribble complex[2,30,45,51]. PAR complex is composed of two scaffold proteins (PAR6 and PAR3) and an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and is localized to the apical junction domain for the assembly of TJs [31,39]. The Crumbs complex is formed by the transmembrane protein Crumbs and the cytoplasmic scaffolding proteins such as the homologue of Drosophila Stardust (Pals1) and Pals-associated tight junction protein (Patj) and localizes to the apical [38]. The Scribble complex is comprised of three proteins, Scribble, Disc large (Dlg) and Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) and is localized in the basolateral domain of epithelial cells [100].

Fig. 4  ERp29 regulates epithelial cell morphogenesis. Over-expression of ERp29 in breast cancer cells induces the transition from a mesenchymal-like to epithelial-like phenotype and the restoration of tight junctions and cell polarity. Up-regulation and membrane 

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The current data from breast cancer cells supports the idea that ERp29 can function as a tumor suppressive protein, in terms of suppression of cell growth and primary tumor formation and inhibition of signaling pathways that facilitate EMT. Nevertheless, the significant role of ERp29 in cell survival against drugs, induction of cell differentiation and potential promotion of MET-related metastasis may lead us to re-assess its function in cancer progression, particularly in distant metastasis. Hence, it is important to explore in detail the ERp29’s role in cancer as a “friend or foe” and to elucidate its clinical significance in breast cancer and other epithelial cancers. Targeting ERp29 and/or its downstream molecules might be an alternative molecular therapeutic approach for chemo/radio-resistant metastatic cancer treatment

7.3.5 Putting together structures of epidermal growth factor receptors

Bessman NJ, Freed DM, Lemmon MA
Curr Opin Struct Biol. 2014 Dec; 29:95-101
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.sbi.2014.10.002

Highlights

  • Several studies suggest flexible linkage between extracellular and intracellular regions. • Others imply more rigid connections, required for allosteric regulation of dimers. • Interactions with membrane lipids play important roles in EGFR regulation. • Cellular studies suggest half-of-the-sites negative cooperativity for human EGFR.

Numerous crystal structures have been reported for the isolated extracellular region and tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its relatives, in different states of activation and bound to a variety of inhibitors used in cancer therapy. The next challenge is to put these structures together accurately in functional models of the intact receptor in its membrane environment. The intact EGFR has been studied using electron microscopy, chemical biology methods, biochemically, and computationally. The distinct approaches yield different impressions about the structural modes of communication between extracellular and intracellular regions. They highlight possible differences between ligands, and also underline the need to understand how the receptor interacts with the membrane itself.

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Growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been the subjects of intense study for many years [1,2]. There are 58 RTKs in the deduced human
proteome, and all play key roles in regulating cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell survival and metabolism, cell migration, and cell cycle control [3].  Importantly, aberrant activation
of RTK signaling by mutation, gene amplification, gene translocation or other mechanisms has been causally linked to cancers, diabetes, inflammation, and other diseases. These observations have prompted
the development of many targeted therapies that inhibit RTKs such as EGFR [4], Kit, VEGFR, or their ligands — typically employing therapeutic antibodies [5] or small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors [6].
Following the initial discoveries for EGFR [7] and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) [8] that ligand-stabilized dimers are essential for RTK signaling, structural studies over the past decade
or so have guided development of quite sophisticated mechanistic views[1]. Each RTK has a ligand-binding extracellular region (ECR) that is linked by a single transmembrane a-helix to an intracellular
tyrosine kinase domain (TKD). Structures of the isolated ECRs and TKDs from several RTKs point to surprising mechanistic diversity across the larger family [1]. Unliganded RTKs exist as an equilibrium
mixture of inactive monomers, inactive dimers and active dimers (Figure 1), except for the extreme case of the insulin receptor (IR), which is covalently dimerized [9]. Extracellular ligand can bind to monomers,
to inactive dimers, or to active dimers — in each case pushing the equilibria shown in Figure 1 towards the central ligand-bound active dimer. Thus, ligand binding can drive receptor dimerization (Figure 1,
upper), or can promote inactive-to-active conformational transitions in dimers (Figure 1, lower). Regardless of pathway, the intracellular TKD of the ligand-stabilized dimer becomes activated either through
trans-autophosphorylation or through induced allosteric changes [1,10]. Roles for other parts of the receptor in RTK activation, including the juxtamembrane (JM) and transmembrane (TM) segments, have
also become clearer. The key current challenge for the field is to assemble data from many studies of isolated RTK parts into coherent views of how the intact receptors are regulated in their native membranes.
We will focus here on recent efforts to do this for the EGFR (or ErbB receptor) family. The missing links in intact RTKs: flexible or rigid? A central goal in extrapolating to the intact RTKs from studies of
isolated soluble domains is to understand how the individual parts of the receptor communicate with one another. The methods that have been used to produce and study the isolated domains inevitably
yield the impression that inter-domain linkers are flexible and disordered. For example, extracellular juxtamembrane regions have typically only been observed as C-terminal extensions of  the soluble ECR.
Similarly, intracellular juxtamembrane regions have been encountered predominantly as N-terminal extensions of TKD constructs, or as short peptides. In each of these contexts, the JM regions are incomplete,
and may appear disordered and flexible simply because key structural restraints have been removed. Nonetheless, this possible artifact has strongly influenced thinking about linkages between the extracellular
and intracellular regions [11], and in turn about mechanisms of RTK signaling. Highly flexible linkages between extracellular and intracellular regions of RTKs are fully consistent with simpler ligand-induced
dimerization models for transmembrane signaling by RTKs. It is more difficult, however, to understand how subtle allosteric communication across the membrane could be achieved if the linkages are truly
flexible. For example, since flexible linkage implies structural independence of the extracellular and intracellular regions, it is difficult to envision how a transition from inactive to active dimer in Figure 1
could be controlled precisely by ligand without more rigid (or restricted) connections.

Recent experimental studies with intact — or nearly intact — EGFR differ in the impressions they provide about how flexibly or rigidly the extracellular and intracellular regions are linked. Springer’s laboratory used cysteine crosslinking and mutagenesis approaches to investigate this issue for EGFR expressed in Ba/F3 cells [12]. They were unable to identify any specific JM or TM region interfaces
that were required for EGFR signaling, leading them to argue that the linkage across the membrane is too flexible to transmit a specific orientation between the extracellular and intracellular regions.
Consistent with this, negative-stain electron microscopy studies of (nearly) full-length EGFR in dodecylmaltoside micelles showed that a given extracellular dimer can be linked to several different
arrangements of the intracellular kinase domain [13,14]. Similarly, dimers driven by inhibitor binding to the intracellular TKD could couple to multiple different ECR conformations [13]. Biochemical
studies are also consistent with such structural independence of the extracellular and intracellular  regions [15,16]. Contrasting with these observations, however, Schepartz and colleagues have
reported that different precise conformations within the EGFR intracellular region can be induced by distinct activating ligands [17]. They used a method called bipartite tetracysteine display that
reports on formation of a chemically detectable tetracysteine motif when two cysteine pairs come together at  the dimer  interface. EGF activation of the receptor led to formation of a  tetracysteine
motif that requires the intracellular JM helix  [18] shown in Figure 2a to form antiparallel coiled-coil dimers  (Figure 2b/c) as proposed by Kuriyan and colleagues [19,20]. Surprisingly, transforming
growth factor-a (TGFa),which also activates EGFR, did not bring these two cysteine pairs together in the same way — arguing that TGFa does not induce formation of the same intracellular antiparallel
coiled-coil. Instead, activation of EGFR with TGFa (but not EGF) stabilized an alternative tetracysteine motif, consistent with a different intracellular JM structure. Evidence for ‘inside-out’ signaling
in EGFR has also been reported, where alterations in the intracellular JM region directly influence allosteric EGF binding to the ECR of the intact receptor analyzed in CHO cells [21–23]. The contradictory
views of flexibility versus rigidity  in linkages between the domains leave the path to understanding the intact receptor unclear, although it seems  reasonable doubt that  the inactive dimers known to
form in the absence of ligand [24–26] could be regulated by extracellular ligand if all linkages are always highly flexible.
Does the membrane hold the key?
All of the studies that support direct conformational communication between the extracellular and intracellular regions of EGFR were performed in cells [17,21,22]. By contrast, most of those that
explicitly suggest otherwise were performed in detergent micelles [13,14,15] — where the potentially important influences of specific membrane lipids (or membrane geometry) are absent. Studies of intact  EGFR in liposomes with defined lipid compositions [27] have shown that the ganglioside GM3 inhibits ligand-independent activation (and dimerization) of the receptor, apparently through interactions with a  site in its extracellular JM region. McLaughlin and colleagues [28,29] also proposed a model in which interaction of the intracellular JM region (and TKD) with anionic phospholipids in the inner leaflet of  the plasma membrane (notably PtdIns(4,5)P2) exerts an inhibitory effect that must be overcome in order for EGFR to signal. Association of the JM and TM regions with specific membrane lipids is likely to  define specific structures in the linkages between the EGFR extracellular and intracellular regions that are more well-defined (and potentially rigid) than is typically appreciated. Recent studies have begun to  shed some structural light on how membrane interactions with the intracellular JM region of EGFR might influence the signaling mechanism. Endres et al. [20] found that simply tethering the complete  intracellular region of EGFR to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane maintains the TKD in a largely monomeric state and inhibits its kinase activity. Parallel computational studies [30] suggest that this  results from the previously proposed [29] inhibitory interaction of the JM and TKD regions of EGFR with the negatively charged membrane surface. The data of Endres et al. [20] further indicated that TM-mediated dimerization reverses this inhibitory effect. Moreover, NMR studies of a 60-residue peptide containing the TM and part of  the JM region solubilized in lipid bicelles led them to conclude that specific  TM dimerization through an N terminal GxxxG motif stabilizes formation of an antiparallel coiled-coil between the two JM fragments in the dimer — the same JM coiled-coil shown in Figure 2b/c that was  investigated in the bipartite tetracysteine display studies of  intact EGF-bound EGFR described above [17,19]. Independent solid-state NMR studies of a similar TM-JM peptide from the EGFR relative
ErbB2 in vesicles containing acidic phospholipids [31] further suggested that an activating mutation in the TM domain leads to release of  the JM region from the anionic membrane surface. Collectively,
these data suggest that ligand-induced dimerization of the receptor (or reorientation of receptors within a dimer) may engage the TM domain in a specific dimer that promotes both the formation of activating
interactions in the JM region and the disruption of inhibitory interactions between the JM region (and possibly TKD) and the membrane surface.

Negative cooperativity 
A key characteristic of ligand binding at the cell surface to EGFR [36], IR [37], and other receptors [38] is negative cooperativity — which is lost when soluble forms of the ECR from human EGFR [39]
or IR [40] are studied in isolation. Several studies have shown that intracellular and/or transmembrane regions are required for this negative cooperativity to be manifest [21,22,40,41], implying that
these parts of the receptor contribute to breaking the symmetry of the dimer — as required for the two sites to have distinct binding properties [42]. Such propagation of dimer asymmetry across the
membrane would surely require defined structures in the regions that connect extracellular and intracellular regions, and is difficult to reconcile with highly flexible JM linkers.
In brief, binding of one ligand stabilizes a singly-liganded asymmetric dimer in which the unoccupied ligand-binding site is compromised [43]. The binding affinity of the second ligand is thus reduced,
constituting a half-of-the-sites mode of negative cooperativity [44]. Leahy’s group has provided important evidence consistent with a similar mechanism in the cases of human EGFR and ErbB4 [16].
By comparing human ErbB receptor ECR dimer crystal structures with different bound ligands, Leahy and colleagues went on to identify two types of dimer interface [16], a ‘flush’ interface that resembles
the asymmetric (singly-liganded) dimer seen for the Drosophila EGFR [43] and a ‘staggered’ interface seen in the ECRs from EGFR (with bound EGF [12]) and ErbB4 (with bound neuregulin1b[16]).
These observations suggest that the ‘flush’ interface drives the most  stable dimers, which are singly liganded (Figure 2b). Binding of the second ligand is weaker, and also forces the dimer interface
into the less stable ‘staggered’ conformation (Figure 2c). Taken together, these findings suggest both a structural basis for negative cooperativity and a possible structural distinction between singly-liganded
and doubly-liganded ErbB receptor dimers.

A model for EGFR activation
The model shown in Figure 2 summarizes key proposed steps in the activation of human EGFR. In the absence of ligand, the ECR exists in a tethered conformation with the domain II ‘dimerization
arm’ engaged in an intramolecular interaction with domain IV that occludes the dimer interface [49]. The TKDs and the N-terminal portions of each intracellular JM region are thought to be engaged
in autoinhibitory interactions with the membrane surface [20,28,29,30].

Figure 2. More detailed view of EGF-induced activation of EGFR, as described in the text.
In the absence of ligand (a), the ECR adopts a tethered conformation, with an autoinhibitory tether interaction between domains II and IV. The TKD and JM regions lie against the membrane, making what
are believed to be additional autoinhibitory interactions. Domains I and III of the ECR are colored red, and domains II and IV are green. The JM helix is shown as a short cylinder and labeled in magenta.
The N-lobes and C-lobes of the kinase are also labeled, and both helix aC (blue) and the short helix in the activation loop (green) that interacts with aC to inhibit the TKD [50] are shown. The C-tail is
also depicted as a curve bearing 5 tyrosines. As described in the text, binding of a single ligand (b) induces formation of a singly-liganded dimer with a ‘flush’ (presumed asymmetric) ECR dimer interface.
The JM region forms an anti-parallel helix, as labeled in magenta, and the TKDs form an asymmetric dimer in which the activator (grey) allosterically activates the receiver (shown with an amber N-lobe).
It is not clear how the extracellular and intracellular asymmetry is structurally related, if at all. Finally, a second ligand binds to yield a more symmetric dimer with the ‘staggered’ ECR interface (c) described
in the text.

Conclusions Our mechanistic understanding of EGFR and its relatives has advanced dramatically in recent years, and the past year or two has seen substantial progress in putting the results of studies
with isolated domains together into initial views of how the intact receptor works. New insights into the origin of allosteric regulation of EGFR have been gained through a combination of innovative
structural, biochemical, cellular, and computational studies. A self-consistent picture is beginning to emerge. Two key issues remain unclear, however, and represent the current frontiers in studies of EGFR.
The first — for which we describe progress in this review — centers on the influence of specific interactions of the receptor with membrane lipids, which seem likely to define the structural ‘connections’
between extracellular and intracellular regions of the receptor. The second centers on the role of the carboxy-terminal 230 amino acids, which is believed to play a regulatory role for which little detail has
so far been defined [55].
(10PRE4140108).
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7.3.6 Complex Relationship between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

Bessman NJ1Bagchi A2Ferguson KM2Lemmon MA3.
Cell Rep. 2014 Nov 20; 9(4):1306-17.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.010

Highlights

  • Preformed extracellular dimers of human EGFR are structurally heterogeneous • EGFR dimerization does not stabilize ligand binding
    • Extracellular mutations found in glioblastoma do not stabilize EGFR dimerization • Glioblastoma mutations in EGFR increase ligand-binding affinity

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays pivotal roles in development and is mutated or overexpressed in several cancers. Despite recent advances, the complex allosteric regulation of EGFR remains incompletely understood. Through efforts to understand why the negative cooperativity observed for intact EGFR is lost in studies of its isolated extracellular region (ECR), we uncovered unexpected relationships between ligand binding and receptor dimerization. The two processes appear to compete. Surprisingly, dimerization does not enhance ligand binding (although ligand binding promotes dimerization). We further show that simply forcing EGFR ECRs into preformed dimers without ligand yields ill-defined, heterogeneous structures. Finally, we demonstrate that extracellular EGFR-activating mutations in glioblastoma enhance ligand-binding affinity without directly promoting EGFR dimerization, suggesting that these oncogenic mutations alter the allosteric linkage between dimerization and ligand binding. Our findings have important implications for understanding how EGFR and its relatives are activated by specific ligands and pathological mutations.

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X-ray crystal structures from 2002 and 2003 (Burgess et al., 2003) yielded the scheme for ligand-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) dimerization shown in Figure 1. Binding of a single ligand to domains I and III within the same extracellular region (ECR) stabilizes an “extended” conformation and exposes a dimerization interface in domain II, promoting self-association with a KD in the micromolar range (Burgess et al., 2003, Dawson et al., 2005, Dawson et al., 2007). Although this model satisfyingly explains ligand-induced EGFR dimerization, it fails to capture the complex ligand-binding characteristics seen for cell-surface EGFR, with concave-up Scatchard plots indicating either negative cooperativity (De Meyts, 2008, Macdonald and Pike, 2008) or distinct affinity classes of EGF-binding site with high-affinity sites responsible for EGFR signaling (Defize et al., 1989). This cooperativity or heterogeneity is lost when the ECR from EGFR is studied in isolation, as also described for the insulin receptor (De Meyts, 2008).

Figure 1

Structural View of Ligand-Induced Dimerization of the hEGFR ECR

(A) Surface representation of tethered, unliganded, sEGFR from Protein Data Bank entry 1NQL (Ferguson et al., 2003). Ligand-binding domains I and III are green and cysteine-rich domains II and IV are cyan. The intramolecular domain II/IV tether is circled in red.

(B) Hypothetical model for an extended EGF-bound sEGFR monomer based on SAXS studies of an EGF-bound dimerization-defective sEGFR variant (Dawson et al., 2007) from PDB entry 3NJP (Lu et al., 2012). EGF is blue, and the red boundary represents the primary dimerization interface.

(C) 2:2 (EGF/sEGFR) dimer, from PDB entry 3NJP (Lu et al., 2012), colored as in (B). Dimerization arm contacts are circled in red.

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Here, we describe studies of an artificially dimerized ECR from hEGFR that yield useful insight into the heterogeneous nature of preformed ECR dimers and into the origins of negative cooperativity. Our data also argue that extracellular structures induced by ligand binding are not “optimized” for dimerization and conversely that dimerization does not optimize the ligand-binding sites. We also analyzed the effects of oncogenic mutations found in glioblastoma patients (Lee et al., 2006), revealing that they affect allosteric linkage between ligand binding and dimerization rather than simply promoting EGFR dimerization. These studies have important implications for understanding extracellular activating mutations found in EGFR/ErbB family receptors in glioblastoma and other cancers and also for understanding specificity of ligand-induced ErbB receptor heterodimerization

Predimerizing the EGFR ECR Has Modest Effects on EGF Binding

To access preformed dimers of the hEGFR ECR (sEGFR) experimentally, we C-terminally fused (to residue 621 of the mature protein) either a dimerizing Fc domain (creating sEGFR-Fc) or the dimeric leucine zipper from S. cerevisiae GCN4 (creating sEGFR-Zip). Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and/or sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) confirmed that the resulting purified sEGFR fusion proteins are dimeric (Figure S1). To measure KD values for ligand binding to sEGFR-Fc and sEGFR-Zip, we labeled EGF with Alexa-488 and monitored binding in fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assays. As shown in Figure 2A, EGF binds approximately 10-fold more tightly to the dimeric sEGFR-Fc or sEGFR-Zip proteins than to monomeric sEGFR (Table 1). The curves obtained for EGF binding to sEGFR-Fc and sEGFR-Zip showed no signs of negative cooperativity, with sEGFR-Zip actually requiring a Hill coefficient (nH) greater than 1 for a good fit (nH = 1 for both sEGFRWT and sEGFR-Fc). Thus, our initial studies argued that simply dimerizing human sEGFR fails to restore the negatively cooperative ligand binding seen for the intact receptor in cells.

One surprise from these data was that forced sEGFR dimerization has only a modest (≤10-fold) effect on EGF-binding affinity. Under the conditions of the FA experiments, isolated sEGFR (without zipper or Fc fusion) remains monomeric; the FA assay contains just 60 nM EGF, so the maximum concentration of EGF-bound sEGFR is also limited to 60 nM, which is over 20-fold lower than the KD for dimerization of the EGF/sEGFR complex (Dawson et al., 2005, Lemmon et al., 1997). This ≤10-fold difference in affinity for dimeric and monomeric sEGFR seems small in light of the strict dependence of sEGFR dimerization on ligand binding (Dawson et al., 2005,Lax et al., 1991, Lemmon et al., 1997). Unliganded sEGFR does not dimerize detectably even at millimolar concentrations, whereas liganded sEGFR dimerizes with KD ∼1 μM, suggesting that ligand enhances dimerization by at least 104– to 106-fold. Straightforward linkage of dimerization and binding equilibria should stabilize EGF binding to dimeric sEGFR similarly (by 5.5–8.0 kcal/mol). The modest difference in EGF-binding affinity for dimeric and monomeric sEGFR is also significantly smaller than the 40- to 100-fold difference typically reported between high-affinity and low-affinity EGF binding on the cell surface when data are fit to two affinity classes of binding site (Burgess et al., 2003, Magun et al., 1980).

Mutations that Prevent sEGFR Dimerization Do Not Significantly Reduce Ligand-Binding Affinity

The fact that predimerizing sEGFR only modestly increased ligand-binding affinity led us to question the extent to which domain II-mediated sEGFR dimerization is linked to ligand binding. It is typically assumed that the domain II conformation stabilized upon forming the sEGFR dimer in Figure 1C optimizes the domain I and III positions for EGF binding. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a well-characterized pair of domain II mutations into sEGFRs that block dimerization: one at the tip of the dimerization arm (Y251A) and one at its “docking site” on the adjacent molecule in a dimer (R285S). The resulting (Y251A/R285S) mutation abolishes sEGFR dimerization and EGFR signaling (Dawson et al., 2005, Ogiso et al., 2002). Importantly, we chose isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) for these studies, where all interacting components are free in solution. Previous surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies have indicated that dimerization-defective sEGFR variants bind immobilized EGF with reduced affinity (Dawson et al., 2005), and we were concerned that this reflects avidity artifacts, where dimeric sEGFR binds more avidly than monomeric sEGFR to sensor chip-immobilized EGF.

Surprisingly, our ITC studies showed that the Y251A/R285S mutation has no significant effect on ligand-binding affinity for sEGFR in solution (Table 1). These experiments employed sEGFR (with no Fc fusion) at 10 μM—ten times higher than KD for dimerization of ligand-saturated WT sEGFR (sEGFRWT) (KD ∼1 μM). Dimerization of sEGFRWT should therefore be complete under these conditions, whereas the Y251A/R285S-mutated variant (sEGFRY251A/R285S) does not dimerize at all (Dawson et al., 2005). The KD value for EGF binding to dimeric sEGFRWT was essentially the same (within 2-fold) as that for sEGFRY251A/R285S (Figures 2B and 2C; Table 1), arguing that the favorable Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of liganded sEGFR dimerization (−5.5 to −8 kcal/mol) does not contribute significantly (<0.4 kcal/mol) to enhanced ligand binding. …

Thermodynamics of EGF Binding to sEGFR-Fc

If there is no discernible positive linkage between sEGFR dimerization and EGF binding, why do sEGFR-Fc and sEGFR-Zip bind EGF ∼10-fold more strongly than wild-type sEGFR? To investigate this, we used ITC to compare EGF binding to sEGFR-Fc and sEGFR-Zip (Figures 3A and 3B ) with binding to isolated (nonfusion) sEGFRWT. As shown in Table 1, the positive (unfavorable) ΔH for EGF binding is further elevated in predimerized sEGFR compared with sEGFRWT, suggesting that enforced dimerization may actually impair ligand/receptor interactions such as hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The increased ΔH is more than compensated for, however, by a favorable increase in TΔS. This favorable entropic effect may reflect an “ordering” imposed on unliganded sEGFR when it is predimerized, such that it exhibits fewer degrees of freedom compared with monomeric sEGFR. In particular, since EGF binding does induce sEGFR dimerization, it is clear that predimerization will reduce the entropic cost of bringing two sEGFR molecules into a dimer upon ligand binding, possibly underlying this effect.

Possible Heterogeneity of Binding Sites in sEGFR-Fc

Close inspection of EGF/sEGFR-Fc titrations such as that in Figure 3A suggested some heterogeneity of sites, as evidenced by the slope in the early part of the experiment. To investigate this possibility further, we repeated titrations over a range of temperatures. We reasoned that if there are two different types of EGF-binding sites in an sEGFR-Fc dimer, they might have different values for heat capacity change (ΔCp), with differences that might become more evident at higher (or lower) temperatures. Indeed, ΔCp values correlate with the nonpolar surface area buried upon binding (Livingstone et al., 1991), and we know that this differs for the two Spitz-binding sites in the asymmetric Drosophila EGFR dimer (Alvarado et al., 2010). As shown in Figure 3C, the heterogeneity was indeed clearer at higher temperatures for sEGFR-Fc—especially at 25°C and 30°C—suggesting the possible presence of distinct classes of binding sites in the sEGFR-Fc dimer. We were not able to fit the two KD values (or ΔH values) uniquely with any precision because the experiment has insufficient information for unique fitting to a model with four variables. Whereas binding to sEGFRWT could be fit confidently with a single-site binding model throughout the temperature range, enforced sEGFR dimerization (by Fc fusion) creates apparent heterogeneity in binding sites, which may reflect negative cooperativity of the sort seen with dEGFR. …

Ligand Binding Is Required for Well-Defined Dimerization of the EGFR ECR

To investigate the structural nature of the preformed sEGFR-Fc dimer, we used negative stain electron microscopy (EM). We hypothesized that enforced dimerization might cause the unliganded ECR to form the same type of loose domain II-mediated dimer seen in crystals of unliganded Drosophila sEGFR (Alvarado et al., 2009). When bound to ligand (Figure 4A), the Fc-fused ECR clearly formed the characteristic heart-shape dimer seen by crystallography and EM (Lu et al., 2010, Mi et al., 2011). Figure 4B presents a structural model of an Fc-fused liganded sEGFR dimer, and Figure 4C shows a calculated 12 Å resolution projection of this model. The class averages for sEGFR-Fc plus EGF (Figure 4A) closely resemble this model, yielding clear densities for all four receptor domains, arranged as expected for the EGF-induced domain II-mediated back-to-back extracellular dimer shown in Figure 1 (Garrett et al., 2002, Lu et al., 2010). In a subset of classes, the Fc domain also appeared well resolved, indicating that these particular arrangements of the Fc domain relative to the ECR represent highly populated states, with the Fc domains occupying similar positions to those of the kinase domain in detergent-solubilized intact receptors (Mi et al., 2011). …

Our results and those of Lu et al. (2012)) argue that preformed extracellular dimers of hEGFR do not contain a well-defined domain II-mediated interface. Rather, the ECRs in these dimers likely sample a broad range of positions (and possibly conformations). This conclusion argues against recent suggestions that stable unliganded extracellular dimers “disfavor activation in preformed dimers by assuming conformations inconsistent with” productive dimerization of the rest of the receptor (Arkhipov et al., 2013). The ligand-free inactive dimeric ECR species modeled by Arkhipov et al. (2013) in their computational studies of the intact receptor do not appear to be stable. The isolated ECR from EGFR has a very low propensity for self-association without ligand, with KD in the millimolar range (or higher). Moreover, sEGFR does not form a defined structure even when forced to dimerize by Fc fusion. It is therefore difficult to envision how it might assume any particular autoinhibitory dimeric conformation in preformed dimers. …

Extracellular Oncogenic Mutations Observed in Glioblastoma May Alter Linkage between Ligand Binding and sEGFR Dimerization

Missense mutations in the hEGFR ECR were discovered in several human glioblastoma multiforme samples or cell lines and occur in 10%–15% of glioblastoma cases (Brennan et al., 2013, Lee et al., 2006). Several elevate basal receptor phosphorylation and cause EGFR to transform NIH 3T3 cells in the absence of EGF (Lee et al., 2006). Thus, these are constitutively activating oncogenic mutations, although the mutated receptors can be activated further by ligand (Lee et al., 2006, Vivanco et al., 2012). Two of the most commonly mutated sites in glioblastoma, R84 and A265 (R108 and A289 in pro-EGFR), are in domains I and II of the ECR, respectively, and contribute directly in inactive sEGFR to intramolecular interactions between these domains that are thought to be autoinhibitory (Figure 5). Domains I and II become separated from one another in this region upon ligand binding to EGFR (Alvarado et al., 2009), as illustrated in the lower part of Figure 5. Interestingly, analogous mutations in the EGFR relative ErbB3 were also found in colon and gastric cancers (Jaiswal et al., 2013).

We hypothesized that domain I/II interface mutations might activate EGFR by disrupting autoinhibitory interactions between these two domains, possibly promoting a domain II conformation that drives dimerization even in the absence of ligand. In contrast, however, sedimentation equilibrium AUC showed that sEGFR variants harboring R84K, A265D, or A265V mutations all remained completely monomeric in the absence of ligand (Figure 6A) at a concentration of 10 μM, which is similar to that experienced at the cell surface (Lemmon et al., 1997). As with WT sEGFR, however, addition of ligand promoted dimerization of each mutated sEGFR variant, with KD values that were indistinguishable from those of WT. Thus, extracellular EGFR mutations seen in glioblastoma do not simply promote ligand-independent ECR dimerization, consistent with our finding that even dimerized sEGFR-Fc requires ligand binding in order to form the characteristic heart-shaped dimer. …

We suggest that domain I is normally restrained by domain I/II interactions so that its orientation with respect to the ligand is compromised. When the domain I/II interface is weakened with mutations, this effect is mitigated. If this results simply in increased ligand-binding affinity of the monomeric receptor, the biological consequence might be to sensitize cells to lower concentrations of EGF or TGF-α (or other agonists). However, cellular studies of EGFR with glioblastoma-derived mutations (Lee et al., 2006, Vivanco et al., 2012) clearly show ligand-independent activation, arguing that this is not the key mechanism. The domain I/II interface mutations may also reduce restraints on domain II so as to permit dimerization of a small proportion of intact receptor, driven by the documented interactions that promote self-association of the transmembrane, juxtamembrane, and intracellular regions of EGFR (Endres et al., 2013, Lemmon et al., 2014, Red Brewer et al., 2009).

Setting out to test the hypothesis that simply dimerizing the EGFR ECR is sufficient to recover the negative cooperativity lost when it is removed from the intact receptor, we were led to revisit several central assumptions about this receptor. Our findings suggest three main conclusions. First, we find that enforcing dimerization of the hEGFR ECR does not drive formation of a well-defined domain II-mediated dimer that resembles ligand-bound ECRs or the unliganded ECR from Drosophila EGFR. Our EM and SAXS data show that ligand binding is necessary for formation of well-defined heart-shaped domain II-mediated dimers. This result argues that the unliganded extracellular dimers modeled by Arkhipov et al. (2013)) are not stable and that it is improbable that stable conformations of preformed extracellular dimers disfavor receptor activation by assuming conformations that counter activating dimerization of the rest of the receptor. Recent work from the Springer laboratory employing kinase inhibitors to drive dimerization of hEGFR (Lu et al., 2012) also showed that EGF binding is required to form heart-shaped ECR dimers. These findings leave open the question of the nature of the ECR in preformed EGFR dimers but certainly argue that it is unlikely to resemble the crystallographic dimer seen for unligandedDrosophila EGFR (Alvarado et al., 2009) or that suggested by computational studies (Arkhipov et al., 2013).

