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Posts Tagged ‘malnutrition’


Food Insecurity in Africa and GMOs

Reporter and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

 

This Report is a presentation from several articles since mid-2013 on the food shortage in Sub-Saharan Africa, where crop yields are among the lowest in the worlds.  In this series we have presented modiable  and epigenetic causes of CVD, among other topics, including diabetes, obesity, and exercise.  We have mentioned that while magnesium, fiber, a sufficient source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (from seafood or seaweed, or from flaxseed), and a functional methyl transporter as well as a source of methionine ( which requires a meat source, as B9 folate is plant sourced and does not fix the problem).  In this discussion we have both a voluntary and an involuntary course of living that leads to CVD and brain dysfunction, depending on where one lives, a “perfect storm”.

Part 1.  Tensions over Food Insecurity in Africa   Oct 8, 2013

Sharon Schmickle

Sub-Saharan Africa’s agricultural yields are among the lowest in the world, and nearly one-third of its people are malnourished. That much, tragically, is well established. Less clear are the reasons Africa’s farm output remains depressed despite hands-on work and billions of dollars invested by individuals, organizations and governments. News reports often explore specific aspects of the problem such as drought. This series takes the novel approach of looking at intertwined tensions underlying the many problems. Through stories told across the continent, Sharon Schmickle focus on several key themes:

  • Africa is caught in an ideological struggle over the nature and scope of agriculture with European—and, sometimes, American—organizations pitted against agribusiness and many agricultural scientists.
  • Institutions have failed African farmers. Public and private agencies often work at cross purposes, neglecting to follow through on crop-saving opportunities. Investments in research and agricultural extension have been inadequate.

Scientists have made impressive gains against the scourges that threaten crops. But they risk losing their breakthroughs against malnutrition, crop-destroying pests and drought if they overlook local tastes and customs.

The series, which also incorporates the work of local journalists, begins with an overview of Tanzania where government officials are divided in the global ideological standoff. Despite a government initiative called Kilimo Kwanza (Farmers First), many farmers lack access to the improved seeds and tissue cultures that could help them thwart yield-stealing diseases and pests. And many farmers are so locked into practices of the past that change comes hard if at all.

This narrative is not twisted to an anti-GMO slant, and could be viewed as a need for GMO harvests without the independence to develop them, and the struggle against a powerful industrial source that takes from an impoverished people.

Sharon Schmickle has been a journalist for MinnPost.com since 2007, and before that she worked for the Minneapolis Star Tribune where she reported from the paper’s Washington bureau…

http://pulitzercenter.org/sites/default/files/styles/responsive_cropped/public/09-16-13/1382/lunch_line_at_engaruka_primary_school_0.jpg

Roiling tensions underlie efforts to improve food security in Africa, often pulling at cross purposes on farmers, consumers and their countries.

Tanzania: Mixed Feelings on Genetically Modified Crops
Tanzania faces the question of whether food from GM crops will sell at markets like this one in Dar es Salaam. Image by Sharon Schmickle. Tanzania, 2013.

Part 2.  Nathanael Johnson lets the anti-GMO movement off the hook

By MICHAEL EISEN | Published: JAN 10, 2014

For the last six months, Nathanael Johnson has been writing about GMOs for the lefty environmental magazine Grist. The goal of his ultimately 26 part series was to try and bring some journalistic sanity to a topic that has gotten nasty in recent years. As Grist editor Scott Rosenberg is quoted on Dan Charles’ blog:
GMOs “were a unique problem for us,” says Rosenberg. On the one hand, most of Grist’s readers and supporters despise GMOs, seeing them as a tool of corporate agribusiness and chemical-dependent farming.

On the other hand, says Rosenberg, he’d been struck by the passion of people who defended this technology, especially scientists. It convinced him that the issue deserved a fresh look.

I’ve enjoyed reading the series. Johnson has investigated a wide range of issues related to GMOs with a generally empirical eye – trying to find data to help answer questions, while avoiding the polemicism that dominates discussions of the topic. Although I don’t think everything he has written is right, the series is a very useful starting point for people trying to wrap the heads around what can be a complex topic. He has clearly tried to delve deeply into every topic, and to not let dogma or propaganda from either side affect his conclusions.

Unfortunately, if the series has had an effect on what I presume is its target audience – the anti-GMO readers of Grist – it hasn’t shown up in online debates about GMOs. When I and others have pointed to Johnson’s series in response to outrageous statements from anti-GMO campaigners, he is dismissed as either a naive fool or just another Monsanto tool.

So I was surprised to read his concluding piece in the series, “What I learned from six months of GMO research: None of it matters“.

The most astonishing thing about the vicious public brawl over GMOs is that the stakes are so low.

His basic point is that a lot of hot air and political energy is spent trying to decide between two alternative futures that aren’t all that different.