This result argues that ligand binding is required to permit dimerization but that domain II-mediated dimerization may compromise, rather than enhance, ligand binding. Assuming flexibility in domain II, we suggest that this domain serves to link dimerization and ligand binding allosterically. Optimal ligand binding may stabilize one conformation of domain II in the scheme shown in Figure 1 that is then distorted upon dimerization of the ECR, in turn reducing the strength of interactions with the ligand. Such a mechanism would give the appearance of a lack of positive linkage between ligand binding and ECR dimerization, and a good test of this model would be to determine the high-resolution structure of a liganded sEGFR monomer (which we expect to differ from a half dimer). This model also suggests a mechanism for selective heterodimerization over homodimerization of certain ErbB receptors. If a ligand-bound EGFR monomer has a domain II conformation that heterodimerizes with ErbB2 in preference to forming EGFR homodimers, this could explain several important observations. It could explain reports that ErbB2 is a preferred heterodimerization partner of EGFR (Graus-Porta et al., 1997) and might also explain why EGF binds more tightly to EGFR in cells where it can form heterodimers with ErbB2 than in cells lacking ErbB2, where only EGFR homodimers can form (Li et al., 2012).

7.3.7 IGFBP-2/PTEN: A critical interaction for tumours and for general physiology?

IGFBP-2
The insulin-like growth factor family of proteins, together with insulin, form an evolutionarily conserved system that helps to coordinate the metabolic status and activity of organisms with their nutritional environment. When food is abundant, the IGF/insulin signalling pathway is switched on and cell proliferation and other activities are enhanced; while when food is limited, such activities are suppressed to conserve energy and resources [1,2]. The IGF axis consists of two ligands IGF-I and -II, a series of heterotetrameric tyrosine kinase receptors and six high affinity binding proteins IGFBP-1 to-6. These IGFBPs not only regulate the reservoir, availability and functions of IGFs but also have direct actions upon cell behaviour that are independent of IGF-binding [3]. The six IGFBPs are conserved in all placental mammals having evolved from serial duplication of genes that were present throughout vertebrate evolution [4]. Each of the six IGFBPs has evolved unique functions that presumably have conferred some evolutionary advantage and hence have been conserved across mammalian evolution. After IGFBP-3, IGFBP-2 is the second most abundant binding protein in the circulation throughout adult life in humans. While circulating IGFBP-3 levels peak during puberty and decrease thereafter, IGFBP-2 levels are highest in infancy and old age. Together with the other five IGFBPs, IGFBP-2 regulates IGF availability and actions and has pleiotropic effects on normal and neoplastic tissues [3]. One of the clear distinctive structural features of IGFBP-2 is that it contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence that enables functional interactions with integrin receptors [4]. This structural element is only present in one of the other IGFBPs, IGFBP-1. Although the RGD sequence was only acquired in IGFBP-1 during mammalian evolution it was present within IGFBP-2 from early vertebrate evolution indicating that it has been a long retained functional characteristic of IGFBP-2 [4]. The integrin receptors are critical for the anchorage of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) within tissues and hence for maintaining tissue architecture [5,6]. In solid tissue an important safeguard is imposed by linking normal cell functions and proliferation to appropriate cues from the ECM that are mediated by signals from attachment receptors such as the integrin receptors. Anchoragedependent growth is a common feature of normal cells and loss of attachment results in a form of apoptosis called anoikis. The integrin receptors interact with growth factor receptors in an ancillary and permissive manner to ensure that the signals for growth and survival occur in the appropriate setting and not inappropriately in detached cells. It has also become clear that integrin receptors serve many other roles in regulating cell functions and integrating cues from the surrounding ECM [5,6]. Over the last few decades, as the role of IGFBPs as extracellular modulators of IGF-availability and actions has emerged, there has also been a gradual characterization of the intracellular counter-regulatory components that modulate the signals initiated by IGF-receptor activation. There has been considerable progress in charting the signalling cascades initiated from these receptors but it is evident that the reason needs to be mechanisms for inactivating the pathways in intervening periods in preparation for subsequent activation. Throughout the canonical kinase cascades, activated by receptor ligation, at each node there is a corresponding phosphatase that returns the pathway to the inactive state and modulates the signal. The extracellular regulators of these phosphatases have however received much less attention than the activating kinases. That the extracellular counter-regulators may act in synchrony and be linked to the intracellular counter-regulators has only recently started to be revealed. Transgenic over-expression of IGFBP-2 at supra-physiological levels in mice results in reduced somatic growth [7] and this growth deficit is more pronounced when these mice were crossed with mice with raised growth hormone/IGF-I [8] implying that the growth inhibitory effect was due to sequestration of IGF-I. As with most of the IGFBP-family [3], there are also however multiple lines of evidence that IGFBP-2 has cellular actions that are independent of its ability to bind IGFs. There is evidence that IGFBP-2 initiates intrinsic cellular signalling through specific binding of its RGD-motif to integrin receptors, particularly the α5β1 integrin.In addition IGFBP-2 appears to modulate IGF and epidermal growth factor signalling through interactions with α5β3 integrins [9]. A heparin binding domain also exists in IGFBP-2 and it has been shown to bind to glycosaminoglycans [10], heparin [11], and other proteoglycans such as the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-β (RPTPβ) [12,13]. In addition,IGFBP-2has been reported to be localized on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm and on the nuclear membrane[14]. Several groups have now reported nuclear localization of IGFBP-2 [15–17]. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the central domain of IGFBP-2 has been reported that appears to interact with importin-α [18]. In the nucleus IGFBP-2 has been reported to regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor [19].
IGFBP-2 and metabolic regulation
Epidemiological studies of human populations have indicated that IGFBP-2 levels are reduced in obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes and are inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity [20]. That these associations were due to a metabolic role for IGFBP-2, rather thanitjustbeingamarkerofdisturbance,hasbeenconfirmedinanumber of animal models. Using a transgenic IGFBP-2 over-expressing mouse model, Wheatcroft and coworkers found that IGFBP-2 was able to protect mice from high-fat/high-energy induced obesity and insulin resistance, and also protected the mice from the age-related development of glucose intolerance and hypertension [21]. Over-expression of IGFBP-2 induced by Leptin in wild type or obese mice similarly resulted in reduced plasma glucose and insulin levels [22]. All these data indicate a metabolic role for IGFBP-2 in glucose homeostasis.
IGFBP-2 and cancer
As indicated above, the early reports had implied that IGFBP-2 was generally a negative regulator of IGF-activity; the systemic growth restriction observed in transgenic mice over-expressing IGFBP-2 was followed by observations that chemically induced colorectal cancers were inhibited in this model [23]. Despite this there has been an accumulation of evidence indicating that IGFBP-2 is positively associated with the malignant progression of a wide range of cancers, as has been reviewed previously [24]. Raised serum levels of IGFBP-2 have been reported and positive associations between tumor IGFBP-2 expression and malignancy or metastasis have been observed for a variety of cancers, including glioma [25], breast [26], prostate [27], lung [28], colon [29] and lymphoid tumor [30]. Subsequent work has generally been consistent with this association between IGFBP-2 and cancer progression. In view of the majority of evidence, indicating that IGFBP-2 interacting with IGFs generally inhibited cell growth, it was suggested thatIGF-independentactionswereprobablyresponsibleforpositiveassociations between IGFBP-2 and tumourgrowth and progression [24]. The explanation for the increased expression of IGFBP-2 that has beenreportedformanydifferentcancersappearstocomefromthefactorsthat have been shown to regulate IGFBP-2 expression.The tumor suppressor gene p53, which is the most mutated gene in many human cancers, has been reported to transcriptionally regulate IGFBP-2 [31].

There also appears to again be reciprocal feedback as p53 mRNA in the breast cancer cell line Hs578T increased significantly after treatment with human recombinant IGFBP-2, suggesting a close interaction between IGFBP-2 and p53 [14]. A number of hormonal regulators of IGFBP-2 expression have been described including hCG, FSH, TGF-β, IL1, estradiol, glucocorticoids, EGF, IGF-I, IGF-II and insulin [24]. The stimulation of IGFBP-2 expression by EGF, IGF-I, IGF-II and insulin has been shown to be via the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells [32] and in adipocytes [33]. This is one of the most well characterisedsignallingpathwaysactivatedbyinsulinandIGFs.Inaddition the critical counter-regulatory phosphatase that deactivates this pathway the phosphatase and tensin homologue PTEN has been shown to downregulate the expression of IGFBP-2 [34]. This suggests another autoregulatory loop in which activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway by IGFs induces the expression of IGFBP-2 that then sequesters the IGFs and modulates the signal. As activating mutations in the PI3K pathway or loss of PTEN are very common across a variety of human cancers, this plus the effect of p53, probably accounts for the common dysregulation of IGFBP-2 observed across many cancers. Using prostate cancer cell lines it has also been shown that local IGFBP-2 expression is metabolically regulated; IGFBP-2 expression was increased in hyperglycemic conditions through acetylation of histones H3 and H4 associated with the IGFBP-2 promoter, furthermore this up-regulation of IGFBP-2 mediated hyperglycemia-induced chemo-resistance [35].

PI3K
The signaling kinase PI3K plays a fundamental role that has been maintained throughout most of evolution. The ability to control growth and development according to the availability of nutrients provides a survival advantage and therefore has been selectively retained throughout evolution. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that the PI3K pathway provides this control in all species from yeast to mammals.Various forms of the PI3K enzyme exist that are classified into three groups (classes I, II, and III). Only one of these forms is present in yeast and is equivalent to mammalian class III PI3K: this acts as a nutrient sensor and is directly activated by the availability of amino acids and then itself activates mTOR/S6K1 to regulate cell growth and development [36]. In mammals class 1API3K has evolved: this form is not directly activated by nutrients but consists of heterodimers comprising a catalytic p110 subunit and a regulatory p85 subunit that enables the enzyme to be controlled by receptor tyrosine kinases, classically the insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptors (IR and IGF-IR) [37]. This enables the regulation of PI3K by social nutritionally dependent signals rather than by nutrients directly. It is not by chance that the insulin/IGF/PI3K pathway plays a fundamental role in regulating both metabolism and growth as it clearly is an advantage to synchronize the set processes and this synchronized control has been maintained throughout evolution.

Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)
Of all the intracellular counter-regulators of the IGF-pathway the one that has received the most attention in relation to cancer is PTEN. PTEN is a lipid tyrosine phosphatase that negatively regulates the Akt/ PKB signaling pathway by specifically dephosphorylating phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate and thereby reduces AKT activation to reduce signals for cell metabolism, proliferation and survival [37]. PTEN is the second most often mutated tumor suppressor in human cancers, after p53[38]. Aberrant PTEN activity occurs due to mutation, homozygous deletion, loss of heterozygosity, or epigenetic silencing. Lost or reduced activity of PTEN has been observed in a great variety of cancers, including breast [39], prostate [40,41], colorectal [42], lung[43], glioblastoma [44], endometrial [45], etc. It has been demonstrated that deregulation of PTEN is involved in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and also the predisposition of many cancers [46]. AsPI3K/Akt signaling is critical for the metabolic effects of insulin. It is clear that PTEN will also play a role in modulating the metabolic actions of insulin. Consistent with this mice genetically modified to have haploinsufficiency of PTEN were observed to be hypersensitive to insulin [47]. Similarly humans with haplo-insufficiency due to mutations in PTEN were found to have enhanced insulin sensitivity [48]. Recently an increase in insulin sensitivity due to suppression of PTEN has been described in grizzly bears in preparation for hibernation, indicating that this is a mechanism for physiological adaptation [49]. Although the genetic defects resulting in PTEN loss in cancers and the intrinsic mechanisms for regulation of PTEN have been well characterised; there have been relatively few reports of external cell regulators. Of interest one of the few extrinsic regulators that has been described is IGF-II [50]. IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor present in most human tissues and activates the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Just as the induction of IGFBP-2 by activation of the PI3K pathway suggests an autoregulatory feedback loop extrinsic to the cell;the induction of PTEN by IGF-II via PI3K suggests an additional feedback loop that is intrinsic within the cell (Fig. 1). Activation of the pathway by IGF-II induces expression of PTEN that then attenuates the signal; conversely when the pathway is not activated then PTEN expression is reduced making the cell more responsive for when an activation signal is next received.One of the mechanisms that has emerged,to explain this feedback loop, indicates that the signaling output of the PI3K/PTEN pathway is balanced by asynchronous regulation of the activity of both PI3K and PTEN. The p85α regulatory subunit of PI3K that binds to and represses the activity of the p110 catalytic subunit also binds directly to PTEN at a regulatory site within PTEN where serine/threonine phosphorylation occurs to inactivatePTEN.The p85α subunit binds to unphosphorylated PTEN at this site and enhances its lipid phosphatase activity 3-fold [51]. The nature of this feedback loop has been further extended by reports that PTEN can suppress the expression of IGF-II [52,53]. As IGF-II induces PTEN, the ability of PTEN to subsequently reduce IGF-II expression may enable the cell to protect itself from over-stimulation. In contrast loss of PTEN may increase the expression of IGF-II resulting inactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway that is then unopposed.

PTEN/IGFBP-2 interactions
In view of the recognized importance of loss of PTEN for a variety of cancers there has been considerable interest in identifying biomarkers that could be used clinically to indicate loss of PTEN within tumors. An unbiased screen of human prostate cancer xenografts and human glioblastoma samples using microarray-based expression profiling found that the most significant gene was IGFBP-2 and it was confirmed in experimental models that IGFBP-2 was inversely regulated by PTEN [54]. This was consistent with all of the subsequent studies indicating that the expression of IGFBP-2 was regulated by the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. An increase in tumor IGFBP-2 has also been associated with loss of PTEN in human breast cancer samples[55]. In the same year that a screen revealed IGFBP-2 as the best marker for loss of PTEN; the nature of the interaction between these two proteins was extended by the demonstration that at the cellular level IGFBP-2 can inversely regulate PTEN. With human breast cancer cells it was confirmed that IGF-II stimulated PTEN expression and that this was modulated by the binding of IGF-II to IGFBP-2, but when IGFBP-2 was not bound to IGF-II it was able to suppress PTEN via an interaction with cell surface integrin receptors (Fig. 1) [56]. Subsequent work with human prostate cancer cells indicated that the interaction of IGFBP-2 with integrin receptors could also result in PTEN inactivation via increasing its phosphorylation [57].

Fig.1. A proposed autoregulatory feedback loop of IGFBP-2/PTEN interaction. Binding of IGF-II to the IGF-IR activates the PI3K pathway. Induction of PI3K activates Akt and mTOR signaling and leads to cell proliferation and cell survival. The regulatory subunit of PI3K,p85, also binds and activates PTEN through dephosphorylation. This increased PTEN subsequently blocks IGFII production to avoid overstimulation. On the other hand, activated PI3K pathway induces IGFBP-2 expression, which when unbound to IGF-II, suppresses PTEN via an interaction with integrin receptors and/or the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β(RPTPβ). Thus the negative control of PTEN on PI3K signaling is counteracted. These feedback loops enable the extrinsic balance between IGF-II and IGFBP-2 to be tightly integrated to the intrinsic balance between PI3K and PTEN.

The ability of IGFBP-2 to regulate PTEN, originally observed in human cancer cell lines has subsequently been confirmed in a variety of normal cell types from different tissues. In IGFBP-2 knock-out mice a decrease in hematopoietic stem cell survival and cycling has been associated with an increase in PTEN and this appeared to be mediated by the heparin binding domain (HBD) within IGFBP-2 as the administration of a peptide analogue could restore the deficit [58]. Similarly a decrease in bone mass in the IGFBP-2 knock-out mice has been attributed to an increase in PTEN and again the use of a peptide analogue appeared to implicate the IGFBP-2HBD [59]. It was subsequently reported that the IGFBP-2HBD mediated an interaction with the RPTPβ resulting in dimerization and consequent inactivation of RPTPβ and that this reduction in phosphatase activity cooperated with IGF-I activation of the IGF-IR to enhance the phosphorylation and inactivation of PTEN [12]. Recently IGFBP-2 has been reported to also suppress PTEN in human skeletal muscle cells [60] and human visceral adipocytes [61] by interacting with integrin receptors. A similar association between IGFBP-2 and PTEN has been implicated as playing a role in murine skeletal muscle cell differentiation, although the functional regulation was not directly investigated in that study [62].

Summary
Evidence from a variety of different sources have indicated a close regulatory feedback loop between IGFBP-2 and PTEN. Work using a variety of different cell types from different tissues and different species has indicated that IGFBP-2 inversely regulates PTEN. There are reports that this is mediated via the IGFBP-2 RGD domain interacting with integrin receptors and by the IGFBP-2 HBD interacting with proteoglycans; the relative involvement of each of these domains and their functional interactions will require further work to elucidate. These studies however suggest a general mechanism that plays a role in a variety of normal physiological processes in addition to having important implications for the progression of many different cancers. The phosphatase PTEN has an important role in determining insulin sensitivity and the extent that IGFBP-2 exerts a metabolic role in regulating PTEN to determine insulin-sensitivity is yet to be examined. The extracellular balance between IGF-II and IGFBP-2 seems tightly linked with the intracellular balance between PI3K and PTEN (Fig. 1). When driving, in order to move forward there is a synchronous application of the accelerator and a removal of the brake. It appears that the cell also synchronizes activation of an essential regulatory pathway with the removal of the tightly linked inactivation pathway.

References
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7.3.8 Emerging roles for the pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors in response to acidotic stress

Edward J Sanderlin, Calvin R Justus, Elizabeth A Krewson, Li V Yang
Cell Health & Cytoskel Mar 2015; 2015(7): 99—109
http://www.dovepress.com/emerging-roles-for-the-ph-sensing-g-protein-coupled-receptors-in-respo-peer-reviewed-article-CHC#

Protons (hydrogen ions) are the simplest form of ions universally produced by cellular metabolism including aerobic respiration and glycolysis. Export of protons out of cells by a number of acid transporters is essential to maintain a stable intracellular pH that is critical for normal cell function. Acid products in the tissue interstitium are removed by blood perfusion and excreted from the body through the respiratory and renal systems. However, the pH homeostasis in tissues is frequently disrupted in many pathophysiologic conditions such as in ischemic tissues and tumors where protons are overproduced and blood perfusion is compromised. Consequently, accumulation of protons causes acidosis in the affected tissue. Although acidosis has profound effects on cell function and disease progression, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to acidotic stress. Recently a family of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), and GPR68 (OGR1), has been identified and characterized. These GPCRs can be activated by extracellular acidic pH through the protonation of histidine residues of the receptors. Upon activation by acidosis the pH-sensing GPCRs can transduce several downstream G protein pathways such as the Gs, Gq/11, and G12/13 pathways to regulate cell behavior. Studies have revealed the biological roles of the pH-sensing GPCRs in the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, skeletal, endocrine, and nervous systems, as well as the involvement of these receptors in a variety of pathological conditions such as cancer, inflammation, pain, and cardiovascular disease. As GPCRs are important drug targets, small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being developed and evaluated for potential therapeutic applications in disease treatment.

Cellular metabolism produces acid as a byproduct. Metabolism of each glucose molecule by glycolysis generates two pyruvate molecules. Under anaerobic conditions the metabolism of pyruvate results in the production of the glycolytic end product lactic acid, which has a pKa of 3.9. Lactic acid is deprotonated at the carboxyl group and results in one lactate ion and one proton at the physiological pH. Under aerobic conditions pyruvate is converted into acetyl-CoA and CO2 in the mitochondria. CO2in water forms a chemical equilibrium of carbonic acid and bicarbonate, an important physiological pH buffering system. The body must maintain suitable pH for proper physiological functions. Some regulatory mechanisms to control systemic pH are respiration, renal excretion, bone buffering, and metabolism.14 The respiratory system can buffer the blood by excreting carbonic acid as CO2 while the kidney responds to decreased circulatory pH by excreting protons and electrolytes to stabilize the physiological pH. Bone buffering helps maintain systemic pH by Ca2+ reabsorption and mineral dissolution. Collectively, it is clear that several biological systems require tight regulation to maintain pH for normal physiological functions. Cells utilize vast varieties of acid-base transporters for proper pH homeostasis within each biological context.58 Some such transporters are H+-ATPase, Na+/H+exchanger, Na+-dependent HCO3/C1 exchanger, Na+-independent anion exchanger, and monocarboxylate transporters. Cells can also maintain short-term pH homeostasis of the intracellular pH by rapid H+ consuming mechanisms. Some such mechanisms utilize metabolic conversions that move acids from the cytosol into organelles. Despite these cellular mechanisms that tightly maintain proper pH homeostasis, there are many diseases whereby pH homeostasis is disrupted. These pathological conditions are characterized by either local or systemic acidosis. Systemic acidosis can occur from respiratory, renal, and metabolic diseases and septic shock.14,9 Additionally, local acidosis is characterized in ischemic tissues, tumors, and chronically inflamed conditions such as in asthma and arthritis caused by deregulated metabolism and hypoxia.1015

Acidosis is a stress for the cell. The ability of the cell to sense and modulate activity for adaptation to the stressful environment is critical. There are several mechanisms whereby cells sense acidosis and modulate cellular functions to facilitate adaptation. Cells can detect extracellular pH changes by acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels.16 Apart from ASIC and TRP channels, extracellular acidic pH was shown to stimulate inositol polyphosphate formation and calcium efflux.17,18 This suggested the presence of an unknown cell surface receptor that may be activated by a certain functional group, namely the imidazole of a histidine residue. The identity of the acid-activated receptor was later unmasked by Ludwig et al as a family of proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This group identified human ovarian cancer GPCR 1 (OGR1) which upon activation will produce inositol phosphate and calcium efflux through the Gq pathway.19 These pH-sensing GPCR family members, including GPR4, GPR65 (TDAG8), and GPR68 (OGR1), will be discussed in this review (Figure 1). The proton-sensing GPCRs sense extracellular pH by protonation of several histidine residues on their extracellular domain. The activation of these proton-sensing GPCRs facilitates the downstream signaling through the Gq/11, Gs, and G12/13 pathways. Their expression varies in different cell types and play critical roles in sensing extracellular acidity and modulating cellular functions in several biological systems.

Figure 1 Biological roles and G protein coupling of the pH-sensing GPCRs.
Abbreviation: GPCRs, G protein-coupled receptors.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the immune system and inflammation

Acidic pH is a main characteristic of the inflammatory loci.14,20,21 The acidic microenvironment in inflamed tissue is predominately due to the increased metabolic demand from infiltrating immune cells, such as the neutrophil. These immune cells increase oxygen consumption and glucose uptake for glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. When oxygen availability is limited, cells often undergo anaerobic glycolysis. This process generates increasing amounts of lactic acid, thereby creating a local acidic microenvironment within the inflammatory loci.22 This presents a role for the pH-sensing GPCR GPR65 (TDAG8) in inflammation and immune cell function.23 TDAG8 was originally identified by cloning as an orphan GPCR which was observed to be upregulated during thymocyte apoptosis.24,25GPR65 (TDAG8) is predominately expressed in lymphoid tissues such as the spleen, lymph nodes, thymus, and leukocytes.2426 It was demonstrated that GPR65 inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, which includes IL-6 and TNF-α, in mouse peritoneal macrophages upon activation by extracellular acidification. This cytokine inhibition was shown to occur through the Gs-cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway.23,27 Treatment with dexamethasone, a potent glucocorticoid, increased GPR65 expression in peritoneal macrophages. Following dexamethasone treatment, there was an inhibition of TNF-α secretion in a manner dependent on increased expression of GPR65.28Another report provides an anti-inflammatory role for GPR65 in arthritis.29 Type II collagen-induced arthritis was increased in GPR65-null mice in comparison to wild-type mice. These studies taken together suggest GPR65 serves as a negative regulator in inflammation.30 However, one study provided a function for GPR65 as a positive modulator in inflammation.31 GPR65 was reported to increase eosinophil viability in the acidic microenvironment by reducing apoptosis through the cAMP pathway. As eosinophils are central in asthmatic inflammation and allergic airway disease, GPR65 may play a role in increasing asthmatic inflammation.31 On the other hand, GPR65 has shown little involvement in immune cell development. One report indicates that GPR65 knockout mice had normal immune development and function.26 Modulation of inflammation by GPR65 is complex and must be examined within each specific pathology.23

In addition to GPR65, GPR4 is also involved in the inflammatory response. Endothelial cells compose blood vessels that often penetrate acidic tissue microenvironments such as the inflammatory loci. Among the pH-sensing GPCR family, GPR4 has the highest expression in endothelial cells. Response to inflammation by vascular endothelial cells facilitates the induction of inflammatory cytokines that are involved in the recruitment of leukocytes for adherence and transmigration into inflamed tissues. Activation of GPR4 by acidosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, among other endothelial cell types, increased the expression of a broad range of pro-inflammatory genes including chemokines, cytokines, PTGS2, NF-κB pathway genes, and adhesion molecules.32 Moreover, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, when treated with acidic pH, increased GPR4-mediated endothelial adhesion to leukocytes.32,33 Altogether, GPR65 and GPR4 provide differential regulation of the inflammatory response through their acid sensing capabilities. GPR65 predominately demonstrates function in the inhibition of the inflammatory response whereas GPR4 activation exacerbates inflammation.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the cardiovascular system

Taken together, both GPR4 and GPR68 play roles in regulating the function of the cardiovascular system. GPR4 regulates blood vessel stability and endothelial cell function and GPR68 increases cardiomyogenic and pro-survival gene expression while also mediating aortic smooth muscle cell gene expression.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the renal system

GPR4 is expressed in the kidney cortex, isolated kidney collecting ducts, inner and outer medulla, and in cultured inner and outer medullary collecting duct cells.59 In mice deficient for GPR4, renal acid excretion and the ability to respond to metabolic acidosis was reduced.59 In response to acidosis, inner and outer medullary collecting duct cells produced cAMP, a second messenger for the Gs G-protein pathway, through the GPR4 receptor.59 In renal HEK293 epithelial cells GPR4 overexpression was found to increase the activity of PKA.60 In addition, the protein expression of H+-K+-ATPase α-subunit (HKα2) was increased following GPR4 overexpression dependent on increased PKA activity.60

GPR68 has also been reported to alter proton export of HEK293 cells by stimulating the Na+/H+exchanger and H+-ATPase.58 The activation of GPR68 by acidosis was found to stimulate this effect through a cluster of extracellular histidine residues and the Gq/PKC signaling pathway.58 In GPR68-null mice the expression of the pH-sensitive kinase Pyk2 in the kidney proximal tubules was upregulated which might compensate for GPR68 deficiency.58 Taken together, GPR4 and GPR68 may both be necessary for successful systemic pH buffering by controlling renal acid excretion.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the respiratory system

Aoki et al demonstrated that GPR68-deficient mice were resistant to asthma along with inhibiting Th2 cytokine and immunoglobulin E production.68 This study concludes that GPR68 in dendritic cells is crucial for the onset of asthmatic responses.68 Moreover, GPR65 has been implicated as having a role in respiratory disorders as it is highly expressed in eosinophils, hallmark cells for asthmatic inflammation.69 Kottyan et al showed that GPR65 increased the viability of eosinophils within an acidic environment through the cAMP pathway in murine asthma models.31 In summary, GPR68 and GPR65 play important roles in the respiratory system and asthma. GPR68 regulates gene expression in airway epithelial, smooth muscle and immune cells while GPR65 enhances the survival of airway eosinophils in response to acidosis.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the skeletal system

GPR65 has also been reported as a pH sensor in bone. GPR65 is expressed in osteoclasts and its activity may inhibit Ca2+ resorption.81 Disruption of GPR65 gene exacerbated osteoclastic bone resorption in ovariectomized mice.81 The relative bone density of GPR65-null mice was less than control mice.81 In cultured osteoclast cells from mice deficient for GPR65, the normal inhibition of osteoclast formation in response to acidosis was abrogated.81 Taken together, this data suggest that the activation of GPR65 may enhance bone density, thus the GPR65 signaling may be important for disease processes such as osteoporosis and other bone density disorders.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the endocrine system

GPR68 has also been found to modify insulin production and secretion. In GPR68 knockout mice insulin secretion in response to glucose administration was reduced when compared to wild-type mice although blood glucose was not significantly altered.84 GPR68 deficiency in this respect may reduce insulin secretion but at the same time increase insulin sensitivity. In addition, stimulation of GPR68 in islet cells by acidosis increased the secretion of insulin through the Gq/11 G-protein signaling.84

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in the nervous system and nociception

Acidosis causes pain by exciting nociceptors located in sensory neurons. Several types of ion channels and receptors, such as ASICs, TRPV1, and proton-sensing GPCRs, have been identified as nociceptors in response to acidosis. ASICs and TRPV act as proton-gated membrane-bound channels, which are activated by acidic pH and mediate multimodal sensory perception including nociception.8688  GPR65 activation sensitized the response of TRPV1 to capsaicin. The results suggest high accumulation of protons post inflammation may not only stimulate nociceptive ion channels such as TRPV1 to trigger pain, but also activate proton-sensing GPCRs to regulate heightened sensitivity to pain.89 Furthermore, Hang et al demonstrated GPR65 activation elicited cancer-related bone pain through the PKA and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) signaling pathway in the rat model.90 Collectively, GPR4, GPR65, and GPR68 are all expressed in the dorsal root ganglia; GPR65 is a functional receptor involved in nociception and the nervous system by sensitizing inflammatory pain and the evocation of cancer-related bone pain.

Role for the pH-sensing GPCRs in tumor biology

The tumor microenvironment is highly heterogeneous. Hypoxia, acidosis, inflammation, defective vasculature, poor blood perfusion, and deregulated cancer cell metabolism are hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.9193 The acidity in the tumor microenvironment is owing to the altered cancer cell metabolism termed the “Warburg Effect”. This metabolic phenotype allows the cancer cells to preferentially utilize glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation as a primary means of energy production.94 This process occurs even in normoxic tissue environments where sufficient oxygen is available. Due to this phenomenon, the Warburg Effect is often termed “aerobic glycolysis”. This unique metabolic phenotype produces vast quantities of lactic acid, which serve as a proton source for acidification. Upon disassociation of lactic acid to one lactate molecule and one proton, the monocarboxylate transporter and proton transporters export lactate and protons into the extracellular tumor microenvironment.95 The proton-sensing GPCRs are activated by acidic pH and facilitate tumor cell modulation in response to extracellular acidification. GPR4, GPR65, and GPR68 play roles in tumor cell apoptosis, proliferation, metastasis, angiogenesis, and immune cell function.19,27,32,33,44,45,96,97

GPR4 has had conflicting reports in terms of tumor suppressing or promoting activities. One study demonstrated that GPR4 could act as a tumor metastasis suppressor, when overexpressed and activated by acidic pH in B16F10 melanoma cells, by impeding migration and invasion of tumor cells.45 GPR4 overexpression also significantly inhibited the lung metastasis of B16F10 melanoma cells in mice.45 Another study utilizing the B16F10 melanoma cell line which overexpressed GPR4 showed an increase in mitochondrial surface area and a significant reduction in membrane protrusions by quantification of 3D morphology.98 These data point to a decrease in cancer cell migration when GPR4 is overexpressed and provides another example of GPR4 as exhibiting tumor metastasis suppressor function.98 However, in another report GPR4 malignantly transformed immortalized NIH3T3 fibroblasts.99 This presents GPR4 with tumor-promoting capabilities. The conflicting reports seem to indicate the functional ability of GPR4 to act as a tumor promoter and a tumor suppressor depending on the context of certain cell types and biological systems.

Reports with GPR65 involvement in cancer cells provide evidence in favor for cancer cell survival; however, opposing evidences suggest GPR65 functions as a tumor suppressor. In the same report suggesting GPR4 is oncogenic due to GPR4 transforming immortalized NIH3T3 fibroblasts, GPR65 overexpression was able to transform the mouse NMuMG mammary epithelial cell line.99 Another group demonstrated in NCI-H460 human non-small cell lung cancer cells that GPR65 promotes cancer cell survival in an acidic microenvironment.100 Conversely, a recent study showed that GPR65 inhibited c-Myc oncogene expression in human lymphoma cells.101 Furthermore, GPR65 messenger ribonucleic acid expression was reduced by more than 50% in a variety of human lymphoma samples when compared to normal lymphoid tissues, therefore implying GPR65 has a tumor suppressor function in lymphoma.101 GPR65 has also been shown to increase glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in murine lymphoma cells.102 These reports highlight cell type dependency and biological context for GPR65 activity as a tumor suppressor or promoter.

GPR68 also has roles in tumor biology as a potential tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter. Reports have shown that GPR68 can inhibit cancer metastasis, reduce cancer cell proliferation, and inhibit migration. One study showed that when GPR68 was overexpressed in prostate cancer cells, metastasis to the lungs, diaphragm, and spleen was inhibited.97 When GPR68 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer (HEY) cells, cellular proliferation and migration were significantly reduced, and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix was increased.96 Another study reported GPR68 expression was critical for the tumor cell induced immunosuppression in myeloid-derived cells. This study proposed that GPR68 promotes M2 macrophage development and inhibits T-cell infiltration, and thereby facilitates tumor development.103 In summary, the biological roles of GPR4, GPR65, and GPR68 in tumor biology are complex and both tumor-suppressing and tumor-promoting functions have been reported, primarily dependent on cell type and biological milieu.

Development of small molecule modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs

GPCRs are critical receptors for the regulation of many physiological operations. It is of little surprise that GPCRs have become a central focus of pharmaceutical development. In fact, 30%–50% of therapeutics focuses on modulating GPCR activity.104,105 In view of the diverse roles of the pH-sensing GPCRs in the context of multiple biological systems, targeting these receptors with small molecules and other modulators could serve as potential therapeutics for diseases associated with deregulated pH homeostasis. There have been recent developments in the characterization of GPR4 antagonists along with agonists for GPR65 and GPR68.29,32,50,106 The GPR4 antagonist demonstrated effectiveness in vitro to reduce the GPR4-mediated inflammatory response to acidosis in endothelial cells.32 The GPR65 agonist, BTB09089, showed in vitro effects in GPR65 activation of immune cells to inhibit inflammatory response; however, the activity of BTB09089 was not strong enough for the use in animal models in vivo.29 The GPR68 agonist, lsx, exhibited pro-neurogenic activity and induced hippocampal neurogenesis in young mice.107 It was also demonstrated that lsx suppressed the proliferation of malignant astrocytes.108 To date, however, much advancement needs to be done in development of efficacious agonists and antagonists of the pH-sensing GPCRs coupled with a capacity to target specific tissue dysfunction in the midst of systemic drug administration to optimize therapeutic effects and minimize potential adverse effects.

Concluding remarks

Cells encounter acidotic stress in many pathophysiologic conditions such as inflammation, cancer, and ischemia. Intricate molecular mechanisms, including a large array of acid/base transporters and acid sensors, have evolved for cells to sense and respond to acidotic stress. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that a family of the pH-sensing GPCRs can be activated by extracellular acidotic stress and regulate the function of multiple physiological systems (Table 1). The pH-sensing GPCRs also play important roles in various pathological disorders. Agonists, antagonists and other modulators of the pH-sensing GPCRs are being actively developed and evaluated as potential novel treatment for acidosis-related diseases.

Table 1 The main biological functions of the pH-sensing GPCRs

7.3.9 Protein amino-terminal modifications and proteomic approaches for N-terminal profiling

Lai ZW1, Petrera A2, Schilling O3.
Curr Opin Chem Biol. 2015 Feb; 24:71-9
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.10.026

Amino-/N-terminal processing is a crucial post-translational modification affecting almost all proteins. In addition to altering the chemical properties of the N-terminus, these modifications affect protein activation, conversion, and degradation, which subsequently lead to diversified biological functions. The study of N-terminal modifications is of increasing interest; especially since modifications such as proteolytic truncation or pyroglutamate formation have been linked to disease processes. During the past decade, mass spectrometry has played an important role in facilitating the investigation of N-terminal modifications. Continuous progress is being made in the development and application of robust methods for the dedicated analysis of native and modified protein N-termini in a proteome-wide manner. Here we highlight recent progress in our understanding of protein N-terminal biology as well as outlining present enrichment strategies for mass spectrometry-based studies of protein N-termini.

Highlights

    • N-terminal acetylation, pyroglutamate formation, N-degrons and proteolysis are reviewed.• N-terminomics provide comprehensive profiling of modification at protein N-termini in a proteome-wide manner.• We outline a number of established methodologies for the enrichment of protein N-termini through positive and negative selection strategies.• Peptidomics-based approach is beneficial for the study of post-translational processing of protein N-termini.

 Introduction The life of every protein begins at the amino-terminus, also known as the N-terminus. During the initiation of mRNA translation into proteins or polypeptides, newly synthesized amino
acid chains form the N-termini and are the first to exit the ribosomes into the cytosol or the endoplasmic reticulum. The N-termini of these proteins or protein precursors often contain a signaling peptide
sequence proximal to the N-terminus, which may function as a ‘zip-code’ to direct the delivery of a protein to a cellular compartment as well as orchestrating protein maturation via different post-translational
modifications (PTMs) such as acetylation or proteolysis. These modifications often determine protein activity or stability; thus being crucial for the tight regulation of cellular homeostasis (Figure 1).
Mass spectrometry (MS) based analyses of protein N-termini, termed N-terminomics, is a promising tool to tackle these problems. In the past decade, we have witnessed significant progress in the
area of mass spectrometric investigation of post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation or glycosylation [1].  Similarly, MS-based studies of protein N-termini are gaining momentum.
Recent progress in positional proteomics using advanced MS platforms combined with a number of effective enrichment strategies has reinforced significant interest in N-terminomics.
Here we outline some of the most current highlights on proteomics-based studies on N-terminal modifications, including N-acetylation, pyroglutamate formation, proteolysis, and N-terminal degrons
(Figure 2). We also present a number of recent N-terminomic methodologies for the study of protein N-termini.

Acetylation of protein N-termini represents an abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes, affecting nearly all cytoplasmic proteins. This  modification is catalyzed by the N-terminal
acetyltransferase (Nat) enzyme complex, which transfers an acetyl group to the N-termini of newly synthesized proteins during translation (Figure 2). Initial findings highlighted that N-terminal
acetylation protects proteins from degradation [2–4]. Recent studies however yield a more diverse picture. N-terminal acetylation may also play a role in protein delivery and localization [5–7],
protein complex formation and generation of specific degradation signals in cellular proteins via the N-degron pathway [9,10]. Loss of N-terminal acetylation through inactive acetyltransferases leads to
smaller aggregates of prion proteins [11]. In addition, N-terminal acetyltransferases have been described to also function as N-terminal proprionyltransferases [12].  Genetic mutation in the Naa10 gene,
encoding the NatA catalytic subunit, is known to cause N-terminal acetyltransferase deficient phenotypes. This genetic mutation has also been linked to X-linked disorder of infancy, causing lethality in
male infants[13]. The multifunctional roles of N-acetyltransferases as well as the importance of  N-terminal acetylation have been previously reviewed in [14]. Few MS-based studies have emerged that
specifically investigate acetylated N-termini in a proteome wide manner. The structural and functional integrity of actomyosin fibers depends on active NatB. A novel methodology determines the
extent of N-terminal acetylation in vivo through chemical, stable-isotope coded acetylation of proteins before their mass spectrometric analysis [16].

Pyroglutamate conversion of N-terminal glutamate and glutamine Many proteins and biologically active peptides exhibit an N-terminal pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) residue. This post
translational modification originates from the conversion of N-terminal glutamate and glutamine into pyroglutamic acid by glutaminyl cyclase or isoglutaminyl cyclase (Figure 2). N-terminal
pGlu influences structural stability as well as biological activity of peptides and proteins [17]. pGlu protects proteins from degradation by aminopeptidases [18] as well as regulating the
biological activity of peptide hormones, neuropeptides or chemokines [19]. Examples include thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and the human
chemokines MCP-1 and 2. The presence of N-terminal pGlu in some amyloidogenic peptides, such as amyloid-b peptides, increases their hydrophobicity, resulting in an accelerated
aggregation [20]. Modulating the extent of N-terminal pGlu formation through pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminyl cyclase is considered a promising strategy, for example, to
increase the degradation of inflammatory and neurotoxic peptides. Inhibition of glutaminyl cyclase has alleviated liver inflammation by destabilizing the chemokine MCP1 (CCL2) [21].
Proteolytic degradation of this promigratory chemokine by inhibiting glutaminyl cyclase was also proposed as an attractive novel strategy in preventing thyroid cancer metastasis [22].
Given the functional relevance of N-terminal pGlu in pathological conditions, an MS-based approach to profile this modification may be particularly useful.

N-terminal degrons N-terminal residues have a strong impact on protein stability and half-life. Firstly described in 1986 by Varshavsky and colleagues [25], the N-end rule pathway
has been identified in a broad range of species, from mammals to bacteria, and from yeast to plants [26]. This control of protein degradation in eukaryotes and bacteria is governed
by the formation and recognition of specific sequences at protein N-termini, called N-degrons. The main determinant of an N-degron is an N-terminal destabilizing residue. In eukaryotes,
two N-end rule pathways are being distinguished: the Ac/N-end rule pathway targets proteins through their N-terminally acetylated residues while the Arg/N-rule pathway targets
unacetylated N-terminal residues and involves N-terminal arginylation [26]. Proteolytic processing leading to new protein N-termini is increasingly recognized to play an important
role in the formation of N-degrons. In eukaryotes, N-degron mediated protein degradation occurs through the  ubiquitin–proteasome system. N degrons are recognized by E3
ubiquitin ligases called N-recognins, which induce protein ubiquitylation. Recent studies showed that the N-end rule pathway can be regulated by various mechanisms [26].
Hemin, the ferric (Fe3+) counterpart of heme, and short peptides can bind to components of the N-end rule pathway and impede their functionality [26]. Although the N-end rule
pathway has been molecularly dissected in great detail, numbers of identified physiological substrates undergoing N-end rule degradation have remained limited. A recent study
has expanded the range of substrates targeted by the Arg/N-end rule. Kim and colleagues have shown that N terminal Met followed by a hydrophobic residue functions as an N-degron
[27]. N-terminal Met followed by a small residue is typically removed by aminopeptidases in a cotranslational manner (Figure 2). However, approximately 15% of the genes in mammals
or yeast encode for an N-terminal Met followed by a larger hydrophobic residue. This specific N-degron is targeted by the Ac/N-end rule pathway when the N-terminal Met is acetylated.
The Arg/N-end rule acts instead on the non-acetylated N-terminal Met. As previously mentioned, novel N-degrons can be generated by preceding proteolysis. Piatkov and colleagues
investigated this concept for proteolytic cleavage products that occur during apoptosis [28]. They find that numerous proapoptotic fragments are short lived substrates of Arg/N-end
rule pathway, attributing to this pathway an anti-apoptotic role. Notably, the corresponding N-degron sequences are evolutionary conserved.

Figure 1 Protein N-termini are susceptible to various post-translational modification.
For a more comprehensive overview of all possible N terminal modification, see [60].

Figure 2 Examples of N-terminal mofications: acetylation, pyroglutamate conversion, proteolysis and N-degron processing via deamidation and amino acid conjugation.

Proteolytic processing of N-termini Proteolysis has long been regarded a degradation process. It is now increasingly recognized as an important posttranslational modification
with an array of proteases mediating cellular signaling via the precise processing of bioactive proteins and peptides. The study of cleavage events using N-terminomics is particularly
useful for the identification of proteolytic substrates. Proteolytic cleavage of proteins and polypeptides results in the generation of cleavage fragments with new N-termini and
C-termini. Numerous recent proteomic studies highlighted differential regulation of proteases in different disease settings. MALDI-TOF in combination with enzymatic assays
established reduced levels of dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP)4 in the serum of patients suffering from metastatic prostate cancer [31]. Another proteomic based study,  using isotope
coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling showed bacterial leucine aminopeptidase from Plasmodium chabaudi to be significantly upregulated in periodontal disease [32]. Mass spectrometry
was also used for the functional characterization of proteases.

7.3.10 Protein homeostasis networks in physiology and disease

Although most text books of biochemistry describe the process of protein folding to a three dimensional native state as an intrinsic property of the primary sequence, it is becoming increasingly clear that this process can go wrong in an almost infinite number of ways. In fact, many different diseases are caused by the misfolding and aggregation of certain proteins without genetic mutations in the primary sequence. An integrative view of the mechanisms that maintain protein folding homeostasis is emerging, which could be thought as a balanced and dynamic network of interconnected processes tightly regulated by a series of quality control mechanisms. This protein homeostasis network involves families of folding catalysts, co-factors under specific environmental and metabolic conditions. Maintaining protein homeostasis is particularly challenging in specialized secretory cells where the high demand for protein synthesis generates a constant source of stress that could lead to proteotoxicity.

Protein folding is assisted and monitored by diverse interconnected processes that follow a sequential pattern over time. The calnexin/calreticulin cycle ensures the proper folding of glycosylated proteins through the secretory pathway, which establishes the final pattern of disulfide bond formation through interactions with the disulfide isomerase ERp57. Coupled to this cycle is the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, which translocates terminally misfolded proteins to the cytosol for degradation by proteasomes. In addition, macroautophagy is becoming a relevant mechanism for the clearance of damaged proteins and abnormal protein aggregates through lysosomal hydrolysis, a process also referred to as ERAD-II. The folding status at the ER is constantly monitored by the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), a specialized signaling pathway initiated by the activation of three types of stress sensors. The process underlying the surveillance of protein folding stress by the UPR is not fully understood, but it may require coupling to key folding mediators such as BiP or the direct recognition of the misfolded peptides by stress sensors. The UPR regulates genes and processs related to almost every folding step in the secretory pathway to reduce the load of misfolded proteins, including protein translation into the ER, translocation, folding, quality control, ERAD, the redox status, and many other related functions. Protein folding stress is observed in many disease conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. For example, abnormal protein aggregation and the accumulation of protein inclusions is associated with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s Disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In those diseases and many others, neuronal dysfunction and disease progression correlates with the presence of a strong ER stress response; however, the direct in vivo role of the UPR in the disease process has been experimentally defined in only a few cases. Therapeutic strategies are currently being developed to increase protein folding and clearance of misfolded proteins, with the goal of alleviating ER stress.

In this issue of Current Opinion in Cell Biology we present a series of focused reviews from recognized experts in the field, that provide an overview of mechanisms underlying protein folding and quality control, and how balance of protein homeostasis is maintained in physiology and deregulated in diseases. Daniela Roth and William Balch integrate the concept of protein homeostasis networks into an interesting model termed FoldFx, showing how the interconnection between different pathways in the context of the cellular proteome determines the energetic barrier required to generate a functional folded peptide. The authors have previously proposed the term Proteostasis to refer to the set of interacting activities that maintain the health of the proteome and the organism (protein homeostasis). The ER is a central subcellular compartment for protein synthesis and quality control in the secretory pathway. Yukio Kimata and Kenji Kohno give an overview of the signaling pathways that control adaptation to ER stress and maintenance of protein folding homeostasis. The authors summarize the models proposed so far for the activation of UPR stress sensors, and discuss how this directly or indirectly relates to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen. Chronic or irreversible ER stress triggers cell death by apoptosis. Gordon Shore, Feroz Papa, and Scott Oakes summarize the complex signaling pathways initiating apoptosis by ER stress, where cross talk between the ER and the mitochondria play a central role. The authors focus on addressing the role of the BCL-2 protein family on the activation of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathways, highlighting different cytosolic and transcriptional events that determine the transition between adaptive responses to apoptosis programmed by the UPR to eliminate irreversibly injured cells.

Although diverse families of chaperones, foldases and co-factors are expressed at the ER, only a few protein folding networks have been well defined. However, molecular explanations for specific substrate recognition and quality control mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we present a series of reviews covering different aspects of protein maturation. Amy Lee summarizes what is known about the biology of the key ER folding chaperone BiP/Grp78, and its emerging role in diverse pathological conditions including cancer. In two reviews, David B. Williams and Linda M. Hendershot describe the best characterized mechanism of protein quality control at the ER, the calnexin cycle. In addition, they give an overview of the function of a family of ER foldases, the protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs), in folding, quality control and degradation of abnormally folded proteins. PDIs are also becoming key factors in establishing the redox tone of the ER. Riccardo Bernasconi and Maurizio Molinari overview the ERAD process and how this pathway affects the efficiency of the protein folding process at the ER and its relation to pathological conditions.

Lysosomal-mediated degradation is becoming a fundamental process for the control of the haft-life of proteins and the degradation of misfolded, aggregate prone proteins. Ana Maria Cuervo reviews the relevance of Chaperone-mediated autophagy in the selective degradation of soluble cytosolic proteins in lysosomes, and also points out a key role for Chaperone-mediated autophagy in the cellular defense against proteotoxicity. David Rubinsztein and Guido Kroemer present two reviews highlighting the emerging relevance of macroautophagy in maintaining the homeostasis of the nervous system. They also discuss the actual impact of macroautophagy in the clearance of protein aggregates related to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington’s disease among others. In addition, recent evidence suggesting an actual impairment of macroautophagy as a causative factor in aging-related disorders is also discussed.

Alterations in protein homeostasis underlie the etiology of many diseases affecting the nervous system, in addition to cancer and diabetes. Fumiko Urano summarizes the impact of ER stress in β cell dysfunction and death during the progression of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as in genetic forms of diabetes such as Wolfram syndrome. The occurrence of basal ER stress is observed in specialized secretory cells and organs, including plasma B cells. Roberto Sitia covers several aspects of how proteotoxic stresses physiologically contribute to regulate the biogenesis, function and lifespan of B cells, and speculates about the possible impact of ER stress in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Claudio Soto describes the specific role of calcineurin, a key phosphatase in the brain, in the occurrence of synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death in prion-related disorders. We also present provide a review summarizing the emerging role of ER stress and the UPR in most neurodegenerative diseases related to protein misfolding. We also discuss the particular mechanisms currently proposed to be involved in the generation of protein folding stress at the ER in these pathologies, and speculate about possible therapeutic interventions to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

Strategies to increase the efficiency of quality control mechanisms, to reduce protein aggregation and to enhance folding are suggested to be beneficial in the setting of diseases associated with the disruption of protein homeostasis. Finally, Jeffery Kelly overviews recent chemical and biological therapeutic strategies to restore protein homeostasis, which could be achieved by enhancing the biological capacity of the proteostasis network or through small molecule to stabilize misfolding-prone proteins. In summary, this volume ofCurrent Opinion in Cell Biology compiles the most recent advances in understanding the impact of protein folding stress in physiology and disease, and integrates a variety of complex mechanisms that evolved to maintain protein homeostasis in a dynamic way in the context of a changing environment. The biomedical applications of developing strategies to cope with protein folding stress have profound implications for the treatment of the most prevalent diseases in the human population.

7.3.11 Proteome sequencing goes deep
Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have transformed the scope and impact of protein characterization efforts. Identifying hundreds of proteins from rather simple biological matrices, such as yeast, was a daunting task just a few decades ago. Now, expression of more than half of the estimated ∼20,000 human protein coding genes can be confirmed in record time and from minute sample quantities. Access to proteomic information at such unprecedented depths has been fueled by strides in every stage of the shotgun proteomics workflow-from sample processing to data analysis-and promises to revolutionize our understanding of the causes and consequences of proteome variation.
Highlights
    • Recent MS advances have transformed the depth of coverage of the human proteome.• Expression of half the estimated human protein coding genes can be verified by MS.• MS sample preparation, instrumentation, and data analysis techniques are highlighted.

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1367593114001586-gr1.sml

Mammalian proteomes  are complex [3]. The human proteome contains ~20,300 protein-coding genes; however, non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs), alternative
splicing events, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) all occur and exponentially increase the number of distinct proteoforms [4–6]. Detection of 5000 proteins in a proteomic
experiment was a considerable achievement just a few years ago [7–9]. More recently, two groups identified over 10,000 protein groups in a single experiment. Through extensive protein
and peptide fractionation (72 fractions) and digestion with multiple enzymes, Nagaraj et al. identified 10,255 protein groups from HeLa cells over 288 hours of instrument analysis [10].
A comparison with paired RNA-Seq data revealed nearly complete overlap between the detected proteins and the expressed transcripts. In that same year, a similar strategy enabled
the identification of 10,006 proteins from the U2OS cell line [11]. Kim and co-workers analyzed 30 human tissues and primary cells over 2000 LC–MS/MS experiments, resulting
in the detection of 293,000 peptides with unique amino acid sequences and evidence for 17,294 gene products [16]. Wilhelm et al. amassed a total of 16,857 LC–MS/MS experiments
from human cell lines, tissues, and body fluids. These experiments produced 946,000 unique peptides, which map to 18,097 protein coding genes [17]. Together, these two studies
provide direct evidence for protein translation of over 90% of  human genes (Figure 2). New developments in mass spectrometer technology have increased the rate at which proteomes
can be analyzed. We describe developments in sample preparation, MS instrumentation, and bioinformatics that have been key to obtaining comprehensive proteomic coverage.
Further, we consider how access to such proteomic detail will impact genomic  research.

Aurelian Udristioiu

Aurelian

Aurelian Udristioiu

Lab Director at Emergency County Hospital Targu Jiu

Mg²+ is critical for maintaining the positional integrity of closely clustered phosphate groups. These clusters appear in numerous and distinct parts of the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. The Mg²+ ion maintains the integrity of nucleic acids, ribosomes and proteins. In addition, this ion acts as an oligo-element with role in energy catalysis. Biological cell membranes and cell walls exhibit poly-anionic charges on the surface. This finding has important implications for the transport of ions, particularly because different membranes preferentially bind different ions. Both Mg²+ and Ca²+ regularly stabilize membranes by cross-linking the carboxylated and phosphorylated head groups of lipids.

Notable document –

Theor Biol Med Model. 2010 Jun 9;7:19.
Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations.
Matveev VV1.
Cell physiologist at Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences

According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen’s dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity.”One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity.”Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/instance/2901313/bin/1742-4682-7-19-1.gif

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/instance/2901313/bin/1742-4682-7-19-2.gif

To date, numerous mechanisms, signal pathways, and different factors have been found in the cell. Researchers are naturally eager to find commonalities in the mechanisms of cellular regulation. I would like to propose a substantial approach to problems of cell physiology – the structural ground that produces signals and underlies the diversity of cellular mechanisms.

The methodological basis for the proposed hypothesis results from studies by the scientific schools of Dmitrii Nasonov [1] and Gilbert Ling [26], which have gained new appreciation over the last 20-30 years owing to advances in protein physics [7] in the study of properties of globular proteins, their unfolding and folding, as well as the discovery of novel states of the protein molecule: the natively unfolded and the molten globule. The key statement for the rationale of the present paper is that the specificity of interactions of polypeptide chains with each other (at the intra- and inter-molecular levels) can be provided only by their secondary structures, primarily α-helices and β-sheets.

Nasonov’s school discovered and studied a fundamental phenomenon — the nonspecific reaction of the cell to external actions [1], while works by Ling [5] and his followers allow the mechanisms of this phenomenon to be understood.

The above-mentioned cell reaction has been called nonspecific because diverse physical and chemical factors produce the same complex of structural changes in the cell: an increase in the turbidity and macroscopic viscosity of the cytoplasm and in the adsorption of hydrophobic substances by cytoplasmic proteins. It is of primary importance that the same changes also occur in the cell during its transition into the active state: muscle contraction, action potential, enhancement of secretory activity (for details, see [8]). Hence, from the point of view of structural changes, there is no fundamental difference between the result of action on the cell of hydrostatic pressure and, for instance, muscle contraction. In both cases, proteins are aggregated.

Nasonov called the cause of these changes the stages of cell protein denaturation, as the changes of properties of isolated proteins during denaturation are very similar to the changes in the cytoplasm during the nonspecific reaction. As a result, the denaturational theory of cell excitation and damage was created [1]. The structural changes of protein denaturation were unclear in Nasonov’s time. Nowadays, it is assumed that the denaturation is the destruction of the tertiary and secondary structure of a protein. Below I give two definitions, for the denaturation of natively folded (globular) proteins and for natively unfolded proteins.

A key notion in physiology is the resting state of the cell. This is implicit in the concept of the threshold character of the action of stimuli on the cell, which has played a historical role in the development of physiological science. It is the threshold that is the boundary between two states — rest and activity. But in effect, all our knowledge about cells concerns active cells, not cells in the resting state. It is in the active cell that variable changes occur that can be recorded. Nothing happens in the resting cell, so there is nothing to be recorded in it. Nevertheless, it is obvious that the resting state is the initial cell state, the starting point for all changes occurring in the cell.

What characterizes the structural aspect of the cell in the state of rest? It is only in Ling’s work [5] that I have found a clear answer to this question. The answer can be interpreted as follows: if all resting cell proteins were arranged in one line, it would turn out that most of the peptide bonds in this superpolypeptide would be accessible to solvent (water), while only a few would be included in secondary structures. When the cell is activated, the ratio between the unfolded and folded areas is changed sharply to the opposite: the proportion of peptide bonds accessible to solvent decreases markedly, whereas the proportion included in secondary structures rises significantly. These two extreme states of cell proteins, suggested by Ling, provide a basis for further consideration.

If Ling’s approach is combined with Nasonov’s theory, we obtain several interesting consequences. First of all, it is clear that proteins with maximally unfolded structures form the structural basis of resting cells because they are inactive, i.e., do not interact with other proteins or other macromolecules. The situation changes when an action on the cell exceeds the threshold: completely or partially unfolded key proteins begin to fold when new secondary protein structures are formed. Owing to these new secondary structures, the proteins become capable of reacting, i.e., intramolecular aggregation (folding of individual polypeptides into globules) and intermolecular aggregation (interaction of some proteins with others) begin. A distinguishing feature of these aggregational processes is their absolutely specific character, which is ensured by the amino acid composition, shape, and size of the secondary structures. The structures appearing have physiological meaning, so such aggregation is native and the secondary structures causing it are centers of native aggregation. Another source of secondary structures necessary for native aggregation is the molten globule.

The ability of cells to return to the initial state, the state of rest, means that native aggregation is completely reversible, and the structures appearing in the course of native aggregation are temporary and are disassembled as soon as they cease to be necessary. Native aggregation can involve both the whole cell and individual organelles, compartments, and structures, and activation of proteins is of a threshold rather than a spontaneous character.

The meaning of the proposed hypothesis of native aggregation is that the primary cause of any functional changes in cell is the appearance, as a result of native aggregation, of temporary structures, continually appearing and disintegrating during the life of the cell. Since native aggregation is initiated by external stimuli or regulatory processes and the structures appearing have a temporary character, these structures can be called signal structures.

Signal structures can have different properties: (i) they can be centers of binding of ions, molecules (solutes), and proteins; (ii) they can have enzymatic activity; (iii) they can form channels and intercellular contacts; (iv) they can serve as matrices organizing the interactions of molecules in synthetic and transport processes; (iv) they can serve as receptors for signal molecules; (v) they can serve as the basis for constructing even more complex supramolecular structures. These structures “flash” in the cell space like signal lights, perform their role, and disappear, to appear in another place and at another time. The meaning of the existence of the structural “flashes” is that during transition into the active state the cell needs new resources, functions, mechanisms, regulators, and signals. As soon as the cell changes to the resting state, the need for these structures disappears, and they are disassembled. Extreme examples of native aggregation are muscle contraction, condensation of chromosomes, the appearance of the division spindle, and interactions of ligands with receptors.

Thus, the present paper will consider the meaning and significance of native aggregation as the universal structural basis of the active cell. The basis of pathological states is the inability of the cell to return to the resting state and errors in the formation of signal structures. The presentation of native aggregation is based on three pillars: (i) reversible protein aggregation is a structural basis of cell activity (Nasonov’s School); (ii) the operation of the living cell or its individual structures can be regarded as a repetitive sequence of transitions between two states (active and resting), a key role in which belongs to natively unfolded proteins (Ling’s approach); (iii) the specificity of interactions of separate parts of a single polypeptide chain with each other (folding) or the interaction of separate polypeptide chains among themselves (self-assembly, aggregation) can be provided only by protein secondary structures.

The goal of this paper is the enunciation of principles, rather than a review of facts corresponding to these principles.

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Pathway Specific Targeting in Anticancer Therapies

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

 

7.7 Pathway specific targeting in anticancer therapies

7.7.1 Structural basis for the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) and its regulation by Raf-Mek-Erk signaling in cancer cell metabolism

7.7.2 Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling promotes tumorigenicity and stemness via activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in bladder cancer.