In the GMO-free future, farming still looks pretty much the same. Without insect-resistant crops, farmers spray more broad-spectrum insecticides, which do some collateral damage to surrounding food webs. Without herbicide-resistant crops, farmers spray less glyphosate, which slows the spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds and perhaps leads to healthier soil biota. Farmers also till their fields more often, which kills soil biota, and releases a lot more greenhouse gases.

The banning of GMOs hasn’t led to a transformation of agriculture because GM seed was never a linchpin supporting the conventional food system: Farmers could always do fine without it. Eaters no longer worry about the small potential threat of GMO health hazards, but they are subject to new risks: GMOs were neither the first, nor have they been the last, agricultural innovation, and each of these technologies comes with its own potential hazards. Plant scientists will have increased their use of mutagenesis and epigenetic manipulation, perhaps. We no longer have biotech patents, but we still have traditional seed-breeding patents. Life goes on.

In the other alternate future, where the pro-GMO side wins, we see less insecticide, more herbicide, and less tillage. In this world, with regulations lifted, a surge of small business and garage-biotechnologists got to work on creative solutions for the problems of agriculture.

Genetic engineering is just one tool in the tinkerer’s belt. Newer tools are already available, and scientists continue to make breakthroughs with traditional breeding. So in this future, a few more genetically engineered plants and animals get their chance to compete. Some make the world a little better, while others cause unexpected problems. But the science has moved beyond basic genetic engineering, and most of the risks and benefits of progress are coming from other technologies. Life goes on.

In many ways he’s right. GMOs on the market today – and most of the ones planned – are about making agriculture more efficient and profitable for farmers and seed providers. This is not a trivial thing, but would global agriculture collapse without these GMOs? Of course not.

We rarely see transformative technologies coming. And remember that we are still in the very early days of genetic engineering of crops and animals. I suspect that you could go back and look at the early days of almost any new technology and convincingly downplay its transformative potential.

Most new technologies ultimately fail to deliver. But the proper stance to take is to say that we just don’t know. What we do know is that there are many pressing and complex problems facing the future of agriculture. And, given that there is no compelling reason not to allow GM techniques to proceed, why take this tool out of the hands of scientists?

People care about GMOs because they symbolize corporate control of the food system, or unsustainable agriculture, or the basic unhealthiness of our modern diet. On the other side, people care about GMOs because they symbolize the victory of human ingenuity over hunger and suffering, or the triumph of market forces, or the wonder of science.

What is most disturbing about the GMO debate – and why it matters – is that the anti-GMO movement at almost every turn rejects empiricism as a means of understanding the world and making decisions about it. GMO opponents have largely rejected Johnson and his series.

They do not appear to believe that the kind of questions that Johnson asks – “Does insect resistant corn reduce the amount of insecticide used on farms?” – can even be asked. They already know the answer, and are completely unmoved by evidence.

The world faces so many challenges now, and we can only solve them if we believe that the world can be understood by studying it, that we can think up and generate possible solutions to the challenges we face, and that we can make rational decisions about which ones to use or not to use.

– See more at: http://www.michaeleisen.org/blog/?p=1530#sthash.GVFidZev.dpuf

Part 3.  Africa: Context is Crucial to Seeing Challenge of Hunger

October 17, 2013 / Des Moines Register
http://pulitzercenter.org/sites/default/files/styles/slideshow/public/10-16-13/farmerprocessingmilkintobutter640.jpg

Women farmers are processing more of their milk. Image by Sharon Schmickle. Tanzania, 2013.

To understand food security in sub-Saharan Africa, context is crucial. Some 500 million small farms feed 80 percent of the people who live in regions that are perilously close to hunger.
Published Oct 17, 2013  SHARON SCHMICKLE

Iowans who take in this year’s World Food Prize Borlaug Dialogue in Des Moines can gain a wealth of expert perspectives on the important challenge of nourishing a growing world population during the next century.
Learning the full measure of the challenge, though, calls for reaching beyond the lectures and panel discussions — reaching into the local reasons it has been so difficult to achieve global food security.
Context is crucial in a world where some 500 million small farms feed 80 percent of the people who live in regions that are perilously close to hunger.
To visit farms in those regions is to learn why it has been so difficult to stand up to the moral challenge the late Norman Borlaug delivered time and again, insisting that access to adequate food is a basic human right.
It is to meet female farmers like Sharifa Said Nambanga, who struggles to feed five children with the rice she can grow on a small plot in Zanzibar. Women do a hefty share of the farm work around the world. Often, though, they are shut off from the extension services that should deliver improved seeds, fertilizer and the know-how to use agriculture’s modern methods. Feeling abandoned, they limp along as best they can on their own.
It is to meet pastoralists like Parmelo Ndiimu. He is a Maasai elder who watches helplessly while the trees he needs to feed his goats are cut to make charcoal for cooking in urban kitchens. “If we won’t be able to feed our goats, we will not be able to feed our children,” Ndiimu said. “And we will be gone.”
It is to meet Tanzanian farmers who work their small plots throughout a full growing season only to see weevils destroy half their bean harvest. They know firsthand the tension between farmers and the ever evolving pests that attack crops in the field and after harvest.
It is to see corn planted from family seed wither in the field, stalks barren and green leaves giving way to limp yellow strips. Theoretically, the simple remedy should be improved seeds. But nothing is simple in the process of getting those improved seeds to small-scale farmers, especially when the improvement involved genetic modification of the plants.
In his later years, Borlaug addressed context in sub-Saharan Africa, recognizing that along with improved seed, farmers also needed to knock down barriers in their marketing, storage and processing systems. He challenged African leaders to invest more in agriculture.
Within that framework, it is clear that millions of small-scale farmers — especially those in Africa — operate amid tensions that limit their opportunities to extract more food from the technology that has filled porridge bowls and bread baskets elsewhere.

Part 4. Betting on the Impact of Synthetic Biology In Healthcare – By Jenny Rooke

Jenny Rooke drives innovation in the life sciences field through investing and business building around brilliant scientists and engineers with novel technologies. Prior, Jenny held multiple executive roles at U.S. Genomics.

I am an ardent believer in the potential of synthetic biology – its technologies, methods, and talented practitioners – to transform human life on just about every dimension: What we eat, how we make things, the character of our environment and how we move through it, how we are born, and, eventually, how long we live.

My more circumspect investor side is forced to admit that the evidence base of practical (not to mention profitable) applications of synthetic biology remains, shall we say, a work in progress. The first wave of synthetic biology companies that focused on energy/biofuels has been largely disappointing commercially, despite some notable technical successes, due in part to challenges related to scale-up, feedstock economics, and distribution.

It seems reasonable to search for proof cases of synthetic biology’s utility in human health; after all, the vast majority of biotechnology’s impact to date (practically and financially) has been in healthcare, including the creation of entirely novel categories of therapeutics and molecular diagnostics.

To be fair, it’s early yet to expect too many synthetic biology success stories in medicine. Synthetic biology as a field is just over a decade old and if it takes on average a decade for a new drug to move from the lab to the market, well, the math is obvious. In addition, there remain a great deal of technical, clinical, and safety risk inherent to applying synthetic biology technologies to human health problems (consider the painful lessons from the analogous field of gene therapy). This helps explain the reluctance of incumbent healthcare companies and traditional healthcare investors to make big bets on synthetic biology until the technology’s practical utility is more proven.

In 2011 and 2012, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation put out a call for grant applications to “Apply Synthetic Biology to Global Health Challenges” under its Global Health division, which aims to harness advances in science and technology to save lives in developing countries. The foundation’s Grand Challenges Explorations, or GCE, program is an ideal mechanism for fostering applications of synthetic biology.

Synthetic biology will play a critical role in enabling novel, affordable healthcare solutions for developing countries. Image source: GrandChallenges.org

For more information on the Grand Challenges in Global Health program, including a brief description of each project and a discussion of observed themes, see the review article “Synthetic biology as a source of global health innovation” (Syst Synth Biol (2013) 7:67–72).

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Protein Malnutrition

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

A large part of  the world’s population is undernourished by the standards of Western Europe and North America. Scientists and nonscientists alike recognize as one of the major challenges of our time the problem of how to ensure that the production and distribution of food keep pace with the increasing number of mouths to be fed. In the world as a whole the most widespread and serious dietary deficiency is that of protein. This fact emerges clearly from the reports of the expert committees of WHO and FAO (World Health Organization, 1951, 1953). Nevertheless, many protein chemists, even those associated with medical research, may not realize the extent and severity of protein malnutrition, because it occurs chiefly in the technically underdeveloped countries far from where they work.

Dietary histories and response to treatment point to deficiency of total protein as the primary cause of the clinical syndrome kwashiorkor. The level of calorie intake has an important influence on the pattern of the disease. Deficiency of one or more specific amino acids, or amino acid imbalances in the diet, may perhaps be responsible for some of the symptoms and signs, particularly those whose incidence varies from one part of the world to another. All these variations on a theme are covered by the general term protein malnutrition. The onset is often precipitated by the added burden of diarrhea, infection, and parasitic infestation. The nutritional state influences the resistance to infection, and conversely the presence of an infection affects the state of nutrition. A further contributory factor may be the psychological upheaval in the child when the next baby in the family is born. At the root of all these causes lie poverty, ignorance, and disruption of the family life.