7.7.3 Differential activation of NF-κB signaling is associated with platinum and taxane resistance in MyD88 deficient epithelial ovarian cancer cells

7.7.4 Activation of apoptosis by caspase-3-dependent specific RelB cleavage in anticancer agent-treated cancer cells

7.7.5 Identification of Liver Cancer Progenitors Whose Malignant Progression Depends on Autocrine IL-6 Signaling

7.7.6 Acetylation Stabilizes ATP-Citrate Lyase to Promote Lipid Biosynthesis and Tumor Growth

7.7.7 Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates a Fatty Acid Network that Promotes Cancer Pathogenesis

7.7.8 Pirin regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition and down-regulates EAF/U19 signaling in prostate cancer cells

7.7.9 O-GlcNAcylation at promoters, nutrient sensors, and transcriptional regulation

 

7.7.1 Structural basis for the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) and its regulation by Raf-Mek-Erk signaling in cancer cell metabolism

Thangavelua, CQ Pana, …, BC Lowa, and J. Sivaramana
Proc Nat Acad Sci 2012; 109(20):7705–7710
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1073/pnas.1116573109

Besides thriving on altered glucose metabolism, cancer cells undergo glutaminolysis to meet their energy demands. As the first enzyme in catalyzing glutaminolysis, human kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA) is becoming an attractive target for small molecules such as BPTES [bis-2-(5 phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide], although the regulatory mechanism of KGA remains unknown. On the basis of crystal structures, we reveal that BPTES binds to an allosteric pocket at the dimer interface of KGA, triggering a dramatic conformational change of the key loop (Glu312-Pro329) near the catalytic site and rendering it inactive. The binding mode of BPTES on the hydrophobic pocket explains its specificity to KGA. Interestingly, KGA activity in cells is stimulated by EGF, and KGA associates with all three kinase components of the Raf-1/Mek2/Erk signaling module. However, the enhanced activity is abrogated by kinase-dead, dominant negative mutants of Raf-1 (Raf-1-K375M) and Mek2 (Mek2-K101A), protein phosphatase PP2A, and Mek-inhibitor U0126, indicative of phosphorylation-dependent regulation. Furthermore, treating cells that coexpressed Mek2-K101A and KGA with suboptimal level of BPTES leads to synergistic inhibition on cell proliferation. Consequently, mutating the crucial hydrophobic residues at this key loop abrogates KGA activity and cell proliferation, despite the binding of constitutive active Mek2-S222/226D. These studies therefore offer insights into (i) allosteric inhibition of KGA by BPTES, revealing the dynamic nature of KGA’s active and inhibitory sites, and (ii) cross-talk and regulation of KGA activities by EGF-mediated Raf-Mek-Erk signaling. These findings will help in the design of better inhibitors and strategies for the treatment of cancers addicted with glutamine metabolism.

The Warburg effect in cancer biology describes the tendency of cancer cells to take up more glucose than most normal cells, despite the availability of oxygen (12). In addition to altered glucose metabolism, glutaminolysis (catabolism of glutamine to ATP and lactate) is another hallmark of cancer cells (23). In glutaminolysis, mitochondrial glutaminase catalyzes the conversion of glutamine to glutamate (4), which is further catabolized in the Krebs cycle for the production of ATP, nucleotides, certain amino acids, lipids, and glutathione (25).

Humans express two glutaminase isoforms: KGA (kidney-type) and LGA (liver-type) from two closely related genes (6). Although KGA is important for promoting growth, nothing is known about the precise mechanism of its activation or inhibition and how its functions are regulated under physiological or pathophysiological conditions. Inhibition of rat KGA activity by antisense mRNA results in decreased growth and tumorigenicity of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (7), reduced level of glutathione, and induced apoptosis (8), whereas Myc, an oncogenic transcription factor, stimulates KGA expression and glutamine metabolism (5). Interestingly, direct suppression of miR23a and miR23b (9) or activation of TGF-β (10) enhances KGA expression. Similarly, Rho GTPase that controls cytoskeleton and cell division also up-regulates KGA expression in an NF-κB–dependent manner (11). In addition, KGA is a substrate for the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-Cdh1, linking glutaminolysis to cell cycle progression (12). In comparison, function and regulation of LGA is not well studied, although it was recently shown to be linked to p53 pathway (1314). Although intense efforts are being made to develop a specific KGA inhibitor such as BPTES [bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide] (15), its mechanism of inhibition and selectivity is not yet understood. Equally important is to understand how KGA function is regulated in normal and cancer cells so that a better treatment strategy can be considered.

The previous crystal structures of microbial (Mglu) and Escherichia coli glutaminases show a conserved catalytic domain of KGA (1617). However, detailed structural information and regulation are not available for human glutaminases especially the KGA, and this has hindered our strategies to develop inhibitors. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human apo KGA and its complexes with substrate (L-glutamine), product (L-glutamate), BPTES, and its derived inhibitors. Further, Raf-Mek-Erk module is identified as the regulator of KGA activity. Although BPTES is not recognized in the active site, its binding confers a drastic conformational change of a key loop (Glu312-Pro329), which is essential in stabilizing the catalytic pocket. Significantly, EGF activates KGA activity, which can be abolished by the kinase-dead, dominant negative mutants of Mek2 (Mek2-K101A) or its upstream activator Raf-1 (Raf-1-K375M), which are the kinase components of the growth-promoting Raf-Mek2-Erk signaling node. Furthermore, coexpression of phosphatase PP2A and treatment with Mek-specific inhibitor or alkaline phosphatase all abolished enhanced KGA activity inside the cells and in vitro, indicating that stimulation of KGA is phosphorylation dependent. Our results therefore provide mechanistic insights into KGA inhibition by BPTES and its regulation by EGF-mediated Raf-Mek-Erk module in cell growth and possibly cancer manifestation.

Structures of cKGA and Its Complexes with L-Glutamine and L-Glutamate.
The human KGA consists of 669 amino acids. We refer to Ile221-Leu533 as the catalytic domain of KGA (cKGA) (Fig. 1A). The crystal structures of the apo cKGA and in complex with L-glutamine or L-glutamate were determined (Table S1). The structure of cKGA has two domains with the active site located at the interface. Domain I comprises (Ile221-Pro281 and Cys424 -Leu533) of a five-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet (β2↓β1↑β5↓β4↑β3↓) surrounded by six α-helices and several loops. The domain II (Phe282-Thr423) mainly consists of seven α-helices. L-Glutamine/L-glutamate is bound in the active site cleft (Fig. 1B and Fig. S1B). Overall the active site is highly basic, and the bound ligand makes several hydrogen-bonding contacts to Gln285, Ser286, Asn335, Glu381, Asn388, Tyr414, Tyr466, and Val484 (Fig. 1C and Fig. S1C), and these residues are highly conserved among KGA homologs (Fig. S1D). Notably, the putative serine-lysine catalytic dyad (286-SCVK-289), corresponding to the SXXK motif of class D β-lactamase (17), is located in close proximity to the bound ligand. In the apo structure, two water molecules were located in the active site, one of them being displaced by glutamine in the substrate complex. The substrate side chain is within hydrogen-bonding distance (2.9 Å) to the active site Ser286. Other key residues involved in catalysis, such as Lys289, Tyr414, and Tyr466, are in the vicinity of the active site. Lys289 is within hydrogen-bonding distance to Ser286 (3.1 Å) and acts as a general base for the nucleophilic attack by accepting the proton from Ser286. Tyr466, which is close to Ser286 and in hydrogen-bonding contact (3.2 Å) with glutamine, is involved in proton transfer during catalysis. Moreover, the carbonyl oxygen of the glutamine is hydrogen-bonded with the main chain amino groups of Ser286 and Val484, forming the oxyanion hole. Thus, we propose that in addition to the putative catalytic dyad (Ser286 XX Lys289), Tyr466 could play an important role in the catalysis (Fig. 1Cand Fig. S2).

structure of the cKGA-L-glutamine complex

structure of the cKGA-L-glutamine complex

http://www.pnas.org/content/109/20/7705/F1.medium.gif

Fig. 1.  Schematic view and structure of the cKGA-L-glutamine complex. (A) Human KGA domains and signature motifs (refer to Fig. S1A for details). (B) Structure of the of cKGA and bound substrate (L-glutamine) is shown as a cyan stick. (C) Fourier 2Fo-Fc electron density map (contoured at 1 σ) for L-glutamine, that makes hydrogen bonds with active site residues are shown.

Allosteric Binding Pocket for BPTES. The chemical structure of BPTES has an internal symmetry, with two exactly equivalent parts including a thiadiazole, amide, and a phenyl group (Fig. S3A), and it equally interacts with each monomer. The thiadiazole group and the aliphatic linker are well buried in a hydrophobic cluster that consists of Leu321, Phe322, Leu323, and Tyr394 from both monomers, which forms the allosteric pocket (Fig. 2 B–E). The side chain of Phe322 is found at the bottom of the allosteric pocket. The phenyl-acetamido moiety of BPTES is partially exposed on the loop (Asn324-Glu325), where it interacts with Phe318, Asn324, and the aliphatic part of the Glu325 side chain. On the basis of our observations we synthesized a series of BPTES-derived inhibitors (compounds2–5) (Fig. S3 AF and SI Results) and solved their cocrystal structure of compounds 2–4. Similar to BPTES, compounds 24 all resides within the hydrophobic cluster of the allosteric pocket (Fig. S3 CF).

Fig. 2. Structure of cKGA: BPTES complex and the allosteric binding mode of BPTES.

Allosteric Binding of BPTES Triggers Major Conformational Change in the Key Loop Near the Active Site.  The overall structure of these inhibitor complexes superimposes well with apo cKGA. However, a major conformational change at the Glu312 to Pro329 loop was observed in the BPTES complex (Fig. 2F). The most conformational changes of the backbone atoms that moved away from the active site region are found at the center of the loop (Leu316-Lys320). The backbone of the residues Phe318 and Asn319 is moved ≈9 Å and ≈7 Å, respectively, compared with the apo structure, whereas the side chain of these residues moved ≈14 Å and ≈12 Å, respectively. This loop rearrangement in turn brings Phe318 closer to the phenyl group of the inhibitor and forms the inhibitor binding pocket, whereas in the apo structure the same loop region (Leu316-Lys320) was found to be adjacent to the active site and forms a closed conformation of the active site.

Binding of BPTES Stabilizes the Inactive Tetramers of cKGA.  To understand the role of oligomerization in KGA function, dimers and tetramers of cKGA were generated using the symmetry-related monomers (Fig. 2 A–E and Fig. S4 D and E). The dimer interface in the cKGA: BPTES complex is formed by residues from the helix Asp386-Lys398 of both monomers and involves hydrogen bonding, salt bridges, and hydrophobic interactions (Phe389, Ala390, Tyr393, and Tyr394), besides two sulfate ions located in the interface (Fig. 2E). The dimers are further stabilized by binding of BPTES, where it binds to loop residues (Glu312-Pro329) and Tyr394 from both monomers (Fig. 2 D and E). Similarly, residues from Lys311-Asn319 loop and Arg454, His461, Gln471, and Asn529-Leu533 are involved in the interface with neighboring monomers to form the tetramer in the BPTES complex.

BPTES Induces Allosteric Conformational Changes That Destabilize Catalytic Function of KGA

Fig. 3A shows that 293T cells overexpressing KGA produced higher level of glutamate compared with the vector control cells. Most significantly, all of these mutants, except Phe322Ala, greatly diminished the KGA activity.

Fig. 3. Mutations at allosteric loop and BPTES binding pocket abrogate KGA activity and BPTES sensitivity.

Raf-Mek-Erk Signaling Module Regulates KGA Activity. Because KGA supports cell growth and proliferation, we first validated that treatment of cells with BPTES indeed inhibits KGA activity and cell proliferation (Fig. S5 A–D and SI Results). Next, as cells respond to various physiological stimuli to regulate their metabolism, with many of the metabolic enzymes being the primary targets of modulation (18), we examined whether KGA activity can be regulated by physiological stimuli, in particular EGF, which is important for cell growth and proliferation. Cells overexpressing KGA were made quiescent and then stimulated with EGF for various time points. Fig. 4A shows that the basal KGA activity remained unchanged 30 min after EGF stimulation, but the activity was substantially enhanced after 1 h and then gradually returned to the basal level after 4 h. Because EGF activates the Raf-Mek-Erk signaling module (19), treatment of cells with Mek-specific inhibitor U0126 could block the enhanced KGA activity with parallel inhibition of Erk phosphorylation (Fig. 4A). Interestingly, such Mek-induced KGA activity is specific to EGF and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but not with other growth factors, such as PDGF, TGF-β, and basic FGF (bFGF), despite activation of Mek-Erk by bFGF (Fig. S6A).

The results show that KGA could interact equally well with the wild-type or mutant forms of Raf-1 and Mek2 (Fig. 4C). Importantly, endogenous Raf-1 or Erk1/2, including the phosphorylated Erk1/2 (Fig. 4 C and D), could be detected in the KGA complex. Taken together, these results indicate that the activity of KGA is directly regulated by Raf-Mek-Erk downstream of EGF receptor. To further show that Mek2-enhanced KGA activity requires both the kinase activity of Mek2 and the core residues for KGA catalysis, wild-type or triple mutant (Leu321Ala/Phe322Ala/Leu323Ala) of KGA was coexpressed with dominant negative Mek2-KA or the constitutive active Mek2-SD and their KGA activities measured. The result shows that the presence of Mek2-KA blocks KGA activity, whereas the triple mutant still remains inert even in the presence of the constitutively active Mek2 (Fig. 4E), and despite Mek2 binding to the KGA triple mutant (Fig. S7B). Consequently, expressing triple mutant did not support cell proliferation as well as the wild-type control (Fig. S7C).

Fig. 4. EGFR-Raf-Mek-Erk signaling stimulates KGA activity.

When cells expressing both KGA and Mek2-K101A were treated with subthreshold levels of BPTES, there was a synergistic reduction in cell proliferation (Fig. S6C and SI Results). Lastly, to determine whether regulation of KGA by Raf-Mek-Erk depends on its phosphorylation status, cells were transfected with KGA with or without the protein phosphatase PP2A and assayed for the KGA activity. PP2A is a ubiquitous and conserved serine/threonine phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. The results indicate that KGA activity was reduced down to the basal level in the presence of PP2A (Fig. 5A). Coimmunoprecipitation study also revealed that KGA interacts with PP2A (Fig. 5B), suggesting a negative feedback regulation by this protein phosphatase. Furthermore, treatment of immunoprecipitated and purified KGA with calf-intestine alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) almost completely abolished the KGA activity in vitro (Fig. S6D). Taken together, these results indicate that KGA activity is regulated by Raf-Mek2, and KGA activation by EGF could be part of the EGF-stimulated Raf-Mek-Erk signaling program in controlling cell growth and proliferation (Fig. 5C).

KGA activity is regulated by phosphorylation

KGA activity is regulated by phosphorylation

http://www.pnas.org/content/109/20/7705/F5.medium.gif

Fig. 5. KGA activity is regulated by phosphorylation. (C) Schematic model depicting the synergistic cross-talk between KGA-mediated glutaminolysis and EGF-activated Raf-Mek-Erk signaling. Exogenous glutamine can be transported across the membrane and converted to glutamate by glutaminase (KGA), thus feeding the metabolite to the ATP-producing tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This process can be stimulated by EGF receptor-mediated Raf-Mek-Erk signaling via their phosphorylation-dependent pathway, as evidenced by the inhibition of KGA activity by the kinase-dead and dominant negative mutants of Raf-1 (Raf-1-K375M) and Mek2 (Mek2-K101A), protein phosphatase PP2A, and Mek-specific inhibitor U0126. Consequently, inhibiting KGA with BPTES and blocking Raf-Mek pathway with Mek2-K101A provide a synergistic inhibition on cell proliferation.

Small-molecule inhibitors that target glutaminase activity in cancer cells are under development. Earlier efforts targeting glutaminase using glutamine analogs have been unsuccessful owing to their toxicities (2). BPTES has attracted much attention as a selective, nontoxic inhibitor of KGA (15), and preclinical testing of BPTES toward human cancers has just begun (20). BPTES selectively suppresses the growth of glioma cells (21) and inhibits the growth of lymphoma tumor growth in animal model studies (22). Wang et al. (11) reported a small molecule that targets glutaminase activity and oncogenic transformation. Despite extensive studies, nothing is known about the structural and molecular basis for KGA inhibitory mechanisms and how their function is regulated during normal and cancer cell metabolism. Such limited information impedes our effort in producing better generations of inhibitors for better treatment regimens.

Comparison of the complex structures with apo cKGA structure, which has well-defined electron density for the key loop, we provide the atomic view of an allosteric binding pocket for BPTES and elucidate the inhibitory mechanism of KGA by BPTES. The key residues of the loop (Glu312-Pro329) undergo major conformational changes upon binding of BPTES. In addition, structure-based mutagenesis studies suggest that this loop is essential for stabilizing the active site. Therefore, by binding in an allosteric pocket, BPTES inhibits the enzymatic activity of KGA through (i) triggering a major conformational change on the key residues that would normally be involved in stabilizing the active sites and regulating its enzymatic activity; and (ii) forming a stable inactive tetrameric KGA form. Our findings are further supported by two very recent reports on KGA isoform (GAC) (2324), although these studies lack full details owing to limitation of their electron density maps. BPTES is specific to KGA but not to LGA (15). Sequence comparison of KGA with LGA (Fig. S8A) reveals two unique residues on KGA, Phe318 and Phe322, which upon mutation to LGA counterparts, become resistant to BPTES. Thus, our study provides the molecular basis of BPTES specificity.

7.7.2 Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling promotes tumorigenicity and stemness via activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in bladder cancer.

Islam SS, Mokhtari RB, Noman AS, …, van der Kwast T, Yeger H, Farhat WA.
Molec Carcinogenesis mar 2015; 54(5). http://dx.doi.org:/10.1002/mc.22300

shh sonic hedgehog signaling pathway nri2151-f1

shh sonic hedgehog signaling pathway nri2151-f1

Activation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway controls tumorigenesis in a variety of cancers. Here, we show a role for Shh signaling in the promotion of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumorigenicity, and stemness in the bladder cancer. EMT induction was assessed by the decreased expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1 and increased expression of N-cadherin. The induced EMT was associated with increased cell motility, invasiveness, and clonogenicity. These progression relevant behaviors were attenuated by treatment with Hh inhibitors cyclopamine and GDC-0449, and after knockdown by Shh-siRNA, and led to reversal of the EMT phenotype. The results with HTB-9 were confirmed using a second bladder cancer cell line, BFTC905 (DM). In a xenograft mouse model TGF-β1 treated HTB-9 cells exhibited enhanced tumor growth. Although normal bladder epithelial cells could also undergo EMT and upregulate Shh with TGF-β1 they did not exhibit tumorigenicity. The TGF-β1 treated HTB-9 xenografts showed strong evidence for a switch to a more stem cell like phenotype, with functional activation of CD133, Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4. The bladder cancer specific stem cell markers CK5 and CK14 were upregulated in the TGF-β1 treated xenograft tumor samples, while CD44 remained unchanged in both treated and untreated tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of 22 primary human bladder tumors indicated that Shh expression was positively correlated with tumor grade and stage. Elevated expression of Ki-67, Shh, Gli2, and N-cadherin were observed in the high grade and stage human bladder tumor samples, and conversely, the downregulation of these genes were observed in the low grade and stage tumor samples. Collectively, this study indicates that TGF-β1-induced Shh may regulate EMT and tumorigenicity in bladder cancer. Our studies reveal that the TGF-β1 induction of EMT and Shh is cell type context dependent. Thus, targeting the Shh pathway could be clinically beneficial in the ability to reverse the EMT phenotype of tumor cells and potentially inhibit bladder cancer progression and metastasis

Sonic_hedgehog_pathway

Sonic_hedgehog_pathway

7.7.3 Differential activation of NF-κB signaling is associated with platinum and taxane resistance in MyD88 deficient epithelial ovarian cancer cells

Gaikwad SM, Thakur B, Sakpal A, Singh RK, Ray P.
Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2015 Apr; 61:90-102
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.biocel.2015.02.001

Development of chemoresistance is a major impediment to successful treatment of patients suffering from epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Among various molecular factors, presence of MyD88, a component of TLR-4/MyD88 mediated NF-κB signaling in EOC tumors is reported to cause intrinsic paclitaxel resistance and poor survival. However, 50-60% of EOC patients do not express MyD88 and one-third of these patients finally relapses and dies due to disease burden. The status and role of NF-κB signaling in this chemoresistant MyD88(negative) population has not been investigated so far. Using isogenic cellular matrices of cisplatin, paclitaxel and platinum-taxol resistant MyD88(negative) A2780 ovarian cancer cells expressing a NF-κB reporter sensor, we showed that enhanced NF-κB activity was required for cisplatin but not for paclitaxel resistance. Immunofluorescence and gel mobility shift assay demonstrated enhanced nuclear localization of NF-κB and subsequent binding to NF-κB response element in cisplatin resistant cells. The enhanced NF-κB activity was measurable from in vivo tumor xenografts by dual bioluminescence imaging. In contrast, paclitaxel and the platinum-taxol resistant cells showed down regulation in NF-κB activity. Intriguingly, silencing of MyD88 in cisplatin resistant and MyD88(positive) TOV21G and SKOV3 cells showed enhanced NF-κB activity after cisplatin but not after paclitaxel or platinum-taxol treatments. Our data thus suggest that NF-κB signaling is important for maintenance of cisplatin resistance but not for taxol or platinum-taxol resistance in absence of an active TLR-4/MyD88 receptor mediated cell survival pathway in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

7.7.4 Activation of apoptosis by caspase-3-dependent specific RelB cleavage in anticancer agent-treated cancer cells

Kuboki MIto ASimizu SUmezawa K.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2015 Jan 16; 456(3):810-4
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.12.024

Activation of caspase 3 and caspase-dependent apoptosis  nrmicro2071-f1

Activation of caspase 3 and caspase-dependent apoptosis nrmicro2071-f1

Highlights

  • We have prepared RelB mutants that are resistant to caspase 3-induced scission.
  • Vinblastine induced caspase 3-dependent site-specific RelB cleavage in cancer cells.
  • Cancer cells expressing cleavage-resistant RelB showed less sensitivity to vinblastine.
  • Caspase 3-induced RelB cleavage may provide positive feedback mechanism in apoptosis.

DTCM-glutarimide (DTCM-G) is a newly found anti-inflammatory agent. In the course of experiments with lymphoma cells, we found that DTCM-G induced specific RelB cleavage. Anticancer agent vinblastine also induced the specific RelB cleavage in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that the Asp205 site in RelB was specifically cleaved possibly by caspase-3 in vinblastine-treated HT1080 cells. Moreover, the cells stably overexpressing RelB Asp205Ala were resistant to vinblastine-induced apoptosis. Thus, the specific Asp205 cleavage of RelB by caspase-3 would be involved in the apoptosis induction by anticancer agents, which would provide the positive feedback mechanism.

apoptotic-caspases-control-microglia-activation-cdd2011107f3

apoptotic-caspases-control-microglia-activation-cdd2011107f3

 

 

7.7.5 Identification of Liver Cancer Progenitors Whose Malignant Progression Depends on Autocrine IL-6 Signaling

He GDhar DNakagawa HFont-Burgada JOgata HJiang Y, et al.
Cell. 2013 Oct 10; 155(2):384-96
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016%2Fj.cell.2013.09.031

Il-6 signaling in cancer cells

Il-6 signaling in cancer cells

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a slowly developing malignancy postulated to evolve from pre-malignant lesions in chronically damaged livers. However, it was never established that premalignant lesions actually contain tumor progenitors that give rise to cancer. Here, we describe isolation and characterization of HCC progenitor cells (HcPCs) from different mouse HCC models. Unlike fully malignant HCC, HcPCs give rise to cancer only when introduced into a liver undergoing chronic damage and compensatory proliferation. Although HcPCs exhibit a similar transcriptomic profile to bipotential hepatobiliary progenitors, the latter do not give rise to tumors. Cells resembling HcPCs reside within dysplastic lesions that appear several months before HCC nodules. Unlike early hepatocarcinogenesis, which depends on paracrine IL-6 production by inflammatory cells, due to upregulation of LIN28 expression, HcPCs had acquired autocrine IL-6 signaling that stimulates their in vivo growth and malignant progression. This may be a general mechanism that drives other IL-6-producing malignancies.

Clonal evolution and selective pressure may cause some descendants of the initial progenitor to cross the bridge of no return and form a premalignant lesion. Cancer genome sequencing indicates that most cancers require at least five genetic changes to evolve (Wood et al., 2007). It has been difficult to isolate and propagate cancer progenitors prior to detection of tumor masses. Further, it is not clear whether cancer progenitors are the precursors for the  cancer stem cells (CSCs)isolated from cancers. An answer to these critical questions depends on identification and isolation of cancer progenitors, which may also enable definition of molecular markers and signaling pathways suitable for early detection and treatment.

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the end product of chronic liver diseases, requires several decades to evolve (El-Serag, 2011). It is the third most deadly and fifth most common cancer worldwide, and in the United States its incidence has doubled in the past two decades. Furthermore, 8% of the world’s population are chronically infected with hepatitis B or C viruses (HBV and HCV) and are at a high risk of new HCC development (El-Serag, 2011). Up to 5% of HCV patients will develop HCC in their lifetime, and the yearly HCC incidence in patients with cirrhosis is 3%–5%. These tumors may arise from premalignant lesions, ranging from dysplastic foci to dysplastic hepatocyte nodules that are often seen in damaged and cirrhotic livers and are more proliferative than the surrounding parenchyma (Hytiroglou et al., 2007). There is no effective treatment for HCC and, upon diagnosis, most patients with advanced disease have a remaining lifespan of 4–6 months. Premalignant lesions, called foci of altered hepatocytes (FAH), were described in chemically induced HCC models (Pitot, 1990), but it was questioned whether these lesions harbor tumor progenitors or result from compensatory proliferation (Sell and Leffert, 2008). The aim of this study was to determine whether HCC progenitor cells (HcPCs) exist and if so, to isolate these cells and identify some of the signaling networks that are involved in their maintenance and progression.

We now describe HcPC isolation from mice treated with the procarcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN), which induces poorly differentiated HCC nodules within 8 to 9 months (Verna et al., 1996). The use of a chemical carcinogen is justified because the finding of up to 121 mutations per HCC genome suggests that carcinogens may be responsible for human HCC induction (Guichard et al., 2012). Furthermore, 20%–30% of HCC, especially in HBV-infected individuals, evolve in noncirrhotic livers (El-Serag, 2011). Nonetheless, we also isolated HcPCs fromTak1Δhep mice, which develop spontaneous HCC as a result of progressive liver damage, inflammation, and fibrosis caused by ablation of TAK1 (Inokuchi et al., 2010). Although the etiology of each model is distinct, both contain HcPCs that express marker genes and signaling pathways previously identified in human HCC stem cells (Marquardt and Thorgeirsson, 2010) long before visible tumors are detected. Furthermore, DEN-induced premalignant lesions and HcPCs exhibit autocrine IL-6 production that is critical for tumorigenic progression. Circulating IL-6 is a risk indicator in several human pathologies and is strongly correlated with adverse prognosis in HCC and cholangiocarcinoma (Porta et al., 2008Soresi et al., 2006). IL-6 produced by in-vitro-induced CSCs was suggested to be important for their maintenance (Iliopoulos et al., 2009). Little is known about the source of IL-6 in HCC.

DEN-Induced Collagenase-Resistant Aggregates of HCC Progenitors

A single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of DEN into 15-day-old BL/6 mice induces HCC nodules first detected 8 to 9 months later. However, hepatocytes prepared from macroscopically normal livers 3 months after DEN administration already contain cells that progress to HCC when transplanted into the permissive liver environment of MUP-uPA mice (He et al., 2010), which express urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) from a mouse liver-specific major urinary protein (MUP) promoter and undergo chronic liver damage and compensatory proliferation (Rhim et al., 1994). HCC markers such as α fetoprotein (AFP), glypican 3 (Gpc3), and Ly6D, whose expression in mouse liver cancer was reported (Meyer et al., 2003), were upregulated in aggregates from DEN-treated livers, but not in nonaggregated hepatocytes or aggregates from control livers (Figure S1A). Using 70 μm and 40 μm sieves, we separated aggregated from nonaggregated hepatocytes (Figure 1A) and tested their tumorigenic potential by transplantation into MUP-uPA mice (Figure 1B). To facilitate transplantation, the aggregates were mechanically dispersed and suspended in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM). Five months after intrasplenic (i.s.) injection of 104 viable cells, mice receiving cells from aggregates developed about 18 liver tumors per mouse, whereas mice receiving nonaggregated hepatocytes developed less than 1 tumor each (Figure 1B). The tumors exhibited typical trabecular HCC morphology and contained cells that abundantly express AFP (Figure S1B).

Only liver tumors were formed by the transplanted cells. Other organs, including the spleen into which the cells were injected, remained tumor free (Figure 1B), suggesting that HcPCs progress to cancer only in the proper microenvironment. Indeed, no tumors appeared after HcPC transplantation into normal BL/6 mice. But, if BL/6 mice were first treated with retrorsine (a chemical that permanently inhibits hepatocyte proliferation [Laconi et al., 1998]), intrasplenically transplanted with HcPC-containing aggregates, and challenged with CCl4 to induce liver injury and compensatory proliferation (Guo et al., 2002), HCCs readily appeared (Figure 1C). CCl4 omission prevented tumor development. Notably, MUP-uPA or CCl4-treated livers are fragile, rendering direct intrahepatic transplantation difficult. CCl4-induced liver damage, especially within a male liver, generates a microenvironment that drives HcPC proliferation and malignant progression. To examine this point, we transplanted GFP-labeled HcPC-containing aggregates into retrorsine-treated BL/6 mice and examined their ability to proliferate with or without subsequent CCl4 treatment. Indeed, the GFP+ cells formed clusters that grew in size only in CCl4-treated host livers (Figure S1E). Omission of CC14 prevented their expansion.

Because CD44 is expressed by HCC stem cells (Yang et al., 2008Zhu et al., 2010), we dispersed the aggregates and separated CD44+ from CD44 cells and transplanted both into MUP-uPA mice. Whereas as few as 103 CD44+ cells gave rise to HCCs in 100% of recipients, no tumors were detected after transplantation of CD44 cells (Figure 1E). Remarkably, 50% of recipients developed at least one HCC after receiving as few as 102 CD44+ cells.

HcPC-Containing Aggregates in Tak1Δhep Mice

We applied the same HcPC isolation protocol to Tak1Δhep mice, which develop HCC of different etiology from DEN-induced HCC. Importantly, Tak1Δhep mice develop HCC as a consequence of chronic liver injury and fibrosis without carcinogen or toxicant exposure (Inokuchi et al., 2010). Indeed, whole-tumor exome sequencing revealed that DEN-induced HCC contained about 24 mutations per 106 bases (Mb) sequenced, with B-RafV637E being the most recurrent, whereas 1.4 mutations per Mb were detected inTak1Δhep HCC’s exome (Table S1). By contrast, Tak1Δhep HCC exhibited gene copy number changes. HCC developed in 75% of MUP-uPA mice that received dispersed Tak1Δhep aggregates, but no tumors appeared in mice receiving nonaggregated Tak1Δhep or totalTak1f/f hepatocytes (Figure 2B). bile duct ligation (BDL) or feeding with 3,5-dicarbethoxy-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC), treatments that cause cholestatic liver injuries and oval cell expansion (Dorrell et al., 2011), did increase the number of small hepatocytic cell aggregates (Figure S2A). Nonetheless, no tumors were observed 5 months after injection of such aggregates into MUP-uPA mice (Figure S2B). Thus, not all hepatocytic aggregates contain HcPCs, and HcPCs only appear under tumorigenic conditions.