The planning of preventive measures cannot be effective unless it is based on some knowledge of the magnitude of the problem to be tackled. At a very rough estimate, in some countries perhaps 10% of the children suffer from severe protein malnutrition at some age between birth and 4 years. The marginal deficiency states must be much more common, Clinical signs and biochemical changes are of little value in diagnosing the early case; a deficit in body weight still seems to be the best criterion. Prevention ideally would be by greater production and consumption of animal protein, and by the increased use of skim milk and of surplus fish at present often wasted. However, animal protein is likely to remain scarce and expensive. Plant sources are being investigated with a view to encouraging not only domestic production, but also the production on an industrial scale of cheap foodstuffs rich in protein. A preventive program that is nutritionally sound may fail if account is not taken of local food habits, traditions, and customs. Protein requirements are affected by the quality of protein, the intake of calories, and by the state of the body (growth, the presence of disease, etc.). The maintenance requirement and the amount required for growth in children can be estimated, but the requirement for health is still unknown. For the time being, the allowances of protein recommended for people in the world as a whole are based empirically on the known physiological requirement with an arbitrarily added wide margin of safety.

The absorption of nitrogen is remarkably efficient even in severely malnourished infants. In general the nitrogen of plant proteins is less well absorbed than that of milk. When a baby receives a diet in which the protein is derived entirely from vegetabIe sources, incomplete absorption of nitrogen may play a significant part in the production of protein malnutrition. The malnourished baby who responds to treatment is able to retain and utilize nitrogen very efficiently; there is no evidence of any impairment in the mechanisms of protein synthesis. It is possible, however, that these mechanisms may be irreversibly damaged in babies who die, and that this may be the cause of death. The level of calorie intake has an important influence on the efficiency of utilization of nitrogen. An adequate calorie intake promotes conservation of nitrogen in the body as a whole when supplies of protein are short, but this protective effect may not be exerted equally in all organs. In this way the level of calorie intake may modify the pattern of protein depletion. A greater than normal calorie intake is needed for the restoration of depleted protein stores.

The discussion of protein metabolism in protein malnutrition has been purposely limited to a narrow field-to studies made on man, and to the few animal experiments that have a direct bearing on those studies. For technical reasons most of the work discussed relates to plasma proteins. There is a conflict of evidence between results obtained in man and animals about the effect of protein depletion or a low protein diet on the rate of catabolism of plasma albumin. It is of great importance to settle this point. A priori there seems no reason why the rate of protein catabolism should be affected by nutritional state. Preliminary studies with radioactive methionine in infants suggest, as working hypotheses, that in protein malnutrition there may be an increase in the reutilization of amino acids liberated by tissue catabolism, and an apparent concentration of protein synthesis in the more essential organs at the expense of the less essential. There is some experimental support for both these ideas, but further work is badly needed. The concept of protein stores or reserve protein is based entirely on dynamic and not on chemical considerations. It is suggested that the essential difference between a “labile” and a “fixed” protein is a difference in turnover rate. An attempt is made to show that the changes produced by protein depletion in the protein content of organs such as liver and muscle are a necessary consequence of the metabolic characteristics of proteins in those organs. There may be no need to invoke the help of homeostatic or compensatory regulations to explain the changes found in protein depletion.

Aging and growth are processes during which some metabolic adjustments must take place. It is believed that it may be better to regard the changes which are found in protein malnutrition in a similar light: as evidence of an alteration in functional pattern, rather than of damage or disease. Protein malnutrition in man has two aspects-a practical and a theoretical one. From the practical point of view it is an extremely common disease with a high mortality, and there is every reason to believe that it will become more common unless urgent preventive measures are taken. Theoretically it raises many questions that are of interest in relation to other branches of medicine and biochemistry. It is believed that the two aspects are linked, and that progress towards prevention is still impeded by our lack of basic knowledge as well as by our failure to apply what is already known. In protein malnutrition there is no sharp line between health and disease. The simple concept of specific deficiency diseases that grew from the discovery of vitamins is not applicable. We have to go back instead to the ideas of an earlier era, when nutrition was regarded as a branch of physiology, concerned with the functions, fate, and metabolic interrelationships of the major nutrients.

It is a characteristic of protein metabolism that nitrogen balance can be maintained at many different levels of protein intake. These different steady states are achieved by adjustments of the amount and distribution of proteins in the body as a whole, in organs, and in cells. It is believed that these changes in amount and distribution of proteins must result in alterations of metabolic pattern, with a gradation of change from an optimum, which cannot be defined, to a state of irreversible breakdown incompatible with life. In the intermediate stages function is modified and efficiency perhaps impaired. It seems possible that variations in diet, and particularly in the amount and quality of the protein, may underlie many of the differences in incidence and symptomatology of disease which are gradually being uncovered in different parts of the world.

Source References:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0065323308603095#

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Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and Linking the Genome to the Metabolome


English: The citric acid cycle, also known as ...