The HcPC Transcriptome Is Similar to that of HCC and Oval Cells

To determine the relationship between DEN-induced HcPCs, normal hepatocytes, and fully transformed HCC cells, we analyzed the transcriptomes of aggregated and nonaggregated hepatocytes from male littermates 5 months after DEN administration, HCC epithelial cells from DEN-induced tumors, and normal hepatocytes from age- and gender-matched littermate controls. Clustering analysis distinguished the HCC samples from other samples and revealed that the aggregated hepatocyte samples did not cluster with each other but rather with nonaggregated hepatocytes derived from the same mouse (Figure S3A). 57% (583/1,020) of genes differentially expressed in aggregated relative to nonaggregated hepatocytes are also differentially expressed in HCC relative to normal hepatocytes (Figure 3B, top), a value that is highly significant (p < 7.13 × 10−243). More specifically, 85% (494/583) of these genes are overexpressed in both HCC and HcPC-containing aggregates (Figure 3B, bottom table). Thus, hepatocyte aggregates isolated 5 months after DEN injection contain cells that are related in their gene expression profile to HCC cells isolated from fully developed tumor nodules.

Figure 3 Aggregated Hepatocytes Exhibit an Altered Transcriptome Similar to that of HCC Cells

We examined which biological processes or cellular compartments were significantly overrepresented in the induced or repressed genes in both pairwise comparisons (Gene Ontology Analysis). As expected, processes and compartments that were enriched in aggregated hepatocytes relative to nonaggregated hepatocytes were almost identical to those that were enriched in HCC relative to normal hepatocytes (Figure 3C). Several human HCC markers, including AFP, Gpc3 and H19, were upregulated in aggregated hepatocytes (Figures 3D and 3E). Aggregated hepatocytes also expressed more Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8), a cell-surface glycoprotein that complexes with integrins and is overexpressed in human carcinomas (Zöller, 2009). Another cell-surface molecule highly expressed in aggregated cells is Ly6D (Figures 3D and 3E). Immunofluorescence (IF) analysis revealed that Ly6D was undetectable in normal liver but was elevated in FAH and ubiquitously expressed in most HCC cells (Figure S3C). A fluorescent-labeled Ly6D antibody injected into HCC-bearing mice specifically stained tumor nodules (Figure S3D). Other cell-surface molecules that were upregulated in aggregated cells included syndecan 3 (Sdc3), integrin α 9 (Itga9), claudin 5 (Cldn5), and cadherin 5 (Cdh5) (Figure 3D). Aggregated hepatocytes also exhibited elevated expression of extracellular matrix proteins (TIF3 and Reln1) and a serine protease inhibitor (Spink3). Elevated expression of such proteins may explain aggregate formation. Aggregated hepatocytes also expressed progenitor cell markers, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) (Figure 3E) and Dlk1 (Figure 3D). We compared the HcPC and HCC (Figure 3A) to the transcriptome of DDC-induced oval cells (Shin et al., 2011). This analysis revealed a striking similarity between the HCC, HcPC, and the oval cell transcriptomes (Figure S3B). Despite these similarities, some genes that were upregulated in HcPC-containing aggregates and HCC were not upregulated in oval cells. Such genes may account for the tumorigenic properties of HcPC and HCC.

Figure 4  DEN-Induced HcPC Aggregates Express Pathways and Markers Characteristic of HCC and Hepatobiliary Stem Cells

We examined the aggregates for signaling pathways and transcription factors involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. Many aggregated cells were positive for phosphorylated c-Jun and STAT3 (Figure 4A), transcription factors involved in DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis (Eferl et al., 2003He et al., 2010). Sox9, a transcription factor that marks hepatobiliary progenitors (Dorrell et al., 2011), was also expressed by many of the aggregated cells, which were also positive for phosphorylated c-Met (Figure 4A), a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and is essential for liver development (Bladt et al., 1995) and hepatocarcinogenesis (Wang et al., 2001). Few of the nonaggregated hepatocytes exhibited activation of these signaling pathways. Despite different etiology, HcPC-containing aggregates from Tak1Δhep mice exhibit upregulation of many of the same markers and pathways that are upregulated in DEN-induced HcPC-containing aggregates. Flow cytometry confirmed enrichment of CD44+ cells as well as CD44+/CD90+ and CD44+/EpCAM+ double-positive cells in the HcPC-containing aggregates from either DEN-treated or Tak1Δhep livers (Figure S4B).

HcPC-Containing Aggregates Originate from Premalignant Dysplastic Lesions

FAH are dysplastic lesions occurring in rodent livers exposed to hepatic carcinogens (Su et al., 1990). Similar lesions are present in premalignant human livers (Su et al., 1997). Yet, it is still debated whether FAH correspond to premalignant lesions or are a reaction to liver injury that does not lead to cancer (Sell and Leffert, 2008). In DEN-treated males, FAH were detected as early as 3 months after DEN administration (Figure 5A), concomitant with the time at which HcPC-containing aggregates were detected. In females, FAH development was delayed. FAH contained cells positive for the same progenitor cell markers and activated signaling pathways present in HcPC-containing aggregates, including AFP, CD44, and EpCAM (Figure 5C). FAH also contained cells positive for activated STAT3, c-Jun, and PCNA (Figure 5C).

HcPCs Exhibit Autocrine IL-6 Expression Necessary for HCC Progression

In situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed that DEN-induced FAH contained IL-6-expressing cells (Figures 6A, 6B, and S5), and freshly isolated DEN-induced aggregates contained more IL-6 messenger RNA (mRNA) than nonaggregated hepatocytes (Figure 6C). We examined several factors that control IL-6 expression and found that LIN28A and B were significantly upregulated in HcPCs and HCC (Figures 6D and 6E). LIN28-expressing cells were also detected within FAH (Figure 6F). As reported (Iliopoulos et al., 2009), knockdown of LIN28B in cultured HcPC or HCC cell lines decreased IL-6 expression (Figure 6G). LIN28 exerts its effects through downregulation of the microRNA (miRNA) Let-7 (Iliopoulos et al., 2009).

Figure 6  Liver Premalignant Lesions and HcPCs Exhibit Elevated IL-6 and LIN28 Expression

Figure 7  HCC Growth Depends on Autocrine IL-6 Production

The isolation and characterization of cells that can give rise to HCC only after transplantation into an appropriate host liver undergoing chronic injury demonstrates that cancer arises from progenitor cells that are yet to become fully malignant. Importantly, unlike fully malignant HCC cells, the HcPCs we isolated cannot form s.c. tumors or even liver tumors when introduced into a nondamaged liver. Liver damage induced by uPA expression or CCl4 treatment provides HcPCs with the proper cytokine and growth factor milieu needed for their proliferation. Although HcPCs produce IL-6, they may also depend on other cytokines such as TNF, which is produced by macrophages that are recruited to the damaged liver. In addition, uPA expression and CCl4 treatment may enhance HcPC growth and progression through their fibrogenic effect on hepatic stellate cells. Although HCC and other cancers have been suspected to arise from premalignant/dysplastic lesions (Hruban et al., 2007Hytiroglou et al., 2007), a direct demonstration that such lesions progress into malignant tumors has been lacking. Based on expression of common markers—EpCAM, CD44, AFP, activated STAT3, and IL-6—that are not expressed in normal hepatocytes, we postulate that HcPCs originate from FAH or dysplastic foci, which are first observed in male mice within 3 months of DEN exposure.

7.7.6 Acetylation Stabilizes ATP-Citrate Lyase to Promote Lipid Biosynthesis and Tumor Growth

Lin R1Tao RGao XLi TZhou XGuan KLXiong YLei QY.
Mol Cell. 2013 Aug 22; 51(4):506-18
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.molcel.2013.07.002

Increased fatty acid synthesis is required to meet the demand for membrane expansion of rapidly growing cells. ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) is upregulated or activated in several types of cancer, and inhibition of ACLY arrests proliferation of cancer cells. Here we show that ACLY is acetylated at lysine residues 540, 546, and 554 (3K). Acetylation at these three lysine residues is stimulated by P300/calcium-binding protein (CBP)-associated factor (PCAF) acetyltransferase under high glucose and increases ACLY stability by blocking its ubiquitylation and degradation. Conversely, the protein deacetylase sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) deacetylates and destabilizes ACLY. Substitution of 3K abolishes ACLY ubiquitylation and promotes de novo lipid synthesis, cell proliferation, and tumor growth. Importantly, 3K acetylation of ACLY is increased in human lung cancers. Our study reveals a crosstalk between acetylation and ubiquitylation by competing for the same lysine residues in the regulation of fatty acid synthesis and cell growth in response to glucose.

Fatty acid synthesis occurs at low rates in most nondividing cells of normal tissues that primarily uptake lipids from circulation. In contrast, increased lipogenesis, especially de novo lipid synthesis, is a key characteristic of cancer cells. Many studies have demonstrated that in cancer cells, fatty acids are preferred to be derived from de novo synthesis instead of extracellular lipid supply (Medes et al., 1953Menendez and Lupu, 2007;Ookhtens et al., 1984Sabine et al., 1967). Fatty acids are key building blocks for membrane biogenesis, and glucose serves as a major carbon source for de novo fatty acid synthesis (Kuhajda, 2000McAndrew, 1986;Swinnen et al., 2006). In rapidly proliferating cells, citrate generated by the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, either from glucose by glycolysis or glutamine by anaplerosis, is preferentially exported from mitochondria to cytosol and then cleaved by ATP citrate lyase (ACLY) (Icard et al., 2012) to produce cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which is the building block for de novo lipid synthesis. As such, ACLY couples energy metabolism with fatty acids synthesis and plays a critical role in supporting cell growth. The function of ACLY in cell growth is supported by the observation that inhibition of ACLY by chemical inhibitors or RNAi dramatically suppresses tumor cell proliferation and induces differentiation in vitro and in vivo (Bauer et al., 2005Hatzivassiliou et al., 2005). In addition, ACLY activity may link metabolic status to histone acetylation by providing acetyl-CoA and, therefore, gene expression (Wellen et al., 2009).

While ACLY is transcriptionally regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) (Kim et al., 2010), ACLY activity is regulated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway (Berwick et al., 2002Migita et al., 2008Pierce et al., 1982). Akt can directly phosphorylate and activate ACLY (Bauer et al., 2005Berwick et al., 2002Migita et al., 2008Potapova et al., 2000). Covalent lysine acetylation has recently been found to play a broad and critical role in the regulation of multiple metabolic enzymes (Choudhary et al., 2009Zhao et al., 2010). In this study, we demonstrate that ACLY protein is acetylated on multiple lysine residues in response to high glucose. Acetylation of ACLY blocks its ubiquitinylation and degradation, thus leading to ACLY accumulation and increased fatty acid synthesis. Our observations reveal a crosstalk between protein acetylation and ubiquitylation in the regulation of fatty acid synthesis and cell growth.

Acetylation of ACLY at Lysines 540, 546, and 554

Recent mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses have potentially identified a large number of acetylated proteins, including ACLY (Figure S1A available online; Choudhary et al., 2009Zhao et al., 2010). We detected the acetylation level of ectopically expressed ACLY followed by western blot using pan-specific anti-acetylated lysine antibody. ACLY was indeed acetylated, and its acetylation was increased by nearly 3-fold after treatment with nicotinamide (NAM), an inhibitor of the SIRT family deacetylases, and trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC) class I and class II (Figure 1A). Experiments with endogenous ACLY also showed that TSA and NAM treatment enhanced ACLY acetylation (Figure 1B).

Figure 1  ACLY Is Acetylated at Lysines 540, 546, and 554

Ten putative acetylation sites were identified by mass spectrometry analyses (Table S1). We singly mutated each lysine to either a glutamine (Q) or an arginine (R) and found that no single mutation resulted in a significant reduction of ACLY acetylation (data not shown), indicating that ACLY may be acetylated at multiple lysine residues. Three lysine residues, K540, K546, and K554, received high scores in the acetylation proteomic screen and are evolutionarily conserved from C. elegans to mammals (Figure S1A). We generated triple Q and R mutants of K540, K546, and K554 (3KQ and 3KR) and found that both 3KQ and 3KR mutations resulted in a significant (~60%) decrease in ACLY acetylation (Figure 1C), indicating that 3K are the major acetylation sites of ACLY.  Further, we found that the acetylation of endogenous ACLY is clearly increased after treatment of cells with NAM and TSA (Figure 1D). These results demonstrate that ACLY is acetylated at K540, K546, and K554.

Glucose Promotes ACLY Acetylation to Stabilize ACLY

In mammalian cells, glucose is the main carbon source for de novo lipid synthesis. We found that ACLY levels increased with increasing glucose concentration, which also correlated with increased ACLY 3K acetylation (Figure 1E). Furthermore, to confirm whether the glucose level affects ACLY protein stability in vivo, we intraperitoneally injected glucose in BALB/c mice and found that high glucose resulted in a significant increase of ACLY protein levels (Figure 1F).

To determine whether ACLY acetylation affects its protein levels, we treated HeLa and Chang liver cells with NAM and TSA and found an increase in ACLY protein levels (Figure S1G, upper panel). ACLY mRNA levels were not significantly changed by the treatment of NAM and TSA (Figure S1G, lower panel), indicating that this upregulation of ACLY is mostly achieved at the posttranscriptional level. Indeed, ACLY protein was also accumulated in cells treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, indicating that ACLY stability could be regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (Figure 1G). Blocking deacetylase activity stabilized ACLY (Figure S1H). The stabilization of ACLY induced by high glucose was associated with an increase of ACLY acetylation at K540, K546, and K554. Together, these data support a notion that high glucose induces both ACLY acetylation and protein stabilization and prompted us to ask whether acetylation directly regulates ACLY stability. We then generated ACLYWT, ACLY3KQ, and ACLY3KRstable cells after knocking down the endogenous ACLY. We found that the ACLY3KR or ACLY3KQmutant was more stable than the ACLYWT (Figures 1I and S1I). Collectively, our results suggest that glucose induces acetylation at K540, 546, and 554 to stabilize ACLY.

Acetylation Stabilizes ACLY by Inhibiting Ubiquitylation

To determine the mechanism underlying the acetylation and ACLY protein stability, we first examined ACLY ubiquitylation and found that it was actively ubiquitylated (Figure 2A). Previous proteomic analyses have identified K546 in ACLY as a ubiquitylation site (Wagner et al., 2011). In order to identify the ubiquitylation sites, we tested the ubiquitylation levels of double mutants 540R–546R and 546–554R (Figure S2A). We found that the ubiquitylation of the 540R-546R and 546R-554R mutants is partially decreased, while mutation of K540, K546, and K554 (3KR), which changes all three putative acetylation lysine residues of ACLY to arginine residues, dramatically reduced the ACLY ubiquitylation level (Figures 2B and S2A), indicating that 3K lysines might also be the ubiquitylation target residues. Moreover, inhibition of deacetylases by NAM and TSA decreased ubiquitylation of WT but not 3KQ or 3KR mutant ACLY (Figure 2C). These results implicate an antagonizing role of the acetylation towards the ubiquitylation of ACLY at these three lysine residues.

Figure 2  Acetylation Protects ACLY from Proteasome Degradation by Inhibiting Ubiquitylation

We found that ACLY acetylation was only detected in the nonubiquitylated, but not the ubiquitylated (high-molecular-weight), ACLY species. This result indicates that ACLY acetylation and ubiquitylation are mutually exclusive and is consistent with the model that K540, K546, and K554 are the sites of both ubiquitylation and acetylation. Therefore, acetylation of these lysines would block ubiquitylation.

We also found that glucose upregulates ACLY acetylation at 3K and decreases its ubiquitylation (Figure S2B). High glucose (25 mM) effectively decreased ACLY ubiquitylation, while inhibition of deacetylases clearly diminished its ubiquitylation (Figure 2E). We conclude that acetylation and ubiquitylation occur mutually exclusively at K540, K546, and K554 and that high-glucose-induced acetylation at these three sites blocks ACLY ubiquitylation and degradation.

UBR4 Targets ACLY for Degradation

UBR4 was identified as a putative ACLY-interacting protein by affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry analysis (data not shown). To address if UBR4 is a potential ACLY E3 ligase, we determined the interaction between ACLY and UBR4 and found that ACLY interacted with the E3 ligase domain of UBR4; this interaction was enhanced by MG132 treatment (Figure 3A). UBR4 knockdown in A549 cells resulted in an increase of endogenous ACLY protein level (Figure 3C). Moreover, UBR4 knockdown significantly stabilized ACLY (Figure 3D) and decreased ACLY ubiquitylation (Figure 3E). Taken together, these results indicate that UBR4 is an ACLY E3 ligase that responds to glucose regulation.

Figure 3  UBR4 Is the E3 Ligase of ACLY

PCAF Acetylates ACLY

PCAF knockdown significantly reduced acetylation of 3K, indicating that PCAF is a potential 3K acetyltransferase in vivo (Figure 4C, upper panel). Furthermore, PCAF knockdown decreased the steady-state level of endogenous ACLY, but not ACLY mRNA (Figure 4C, middle and lower panels). Moreover, we found that PCAF knockdown destabilized ACLY (Figure 4D). In addition, overexpression of PCAF decreases ACLY ubiquitylation (Figure 4E), while PCAF inhibition increases the interaction between UBR4 E3 ligase domain and wild-type ACLY, but not 3KR (Figure 4F). Together, our results indicate that PCAF increases ACLY protein level, possibly via acetylating ACLY at 3K.

Figure 4  PCAF Is the Acetylase of ACLY

SIRT2 Deacetylates ACLY

Figure 5  SIRT2 Decreases ACLY Acetylation and Increases Its Protein Levels In Vivo

Acetylation of ACLY Promotes Cell Proliferation and De Novo Lipid Synthesis

The protein levels of ACLY 3KQ and 3KR were accumulated to a level higher than the wild-type cells upon extended culture in low-glucose medium (Figure S6A, right panel), indicating a growth advantage conferred by ACLY stabilization resulting from the disruption of both acetylation and ubiquitylation at K540, K546, and K554. Cellular acetyl-CoA assay showed that cells expressing 3KQ or 3KR mutant ACLY produce more acetyl-CoA than cells expressing the wild-type ACLY under low glucose (Figures 6B and S6B), further supporting the conclusion that 3KQ or 3KR mutation stabilizes ACLY.

Figure 6  Acetylation of ACLY at 3K Promotes Lipogenesis and Tumor Cell Proliferation

ACLY is a key enzyme in de novo lipid synthesis. Silencing ACLY inhibited the proliferation of multiple cancer cell lines, and this inhibition can be partially rescued by adding extra fatty acids or cholesterol into the culture media (Zaidi et al., 2012). This prompted us to measure extracellular lipid incorporation in A549 cells after knockdown and ectopic expression of ACLY. We found that when cultured in low glucose (2.5 mM), cells expressing wild-type ACLY uptake significantly more phospholipids compared to cells expressing 3KQ or 3KR mutant ACLY (Figures 6C, 6D, and S6D). When cultured in the presence of high glucose (25 mM), however, cells expressing either the wild-type, 3KQ, or 3KR mutant ACLY all have reduced, but similar, uptake of extracellular phospholipids (Figures 6C, 6D, and S6D). The above results are consistent with a model that acetylation of ACLY induced by high glucose increases its stability and stimulates de novo lipid synthesis.

3K Acetylation of ACLY Is Increased in Lung Cancer

ACLY is reported to be upregulated in human lung cancer (Migita et al., 2008). Many small chemicals targeting ACLY have been designed for cancer treatment (Zu et al., 2012). The finding that 3KQ or 3KR mutant increased the ability of ACLY to support A549 lung cancer cell proliferation prompted us to examine 3K acetylation in human lung cancers. We collected a total of 54 pairs of primary human lung cancer samples with adjacent normal lung tissues and performed immunoblotting for ACLY protein levels. This analysis revealed that, when compared to the matched normal lung tissues, 29 pairs showed a significant increase of total ACLY protein using b-actin as a loading control (Figures 7A and S7A). The tumor sample analyses demonstrate that ACLY protein levels are elevated in lung cancers, and 3K acetylation positively correlates with the elevated ACLY protein. These data also indicate that ACLY with 3K acetylation may be potential biomarker for lung cancer diagnosis.

Figure 7
  Acetylation of ACLY at 3K Is Upregulated in Human Lung Carcinoma

Dysregulation of cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer (Hanahan and Weinberg, 2011Vander Heiden et al., 2009). Besides elevated glycolysis, increased lipogenesis, especially de novo lipid synthesis, also plays an important role in tumor growth. Because most carbon sources for fatty acid synthesis are from glucose in mammalian cells (Wellen et al., 2009), the channeling of carbon into de novo lipid synthesis as building blocks for tumor cell growth is primarily linked to acetyl-CoA production by ACLY. Moreover, the ACLY-catalyzed reaction consumes ATP. Therefore, as the key cellular energy and carbon source, one may expect a role for glucose in ACLY regulation. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism of ACLY regulation by glucose that increases ACLY protein level to meet the enhanced demand of lipogenesis in growing cells, such as tumor cells (Figure 7C). Glucose increases ACLY protein levels by stimulating its acetylation.

Upregulation of ACLY is common in many cancers (Kuhajda, 2000Milgraum et al., 1997Swinnen et al., 2004Yahagi et al., 2005). This is in part due to the transcriptional activation by SREBP-1 resulting from the activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancers (Kim et al., 2010Nadler et al., 2001Wang and Dey, 2006). In this study, we report a mechanism of ACLY regulation at the posttranscriptional level. We propose that acetylation modulated by glucose status plays a crucial role in coordinating the intracellular level of ACLY, hence fatty acid synthesis, and glucose availability. When glucose is sufficient, lipogenesis is enhanced. This can be achieved, at least in part, by the glucose-induced stabilization of ACLY. High glucose increases ACLY acetylation, which inhibits its ubiquitylation and degradation, leading to the accumulation of ACLY and enhanced lipogenesis. In contrast, when glucose is limited, ACLY is not acetylated and thus can be ubiquitylated, leading to ACLY degradation and reduced lipogenesis. Moreover, our data indicate that acetylation and ubiquitylation in ACLY may compete with each other by targeting the same lysine residues at K540, K546, and K554. Consistently, previous proteomic analyses have identified K546 in ACLY as a ubiquitylation site (Wagner et al., 2011). Similar models of different modifications on the same lysine residues have been reported in the regulation of other proteins (Grönroos et al., 2002Li et al., 20022012). We propose that acetylation and ubiquitylation have opposing effects in the regulation of ACLY by competitively modifying the same lysine residues. The acetylation-mimetic 3KQ and the acetylation-deficient 3KR mutants behaved indistinguishably in most biochemical and functional assays, mainly due to the fact that these mutations disrupt lysine ubiquitylation that primarily occurs on these three residues.

ACLY is increased in lung cancer tissues compared to adjacent tissues. Consistently, ACLY acetylation at 3K is also significantly increased in lung cancer tissues. These observations not only confirm ACLY acetylation in vivo, but also suggest that ACLY 3K acetylation may play a role in lung cancer development. Our study reveals a mechanism of ACLY regulation in response to glucose signals.

 

7.7.7 Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates a Fatty Acid Network that Promotes Cancer Pathogenesis

Nomura DK1Long JZNiessen SHoover HSNg SWCravatt BF.
Cell. 2010 Jan 8; 140(1):49-61
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016.2Fj.cell.2009.11.027

Highlights

  • Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is elevated in aggressive human cancer cells
  • Loss of MAGL lowers fatty acid levels in cancer cells and impairs pathogenicity
  • MAGL controls a signaling network enriched in protumorigenic lipids
  • A high-fat diet can restore the growth of tumors lacking MAGL in vivo
monoacylglycerol-lipase-magl-is-highly-expressed-in-aggressive-human-cancer-cells-and-primary-tumors

monoacylglycerol-lipase-magl-is-highly-expressed-in-aggressive-human-cancer-cells-and-primary-tumors

http://www.cell.com/cms/attachment/1082768/7977146/fx1.jpg

Tumor cells display progressive changes in metabolism that correlate with malignancy, including development of a lipogenic phenotype. How stored fats are liberated and remodeled to support cancer pathogenesis, however, remains unknown. Here, we show that the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is highly expressed in aggressive human cancer cells and primary tumors, where it regulates a fatty acid network enriched in oncogenic signaling lipids that promotes migration, invasion, survival, and in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of MAGL in nonaggressive cancer cells recapitulates this fatty acid network and increases their pathogenicity—phenotypes that are reversed by an MAGL inhibitor. Impairments in MAGL-dependent tumor growth are rescued by a high-fat diet, indicating that exogenous sources of fatty acids can contribute to malignancy in cancers lacking MAGL activity. Together, these findings reveal how cancer cells can co-opt a lipolytic enzyme to translate their lipogenic state into an array of protumorigenic signals.

We show that the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is highly expressed in aggressive human cancer cells and primary tumors, where it regulates a fatty acid network enriched in oncogenic signaling lipids that promotes migration, invasion, survival, and in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of MAGL in non-aggressive cancer cells recapitulates this fatty acid network and increases their pathogenicity — phenotypes that are reversed by an MAGL inhibitor. Interestingly, impairments in MAGL-dependent tumor growth are rescued by a high-fat diet, indicating that exogenous sources of fatty acids can contribute to malignancy in cancers lacking MAGL activity. Together, these findings reveal how cancer cells can co-opt a lipolytic enzyme to translate their lipogenic state into an array of pro-tumorigenic signals.

The conversion of cells from a normal to cancerous state is accompanied by reprogramming of metabolic pathways (Deberardinis et al., 2008Jones and Thompson, 2009Kroemer and Pouyssegur, 2008), including those that regulate glycolysis (Christofk et al., 2008Gatenby and Gillies, 2004), glutamine-dependent anaplerosis (DeBerardinis et al., 2008DeBerardinis et al., 2007Wise et al., 2008), and the production of lipids (DeBerardinis et al., 2008Menendez and Lupu, 2007). Despite a growing appreciation that dysregulated metabolism is a defining feature of cancer, it remains unclear, in many instances, how such biochemical changes occur and whether they play crucial roles in disease progression and malignancy.

Among dysregulated metabolic pathways, heightened de novo lipid biosynthesis, or the development a “lipogenic” phenotype (Menendez and Lupu, 2007), has been posited to play a major role in cancer. For instance, elevated levels of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the enzyme responsible for fatty acid biosynthesis from acetate and malonyl CoA, are correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, and inhibition of FAS results in decreased cell proliferation, loss of cell viability, and decreased tumor growth in vivo (Kuhajda et al., 2000Menendez and Lupu, 2007Zhou et al., 2007). FAS may support cancer growth, at least in part, by providing metabolic substrates for energy production (via fatty acid oxidation) (Buzzai et al., 2005Buzzai et al., 2007Liu, 2006). Many other features of lipid biochemistry, however, are also critical for supporting the malignancy of cancer cells, including:

Prominent examples of lipid messengers that contribute to cancer include:

Here, we use functional proteomic methods to discover a lipolytic enzyme, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), that is highly elevated in aggressive cancer cells from multiple tissues of origin. We show that MAGL, through hydrolysis of monoacylglycerols (MAGs), controls free fatty acid (FFA) levels in cancer cells. The resulting MAGL-FFA pathway feeds into a diverse lipid network enriched in pro-tumorigenic signaling molecules and promotes migration, survival, and in vivo tumor growth. Aggressive cancer cells thus pair lipogenesis with high lipolytic activity to generate an array of pro-tumorigenic signals that support their malignant behavior.

Activity-Based Proteomic Analysis of Hydrolytic Enzymes in Human Cancer Cells

To identify enzyme activities that contribute to cancer pathogenesis, we conducted a functional proteomic analysis of a panel of aggressive and non-aggressive human cancer cell lines from multiple tumors of origin, including melanoma [aggressive (C8161, MUM2B), non-aggressive (MUM2C)], ovarian [aggressive (SKOV3), non-aggressive (OVCAR3)], and breast [aggressive (231MFP), non-aggressive (MCF7)] cancer. Aggressive cancer lines were confirmed to display much greater in vitro migration and in vivo tumor-growth rates compared to their non-aggressive counterparts (Figure S1), as previously shown (Jessani et al., 2004;Jessani et al., 2002Seftor et al., 2002Welch et al., 1991). Proteomes from these cancer lines were screened by activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) using serine hydrolase-directed fluorophosphonate (FP) activity-based probes (Jessani et al., 2002Patricelli et al., 2001). Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in the human proteome (representing ~ 1–1.5% of all human proteins) and play important roles in many biochemical processes of potential relevance to cancer, such as proteolysis (McMahon and Kwaan, 2008Puustinen et al., 2009), signal transduction (Puustinen et al., 2009), and lipid metabolism (Menendez and Lupu, 2007Zechner et al., 2005). The goal of this study was to identify hydrolytic enzyme activities that were consistently altered in aggressive versus non-aggressive cancer lines, working under the hypothesis that these conserved enzymatic changes would have a high probability of contributing to the pathogenic state of cancer cells.

Among the more than 50 serine hydrolases detected in this analysis (Tables S13), two enzymes, KIAA1363 and MAGL, were found to be consistently elevated in aggressive cancer cells relative to their non-aggressive counterparts, as judged by spectral counting (Jessani et al., 2005Liu et al., 2004). We confirmed elevations in KIAA1363 and MAGL in aggressive cancer cells by gel-based ABPP, where proteomes are treated with a rhodamine-tagged FP probe and resolved by 1D-SDS-PAGE and in-gel fluorescence scanning (Figure 1A). In both cases, two forms of each enzyme were detected (Figure 1A), due to differential glycoslyation for KIAA1363 (Jessani et al., 2002), and possibly alternative splicing for MAGL (Karlsson et al., 2001). We have previously shown that KIAA1363 plays a role in regulating ether lipid signaling pathways in aggressive cancer cells (Chiang et al., 2006). On the other hand, very little was known about the function of MAGL in cancer.

Figure 1  MAGL is elevated in aggressive cancer cells, where the enzyme regulates monoacylgycerol (MAG) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels

The heightened activity of MAGL in aggressive cancer cells was confirmed using the substrate C20:4 MAG (Figure 1B). Since several enzymes have been shown to display MAG hydrolytic activity (Blankman et al., 2007), we confirmed the contribution that MAGL makes to this process in cancer cells using the potent and selective MAGL inhibitor JZL184 (Long et al., 2009a).

MAGL Regulates Free Fatty Acid Levels in Aggressive Cancer Cells

MAGL is perhaps best recognized for its role in degrading the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, C20:4 MAG), as well as other MAGs, in brain and peripheral tissues (Dinh et al., 2002Long et al., 2009aLong et al., 2009bNomura et al., 2008). Consistent with this established function, blockade of MAGL by JZL184 (1 μM, 4 hr) produced significant elevations in the levels of several MAGs, including 2-AG, in each of the aggressive cancer cell lines (Figure 1C and Figure S2). Interestingly, however, MAGL inhibition also caused significant reductions in the levels of FFAs in aggressive cancer cells (Figure 1D and Figure S2). This surprising finding contrasts with the function of MAGL in normal tissues, where the enzyme does not, in general, control the levels of FFAs (Long et al., 2009aLong et al., 2009b;Nomura et al., 2008).

Metabolic labeling studies using the non-natural C17:0-MAG confirmed that MAGs are converted to LPC and LPE by aggressive cancer cells, and that this metabolic transformation is significantly enhanced by treatment with JZL184 (Figure S1). Finally, JZL184 treatment did not affect the levels of MAGs and FFAs in non-aggressive cancer lines (Figure 1C, D), consistent with the negligible expression of MAGL in these cells (Figure 1A, B).

We next stably knocked down MAGL expression by RNA interference technology using two independent shRNA probes (shMAGL1, shMAGL2), both of which reduced MAGL activity by 70–80% in aggressive cancer lines (Figure 2A, D and Figure S2). Other serine hydrolase activities were unaffected by shMAGL probes (Figure 2A, D and Figures S2), confirming the specificity of these reagents. Both shMAGL probes caused significant elevations in MAGs and corresponding reductions in FFAs in aggressive melanoma (Figure 2B, C), ovarian (Figure 2E, F), and breast cancer cells (Figure S2).

Figure 2  Stable shRNA-mediated knockdown of MAGL lowers FFA levels in aggressive cancer cells.

Together, these data demonstrate that both acute (pharmacological) and stable (shRNA) blockade of MAGL cause elevations in MAGs and reductions in FFAs in aggressive cancer cells. These intriguing findings indicate that MAGL is the principal regulator of FFA levels in aggressive cancer cells. Finally, we confirmed that MAGL activity (Figure 3A, B) and FFA levels (Figure 3C) are also elevated in high-grade primary human ovarian tumors compared to benign or low-grade tumors. Thus, heightened expression of the MAGL-FFA pathway is a prominent feature of both aggressive human cancer cell lines and primary tumors.

Figure 3  High-grade primary human ovarian tumors possess elevated MAGL activity and FFAs compared to benign tumors.

Disruption of MAGL Expression and Activity Impairs Cancer Pathogenicity

shMAGL cancer lines were next examined for alterations in pathogenicity using a set of in vitro and in vivo assays. shMAGL-melanoma (C8161), ovarian (SKOV3), and breast (231MFP) cancer cells exhibited significantly reduced in vitro migration (Figure 4A, F and Figure S2), invasion (Figure 4B, G and Figure S2), and cell survival under serum-starvation conditions (Figure 4C, H and Figure S2). Acute pharmacological blockade of MAGL by JZL184 also decreased cancer cell migration (Figure S2), but not survival, possibly indicating that maximal impairments in cancer aggressiveness require sustained inhibition of MAGL.

Figure 4  shRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of MAGL impair cancer aggressiveness.

MAGL Overexpression Increases FFAs and the Aggressiveness of Cancer Cells

Stable MAGL-overexpressing (MAGL-OE) and control [expressing an empty vector or a catalytically inactive version of MAGL, where the serine nucleophile was mutated to alanine (S122A)] variants of MUM2C and OVCAR3 cells were generated by retroviral infection and evaluated for their respective MAGL activities by ABPP and C20:4 MAG substrate assays. Both assays confirmed that MAGL-OE cells possess greater than 10-fold elevations in MAGL activity compared to control cells (Figure 5A and Figure S4). MAGL-OE cells also showed significant reductions in MAGs (Figure 5B andFigure S4) and elevated FFAs (Figure 5C and Figure S4). This altered metabolic profile was accompanied by increased migration (Figure 5D and Figure S4), invasion (Figure 5E and Figure S4), and survival (Figure S4) in MAGL-OE cells. None of these effects were observed in cancer cells expressing the S122A MAGL mutant, indicating that they require MAGL activity.  MAGL-OE MUM2C cells also showed enhanced tumor growth in vivo compared to control cells (Figure 5F). Notably, the increased tumor growth rate of MAGL-OE MUM2C cells nearly matched that of aggressive C8161 cells (Figure S4). These data indicate that the ectopic expression of MAGL in non-aggressive cancer cells is sufficient to elevate their FFA levels and promote pathogenicity both in vitro and in vivo.

Figure 5 Ectopic expression of MAGL elevates FFA levels and enhances the in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity of MUM2C melanoma cells.

Metabolic Rescue of Impaired Pathogenicity in MAGL-Disrupted Cancer Cells

MAGL could support the aggressiveness of cancer cells by either reducing the levels of its MAG substrates, elevating the levels of its FFA products, or both. Among MAGs, the principal signaling molecule is the endocannabinoid 2-AG, which activates the CB1 and CB2 receptors (Ahn et al., 2008Mackie and Stella, 2006). The endocannabinoid system has been implicated previously in cancer progression and, depending on the specific study, shown to promote (Sarnataro et al., 2006Zhao et al., 2005) or suppress (Endsley et al., 2007Wang et al., 2008) cancer pathogenesis. Neither a CB1 or CB2 antagonist rescued the migratory defects of shMAGL cancer cells (Figure S5). CB1 and CB2 antagonists also did not affect the levels of MAGs or FFAs in cancer cells (Figure S5).

We then determined whether increased FFA delivery could rectify the tumor growth defect observed for shMAGL cells in vivo. Immune-deficient mice were fed either a normal chow or high-fat diet throughout the duration of a xenograft tumor growth experiment. Notably, the impaired tumor growth rate of shMAGL-C8161 cells was completely rescued in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, shControl-C8161 cells showed equivalent tumor growth rates on a normal versus high-fat diet. The recovery in tumor growth for shMAGL-C8161 cells in the high-fat diet group correlated with significantly increases levels of FFAs in excised tumors (Figure 6D). Collectively, these results indicate that MAGL supports the pathogenic properties of cancer cells by maintaining tonically elevated levels of FFAs.

Figure 6  Recovery of the pathogenic properties of shMAGL cancer cells by treatment with exogenous fatty acids.

MAGL Regulates a Fatty Acid Network Enriched in Pro-Tumorigenic Signals

Studies revealed that neither

  • the MAGL-FFA pathway might serve as a means to regenerate NAD+ (via continual fatty acyl glyceride/FFA recycling) to fuel glycolysis, or
  • increased lipolysis could be to generate FFA substrates for β-oxidation, which may serve as an important energy source for cancer cells (Buzzai et al., 2005), or
  • CPT1 blockade (reduced expression of CPT1 in aggressive cancer cells (data not shown) has been reported previously (Deberardinis et al., 2006))

providing evidence against a role for β-oxidation as a downstream mediator of the pathogenic effects of the MAGL-fatty acid pathway.

Considering that FFAs are fundamental building blocks for the production and remodeling of membrane structures and signaling molecules, perturbations in MAGL might be expected to affect several lipid-dependent biochemical networks important for malignancy. To test this hypothesis, we performed lipidomic analyses of cancer cell models with altered MAGL activity, including comparisons of:

  1. MAGL-OE versus control cancer cells (OVCAR3, MUM2C), and
  2. shMAGL versus shControl cancer cells (SKOV3, C8161).

Complementing these global profiles, we also conducted targeted measurements of specific bioactive lipids (e.g., prostaglandins) that are too low in abundance for detection by standard lipidomic methods. The resulting data sets were then mined to identify a common signature of lipid metabolites regulated by MAGL, which we defined as metabolites that were significantly increased or reduced in MAGL–OE cells and showed the opposite change in shMAGL cells relative to their respective control groups (Figure 7A, B and Table S4).

Figure 7  MAGL regulates a lipid network enriched in pro-tumorigenic signaling molecules.

Most of the lipids in the MAGL-fatty acid network, including several lysophospholipids (LPC, LPA, LPE), ether lipids (MAGE, alkyl LPE), phosphatidic acid (PA), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), displayed similar profiles to FFAs, being consistently elevated and reduced in MAGL-OE and shMAGL cells, respectively. Only MAGs were found to show the opposite profile (elevated and reduced in shMAGL and MAGL-OE cells, respectively). Interestingly, virtually this entire lipidomic signature was also observed in aggressive cancer cells when compared to their non-aggressive counterparts (e.g., C8161 versus MUM2C and SKOV3 versus OVCAR3, respectively; Table S4). These findings demonstrate that MAGL regulates a lipid network in aggressive cancer cells that consists of not only FFAs and MAGs, but also a host of secondary lipid metabolites. Increases (rather than decreases) in LPCs and LPEs were observed in JZL184-treated cells (Figure S1 and Table S4). These data indicate that acute and chronic blockade of MAGL generate distinct metabolomic effects in cancer cells, likely reflecting the differential outcomes of short- versus long-term depletion of FFAs.

Within the MAGL-fatty acid network are several pro-tumorigenic lipid messengers, including LPA and PGE2, that have been reported to promote the aggressiveness of cancer cells (Gupta et al., 2007Mills and Moolenaar, 2003). Metabolic labeling studies confirmed that aggressive cancer cells can convert both MAGs and FFAs (Figure S1) to LPA and PGE2 and, for MAGs, this conversion was blocked by JZL184 (Figure S1). Interestingly, treatment with either LPA or PGE2 (100 nM, 4 hr) rescued the impaired migration of shMAGL cancer cells at concentrations that did not affect the migration of shControl cells (Figure 7E).

Heightened lipogenesis is an established early hallmark of dysregulated metabolism and pathogenicity in cancer (Menendez and Lupu, 2007). Cancer lipogenesis appears to be driven principally by FAS, which is elevated in most transformed cells and important for survival and proliferation (De Schrijver et al., 2003;Kuhajda et al., 2000Vazquez-Martin et al., 2008). It is not yet clear how FAS supports cancer growth, but most of the proposed mechanisms invoke pro-tumorigenic functions for the enzyme s fatty acid products and their lipid derivatives (Menendez and Lupu, 2007). This creates a conundrum, since the fatty acid molecules produced by FAS are thought to be rapidly incorporated into neutral- and phospho-lipids, pointing to the need for complementary lipolytic pathways in cancer cells to release stored fatty acids for metabolic and signaling purposes (Prentki and Madiraju, 2008Przybytkowski et al., 2007). Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that acute treatment with the FAS inhibitor C75 (40 μM, 4 h) did not reduce FFA levels in cancer cells (data not shown). Furthermore, aggressive and non-aggressive cancer cells exhibited similar levels of FAS (data not shown), indicating that lipogenesis in the absence of paired lipolysis may be insufficient to confer high levels of malignancy.

Here we show that aggressive cancer cells do indeed acquire the ability to liberate FFAs from neutral lipid stores as a consequence of heightened expression of MAGL. MAGL and its FFA products were found to be elevated in aggressive human cancer cell lines from multiple tissues of origin, as well as in high-grade primary human ovarian tumors. These data suggest that the MAGL-FFA pathway may be a conserved feature of advanced forms of many types of cancer. Further evidence in support of this premise originates from gene expression profiling studies, which have identified increased levels of MAGL in primary human ductal breast tumors compared to less malignant medullary breast tumors (Gjerstorff et al., 2006). The key role that MAGL plays in regulating FFA levels in aggressive cancer cells contrasts with the function of this enzyme in normal tissues, where it mainly controls the levels of MAGs, but not FFAs (Long et al., 2009b). These data thus provide a striking example of the co-opting of an enzyme by cancer cells to serve a distinct metabolic purpose that supports their pathogenic behavior.

Taken together, our results indicate that MAGL serves as key metabolic hub in aggressive cancer cells, where the enzyme regulates a fatty acid network that feeds into a number of pro-tumorigenic signaling pathways.

 

7.7.8 Pirin regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition and down-regulates EAF/U19 signaling in prostate cancer cells

7.7.8.1  Pirin regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition independently of Bcl3-Slug signaling

Komai K1Niwa Y1Sasazawa Y1Simizu S2.
FEBS Lett. 2015 Mar 12; 589(6):738-43
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.febslet.2015.01.040

Highlights

  • Pirin decreases E-cadherin expression and induces EMT.
  • The induction of EMT by Pirin is achieved through a Bcl3 independent pathway.
  • Pirin may be a novel target for cancer therapy.

Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism for the initial step of metastasis. Proteomic analysis indicates that Pirin is involved in metastasis. However, there are no reports demonstrating its direct contribution. Here we investigated the involvement of Pirin in EMT. In HeLa cells, Pirin suppressed E-cadherin expression and regulated the expression of other EMT markers. Furthermore, cells expressing Pirin exhibited a spindle-like morphology, which is reminiscent of EMT. A Pirin mutant defective for Bcl3 binding decreased E-cadherin expression similar to wild-type, suggesting that Pirin regulates E-cadherin independently of Bcl3-Slug signaling. These data provide direct evidence that Pirin contributes to cancer metastasis.

Pirin regulates the expression of E-cadherin and EMT markers

In melanoma, Pirin enhances NF-jB activity and increases Slug expression by binding Bcl3 [31], and it may also be involved in adenoid cystic tumor metastasis [23]. Since Slug suppresses E-cadherin transcription and is recognized as a major EMT inducer, we hypothesized that Pirin may regulate EMT through inducing Slug expression. To investigate whether Pirin regulates EMT, we measured E-cadherin expression following Pirin knockdown. As shown in Fig. 1A and B, E-cadherin expression was significantly increased following Pirin knockdown indicating that it may promote EMT. To confirm this, we established Pirin-expressing HeLa cells (Fig. 1C), which inhibited the expression of E-cadherin (Fig. 1D). Additionally, the expression of Occludin, an epithelial marker, was decreased, and several mesenchymal markers, including Fibronectin, N-cadherin, and Vimentin, were increased by Pirin expression (Fig. 1D). These data suggest that Pirin promotes EMT.

Pirin induces EMT-associated cell morphological changes

As mentioned above, cells undergo morphological changes during EMT. Therefore, we next analyzed whether Pirin expression affects cell morphology. Quantitative analysis of morphological changes was based on cell circularity, {4p(area)/(perimeter)2}100, which decreases during EMT-associated morphological changes [34–36]. Indeed, TGF-b or TNF-a exposure induced EMTassociated cell morphological changes in HeLa cells (data not shown). Employing this parameter of circularity, we compared the morphology of our established HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells with control HeLa/GFP cells. Although the control HeLa/GFP cells displayed a cobblestone-like morphology, HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells were elongated in shape (Fig. 2A). Indeed, compared with control cells, the circularity of HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells was significantly decreased (Fig. 2B). To confirm that these observations were dependent on Pirin expression, HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells were treated with an siRNA targeting Pirin. HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells recovered a cobblestone-like morphology (Fig. 2C) and circularity (Fig. 2D) when treated with Pirin siRNA indicating that Pirin expression induces EMT.

Pirin induces cell migration

During EMT cells acquire migratory capabilities. Therefore, we analyzed whether Pirin affects cell migration. HeLa cells were treated with an siRNA targeting Pirin and migration was assessed using a wound healing assay. Although Pirin knockdown had no effect on cell proliferation (data not shown), wound repair was inhibited in Pirin-depleted HeLa cells (Fig. 3A and B) suggesting that Pirin promoted cell migration. Furthermore, camptothecin treatment of HeLa/GFP cells caused decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, whereas HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells were more resistantto drugtreatment (datanot shown).These results suggest that Pirin induces EMT-like phenotypes, such as cell migration and anticancer drug resistance.
Pirin regulates EMT independently of Bcl3-Slug signaling

To investigate whether Pirin controls E-cadherin expression at the transcriptional level, we measured E-cadherin promoter activity with a reporter assay. Indeed, the luciferase reporter analysis indicated that Pirin inhibited E-cadherin promoter activity (Fig. 4A and B). To determine if Bcl3 is involved in Pirin-induced EMT, we tested whether a Pirin mutant defective in Bcl3 binding could inhibit E-cadherin expression. We generated a mutation in the metal-binding cavity of Pirin(E103A) and confirmed that it disrupted Bcl3 binding. In vitro GST pull-down analysis using recombinant Pirin and Bcl3/ARD demonstrated that the Pirin mutant was defective for Bcl3 binding compared to wild-type (Fig. 5A). Interestingly, expression of both wild-type Pirin and the mutant defective in Bcl3 binding reduced E-cadherin gene and protein expression (Fig. 5B and C). Taken together these results indicate that Pirin decreases E-cadherin expression without binding Bcl3, and suggest that Pirin regulates EMT independently of Bcl3-Slug signaling.

Discussion

A characteristic feature of EMT is the disruption of epithelial cell–cell contact, which is achieved by reduced E-cadherin expression. Therefore, revealing the regulatory pathways controlling E-cadherin expression may elucidate the mechanisms of EMT. Several transcription factors regulate E-cadherin transcription. For instance,Snail,Slug,Twist,and Zebact as mastertranscriptional regulators that bind the consensus E-box sequence in the E-cadherin gene promoter and decrease the transcriptional activity [38]. Since Pirin regulates the transcription of Slug [31], we hypothesized that Pirin may also regulate EMT. In this study we demonstrated that Pirin decreases E-cadherin expression, and induces EMT and cancer malignant phenotypes. Since EMT is an initial step of metastasis, Pirin may contribute to cancer progression. We next examined whether the regulation of EMT by Pirin is attributed to Bcl3 binding and the induction of Slug. To this end, we generated a Pirin mutant (E103A) defective for Bcl3 binding (Fig. 5A). Single Fe2+ ion chelating is coordinated by His56, His58, His101, and Glu103 of Pirin, and the N-terminal domain containing these residues is highly conserved between mammals, plants, fungi, and prokaryotic organisms [15,27]. Therefore, it has been predicted that this N-terminal domain containing the metal-binding cavity is important for Pirin function [20,26,31]. Indeed, TPh A inserts into the metal-binding cavity and inhibits binding to Bcl3 suggesting that the interaction occurs with the metal-binding cavity of Pirin [31]. In contrast, Hai Pang suggests that a Pirin–Bcl3– (p50)2 complex forms between acidic regions of the N-terminal Pirin domain at residues 77–82, 97–103 and 124–128 with a basic patch of Bcl3 [27]. In this study, we mutated Glutamic acid 103, a residue common between Hai Pang’s model and Pirin’s metalbinding cavity. Pull-down analysis indicated that an E103A mutant is defectiveinfor Bcl3binding(Fig.5A). Thisis the firstexperimental demonstration showing that Glu103 of Pirin is important Bcl3 binding. However, expression of the E103A mutant suppressed Ecadherin gene expression similarly to wild-type Pirin (Fig. 5B and C). Although the Bcl3–(p50)2 complex participates in oncogene addiction in cervical cells [39,40], expression of Pirin in HeLa cells did not increase Slug expression (data not shown). Therefore, we concludethatPirindecreasesE-cadherinexpressionindependently of Bcl3-Slug signaling. To understand how Pirin suppresses E-cadherin gene expression, we analyzed E-cadherin promoter activity (Fig. 4). Since Pirin decreased the activity of the E-cadherin promoter (995+1), we constructed a series of promoter deletion mutants (795+1, 565+1, 365+1, 175+1) to identify a region important for Pirin-mediated regulation. Expression of Pirin decreased the transcriptional activity of all constructs (Supplementary Fig. S1A), suggesting that Pirin may suppress E-cadherin expression through element(s) in region 175+1. Yan-Nan Liu and colleagues proposed that this region contains four Sp1-binding sites and two E-boxes that regulate E-cadherin expression.

Fig. 1. Pirin regulates E-cadherin gene expression. (A, B) HeLa cells were transfected with siRNA targeting Pirin (siPirin#1 or #2) or control siRNA (siCTRL). Forty-eight hours after transfection, cDNA was used for PCR using primer sets specific against Pirin, E-cadherin and GAPDH (A). Forty-eight hours after transfection, HeLa cells were lysed and the lysates were analyzed by Western blot with the indicated antibodies (B). (C) Lysates from HeLa/Pirin-GFP and HeLa/GFP cells were analyzed by Western blot with the indicated antibodies. (D) cDNA from HeLa/GFP or HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells was used for PCR to determine the effect of Pirin on the expression of EMT marker genes.

Fig. 2. Pirin induces cell morphological changes associated with EMT. (A) Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopic images were taken of HeLa/GFP and HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells. (B) Cell circularity was defined as form factor, {4p(area)/(perimeter)2}100 [%], and calculated using Image J software. A random selection of 100 cells from each condition was measured. (C, D) Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopic images were taken of siRNA-treated HeLa/GFP and HeLa/Pirin-GFP cells. Each cell line was transfected with siPirin#2 or siCTRL. Cells were observed by microscopy 48 h after transfection (C) and circularity was measured (D). Data shown are means ± s.d. ⁄P <0.05, bars 100lm.

Fig. 3. Pirin knockdown suppresses cell migration. (A, B) HeLa cells were transfected with siPirin#2 or siCTRL. An artificial wound was created with a tip 24h after transfection and cells were cultured for an additional 12 h. For quantification, the cells were photographed after 12h of incubation (A) and the area covered by cells was measured using Image J and normalized to control cells (B).

Fig. 4. Pirin regulates E-cadherin promoter activity.(A). HeLacells were transfected with siPirin#2 or siGFP (control) and cultured for 24 h. The E-cadherin promoter construct (995+1) and phRL-TK vectorwere transfected and cellswere cultured for an additional 24 h. Luciferase activities were measured and normalized to Renilla luciferase activity. (B) HeLa cells were transfected with the promoter construct (995+1), phRL-TK vector, and a Pirin expression vector. After 24 h, luciferase activities were measured and normalized to Renilla luciferase activity. Data are the mean ± s.d. ⁄P < 0.05.

Fig. 5. Pirin decreases E-cadherin expression in a Bcl3-independent manner. (A) Purified His6-Pirin and His6-Pirin(E103A) were incubated with Glutathione-Sepharose beads conjugated to GST or GST-Bcl3/ARD. The samples were analyzed by Western blot. (B, C) HeLa cells were transfected with vectors encoding GFP, Pirin-GFP, or Pirin(E103A)GFP. Cells were lysed 48 h after transfection and lysates were analyzed by Western blot (B). RNA collected at 48h was used for RT-PCR with the specified primer sets for each gene (C).

7.7.8.2 1324 PIRIN DOWN-REGULATES THE EAF2/U19 SIGNALING AND RETARDS THE GROWTH INHIBITION INDUCED BY EAF2/U19 IN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS

Zhongjie Qiao, Dan Wang, Zhou Wang
The Journal of Urology Apr 2013; 189(4), Supplement: e541
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2013.02.2678
EAF2/U19, as the tumor suppressor, has been reported to induce apoptosis of LNCaP cells and suppress AT6.1 xenograft prostate tumor growth in vivo, and its expression level is down-regulated in advanced human prostate cancer. EAF2/U19 is also a putative transcription factor with a transactivation domain and capability of sequence-specific DNA binding. Identification and characterization of the binding partners and regulators of EAF2/U19 is essential to understand its function in regulating apoptosis/survival of prostate cancer cells.

7.7.8.3 Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression

Cellular senescence is a physiological process through which normal somatic cells lose their ability to divide and enter an irreversible state of cell cycle arrest, although they remain viable and metabolically active.1,2The specific molecular circuitry underlying the onset of cellular senescence is dependent on the type of stimulus and on the cellular context. A central role is held by the activation of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (pRB),3–5 which act by interfering with the transcriptional program of the cell and ultimately arresting cell cycle progression.

In the last decade, senescence has been recognized as a major barrier against the development of tumors in mammals.6–8 One of the most prominent in vivo examples is represented by nevi, in which cells proliferate after oncogene activation and then become senescent. Melanoma is a highly aggressive form of neoplasm often observed to derive from nevi, and the transition implies suppression of the mechanisms that sustain the onset and maintenance of senescence.9 In fact, many of the melanoma-associated tumor suppressor genes identified to date are themselves involved in control of senescence, including BRAF (encoding serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf), CKD4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4), and CDKN2A (encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A isoforms p16INK4a and p19ARF).3,10

Nevi frequently harbor oncogenic mutations of the tyrosine kinase BRAF gene, particularly V600E,11 andBRAFV600E is also found in approximately 70% of cutaneous melanomas.12 Expression of BRAFV600E in human melanocytes leads to oncogene-induced senescence,8 which can be considered as a mechanism that protects from malignant progression. In time, some cells may eventually escape senescence, probably through the acquisition of additional genetic abnormalities, thus favoring transformation to melanoma.13

Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein belonging to the Cupin superfamily14 whose function is, to date, poorly characterized. It has been described as a putative transcriptional regulator on the basis of its physical association with the nuclear I/CCAAT box transcription factor NFI/CTF115 and with the B-cell lymphoma protein, BCL-3, a regulator of NF-κB/Rel activity. A recent report shows that PIR controls melanoma cell migration through the transcriptional regulation of snail homolog 2, SNAI2 (previously SLUG).16 Other reports described quercetinase enzymatic activity,17 and regulation of apoptosis18,19 and stress response, unveiling a high degree of cell-type and species specificity in PIR function.

There is evidence of variations in PIR expression levels in different types of malignancies, but a systematic analysis of PIR expression in human tumors has been lacking. We analyzed PIR expression pattern in a collection of normal and neoplastic human tissues and found that it is expressed in scattered melanocytes, virtually absent in more mature regions of nevi, and present at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Functional studies performed in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR ablation results in cellular senescence, and that PIR levels decrease in response to senescence stimuli. Our results suggest that PIR may be a relevant player in the negative control of cellular senescence in PIR-expressing melanomas.

PIR overexpression in melanoma

Figure 3  PIR overexpression in PIR melanoma cells has no effect on proliferation.
PIR Expression Is Down-Regulated by BRAF Activation and Camptothecin Treatment

BRAF mutations are frequent in nevi, and are directly linked to the induction of oncogene-induced senescence. Variations in PIR expression levels were therefore investigated in an experimental model of senescence induced by oncogenic BRAF. Human diploid fibroblasts (TIG3–hTERT) expressing a conditional form of constitutively activated BRAF fused to the ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) rapidly undergo oncogene-induced senescence on treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT).28,29 PIR protein and mRNA levels were measured in TIG3-BRAF-ER cells at different time points of treatment with 800 nmol/L OHT. PIR expression was significantly repressed both at the mRNA and at the protein level after BRAF activation (Figure 6A), and remained at low levels after 120 hours, suggesting that a significant reduction of PIR expression is associated with the establishment of oncogene-induced senescence in different cell types.

7.7.9 O-GlcNAcylation at promoters, nutrient sensors, and transcriptional regulation

Brian A. Lewis
Biochim et Biophys Acta (BBA) – Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Nov 2013; 1829(11): 1202–1206
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbagrm.2013.09.003

Highlights

  • This review article discusses recent advances in the links between O-GlcNAc and transcriptional regulation.
  • Discusses several systems to illustrate O-GlcNAc dynamics: Tet proteins, MLL complexes, circadian clock proteins and RNA pol II.
  • Suggests that promoters are nutrient sensors.

Post-translational modifications play important roles in transcriptional regulation. Among the less understood PTMs is O-GlcNAcylation. Nevertheless, O-GlcNAcylation in the nucleus is found on hundreds of transcription factors and coactivators and is often found in a mutually exclusive ying–yang relationship with phosphorylation. O-GlcNAcylation also links cellular metabolism directly to the proteome, serving as a conduit of metabolic information to the nucleus. This review serves as a brief introduction to O-GlcNAcylation, emphasizing its important thematic roles in transcriptional regulation, and highlights several recent and important additions to the literature that illustrate the connections between O-GlcNAc and transcription.

links between O-GlcNAc and transcriptional regulation.

links between O-GlcNAc and transcriptional regulation.

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1874939913001351-gr1.sml
links between O-GlcNAc and transcriptional regulation.

systems to illustrate O-GlcNAc dynamics

systems to illustrate O-GlcNAc dynamics

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S1874939913001351-gr2.sml
systems to illustrate O-GlcNAc dynamics

7.7.10 O-GlcNAcylation in cellular functions and human diseases

Yang YR1Suh PG2.
Adv Biol Regul. 2014 Jan; 54:68-73
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.jbior.2013.09.007

O-GlcNAcylation is dynamic and a ubiquitous post-translational modification. O-GlcNAcylated proteins influence fundamental functions of proteins such as protein-protein interactions, altering protein stability, and changing protein activity. Thus, aberrant regulation of O-GlcNAcylation contributes to the etiology of chronic diseases of aging, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease. Diverse cellular signaling systems are involved in pathogenesis of these diseases. O-GlcNAcylated proteins occur in many different tissues and cellular compartments and affect specific cell signaling. This review focuses on the O-GlcNAcylation in basic cellular functions and human diseases.

O-GlcNAcylated proteins influence protein phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions

O-GlcNAcylated proteins influence protein phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S2212492613000717-gr2.sml
O-GlcNAcylated proteins influence protein phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions

aberrant regulation of O-GlcNAcylation in disease

aberrant regulation of O-GlcNAcylation in disease

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S2212492613000717-gr3.sml
aberrant regulation of O-GlcNAcylation in disease

 Comment:

Body of review in energetic metabolic pathways in malignant T cells

Antigen stimulation of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling to nuclear factor (NF)-B is required for T cell proliferation and differentiation of effector cells.
The TCR-to-NF-B pathway is generally viewed as a linear sequence of events in which TCR engagement triggers a cytoplasmic cascade of protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications, ultimately culminating in the nuclear translocation of NF-B.
Activation of effect or T cells leads to increased glucose uptake, glycolysis, and lipid synthesis to support growth and proliferation.
Activated T cells were identified with CD7, CD5, CD3, CD2, CD4, CD8 and CD45RO. Simultaneously, the expression of CD95 and its ligand causes apoptotic cells death by paracrine or autocrine mechanism, and during inflammation, IL1-β and interferon-1α. The receptor glucose, Glut 1, is expressed at a low level in naive T cells, and rapidly induced by Myc following T cell receptor (TCR) activation. Glut1 trafficking is also highly regulated, with Glut1 protein remaining in intracellular vesicles until T cell activation.