English: The citric acid cycle, also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) or the Krebs cycle. Produced at WikiPathways. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and Linking the Genome to the Metabolome

 

Reporter& Curator:  Larry Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unlocking the diversity of genomic expression within tumorigenesis and “tailoring” of therapeutic options

1. Reshaping the DNA landscape between diseases and within diseases by the linking of DNA to treatments

In the NEW York Times of 9/24,2012 Gina Kolata reports on four types of breast cancer and the reshaping of breast cancer DNA treatment based on the findings of the genetically distinct types, which each have common “cluster” features that are driving many cancers.  The discoveries were published online in the journal Nature on Sunday (9/23).  The study is considered the first comprehensive genetic analysis of breast cancer and called a roadmap to future breast cancer treatments.  I consider that if this is a landmark study in cancer genomics leading to personalized drug management of patients, it is also a fitting of the treatment to measurable “combinatorial feature sets” that tie into population biodiversity with respect to known conditions.   The researchers caution that it will take years to establish transformative treatments, and this is clearly because in the genetic types, there are subsets that have a bearing on treatment “tailoring”.   In addition, there is growing evidence that the Watson-Crick model of the gene is itself being modified by an expansion of the alphabet used to construct the DNA library, which itself will open opportunities to explain some of what has been considered junk DNA, and which may carry essential information with respect to metabolic pathways and pathway regulation.  The breast cancer study is tied to the  “Cancer Genome Atlas” Project, already reported.  It is expected that this work will tie into building maps of genetic changes in common cancers, such as, breast, colon, and lung.  What is not explicit I presume is a closely related concept, that the translational challenge is closely related to the suppression of key proteomic processes tied into manipulating the metabolome.

Saha S. Impact of evolutionary selection on functional regions: The imprint of evolutionary selection on ENCODE regulatory elements is manifested between species and within human populations. 9/12/2012. PharmaceuticalIntelligence.Wordpress.com

Hawrylycz MJ, Lein ES, Guillozet-Bongaarts AL, Shen EH, Ng L, et al. An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the adult human brain transcriptome. Nature  Sept 14-20, 2012

Sarkar A. Prediction of Nucleosome Positioning and Occupancy Using a Statistical Mechanics Model. 9/12/2012. PharmaceuticalIntelligence.WordPress.com

Heijden et al.   Connecting nucleosome positions with free energy landscapes. (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012, Aug 20 [Epub ahead of print]).  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22908247

2. Fiddling with an expanded genetic alphabet – greater flexibility in design of treatment (pharmaneogenesis?)

Diagram of DNA polymerase extending a DNA stra...

Diagram of DNA polymerase extending a DNA strand and proof-reading. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A clear indication of this emerging remodeling of the genetic alphabet is a new
study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute appeared in the
June 3, 2012 issue of Nature Chemical Biology that indicates the genetic code as
we know it may be expanded to include synthetic and unnatural sequence pairing (Study Suggests Expanding the Genetic Alphabet May Be Easier than Previously Thought, Genome). They infer that the genetic instructions for living organisms
that is composed of four bases (C, G, A and T)— is open to unnatural letters. An expanded “DNA alphabet” could carry more information than natural DNA, potentially coding for a much wider range of molecules and enabling a variety of powerful applications. The implications of the application of this would further expand the translation of portions of DNA to new transciptional proteins that are heretofore unknown, but have metabolic relavence and therapeutic potential. The existence of such pairing in nature has been studied in Eukariotes for at least a decade, and may have a role in biodiversity. The investigators show how a previously identified pair of artificial DNA bases can go through the DNA replication process almost as efficiently as the four natural bases.  This could as well be translated into human diversity, and human diseases.

The Romesberg laboratory collaborated on the new study and his lab have been trying to find a way to extend the DNA alphabet since the late 1990s. In 2008, they developed the efficiently replicating bases NaM and 5SICS, which come together as a complementary base pair within the DNA helix, much as, in normal DNA, the base adenine (A) pairs with thymine (T), and cytosine (C) pairs with guanine (G). It had been clear that their chemical structures lack the ability to form the hydrogen bonds that join natural base pairs in DNA. Such bonds had been thought to be an absolute requirement for successful DNA replication, but that is not the case because other bonds can be in play.

The data strongly suggested that NaM and 5SICS do not even approximate the edge-to-edge geometry of natural base pairs—termed the Watson-Crick geometry, after the co-discoverers of the DNA double-helix. Instead, they join in a looser, overlapping, “intercalated” fashion that resembles a ‘mispair.’ In test after test, the NaM-5SICS pair was efficiently replicable even though it appeared that the DNA polymerase didn’t recognize it. Their structural data showed that the NaM-5SICS pair maintain an abnormal, intercalated structure within double-helix DNA—but remarkably adopt the normal, edge-to-edge, “Watson-Crick” positioning when gripped by the polymerase during the crucial moments of DNA replication. NaM and 5SICS, lacking hydrogen bonds, are held together in the DNA double-helix by “hydrophobic” forces, which cause certain molecular structures (like those found in oil) to be repelled by water molecules, and thus to cling together in a watery medium.

The finding suggests that NaM-5SICS and potentially other, hydrophobically bound base pairs could be used to extend the DNA alphabet and that Evolution’s choice of the existing four-letter DNA alphabet—on this planet—may have been developed allowing for life based on other genetic systems.

3.  Studies that consider a DNA triplet model that includes one or more NATURAL nucleosides and looks closely allied to the formation of the disulfide bond and oxidation reduction reaction.

This independent work is being conducted based on a similar concep. John Berger, founder of Triplex DNA has commented on this. He emphasizes Sulfur as the most important element for understanding evolution of metabolic pathways in the human transcriptome. It is a combination of sulfur 34 and sulphur 32 ATMU. S34 is element 16 + flourine, while S32 is element 16 + phosphorous. The cysteine-cystine bond is the bridge and controller between inorganic chemistry (flourine) and organic chemistry (phosphorous). He uses a dual spelling, using  sulfphur to combine the two referring to the master catalyst of oxidation-reduction reactions. Various isotopic alleles (please note the duality principle which is natures most important pattern). Sulfphur is Methionine, S adenosylmethionine, cysteine, cystine, taurine, gluthionine, acetyl Coenzyme A, Biotin, Linoic acid, H2S, H2SO4, HSO3-, cytochromes, thioredoxin, ferredoxins, purple sulfphur anerobic bacteria prokaroytes, hydrocarbons, green sulfphur bacteria, garlic, penicillin and many antibiotics; hundreds of CSN drugs for parasites and fungi antagonists. These are but a few names which come to mind. It is at the heart of the Krebs cycle of oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. ATP. It is also a second pathway to purine metabolism and nucleic acids. It literally is the key enzymes between RNA and DNA, ie, SH thiol bond oxidized to SS (dna) cysteine through thioredoxins, ferredoxins, and nitrogenase. The immune system is founded upon sulfphur compounds and processes. Photosynthesis Fe4S4 to Fe2S3 absorbs the entire electromagnetic spectrum which is filtered by the Allen belt some 75 miles above earth. Look up chromatium vinosum or allochromatium species.  There is reasonable evidence it is the first symbiotic species of sulfphur anerobic bacteria (Fe4S4) with high potential mvolts which drives photosynthesis while making glucose with H2S.
He envisions a sulfphur control map to automate human metabolism with exact timing sequences, at specific three dimensional coordinates on Bravais crystalline lattices. He proposes adding the inosine-xanthosine family to the current 5 nucleotide genetic code. Finally, he adds, the expanded genetic code is populated with “synthetic nucleosides and nucleotides” with all kinds of customized functional side groups, which often reshape nature’s allosteric and physiochemical properties. The inosine family is nature’s natural evolutionary partner with the adenosine and guanosine families in purine synthesis de novo, salvage, and catabolic degradation. Inosine has three major enzymes (IMPDH1,2&3 for purine ring closure, HPGRT for purine salvage, and xanthine oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase.

English: DNA replication or DNA synthesis is t...

English: DNA replication or DNA synthesis is the process of copying a double-stranded DNA molecule. This process is paramount to all life as we know it. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

3. Nutritional regulation of gene expression,  an essential role of sulfur, and metabolic control 

Finally, the research carried out for decades by Yves Ingenbleek and the late Vernon Young warrants mention. According to their work, sulfur is again tagged as essential for health. Sulfur (S) is the seventh most abundant element measurable in human tissues and its provision is mainly insured by the intake of methionine (Met) found in plant and animal proteins. Met is endowed with unique functional properties as it controls the ribosomal initiation of protein syntheses, governs a myriad of major metabolic and catalytic activities and may be subjected to reversible redox processes contributing to safeguard protein integrity.

Consuming diets with inadequate amounts of methionine (Met) are characterized by overt or subclinical protein malnutrition, and it has serious morbid consequences. The result is reduction in size of their lean body mass (LBM), best identified by the serial measurement of plasma transthyretin (TTR), which is seen with unachieved replenishment (chronic malnutrition, strict veganism) or excessive losses (trauma, burns, inflammatory diseases).  This status is accompanied by a rise in homocysteine, and a concomitant fall in methionine.  The ratio of S to N is quite invariant, but dependent on source.  The S:N ratio is typical 1:20 for plant sources and 1:14.5 for animal protein sources.  The key enzyme involved with the control of Met in man is the enzyme cystathionine-b-synthase, which declines with inadequate dietary provision of S, and the loss is not compensated by cobalamine for CH3- transfer.