Dr. Aurel,
Targu Jiu

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Warburg Effect and Mitochondrial Regulation -2.1.3

Writer and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

2.1.3 Warburg Effect and Mitochondrial Regulation

Warburg Effect and Mitochondrial Regulation- 2.1.3

Word Cloud by Daniel Menzin

2.1.3.1 Regulation of Substrate Utilization by the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier

NM Vacanti, AS Divakaruni, CR Green, SJ Parker, RR Henry, TP Ciaraldi, et a..
Molec Cell 6 Nov 2014; 56(3):425–435
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2014.09.024

Highlights

  • Oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids is increased upon MPC inhibition
    •Respiration, proliferation, and biosynthesis are maintained when MPC is inhibited
    •Glutaminolytic flux supports lipogenesis in the absence of MPC
    •MPC inhibition is distinct from hypoxia or complex I inhibition

Summary

Pyruvate lies at a central biochemical node connecting carbohydrate, amino acid, and fatty acid metabolism, and the regulation of pyruvate flux into mitochondria represents a critical step in intermediary metabolism impacting numerous diseases. To characterize changes in mitochondrial substrate utilization in the context of compromised mitochondrial pyruvate transport, we applied 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) to cells after transcriptional or pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC). Despite profound suppression of both glucose and pyruvate oxidation, cell growth, oxygen consumption, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism were surprisingly maintained. Oxidative TCA flux was achieved through enhanced reliance on glutaminolysis through malic enzyme and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) as well as fatty acid and branched-chain amino acid oxidation. Thus, in contrast to inhibition of complex I or PDH, suppression of pyruvate transport induces a form of metabolic flexibility associated with the use of lipids and amino acids as catabolic and anabolic fuels.

oxidation-of-fatty-acids-and-amino-acid

oxidation-of-fatty-acids-and-amino-acids

Graphical Abstract – Oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids is increased upon MPC inhibition

Figure 2. MPC Regulates Mitochondrial Substrate Utilization (A) Citrate mass isotopomer distribution (MID) resulting from culture with [U-13C6]glucose (UGlc). (B) Percentage of 13C-labeled metabolites from UGlc. (C) Percentage of fully labeled lactate, pyruvate, and alanine from UGlc. (D) Serine MID resulting from culture with UGlc. (E) Percentage of fully labeled metabolites derived from [U-13C5]glutamine (UGln). (F) Schematic of UGln labeling of carbon atoms in TCA cycle intermediates arising via glutaminoloysis and reductive carboxylation. Mitochondrion schematic inspired by Lewis et al. (2014). (G and H) Citrate (G) and alanine (H) MIDs resulting from culture with UGln. (I) Maximal oxygen consumption rates with or without 3 mM BPTES in medium supplemented with 1 mM pyruvate. (J) Percentage of newly synthesized palmitate as determined by ISA. (K) Contribution of UGln and UGlc to lipogenic AcCoA as determined by ISA. (L) Contribution of glutamine to lipogenic AcCoA via glutaminolysis (ISA using a [3-13C] glutamine [3Gln]) and reductive carboxylation (ISA using a [5-13C]glutamine [5Gln]) under normoxia and hypoxia. (M) Citrate MID resulting from culture with 3Gln. (N) Contribution of UGln and exogenous [3-13C] pyruvate (3Pyr) to lipogenic AcCoA. 2KD+Pyr refers to Mpc2KD cells cultured with 10 mM extracellular pyruvate. Error bars represent SD (A–E, G, H, and M), SEM(I), or 95% confidence intervals(J–L, and N).*p<0.05,**p<0.01,and ***p<0.001 by ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test (A–E and G–I) or * indicates significance by non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals (J–L and N).

Figure 3. Mpc Knockdown Increases Fatty Acid Oxidation. (A) Schematic of changes in flux through metabolic pathways in Mpc2KD relative to control cells. (B) Citrate MID resulting from culture with [U-13C16] palmitate conjugated to BSA (UPalm). (C) Percentage of 13C enrichment resulting from culture with UPalm. (D) ATP-linked and maximal oxygen consumption rate, with or without 20m Metomoxir, with or without 3 mM BPTES. Culture medium supplemented with 0.5 mM carnitine. Error bars represent SD (B and C) or SEM (D). *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, and ***p < 0.001 by two-tailed, equal variance, Student’s t test(B–D), or by ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test (D).

Figure 4. Metabolic Reprogramming Resulting from Pharmacological Mpc Inhibition Is Distinct from Hypoxia or Complex I Inhibition

2.1.3.2 Oxidation of Alpha-Ketoglutarate Is Required for Reductive Carboxylation in Cancer Cells with Mitochondrial Defects

AR Mullen, Z Hu, X Shi, L Jiang, …, WM Linehan, NS Chandel, RJ DeBerardinis
Cell Reports 12 Jun 2014; 7(5):1679–1690
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.04.037

Highlights

  • Cells with mitochondrial defects use bidirectional metabolism of the TCA cycle
    •Glutamine supplies the succinate pool through oxidative and reductive metabolism
    •Oxidative TCA cycle metabolism is required for reductive citrate formation
    •Oxidative metabolism produces reducing equivalents for reductive carboxylation

Summary

Mammalian cells generate citrate by decarboxylating pyruvate in the mitochondria to supply the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, hypoxia and other impairments of mitochondrial function induce an alternative pathway that produces citrate by reductively carboxylating α-ketoglutarate (AKG) via NADPH-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). It is unknown how cells generate reducing equivalents necessary to supply reductive carboxylation in the setting of mitochondrial impairment. Here, we identified shared metabolic features in cells using reductive carboxylation. Paradoxically, reductive carboxylation was accompanied by concomitant AKG oxidation in the TCA cycle. Inhibiting AKG oxidation decreased reducing equivalent availability and suppressed reductive carboxylation. Interrupting transfer of reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase increased NADH abundance and decreased NADPH abundance while suppressing reductive carboxylation. The data demonstrate that reductive carboxylation requires bidirectional AKG metabolism along oxidative and reductive pathways, with the oxidative pathway producing reducing equivalents used to operate IDH in reverse.

Proliferating cells support their growth by converting abundant extracellular nutrients like glucose and glutamine into precursors for macromolecular biosynthesis. A continuous supply of metabolic intermediates from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is essential for cell growth, because many of these intermediates feed biosynthetic pathways to produce lipids, proteins and nucleic acids (Deberardinis et al., 2008). This underscores the dual roles of the TCA cycle for cell growth: it generates reducing equivalents for oxidative phosphorylation by the electron transport chain (ETC), while also serving as a hub for precursor production. During rapid growth, the TCA cycle is characterized by large influxes of carbon at positions other than acetyl-CoA, enabling the cycle to remain full even as intermediates are withdrawn for biosynthesis. Cultured cancer cells usually display persistence of TCA cycle activity despite robust aerobic glycolysis, and often require mitochondrial catabolism of glutamine to the TCA cycle intermediate AKG to maintain rapid rates of proliferation (Icard et al., 2012Hiller and Metallo, 2013).

Some cancer cells contain severe, fixed defects in oxidative metabolism caused by mutations in the TCA cycle or the ETC. These include mutations in fumarate hydratase (FH) in renal cell carcinoma and components of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (Tomlinson et al., 2002Astuti et al., 2001Baysal et al., 2000Killian et al., 2013Niemann and Muller, 2000). All of these mutations alter oxidative metabolism of glutamine in the TCA cycle. Recently, analysis of cells containing mutations in FH, ETC Complexes I or III, or exposed to the ETC inhibitors metformin and rotenone or the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin revealed that turnover of TCA cycle intermediates was maintained in all cases (Mullen et al., 2012). However, the cycle operated in an unusual fashion characterized by conversion of glutamine-derived AKG to isocitrate through a reductive carboxylation reaction catalyzed by NADP+/NADPH-dependent isoforms of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). As a result, a large fraction of the citrate pool carried five glutamine-derived carbons. Citrate could be cleaved to produce acetyl-CoA to supply fatty acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate (OAA) to supply pools of other TCA cycle intermediates. Thus, reductive carboxylation enables biosynthesis by enabling cells with impaired mitochondrial metabolism to maintain pools of biosynthetic precursors that would normally be supplied by oxidative metabolism. Reductive carboxylation is also induced by hypoxia and by pseudo-hypoxic states caused by mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene (Metallo et al., 2012Wise et al., 2011).

Interest in reductive carboxylation stems in part from the possibility that inhibiting the pathway might induce selective growth suppression in tumor cells subjected to hypoxia or containing mutations that prevent them from engaging in maximal oxidative metabolism. Hence, several recent studies have sought to understand the mechanisms by which this pathway operates. In vitro studies of IDH1 indicate that a high ratio of NADPH/NADP+ and low citrate concentration activate the reductive carboxylation reaction (Leonardi et al., 2012). This is supported by data demonstrating that reductive carboxylation in VHL-deficient renal carcinoma cells is associated with a low concentration of citrate and a reduced ratio of citrate:AKG, suggesting that mass action can be a driving force to determine IDH directionality (Gameiro et al., 2013b). Moreover, interrupting the supply of mitochondrial NADPH by silencing the nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) suppresses reductive carboxylation (Gameiro et al., 2013a). This mitochondrial transmembrane protein catalyzes the transfer of a hydride ion from NADH to NADP+ to generate NAD+ and NADPH. Together, these observations suggest that reductive carboxylation is modulated in part through the mitochondrial redox state and the balance of substrate/products.

Here we used metabolomics and stable isotope tracing to better understand overall metabolic states associated with reductive carboxylation in cells with defective mitochondrial metabolism, and to identify sources of mitochondrial reducing equivalents necessary to induce the reaction. We identified high levels of succinate in some cells using reductive carboxylation, and determined that most of this succinate was formed through persistent oxidative metabolism of AKG. Silencing this oxidative flux by depleting the mitochondrial enzyme AKG dehydrogenase substantially altered the cellular redox state and suppressed reductive carboxylation. The data demonstrate that bidirectional/branched AKG metabolism occurs during reductive carboxylation in cells with mitochondrial defects, with oxidative metabolism producing reducing equivalents to supply reductive metabolism.

Shared metabolomic features among cell lines with cytb or FH mutations

To identify conserved metabolic features associated with reductive carboxylation in cells harboring defective mitochondrial metabolism, we analyzed metabolite abundance in isogenic pairs of cell lines in which one member displayed substantial reductive carboxylation and the other did not. We used a pair of previously described cybrids derived from 143B osteosarcoma cells, in which one cell line contained wild-type mitochondrial DNA (143Bwt) and the other contained a mutation in the cytb gene (143Bcytb), severely reducing complex III function (Rana et al., 2000Weinberg et al., 2010). The 143Bwt cells primarily use oxidative metabolism to supply the citrate pool while the 143Bcytb cells use reductive carboxylation (Mullen et al., 2012). The other pair, derived from FH-deficient UOK262 renal carcinoma cells, contained either an empty vector control (UOK262EV) or a stably re-expressed wild-type FH allele (UOK262FH). Metabolites were extracted from all four cell lines and analyzed by triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry. We first performed a quantitative analysis to determine the abundance of AKG and citrate in the four cell lines. Both 143Bcytb and UOK262EV cells had less citrate, more AKG, and lower citrate:AKG ratios than their oxidative partners (Fig. S1A-C), consistent with findings from VHL-deficient renal carcinoma cells (Gameiro et al., 2013b).

Next, to identify other perturbations, we profiled the relative abundance of more than 90 metabolites from glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, one-carbon/nucleotide metabolism, the TCA cycle, amino acid degradation, and other pathways (Tables S1 and S2). Each metabolite was normalized to protein content, and relative abundance was determined between cell lines from each pair. Hierarchical clustering (Fig 1A) and principal component analysis (Fig 1B) revealed far greater metabolomic similarities between the members of each pair than between the two cell lines using reductive carboxylation. Only three metabolites displayed highly significant (p<0.005) differences in abundance between the two members of both pairs, and in all three cases the direction of the difference (i.e. higher or lower) was shared in the two cell lines using reductive carboxylation. Proline, a nonessential amino acid derived from glutamine in an NADPH-dependent biosynthetic pathway, was depleted in 143Bcytb and UOK262EV cells (Fig. 1C). 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), the reduced form of AKG, was elevated in 143Bcytb and UOK262EV cells (Fig. 1D), and further analysis revealed that while both the L- and D-enantiomers of this metabolite were increased, L-2HG was quantitatively the predominant enantiomer (Fig. S1D). It is likely that 2HG accumulation was related to the reduced redox ratio associated with cytb and FH mutations. Although the sources of 2HG are still under investigation, promiscuous activity of the TCA cycle enzyme malate dehydrogenase produces L-2HG in an NADH-dependent manner (Rzem et al., 2007). Both enantiomers are oxidized to AKG by dehydrogenases (L-2HG dehydrogenase and D-2HG dehydrogenase). It is therefore likely that elevated 2-HG is a consequence of a reduced NAD+/NADH ratio. Consistent with this model, inborn errors of the ETC result in 2-HG accumulation (Reinecke et al., 2011). Exposure to hypoxia (<1% O2) has also been demonstrated to reduce the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio (Santidrian et al., 2013) and to favor modest 2HG accumulation in cultured cells (Wise et al., 2011), although these levels were below those noted in gliomas expressing 2HG-producing mutant alleles of isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 or -2 (Dang et al., 2009).

Figure 1 Metabolomic features of cells using reductive carboxylation

 

Finally, the TCA cycle intermediate succinate was markedly elevated in both cell lines (Fig. 1E). We tested additional factors previously reported to stimulate reductive AKG metabolism, including a genetic defect in ETC Complex I, exposure to hypoxia, and chemical inhibitors of the ETC (Mullen et al., 2012Wise et al., 2011Metallo et al., 2012). These factors had a variable effect on succinate, with impairments of Complex III or IV strongly inducing succinate accumulation, while impairments of Complex I either had little effect or suppressed succinate (Fig. 1F).

Oxidative glutamine metabolism is the primary route of succinate formation

UOK262EV cells lack FH activity and accumulate large amounts of fumarate (Frezza et al., 2011); elevated succinate was therefore not surprising in these cells, because succinate precedes fumarate by one reaction in the TCA cycle. On the other hand, TCA cycle perturbation in 143Bcytb cells results from primary ETC dysfunction, and reductive carboxylation is postulated to be a consequence of accumulated AKG (Anastasiou and Cantley, 2012Fendt et al., 2013). Accumulation of AKG is not predicted to result in elevated succinate. We previously reported that 143Bcytb cells produce succinate through simultaneous oxidative and reductive glutamine metabolism (Mullen et al., 2012). To determine the relative contributions of these two pathways, we cultured 143Bwt and 143Bcytb with [U-13C]glutamine and monitored time-dependent 13C incorporation in succinate and other TCA cycle intermediates. Oxidative metabolism of glutamine generates succinate, fumarate and malate containing four glutamine-derived 13C nuclei on the first turn of the cycle (m+4), while reductive metabolism results in the incorporation of three 13C nuclei in these intermediates (Fig. S2). As expected, oxidative glutamine metabolism was the predominant source of succinate, fumarate and malate in 143Bwt cells (Fig. 2A-C). In 143Bcytb, fumarate and malate were produced primarily through reductive metabolism (Fig. 2E-F). Conversely, succinate was formed primarily through oxidative glutamine metabolism, with a minor contribution from the reductive carboxylation pathway (Fig. 2D). Notably, this oxidatively-derived succinate was detected prior to that formed through reductive carboxylation. This indicated that 143Bcytb cells retain the ability to oxidize AKG despite the observation that most of the citrate pool bears the labeling pattern of reductive carboxylation. Together, the labeling data in 143Bcytb cells revealed bidirectional metabolism of carbon from glutamine to produce various TCA cycle intermediates.

Figure 2  Oxidative glutamine metabolism is the primary route of succinate formation in cells using reductive carboxylation to generate citrate

Pyruvate carboxylation contributes to the TCA cycle in cells using reductive carboxylation

Because of the persistence of oxidative metabolism, we determined the extent to which other routes of metabolism besides reductive carboxylation contributed to the TCA cycle. We previously reported that silencing the glutamine-catabolizing enzyme glutaminase (GLS) depletes pools of fumarate, malate and OAA, eliciting a compensatory increase in pyruvate carboxylase (PC) to supply the TCA cycle (Cheng et al., 2011). In cells with defective oxidative phophorylation, production of OAA by PC may be preferable to glutamine oxidation because it diminishes the need to recycle reduced electron carriers generated by the TCA cycle. Citrate synthase (CS) can then condense PC-derived OAA with acetyl-CoA to form citrate. To examine the contribution of PC to the TCA cycle, cells were cultured with [3,4-13C]glucose. In this labeling scheme, glucose-derived pyruvate is labeled in carbon 1 (Fig. S3). This label is retained in OAA if pyruvate is carboxylated, but removed as CO2 during conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA by pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH).

Figure 3 Pyruvate carboxylase contributes to citrate formation in cells using reductive carboxylation

Oxidative metabolism of AKG is required for reductive carboxylation

Oxidative synthesis of succinate from AKG requires two reactions: the oxidative decarboxylation of AKG to succinyl-CoA by AKG dehydrogenase, and the conversion of succinyl-CoA to succinate by succinyl-CoA synthetase. In tumors with mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, large accumulations of succinate are associated with epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones to promote malignancy (Kaelin and McKnight, 2013Killian et al., 2013). We therefore tested whether succinate accumulation per se was required to induce reductive carboxylation in 143Bcytb cells. We used RNA interference directed against the gene encoding the alpha subunit (SUCLG1) of succinyl-CoA synthetase, the last step in the pathway of oxidative succinate formation from glutamine (Fig. 4A). Silencing this enzyme greatly reduced succinate levels (Fig. 4B), but had no effect on the labeling pattern of citrate from [U-13C]glutamine (Fig. 4C). Thus, succinate accumulation is not required for reductive carboxylation.

Figure 5 AKG dehydrogenase is required for reductive carboxylation

Figure 6 AKG dehydrogenase and NNT contribute to NAD+/NADH ratio

Finally, we tested whether these enzymes also controlled the NADP+/NADPH ratio in 143Bcytb cells. Silencing either OGDH or NNT increased the NADP+/NADPH ratio (Fig. 6F,G), whereas silencing IDH2reduced it (Fig. 6H). Together, these data are consistent with a model in which persistent metabolism of AKG by AKG dehydrogenase produces NADH that supports reductive carboxylation by serving as substrate for NNT-dependent NADPH formation, and that IDH2 is a major consumer of NADPH during reductive carboxylation (Fig. 6I).

Reductive carboxylation of AKG initiates a non-conventional form of metabolism that produces TCA cycle intermediates when oxidative metabolism is impaired by mutations, drugs or hypoxia. Because NADPH-dependent isoforms of IDH are reversible, supplying supra-physiological pools of substrates on either side of the reaction drives function of the enzyme as a reductive carboxylase or an oxidative decarboxylase. Thus, in some circumstances reductive carboxylation may operate in response to a mass effect imposed by drastic changes in the abundance of AKG and isocitrate/citrate. However, reductive carboxylation cannot occur without a source of reducing equivalents to produce NADPH. The current work demonstrates that AKG dehydrogenase, an NADH-generating enzyme complex, is required to maintain a low NAD+/NADH ratio for reductive carboxylation of AKG. Thus, reductive carboxylation not only coexists with oxidative metabolism of AKG, but depends on it. Furthermore, silencing NNT, a consumer of NADH, also perturbs the redox ratio and suppresses reductive formation of citrate. These observations suggest that the segment of the oxidative TCA cycle culminating in succinate is necessary to transmit reducing equivalents to NNT for the reductive pathway (Fig 6I).

Succinate accumulation was observed in cells with cytb or FH mutations. However, this accumulation was dispensable for reductive carboxylation, because silencing SUCLG1 expression had no bearing on the pathway as long as AKG dehydrogenase was active. Furthermore, succinate accumulation was not a universal finding of cells using reductive carboxylation. Rather, high succinate levels were observed in cells with distal defects in the ETC (complex III: antimycin, cytb mutation; complex IV: hypoxia) but not defects in complex I (rotenone, metformin, NDUFA1 mutation). These differences reflect the known suppression of SDH activity when downstream components of the ETC are impaired, and the various mechanisms by which succinate may be formed through either oxidative or reductive metabolism. Succinate has long been known as an evolutionarily conserved anaerobic end product of amino acid metabolism during prolonged hypoxia, including in diving mammals (Hochachka and Storey, 1975, Hochachka et al., 1975). The terminal step in this pathway is the conversion of fumarate to succinate using the NADH-dependent “fumarate reductase” system, essentially a reversal of succinate dehydrogenase/ETC complex II (Weinberg et al., 2000, Tomitsuka et al., 2010). However, this process requires reducing equivalents to be passed from NADH to complex I, then to Coenzyme Q, and eventually to complex II to drive the reduction of fumarate to succinate. Hence, producing succinate through reductive glutamine metabolism would require functional complex I. Interestingly, the fumarate reductase system has generally been considered as a mechanism to maintain a proton gradient under conditions of defective ETC activity. Our data suggest that the system is part of a more extensive reorganization of the TCA cycle that also enables reductive citrate formation.

In summary, we demonstrated that branched AKG metabolism is required to sustain levels of reductive carboxylation observed in cells with mitochondrial defects. The organization of this branched pathway suggests that it serves as a relay system to maintain the redox requirements for reductive carboxylation, with the oxidative arm producing reducing equivalents at the level of AKG dehydrogenase and NNT linking this activity to the production of NADPH to be used in the reductive carboxylation reaction. Hence, impairment of the oxidative arm prevents maximal engagement of reductive carboxylation. As both NNT and AKG dehydrogenase are mitochondrial enzymes, the work emphasizes the flexibility of metabolic systems in the mitochondria to fulfill requirements for redox balance and precursor production even when the canonical oxidative function of the mitochondria is impaired.

2.1.3.3 Rewiring Mitochondrial Pyruvate Metabolism. Switching Off the Light in Cancer Cells

Peter W. Szlosarek, Suk Jun Lee, Patrick J. Pollard
Molec Cell 6 Nov 2014; 56(3): 343–344
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2014.10.018

Figure 1. MPC Expression and Metabolic Targeting of Mitochondrial Pyruvate High MPC expression (green) is associated with more favorable tumor prognosis, increased pyruvate oxidation, and reduced lactate and ROS, whereas low expression or mutated MPC is linked to poor tumor prognosis and increased anaplerotic generation of OAA. Dual targeting of MPC and GDH with small molecule inhibitors may ameliorate tumorigenesis in certain cancer types.

The study by Yang et al., (2014) provides evidence for the metabolic flexibility to maintain TCA cycle function. Using isotopic labeling, the authors demonstrated that inhibition of MPCs by a specific compound (UK5099) induced glutamine-dependent acetyl-CoA formation via glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Consequently, and in contrast to single agent treatment, simultaneous administration of MPC and GDH inhibitors drastically abrogated the growth of cancer cells (Figure 1). These studies have also enabled a fresh perspective on metabolism in the clinic and emphasized a need for high-quality translational studies to assess the role of mitochondrial pyruvate transport in vivo. Thus, integrating the biomarker of low MPC expression with dual inhibition of

MPC and GDH as a synthetic lethal strategy (Yang et al., 2014) is testable and may offer a novel therapeutic window for patients (DeBerardinis and Thompson, 2012). Indeed, combinatorial targeting of cancer metabolism may prevent early drug resistance and lead to enhanced tumor control, as shown recently for antifolate agents combined with arginine deprivation with modulation of intracellular glutamine (Szlosarek, 2014). Moreover, it will be important to assess both intertumoral and intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity going forward, as tumor cells are highly adaptable with respect to the precursors used to fuel the TCA cycle in the presence of reduced pyruvate transport. The observation by Vacanti et al. (2014) that the flux of BCAAs increased following inhibition of MPC activity may also underlie the increase in BCAAs detected in the plasma of patients several years before a clinical diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (Mayers et al., 2014). Since measuring pyruvate transport via the MPC is technically challenging, the use of 18-FDG positron emission tomography and more recently magnetic spectroscopy with hyperpolarized 13C-labeled pyruvate will need to be incorporated into these future studies (Brindle et al., 2011).

References

Bricker, D.K., Taylor, E.B., Schell, J.C., Orsak, T., Boutron, A., Chen, Y.C., Cox, J.E., Cardon, C.M., Van Vranken, J.G., Dephoure, N., et al. (2012). Science 337, 96–100.

Brindle, K.M., Bohndiek, S.E., Gallagher, F.A., and Kettunen, M.I. (2011). Magn. Reson. Med. 66, 505–519.

DeBerardinis, R.J., and Thompson, C.B. (2012). Cell 148, 1132–1144.

Herzig, S., Raemy, E., Montessuit, S., Veuthey, J.L., Zamboni, N., Westermann, B., Kunji, E.R., and Martinou, J.C. (2012). Science 337, 93–96.

Mayers, J.R., Wu, C., Clish, C.B., Kraft, P., Torrence, M.E., Fiske, B.P., Yuan, C., Bao, Y., Townsend, M.K., Tworoger, S.S., et al. (2014). Nat. Med. 20, 1193–1198.

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Schell, J.C., Olson, K.A., Jiang, L., Hawkins, A.J., Van Vranken, J.G., et al. (2014). Mol. Cell 56, this issue, 400–413.

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Vacanti, N.M., Divakaruni, A.S., Green, C.R., Parker, S.J., Henry, R.R., et al. (2014). Mol. Cell 56, this issue, 425–435.

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2.1.3.4 Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

Lee I
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2015 Jan 9; 456(2):621-5.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.12.005

Highlights

  • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration.
    • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels.
    • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

2.1.3.5 Mitochondrial dysfunction in human non-small-cell lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by reactive oxygen species and Bcl-XL/p53-mediated amplification mechanisms

Y-L Shi, S Feng, W Chen, Z-C Hua, J-J Bian and W Yin
Cell Death and Disease (2014) 5, e1579
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/cddis.2014.547

Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising agent for anticancer therapy; however, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells are relatively TRAIL resistant. Identification of small molecules that can restore NSCLC susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is meaningful. We found here that rotenone, as a mitochondrial respiration inhibitor, preferentially increased NSCLC cells sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis at subtoxic concentrations, the mechanisms by which were accounted by the upregulation of death receptors and the downregulation of c-FLIP (cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein). Further analysis revealed that death receptors expression by rotenone was regulated by p53, whereas c-FLIP downregulation was blocked by Bcl-XL overexpression. Rotenone triggered the mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which subsequently led to Bcl-XL downregulation and PUMA upregulation. As PUMA expression was regulated by p53, the PUMA, Bcl-XL and p53 in rotenone-treated cells form a positive feedback amplification loop to increase the apoptosis sensitivity. Mitochondria-derived ROS, however, promote the formation of this amplification loop. Collectively, we concluded that ROS generation, Bcl-XL and p53-mediated amplification mechanisms had an important role in the sensitization of NSCLC cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by rotenone. The combined TRAIL and rotenone treatment may be appreciated as a useful approach for the therapy of NSCLC that warrants further investigation.

Abbreviations: c-FLIP, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein; DHE, dihydroethidium; DISC, death-inducing signaling complex; DPI, diphenylene iodonium; DR4/DR5, death receptor 4/5; EB, ethidium bromide; FADD, Fas-associated protein with death domain; MnSOD, manganese superoxide; NAC, N-acetylcysteine; NSCLC, non-small-cell lung carcinoma; PBMC, peripheral blood mononuclear cells; ROS, reactive oxygen species; TRAIL, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand; UPR, unfolded protein response.

Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has emerged as a promising cancer therapeutic because it can selectively induce apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro, and most importantly, in vivo with little adverse effect on normal cells.1 However, a number of cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL, especially highly malignant tumors such as lung cancer.23 Lung cancer, especially the non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) constitutes a heavy threat to human life. Presently, the morbidity and mortality of NSCLC has markedly increased in the past decade,4 which highlights the need for more effective treatment strategies.

TRAIL has been shown to interact with five receptors, including the death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5), the decoy receptors DcR1 and DcR2, and osteoprotegerin.5 Ligation of TRAIL to DR4 or DR5 allows for the recruitment of Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), which leads to the formation of death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) and the subsequent activation of caspase-8/10.6 The effector caspase-3 is activated by caspase-8, which cleaves numerous regulatory and structural proteins resulting in cell apoptosis. Caspase-8 can also cleave the Bcl-2 inhibitory BH3-domain protein (Bid), which engages the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by binding to Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer (BAK). The oligomerization between Bcl-2 and Bax promotes the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, and facilitates the formation of apoptosome and caspase-9 activation.7 Like caspase-8, caspase-9 can also activate caspase-3 and initiate cell apoptosis. Besides apoptosis-inducing molecules, several apoptosis-inhibitory proteins also exist and have function even when apoptosis program is initiated. For example, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) is able to suppress DISC formation and apoptosis induction by sequestering FADD.891011

Until now, the recognized causes of TRAIL resistance include differential expression of death receptors, constitutively active AKT and NF-κB,1213overexpression of c-FLIP and IAPs, mutations in Bax and BAK gene.2 Hence, resistance can be overcome by the use of sensitizing agents that modify the deregulated death receptor expression and/or apoptosis signaling pathways in cancer cells.5 Many sensitizing agents have been developed in a variety of tumor cell models.2 Although the clinical effectiveness of these agents needs further investigation, treatment of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells with sensitizing agents, especially the compounds with low molecular weight, as well as prolonged plasma half-life represents a promising trend for cancer therapy.

Mitochondria emerge as intriguing targets for cancer therapy. Metabolic changes affecting mitochondria function inside cancer cells endow these cells with distinctive properties and survival advantage worthy of drug targeting, mitochondria-targeting drugs offer substantial promise as clinical treatment with minimal side effects.141516 Rotenone is a potent inhibitor of NADH oxidoreductase in complex I, which demonstrates anti-neoplastic activity on a variety of cancer cells.1718192021 However, the neurotoxicity of rotenone limits its potential application in cancer therapy. To avoid it, rotenone was effectively used in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs to kill cancerous cells.22

In our previous investigation, we found that rotenone was able to suppress membrane Na+,K+-ATPase activity and enhance ouabain-induced cancer cell death.23 Given these facts, we wonder whether rotenone may also be used as a sensitizing agent that can restore the susceptibility of NSCLC cells toward TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and increase the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL on NSCLC. To test this hypothesis, we initiated this study.

Rotenone sensitizes NSCLC cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

Four NSCLC cell lines including A549, H522, H157 and Calu-1 were used in this study. As shown in Figure 1a, the apoptosis induced by TRAIL alone at 50 or 100 ng/ml on A549, H522, H157 and Calu-1 cells was non-prevalent, indicating that these NSCLC cell lines are relatively TRAIL resistant. Interestingly, when these cells were treated with TRAIL combined with rotenone, significant increase in cell apoptosis was observed. To examine whether rotenone was also able to sensitize normal cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolated from human blood were used. As a result, rotenone failed to sensitize human PBMC to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, indicating that the sensitizing effect of rotenone is tumor cell specific. Of note, the apoptosis-enhancing effect of rotenone occurred independent of its cytotoxicity, because the minimal dosage required for rotenone to cause toxic effect on NSCLC cell lines was 10 μM, however, rotenone augmented TRAIL-mediated apoptosis when it was used as little as 10 nM.

Figure 1.

Full figure and legend (310K)

http://www.nature.com/cddis/journal/v5/n12/fig_tab/cddis2014547f1.html#figure-title
To further confirm the effect of rotenone, cells were stained with Hoechst and observed under fluorescent microscope (Figure 1b). Consistently, the combined treatment of rotenone with TRAIL caused significant nuclear fragmentation in A549, H522, H157 and Calu-1 cells. Rotenone or TRAIL treatment alone, however, had no significant effect.

Caspases activation is a hallmark of cell apoptosis. In this study, the enzymatic activities of caspases including caspase-3, -8 and -9 were measured by flow cytometry by using FITC-conjugated caspases substrate (Figure 1c). As a result, rotenone used at 1 μM or TRAIL used at 100 ng/ml alone did not cause caspase-3, -8 and -9 activation. The combined treatment, however, significantly increased the enzymatic activities of them. Moreover, A549 or H522 cell apoptosis by TRAIL combined with rotenone was almost completely suppressed in the presence of z-VAD.fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor (Figure 1d). All of these data indicate that both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are involved in the sensitizing effect of rotenone on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC.