As a result of the disordered metabolic state from inadequate sulfur intake (the S:N ratio is lower in plants than in animals), the transsulfuration pathway is depressed at cystathionine-β-synthase (CβS) level triggering the upstream sequestration of homocysteine (Hcy) in biological fluids and promoting its conversion to Met. They both stimulate comparable remethylation reactions from homocysteine (Hcy), indicating that Met homeostasis benefits from high metabolic priority. Maintenance of beneficial Met homeostasis is counterpoised by the drop of cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) values downstream to CβS causing reducing molecules implicated in the regulation of the 3 desulfuration pathways

4. The effect on accretion of LBM of protein malnutrition and/or the inflammatory state: in closer focus

Hepatic synthesis is influenced by nutritional and inflammatory circumstances working concomitantly and liver production of  TTR integrates the dietary and stressful components of any disease spectrum. Thus we have a depletion of visceral transport proteins made by the liver and fat-free weight loss secondary to protein catabolism. This is most accurately reflected by TTR, which is a rapid turnover protein, but it is involved in transport and is essential for thyroid function (thyroxine-binding prealbumin) and tied to retinol-binding protein. Furthermore, protein accretion is dependent on a sulfonation reaction with 2 ATP.  Consequently, Kwashiorkor is associated with thyroid goiter, as the pituitary-thyroid axis is a major sulfonation target. With this in mind, it is not surprising why TTR is the sole plasma protein whose evolutionary patterns closely follow the shape outlined by LBM fluctuations. Serial measurement of TTR therefore provides unequaled information on the alterations affecting overall protein nutritional status. Recent advances in TTR physiopathology emphasize the detecting power and preventive role played by the protein in hyper-homocysteinemic states.

Individuals submitted to N-restricted regimens are basically able to maintain N homeostasis until very late in the starvation processes. But the N balance study only provides an overall estimate of N gains and losses but fails to identify the tissue sites and specific interorgan fluxes involved. Using vastly improved methods the LBM has been measured in its components. The LBM of the reference man contains 98% of total body potassium (TBK) and the bulk of total body sulfur (TBS). TBK and TBS reach equal intracellular amounts (140 g each) and share distribution patterns (half in SM and half in the rest of cell mass). The body content of K and S largely exceeds that of magnesium (19 g), iron (4.2 g) and zinc (2.3 g).

TBN and TBK are highly correlated in healthy subjects and both parameters manifest an age-dependent curvilinear decline with an accelerated decrease after 65 years. Sulfur Methylation (SM) undergoes a 15% reduction in size per decade, an involutive process. The trend toward sarcopenia is more marked and rapid in elderly men than in elderly women decreasing strength and functional capacity. The downward SM slope may be somewhat prevented by physical training or accelerated by supranormal cytokine status as reported in apparently healthy aged persons suffering low-grade inflammation or in critically ill patients whose muscle mass undergoes proteolysis.

5.  The results of the events described are:

  • Declining generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from enzymatic sources and in the non-enzymatic reduction of elemental S to H2S.
  • The biogenesis of H2S via non-enzymatic reduction is further inhibited in areas where earth’s crust is depleted in elemental sulfur (S8) and sulfate oxyanions.
  • Elemental S operates as co-factor of several (apo)enzymes critically involved in the control of oxidative processes.

Combination of protein and sulfur dietary deficiencies constitute a novel clinical entity threatening plant-eating population groups. They have a defective production of Cys, GSH and H2S reductants, explaining persistence of an oxidative burden.

6. The clinical entity increases the risk of developing:

  • cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and
  • stroke

in plant-eating populations regardless of Framingham criteria and vitamin-B status.
Met molecules supplied by dietary proteins are submitted to transmethylation processes resulting in the release of Hcy which:

  • either undergoes Hcy — Met RM pathways or
  • is committed to transsulfuration decay.

Impairment of CβS activity, as described in protein malnutrition, entails supranormal accumulation of Hcy in body fluids, stimulation of activity and maintenance of Met homeostasis. The data show that combined protein- and S-deficiencies work in concert to deplete Cys, GSH and H2S from their body reserves, hence impeding these reducing molecules to properly face the oxidative stress imposed by hyperhomocysteinemia.

Although unrecognized up to now, the nutritional disorder is one of the commonest worldwide, reaching top prevalence in populated regions of Southeastern Asia. Increased risk of hyperhomocysteinemia and oxidative stress may also affect individuals suffering from intestinal malabsorption or westernized communities having adopted vegan dietary lifestyles.

Ingenbleek Y. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a biomarker of sulfur-deficiency in human morbidities. Open Clin. Chem. J. 2009 ; 2 : 49-60.