Upregulation of death receptors expression is required for rotenone-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

Sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis has been explained in some studies by upregulation of death receptors,24 whereas other results show that sensitization can occur without increased TRAIL receptor expression.25 As such, we examined TRAIL receptors expression on NSCLC cells after treatment with rotenone. Rotenone increased DR4 and DR5 mRNA levels in A549 cells in a time or concentration-dependent manner (Figures 2a and b), also increased DR4 and DR5 protein expression levels (Supplementary Figure S1). Notably, rotenone failed to increase DR5 mRNA levels in H157 and Calu-1 cells (Supplementary Figure S2). To observe whether the increased DR4 and DR5 mRNA levels finally correlated with the functional molecules, we examined the surface expression levels of DR4 and DR5 by flow cytometry. The results, as shown in Figure 2c demonstrated that the cell surface expression levels of DR4 and DR5 were greatly upregulated by rotenone in either A549 cells or H522 cells.

Figure 2.

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To analyze whether the upregulation of DR4 and DR5 is a ‘side-effect’, or contrarily, necessary for rotenone-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, we blocked upregulation of the death receptors by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against DR4 and DR5 (Supplementary Figure S3). The results showed that blocking DR4 and DR5 expression alone significantly reduced the rate of cell apoptosis in A549 cells (Figure 2d). However, the highest inhibition of apoptosis was observed when upregulation of both receptors was blocked in parallel, thus showing an additive effect of blocking DR4 and DR5 at the same time. Similar results were also obtained in H522 cells

To analyze whether the upregulation of DR4 and DR5 is a ‘side-effect’, or contrarily, necessary for rotenone-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, we blocked upregulation of the death receptors by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against DR4 and DR5 (Supplementary Figure S3). The results showed that blocking DR4 and DR5 expression alone significantly reduced the rate of cell apoptosis in A549 cells (Figure 2d). However, the highest inhibition of apoptosis was observed when upregulation of both receptors was blocked in parallel, thus showing an additive effect of blocking DR4 and DR5 at the same time. Similar results were also obtained in H522 cells.

Rotenone-induced p53 activation regulates death receptors upregulation

TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 are regulated at multiple levels. At transcriptional level, studies suggest that several transcriptional factors including NF-κB, p53 and AP-1 are involved in DR4 or DR5 gene transcription.2 The NF-κB or AP-1 transcriptional activity was further modulated by ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinase activity. Unexpectedly, we found here that none of these MAP kinases inhibitors were able to suppress the apoptosis mediated by TRAIL plus rotenone (Figure 3a). To find out other possible mechanisms, we observed that rotenone was able to stimulate p53 phosphorylation as well as p53 protein expression in A549 and H522 cells (Figure 3b). As a p53-inducible gene, p21 mRNA expression was also upregulated by rotenone treatment in a time-dependent manner (Figure 3c). To characterize the effect of p53, A549 cells were transfected with p53 siRNA. The results, as shown in Figure 3d-1 demonstrated that rotenone-mediated surface expression levels of DR4 and DR5 in A549 cells were largely attenuated by siRNA-mediated p53 expression silencing. Control siRNA, however, failed to reveal such effect. Similar results were also obtained in H522 cells (Figure 3d-2). Silencing of p53 expression in A549 cells also partially suppressed the apoptosis induced by TRAIL plus rotenone (Figure 3e).

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Rotenone suppresses c-FLIP expression and increases the sensitivity of A549 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

The c-FLIP protein has been commonly appreciated as an anti-apoptotic molecule in death receptor-mediated cell apoptosis. In this study, rotenone treatment led to dose-dependent downregulation of c-FLIP expression, including c-FLIPL and c-FLIPs in A549 cells (Figure 4a-1), H522 cells (Figure 4a-2), H441 and Calu-1 cells (Supplementary Figure S4). To test whether c-FLIP is essential for the apoptosis enhancement, A549 cells were transfected with c-FLIPL-overexpressing plasmids. As shown in Figure 4b-1, the apoptosis of A549 cells after the combined treatment was significantly reduced when c-FLIPL was overexpressed. Similar results were also obtained in H522 cells (Figure 4b-2).

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Bcl-XL is involved in the apoptosis enhancement by rotenone

Notably, c-FLIP downregulation by rotenone in NSCLC cells was irrelevant to p53 signaling (data not shown). To identify other mechanism involved, we found that anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-XL was also found to be downregulated by rotenone in a dose-dependent manner (Figure 5a). Notably, both Bcl-XL and c-FLIPL mRNA levels remained unchanged in cells after rotenone treatment (Supplementary Figure S5). Bcl-2 is homolog to Bcl-XL. But surprisingly, Bcl-2 expression was almost undetectable in A549 cells. To examine whether Bcl-XL is involved, A549 cells were transfected with Bcl-XL-overexpressing plasmid. As compared with mock transfectant, cell apoptosis induced by TRAIL plus rotenone was markedly suppressed under the condition of Bcl-XL overexpression (Figure 5b). To characterize the mechanisms, surface expression levels of DR4 and DR5 were examined. As shown in Figure 5c, the increased surface expression of DR4 and DR5 in A549 cells, or in H522 cells were greatly reduced after Bcl-XLoverexpression (Figure 5c). In addition, Bcl-XL overexpression also significantly prevented the downregulation of c-FLIPL and c-FLIPs expression in A549 cells by rotenone treatment (Figure 5d).

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Rotenone suppresses the interaction between BCL-XL/p53 and increases PUMA transcription

Lines of evidence suggest that Bcl-XL has a strong binding affinity with p53, and can suppress p53-mediated tumor cell apoptosis.26 In this study, FLAG-tagged Bcl-XL and HA-tagged p53 were co-transfected into cells; immunoprecipitation experiment was performed by using FLAG antibody to immunoprecipitate HA-tagged p53. As a result, we found that at the same amount of p53 protein input, rotenone treatment caused a concentration-dependent suppression of the protein interaction between Bcl-XL and p53 (Figure 6a). Rotenone also significantly suppressed the interaction between endogenous Bcl-XL and p53 when polyclonal antibody against p53 was used to immunoprecipitate cellular Bcl-XL (Figure 6b). Recent study highlighted the importance of PUMA in BCL-XL/p53 interaction and cell apoptosis.27 We found here that rotenone significantly increased PUMA gene transcription (Figure 6c) and protein expression (Figure 6d) in NSCLC cells, but not in transformed 293T cell. Meanwhile, this effect was attenuated by silencing of p53 expression (Figure 6e).

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Mitochondria-derived ROS are responsible for the apoptosis-enhancing effect of rotenone

As an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration, rotenone was found to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in a variety of transformed or non-transformed cells.2022 Consistently, by using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH) for the measurement of intracellular H2O2 and dihydroethidium (DHE) for O2.−, we found that rotenone significantly triggered the .generation of H2O2(Figure 7a) and O2.− (Figure 7b) in A549 and H522 cells. To identify the origin of ROS production, we first incubated cells with diphenylene iodonium (DPI), a potent inhibitor of plasma membrane NADP/NADPH oxidase. The results showed that DPI failed to suppress rotenone-induced ROS generation (Figure 7c). Then, we generated A549 cells deficient in mitochondria DNA by culturing cells in medium supplemented with ethidium bromide (EB). These mtDNA-deficient cells were subject to rotenone treatment, and the result showed that rotenone-induced ROS production were largely attenuated in A549 ρ° cells, but not wild-type A549 cells, suggesting ROS are mainly produced from mitochondria (Figure 7d). Notably, the sensitizing effect of rotenone on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in A549 cells was largely dependent on ROS, because the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment greatly suppressed the cell apoptosis, as shown in annexin V/PI double staining experiment (Figure 7e), cell cycle analysis (Figure 7f) and caspase-3 cleavage activity assay (Figure 7g). Finally, in A549 cells stably transfected with manganese superoxide (MnSOD) and catalase, apoptosis induced by TRAIL and rotenone was partially reversed (Figure 7h). All of these data suggest that mitochondria-derived ROS, including H2O2 and O2.−, are responsible for the apoptosis-enhancing effect of rotenone.

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Rotenone promotes BCl-XL degradation and PUMA transcription in ROS-dependent manner

To understand why ROS are responsible for the apoptosis-enhancing effect of rotenone, we found that rotenone-induced suppression of BCL-XL expression can be largely reversed by NAC treatment (Figure 8a). To examine whether this effect of rotenone occurs at posttranslational level, we used cycloheximide (CHX) to halt protein synthesis, and found that the rapid degradation of Bcl-XL by rotenone was largely attenuated in A549 ρ0 cells (Figure 8b). Similarly, rotenone-induced PUMA upregulation was also significantly abrogated in A549 ρ0 cells (Figure 8c). Finally, A549 cells were inoculated into nude mice to produce xenografts tumor model. In this model, the therapeutic effect of TRAIL combined with rotenone was evaluated. Notably, in order to circumvent the potential neurotoxic adverse effect of rotenone, mice were challenged with rotenone at a low concentration of 0.5 mg/kg. The results, as shown in Figure 8d revealed that while TRAIL or rotenone alone remained unaffected on A549 tumor growth, the combined therapy significantly slowed down the tumor growth. Interestingly, the tumor-suppressive effect of TRAIL plus rotenone was significantly attenuated by NAC (P<0.01). After experiment, tumors were removed and the caspase-3 activity in tumor cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Consistently, the caspase-3 cleavage activities were significantly activated in A549 cells from animals challenged with TRAIL plus rotenone, meanwhile, this effect was attenuated by NAC (Figure 8e). The similar effect of rotenone also occurred in NCI-H441 xenografts tumor model (Supplementary Figure S6).

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Restoration of cancer cells susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is becoming a very useful strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we provided evidence that rotenone increased the apoptosis sensitivity of NSCLC cells toward TRAIL by mechanisms involving ROS generation, p53 upregulation, Bcl-XL and c-FLIP downregulation, and death receptors upregulation. Among them, mitochondria-derived ROS had a predominant role. Although rotenone is toxic to neuron, increasing evidence also demonstrated that it was beneficial for improving inflammation, reducing reperfusion injury, decreasing virus infection or triggering cancer cell death. We identified here another important characteristic of rotenone as a tumor sensitizer in TRAIL-based cancer therapy, which widens the application potential of rotenone in disease therapy.

As Warburg proposed the cancer ‘respiration injury’ theory, increasing evidence suggest that cancer cells may have mitochondrial dysfunction, which causes cancer cells, compared with the normal cells, are under increased generation of ROS.33 The increased ROS in cancer cells have a variety of biological effects. We found here that rotenone preferentially increased the apoptosis sensitivity of cancer cells toward TRAIL, further confirming the concept that although tumor cells have a high level of intracellular ROS, they are more sensitive than normal cells to agents that can cause further accumulation of ROS.

Cancer cells stay in a stressful tumor microenvironment including hypoxia, low nutrient availability and immune infiltrates. These conditions, however, activate a range of stress response pathways to promote tumor survival and aggressiveness. In order to circumvent TRAIL-mediated apoptotic clearance, the expression levels of DR4 and DR5 in many types of cancer cells are nullified, but interestingly, they can be reactivated when cancer cells are challenged with small chemical molecules. Furthermore, those small molecules often take advantage of the stress signaling required for cancer cells survival to increase cancer cells sensitivity toward TRAIL. For example, the unfolded protein response (UPR) has an important role in cancer cells survival, SHetA2, as a small molecule, can induce UPR in NSCLC cell lines and augment TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulating DR5 expression in CHOP-dependent manner. Here, we found rotenone manipulated the oxidative stress signaling of NSCLC cells to increase their susceptibility to TRAIL. These facts suggest that cellular stress signaling not only offers opportunity for cancer cells to survive, but also renders cancer cells eligible for attack by small molecules. A possible explanation is that depending on the intensity of stress, cellular stress signaling can switch its role from prosurvival to death enhancement. As described in this study, although ROS generation in cancer cells is beneficial for survival, rotenone treatment further increased ROS production to a high level that surpasses the cell ability to eliminate them; as a result, ROS convert its role from survival to death.

2.1.3.6 PPARs and ERRs. molecular mediators of mitochondrial metabolism

Weiwei Fan, Ronald Evans
Current Opinion in Cell Biology Apr 2015; 33:49–54
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ceb.2014.11.002

Since the revitalization of ‘the Warburg effect’, there has been great interest in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, not only from the cancer perspective but also from the general biomedical science field. As the center of oxidative metabolism, mitochondria and their metabolic activity are tightly controlled to meet cellular energy requirements under different physiological conditions. One such mechanism is through the inducible transcriptional co-regulators PGC1α and NCOR1, which respond to various internal or external stimuli to modulate mitochondrial function. However, the activity of such co-regulators depends on their interaction with transcriptional factors that directly bind to and control downstream target genes. The nuclear receptors PPARs and ERRs have been shown to be key transcriptional factors in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and executing the inducible effects of PGC1α and NCOR1. In this review, we summarize recent gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies of PPARs and ERRs in metabolic tissues and discuss their unique roles in regulating different aspects of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.

Energy is vital to all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, the vast majority of energy is produced by oxidative metabolism in mitochondria [1]. As a cellular organelle, mitochondria are under tight control of the nucleus. Although the majority of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA) and their expression regulated by the nucleus, mitochondria retain their own genome, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), encoding 13 polypeptides of the electron transport chain (ETC) in mammals. However, all proteins required for mtDNA replication, transcription, and translation, as well as factors regulating such activities, are encoded by the nucleus [2].

The cellular demand for energy varies in different cells under different physiological conditions. Accordingly, the quantity and activity of mitochondria are differentially controlled by a transcriptional regulatory network in both the basal and induced states. A number of components of this network have been identified, including members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and the estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) [34 and 5].

The Yin-Yang co-regulators

A well-known inducer of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) [6], a nuclear cofactor which is abundantly expressed in high energy demand tissues such as heart, skeletal muscle, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) [7]. Induction by cold-exposure, fasting, and exercise allows PGC1α to regulate mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by activating genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), beta-oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), as well as mitochondrial biogenesis [6 and 8] (Figure 1).

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Figure 1.  PPARs and ERRs are major executors of PGC1α-induced regulation of oxidative metabolism. Physiological stress such as exercise induces both the expression and activity of PGC1α, which stimulates energy production by activating downstream genes involved in fatty acid and glucose metabolism, TCA cycle, β-oxidation, OXPHOS, and mitochondrial biogenesis. The transcriptional activity of PGC1α relies on its interactions with transcriptional factors such as PPARs (for controlling fatty acid metabolism) and ERRs (for regulating mitochondrial OXPHOS).

The effect of PGC1α on mitochondrial regulation is antagonized by transcriptional corepressors such as the nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR1) [9 and 10]. In contrast to PGC1α, the expression of NCOR1 is suppressed in conditions where PGC1α is induced such as during fasting, high-fat-diet challenge, and exercise [9 and 11]. Moreover, the knockout of NCOR1 phenotypically mimics PGC1α overexpression in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism [9]. Therefore, coactivators and corepressors collectively regulate mitochondrial metabolism in a Yin-Yang fashion.

However, both PGC1α and NCOR1 lack DNA binding activity and rather act via their interaction with transcription factors that direct the regulatory program. Therefore the transcriptional factors that partner with PGC1α and NCOR1 mediate the molecular signaling cascades and execute their inducible effects on mitochondrial regulation.

PPARs: master executors controlling fatty acid oxidation

Both PGC1α and NCOR1 are co-factors for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, γ, and δ) [71112 and 13]. It is now clear that all three PPARs play essential roles in lipid and fatty acid metabolism by directly binding to and modulating genes involved in fat metabolism [1314151617,18 and 19]. While PPARγ is known as a master regulator for adipocyte differentiation and does not seem to be involved with oxidative metabolism [14 and 20], both PPARα and PPARδ are essential regulators of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) [3131519 and 21] (Figure 1).

PPARα was first cloned as the molecular target of fibrates, a class of cholesterol-lowering compounds that increase hepatic FAO [22]. The importance of PPARα in regulating FAO is indicated in its expression pattern which is restricted to tissues with high capacity of FAO such as heart, liver, BAT, and oxidative muscle [23]. On the other hand, PPARδ is ubiquitously expressed with higher levels in the digestive tract, heart, and BAT [24]. In the past 15 years, extensive studies using gain-of-function and loss-of-function models have clearly demonstrated PPARα and PPARδ as the major drivers of FAO in a wide variety of tissues.

ERRS: master executors controlling mitochondrial OXPHOS

ERRs are essential regulators of mitochondrial energy metabolism [4]. ERRα is ubiquitously expressed but particularly abundant in tissues with high energy demands such as brain, heart, muscle, and BAT. ERRβ and ERRγ have similar expression patterns, both are selectively expressed in highly oxidative tissues including brain, heart, and oxidative muscle [45]. Instead of endogenous ligands, the transcriptional activity of ERRs is primarily regulated by co-factors such as PGC1α and NCOR1 [4 and 46] (Figure 1).

Of the three ERRs, ERRβ is the least studied and its role in regulating mitochondrial function is unclear [4 and 47]. In contrast, when PGC1α is induced, ERRα is the master regulator of the mitochondrial biogenic gene network. As ERRα binds to its own promoter, PGC1α can also induce an autoregulatory loop to enhance overall ERRα activity [48]. Without ERRα, the ability of PGC1α to induce the expression of mitochondrial genes is severely impaired. However, the basal-state levels of mitochondrial target genes are not affected by ERRα deletion, suggesting induced mitochondrial biogenesis is a transient process and that other transcriptional factors such as ERRγ may be important maintaining baseline mitochondrial OXPHOS [41•42 and 43]. Consistent with this idea, ERRγ (which is active even when PGC1α is not induced) shares many target genes with ERRα [49 and 50].

Conclusion and perspectives

Taken together, recent studies have clearly demonstrated the essential roles of PPARs and ERRs in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and executing the inducible effects of PGC1α (Figure 1). Both PPARα and PPARδ are key regulators for FA oxidation. While the function of PPARα seems more restricted in FA uptake, beta-oxidation, and ketogenesis, PPARδ plays a broader role in controlling oxidative metabolism and fuel preference, with its target genes involved in FA oxidation, mitochondrial OXPHOS, and glucose utilization. However, it is still not clear how much redundancy exists between PPARα and PPARδ, a question which may require the generation of a double knockout model. In addition, more effort is needed to fully understand how PPARα and PPARδ control their target genes in response to environmental changes.

Likewise, ERRα and ERRγ have been shown to be key regulators of mitochondrial OXPHOS. Knockout studies of ERRα suggest it to be the principal executor of PGC1α induced up-regulation of mitochondrial genes, though its role in exercise-dependent changes in skeletal muscle needs further investigation. Transgenic models have demonstrated ERRγ’s powerful induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and its ability to act in a PGC1α-independent manner. However, it remains to be elucidated whether ERRγ is sufficient for basal-state mitochondrial function in general, and whether ERRα can compensate for its function.

2.1.3.7 Metabolic control via the mitochondrial protein import machinery

Opalińska M, Meisinger C.
Curr Opin Cell Biol. 2015 Apr; 33:42-48
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.ceb.2014.11.001

Mitochondria have to import most of their proteins in order to fulfill a multitude of metabolic functions. Sophisticated import machineries mediate targeting and translocation of preproteins from the cytosol and subsequent sorting into their suborganellar destination. The mode of action of these machineries has been considered for long time as a static and constitutively active process. However, recent studies revealed that the mitochondrial protein import machinery is subject to intense regulatory mechanisms that include direct control of protein flux by metabolites and metabolic signaling cascades.
2.1.3.8 The Protein Import Machinery of Mitochondria—A Regulatory Hub

AB Harbauer, RP Zahedi, A Sickmann, N Pfanner, C Meisinger
Cell Metab 4 Mar 2014; 19(3):357–372

Mitochondria are essential cell. They are best known for their role as cellular powerhouses, which convert the energy derived from food into an electrochemical proton gradient across the inner membrane. The proton gradient drives the mitochondrial ATP synthase, thus providing large amounts of ATP for the cell. In addition, mitochondria fulfill central functions in the metabolism of amino acids and lipids and the biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme. Mitochondria form a dynamic network that is continuously remodeled by fusion and fission. They are involved in the maintenance of cellular ion homeostasis, play a crucial role in apoptosis, and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, in particular neurodegenerative disorders.

Mitochondria consist of two membranes, outer membrane and inner membrane, and two aqueous compartments, intermembrane space and matrix (Figure 1). Proteomic studies revealed that mitochondria contain more than 1,000 different proteins (Prokisch et al., 2004Reinders et al., 2006Pagliarini et al., 2008 and Schmidt et al., 2010). Based on the endosymbiotic origin from a prokaryotic ancestor, mitochondria contain a complete genetic system and protein synthesis apparatus in the matrix; however, only ∼1% of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the mitochondrial genome (13 proteins in humans and 8 proteins in yeast). Nuclear genes code for ∼99% of mitochondrial proteins. The proteins are synthesized as precursors on cytosolic ribosomes and are translocated into mitochondria by a multicomponent import machinery. The protein import machinery is essential for the viability of eukaryotic cells. Numerous studies on the targeting signals and import components have been reported (reviewed in Dolezal et al., 2006,Neupert and Herrmann, 2007Endo and Yamano, 2010 and Schmidt et al., 2010), yet for many years little has been known on the regulation of the import machinery. This led to the general assumption that the protein import machinery is constitutively active and not subject to detailed regulation.

Figure 1. Protein Import Pathways of Mitochondria.  Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and are imported by the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex). (A) Presequence-carrying (cleavable) preproteins are transferred from TOM to the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex), which is driven by the membrane potential (Δψ). The proteins either are inserted into the inner membrane (IM) or are translocated into the matrix with the help of the presequence translocase-associated motor (PAM). The presequences are typically cleaved off by the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). (B) The noncleavable precursors of hydrophobic metabolite carriers are bound to molecular chaperones in the cytosol and transferred to the receptor Tom70. After translocation through the TOM channel, the precursors bind to small TIM chaperones in the intermembrane space and are membrane inserted by the Δψ-dependent carrier translocase of the inner membrane (TIM22 complex).
(C) Cysteine-rich proteins destined for the intermembrane space (IMS) are translocated through the TOM channel in a reduced conformation and imported by the mitochondrial IMS import and assembly (MIA) machinery. Mia40 functions as precursor receptor and oxidoreductase in the IMS, promoting the insertion of disulfide bonds into the imported proteins. The sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 reoxidizes Mia40 for further rounds of oxidative protein import and folding. (D) The precursors of outer membrane β-barrel proteins are imported by the TOM complex and small TIM chaperones and are inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). (E) Outer membrane (OM) proteins with α-helical transmembrane segments are inserted into the membrane by import pathways that have only been partially characterized. Shown is an import pathway via the mitochondrial import (MIM) complex

Studies in recent years, however, indicated that different steps of mitochondrial protein import are regulated, suggesting a remarkable diversity of potential mechanisms. After an overview on the mitochondrial protein import machinery, we will discuss the regulatory processes at different stages of protein translocation into mitochondria. We propose that the mitochondrial protein import machinery plays a crucial role as regulatory hub under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Whereas the basic mechanisms of mitochondrial protein import have been conserved from lower to higher eukaryotes (yeast to humans), regulatory processes may differ between different organisms and cell types. So far, many studies on the regulation of mitochondrial protein import have only been performed in a limited set of organisms. Here we discuss regulatory principles, yet it is important to emphasize that future studies will have to address which regulatory processes have been conserved in evolution and which processes are organism specific.

Protein Import Pathways into Mitochondria

The classical route of protein import into mitochondria is the presequence pathway (Neupert and Herrmann, 2007 and Chacinska et al., 2009). This pathway is used by more than half of all mitochondrial proteins (Vögtle et al., 2009). The proteins are synthesized as precursors with cleavable amino-terminal extensions, termed presequences. The presequences form positively charged amphipathic α helices and are recognized by receptors of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) (Figure 1A) (Mayer et al., 1995Brix et al., 1997van Wilpe et al., 1999Abe et al., 2000Meisinger et al., 2001 and Saitoh et al., 2007). Upon translocation through the TOM channel, the cleavable preproteins are transferred to the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex). The membrane potential across the inner membrane (Δψ, negative on the matrix side) exerts an electrophoretic effect on the positively charged presequences (Martin et al., 1991). The presequence translocase-associated motor (PAM) with the ATP-dependent heat-shock protein 70 (mtHsp70) drives preprotein translocation into the matrix (Chacinska et al., 2005 and Mapa et al., 2010). Here the presequences are typically cleaved off by the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). Some cleavable preproteins contain a hydrophobic segment behind the presequence, leading to arrest of translocation in the TIM23 complex and lateral release of the protein into the inner membrane (Glick et al., 1992Chacinska et al., 2005 and Meier et al., 2005). In an alternative sorting route, some cleavable preproteins destined for the inner membrane are fully or partially translocated into the matrix, followed by insertion into the inner membrane by the OXA export machinery, which has been conserved from bacteria to mitochondria (“conservative sorting”) (He and Fox, 1997Hell et al., 1998Meier et al., 2005 and Bohnert et al., 2010).  …

Regulatory Processes Acting at Cytosolic Precursors of Mitochondrial Proteins

Two properties of cytosolic precursor proteins are crucial for import into mitochondria. (1) The targeting signals of the precursors have to be accessible to organellar receptors. Modification of a targeting signal by posttranslational modification or masking of a signal by binding partners can promote or inhibit import into an organelle. (2) The protein import channels of mitochondria are so narrow that folded preproteins cannot be imported. Thus preproteins should be in a loosely folded state or have to be unfolded during the import process. Stable folding of preprotein domains in the cytosol impairs protein import.  …

Import Regulation by Binding of Metabolites or Partner Proteins to Preproteins

Binding of a metabolite to a precursor protein can represent a direct means of import regulation (Figure 2A, condition 1). A characteristic example is the import of 5-aminolevulinate synthase, a mitochondrial matrix protein that catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis (Hamza and Dailey, 2012). The precursor contains heme binding motifs in its amino-terminal region, including the presequence (Dailey et al., 2005). Binding of heme to the precursor inhibits its import into mitochondria, likely by impairing recognition of the precursor protein by TOM receptors (Lathrop and Timko, 1993González-Domínguez et al., 2001,Munakata et al., 2004 and Dailey et al., 2005). Thus the biosynthetic pathway is regulated by a feedback inhibition of mitochondrial import of a crucial enzyme, providing an efficient and precursor-specific means of import regulation dependent on the metabolic situation.

Figure 2. Regulation of Cytosolic Precursors of Mitochondrial Proteins

(A) The import of a subset of mitochondrial precursor proteins can be positively or negatively regulated by precursor-specific reactions in the cytosol. (1) Binding of ligands/metabolites can inhibit mitochondrial import. (2) Binding of precursors to partner proteins can stimulate or inhibit import into mitochondria. (3) Phosphorylation of precursors in the vicinity of targeting signals can modulate dual targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. (4) Precursor folding can mask the targeting signal. (B) Cytosolic and mitochondrial fumarases are derived from the same presequence-carrying preprotein. The precursor is partially imported by the TOM and TIM23 complexes of the mitochondrial membranes and the presequence is removed by the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). Folding of the preprotein promotes retrograde translocation of more than half of the molecules into the cytosol, whereas the other molecules are completely imported into mitochondria.

Regulation of Mitochondrial Protein Entry Gate by Cytosolic Kinases

Figure 3. Regulation of TOM Complex by Cytosolic Kinases

(A) All subunits of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) are phosphorylated by cytosolic kinases (phosphorylated amino acid residues are indicated by stars with P). Casein kinase 1 (CK1) stimulates the assembly of Tom22 into the TOM complex. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) stimulates the biogenesis of Tom22 as well as the mitochondrial import protein 1 (Mim1). Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibits the biogenesis of Tom22 and Tom40, and inhibits the activity of Tom70 (see B). Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) are possibly involved in regulation of TOM. (B) Metabolic shift-induced regulation of the receptor Tom70 by PKA. Carrier precursors bind to cytosolic chaperones (Hsp70 and/or Hsp90). Tom70 has two binding pockets, one for the precursor and one for the accompanying chaperone (shown on the left). When glucose is added to yeast cells (fermentable conditions), the levels of intracellular cAMP are increased and PKA is activated (shown on the right). PKA phosphorylates a serine of Tom70 in vicinity of the chaperone binding pocket, thus impairing chaperone binding to Tom70 and carrier import into mitochondria.

Casein Kinase 2 Stimulates TOM Biogenesis and Protein Import

Metabolic Switch from Respiratory to Fermentable Conditions Involves Protein Kinase A-Mediated Inhibition of TOM

Network of Stimulatory and Inhibitory Kinases Acts on TOM Receptors, Channel, and Assembly Factors

Protein Import Activity as Sensor of Mitochondrial Stress and Dysfunction

Figure 4. Mitochondrial Quality Control and Stress Response

(A) Import and quality control of cleavable preproteins. The TIM23 complex cooperates with several machineries: the TOM complex, a supercomplex consisting of the respiratory chain complexes III and IV, and the presequence translocase-associated motor (PAM) with the central chaperone mtHsp70. Several proteases/peptidases involved in processing, quality control, and/or degradation of imported proteins are shown, including mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), intermediate cleaving peptidase (XPNPEP3/Icp55), mitochondrial intermediate peptidase (MIP/Oct1), mitochondrial rhomboid protease (PARL/Pcp1), and LON/Pim1 protease. (B) The transcription factor ATFS-1 contains dual targeting information, a mitochondrial targeting signal at the amino terminus, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). In normal cells, ATFS-1 is efficiently imported into mitochondria and degraded by the Lon protease in the matrix. When under stress conditions the protein import activity of mitochondria is reduced (due to lower Δψ, impaired mtHsp70 activity, or peptides exported by the peptide transporter HAF-1), some ATFS-1 molecules accumulate in the cytosol and can be imported into the nucleus, leading to induction of an unfolded protein response (UPRmt).

Regulation of PINK1/Parkin-Induced Mitophagy by the Activity of the Mitochondrial Protein Import Machinery

Figure 5.  Mitochondrial Dynamics and Disease

(A) In healthy cells, the kinase PINK1 is partially imported into mitochondria in a membrane potential (Δψ)-dependent manner and processed by the inner membrane rhomboid protease PARL, which cleaves within the transmembrane segment and generates a destabilizing N terminus, followed by retro-translocation of cleaved PINK1 into the cytosol and degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (different views have been reported if PINK1 is first processed by MPP or not; Greene et al., 2012, Kato et al., 2013 and Yamano and Youle, 2013). Dissipation of Δψ in damaged mitochondria leads to an accumulation of unprocessed PINK1 at the TOM complex and the recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase Parkin to mitochondria. Mitofusin 2 is phosphorylated by PINK1 and likely functions as receptor for Parkin. Parkin mediates ubiquitination of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins (including mitofusins), leading to a degradation of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy. Mutations of PINK1 or Parkin have been observed in monogenic cases of Parkinson’s disease. (B) The inner membrane fusion protein OPA1/Mgm1 is present in long and short isoforms. A balanced formation of the isoforms is a prerequisite for the proper function of OPA1/Mgm1. The precursor of OP