7. The dysfunctional metabolism in transitional cell transformation

A third development is also important and possibly related. The transition a cell goes through in becoming cancerous tends to be driven by changes to the cell’s DNA. But that is not the whole story. Large-scale techniques to the study of metabolic processes going on in cancer cells is being carried out at Oxford, UK in collaboration with Japanese workers. This thread will extend our insight into the metabolome. Otto Warburg, the pioneer in respiration studies, pointed out in the early 1900s that most cancer cells get the energy they need predominantly through a high utilization of glucose with lower respiration (the metabolic process that breaks down glucose to release energy). It helps the cancer cells deal with the low oxygen levels that tend to be present in a tumor. The tissue reverts to a metabolic profile of anaerobiosis.  Studies of the genetic basis of cancer and dysfunctional metabolism in cancer cells are complementary. Tomoyoshi Soga’s large lab in Japan has been at the forefront of developing the technology for metabolomics research over the past couple of decades (metabolomics being the ugly-sounding term used to describe research that studies all metabolic processes at once, like genomics is the study of the entire genome).

Their results have led to the idea that some metabolic compounds, or metabolites, when they accumulate in cells, can cause changes to metabolic processes and set cells off on a path towards cancer. The collaborators have published a perspective article in the journal Frontiers in Molecular and Cellular Oncology that proposes fumarate as such an ‘oncometabolite’. Fumarate is a standard compound involved in cellular metabolism. The researchers summarize that shows how accumulation of fumarate when an enzyme goes wrong affects various biological pathways in the cell. It shifts the balance of metabolic processes and disrupts the cell in ways that could favor development of cancer.  This is of particular interest because “fumarate” is the intermediate in the TCA cycle that is converted to malate.

Animation of the structure of a section of DNA...

Animation of the structure of a section of DNA. The bases lie horizontally between the two spiraling strands. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Keio group is able to label glucose or glutamine, basic biological sources of fuel for cells, and track the pathways cells use to burn up the fuel.  As these studies proceed, they could profile the metabolites in a cohort of tumor samples and matched normal tissue. This would produce a dataset of the concentrations of hundreds of different metabolites in each group. Statistical approaches could suggest which metabolic pathways were abnormal. These would then be the subject of experiments targeting the pathways to confirm the relationship between changed metabolism and uncontrolled growth of the cancer cells.

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The Automated Second Opinion Generator

Larry H. Bernstein, MD

Gil David and Larry Bernstein have developed a first generation software agent under the supervision of Prof. Ronal Coifman, in the Yale University Applied Mathematics Program that is the equivalent of an intelligent EHR Dashboard that learns.  What is a Dashboard?   A Dashboard is a visual display of essential metrics. The primary purpose is to gather information and generate the metrics relatively quickly, and analyze it, meeting the highest standard of accuracy.  This invention is a leap across traditional boundaries of Health Information Technology in that it integrates and digests extractable information sources from the medical record using the laboratory, the extractable vital signs, EKG, for instance, and documented clinical descriptors to form one or more  provisional diagnoses describing the patient status by inference from a nonparametric network algorithm.  This is the first generation of a “convergence” of medicine and information science.  The diagnoses are complete only after review of thousands of records to which diagnoses are first provided, and then training the algorithm, and validating the software by applying to a second set of data, and reviewing the accuracy of the diagnoses.

The only limitation of the algorithm is sparsity of data in some subsets, which doesn’t permit a probability calculation until sufficient data is obtained.  The limitation is not so serious because it does not disable the system from recognizing at least 95 percent of the information used in medical decision-making, and adequately covers the top 15 medical diagnoses.  An example of this exception would be the diagnosis of alpha or beta thalassemia, with a microcytic picture (MCV low) and RBC high with a low Hgb).  The accuracy is very high because the anomaly detection used for classifying the data creates aggregates that have common features.  The aggregates themselves are consistent within separatory  rules that pertain to any class.  As the model grows, however, there is unknown potential for there to be prognostic, as well as diagnostic information within classes (subclasses), and a further potential to uncover therapeutic differences within classes – which will be made coherent with new classes of drugs (personalized medicine) that are emerging from the “convergence” of genomics, metabolomics, and translational biology.

The fact that such algorithms have already been used for limited data sets and unencumbered diagnoses in many cases using the approach of studies with inclusions and exclusions common for clinical trials, the approach has proved ever more costly when used outside the study environment.   The elephant in the room is age-related co-morbidities and co-existence of obesity, lipid derangements, renal function impairment, genetic and environmental factors that are hidden from view.  The approach envisioned is manageable, overcoming these obstacles, and handles both inputs and outputs with considerable ease.

We anticipate that the effect of implementing this artificial intelligence diagnostic amplifier would result in higher physician productivity at a time of great human resource limitation(s), safer prescribing practices, rapid identification of unusual patients, better assignment of patients to observation, inpatient beds, intemsive care, or referral to clinic, shortened length of patients ICU and bed days.  If the observation of systemic issues in “To err is human” is now 10 years old with marginal improvement at great cost, this should be a quantum leap forward for the patient, the physician, the caregiving team, and the society that adopts it.

 

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