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Posts Tagged ‘Artery’


Brain Surgeons Use 3D printing to Practice

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Mechanical thrombectomy is a hopeful new modality of interventional stroke treatment. The countless devices on the market differ with regard to where they apply force on the thrombus, taking a proximal approach such as aspiration devices or a distal approach such as basket-like devices. In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved mechanical thrombectomy – using a wire to pull clots out of the brains of stroke victims. At the end of the wire a trap exists which is like a noose that that captures the clot. Considering that the mechanical thrombectomy is a very risky procedure, interventional radiologists and neurosurgeons need to train extensively before they work on a real person.

Because of the procedure is very risky, a UConn Health radiologist and medical physicist made it easier for surgeons to practice first before the actual procedure. The team made a life size model of the arteries that the wire must pass through using brain scans and a 3D printer. The life size model will allow the surgeon to be more confident when guiding the wire and will give them the basic techniques on how to move the catheter. Holding the life size model of arteries, brings home how small they are even in an adult man. According to Dr. Ketan Bulsara, this life size model will be used a training model to learn mechanical thrombectomy and being able to model the tumor in advance could personalize and advance patient care.

SOURCE

https://www.mdtmag.com/news/2017/09/uconn-healths-new-3-d-printed-model-allows-brain-surgeons-practice

 

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Pros and Cons of Drug Stabilizers for Arterial  Elasticity as an Alternative or Adjunct to Diuretics and Vasodilators in the Management of Hypertension.

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

and

Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

This article presents the 2013 Thought Frontier on Hypertension and Vascular Compliance.

Conceptual development of the subject is presented in the following nine parts:

1.        Physiology of Circulation and Role of Arterial Elasticity

2.      Isolated Systolic Hypertension caused by Arterial Stiffening may be inadequately treated by Diuretics or Vasodilatation Antihypertensive Medications

3.         Physiology of Circulation and Compensatory Mechanism of Arterial Elasticity

4.         Vascular Compliance – The Potential for Novel Therapies

  • Novel Mechanism for Disease Etiology: Modulation of Nuclear and Cytoskeletal Actin Polymerization.
  • Genetic Therapy targeting Vascular Conductivity 
  • Regenerative Medicine for Vasculature Function Protection

5.        In addition to curtailing high pressures, stabilizing BP variability is a potential target for management of hypertension

6.        Mathematical Modeling: Arterial stiffening  explains much of primary hypertension

7.         Classification of Blood Pressure and Hypertensive Treatment Best Practice of Care in the US

8.         Genetic Risk for High Blood Pressure

9.         Is it Hypertension or Physical Inactivity: Cardiovascular Risk and Mortality – New results in 3/2013.

Summary By Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC

1.       Physiology of Circulation and Role of Arterial Elasticity

  • Simplistically, high blood pressure stems from too much volume (salt water) for the vascular space, or conversely, too little space for the volume. Biological signals, such as endothelin, hypoxia, acidosis, nitric oxide, can modify vascular volume by constricting muscles in blood vessel walls. Less simplistically the physics of circulation are governed by numerous factors, with essentials detailed below.
  • The vascular space has two major circuits: pulmonary (lungs) and systemic (body).
  • Compliance (C)  relates change in volume (ΔV) to change in pressure (ΔP) as a measure of the strength of elasticity, where elasticity summarizes the intrinsic forces that  return to original shape after deformation: C = ΔV/ΔP . Those values can be estimated by ultrasound imaging with Doppler blood velocity estimation, by MRI, or invasively. Related properties can also be measured, such as wave propagation time or fractional flow reserve.
  • The vascular system is dynamic, with frequency components and reactive elements. The fundamental frequency is governed by the heart rate delivering a stroke volume forward into the vasculature; a heart rate of 60/minute corresponds to the frequency of 1 Hertz (1 cycle/second). The pressure rise due to the ejection of stroke volume is called the pulse pressure.
  • Numerous factors affect blood flow, including blood composition (affected by anemia or blood dilution), leakiness of vessels, elasticity, wave propagation, streamlines, viscosity, osmotic pressure (affected by protein deficiency and other factors),
  • In a static system, the driving force relates linearly flow by way of resistance (R  in units of dyn·s·cm−5): V=IR (Ohm’s law).
    • Pulmonary:\frac {80 \cdot (mean\ pulmonary\ arterial\ pressure - mean \ pulmonary \ artery \ wedge \ pressure)} {cardiac\ output}
    • Systemic:\frac {80 \cdot (mean\ arterial\ pressure - mean \ right \ atrial \ pressure)} {cardiac\ output}
  • In a dynamic, reactive system, the relation between the driving potential (pressure gradient), and current (blood flow) is governed by a differential equation. However, use of complex numbers and exponentials recovers simplicity similar to Ohm’s law:
    • Variables take the form Ae^{st}, where t is time, s is a complex parameter, and A is a complex scalar. Complex values simply mean two dimensional, e.g., magnitude (as in resistance) plus phase shift (to account for reactive components).
    • Complex version of Ohm’s law: \boldsymbol{V} = \boldsymbol{I} \cdot \boldsymbol{Z} where V and I are the complex scalars in the voltage and current respectively and Z is the complex impedance.
    • Frequency dependent “resistance” is captured by the term impedance.
  • Breathing in increases the return of blood to the heart, adding to pulse variation.
  • Dynamic elastance  (Eadyn relates volume variation (VVS) to pressure variation (PPV): Eadyn=PPV/SVV
    • PPV(%) = 100% × (PPmax − PPmin)/[(PPmax + PPmin)/2)]
      • where PPmax and PPmin are the maximum and minimum pulse pressures determined during a single  respiratory cycle
    • SVV(%) = 100% × [(SVmax − SVmin)/SVmean]
      • where SVmax and SVmin  are the maximum and minimum standard deviation of arterial pressure about the mean arterial pressure during a single respiratory cycle
  • The nervous system provides both stimulants and inhibitors (sympathetic and vagal nerves) to regulate blood vessel wall muscle tone and also heart rate. Many medications, and anesthetic agents in particular, reduce those responses to stimuli, so the vessels dilate, vascular impedance lowers, pressures drop, and autoregulation is impaired.
  • Diuretics aim to decrease volume of circulating fluid, vasodilators aim to increase the vascular space, and elasticity treatments will aim to preserve or improve the ability to accommodate changes in volume of fluid.
    • Vessel dilation near the skin promotes heat loss.
  • Vascular elasticity is impaired by atherosclerosis, menopause, and endothelial dysfunction (impaired nitric oxide signals  response, impaired endothelin response).
  • Elastance in a cyclic pressure system of systole-diastole (contraction-dilation) presents impedance as a pulsatile load on the heart. Inotropy describes the generation of pressure by cardiac contraction, lusiotropy the compliance of the heart to accept filling with minimal back pressure to the lungs. Chronic exposure to elevated vascular impedance leads to impairment of lusiotropy (diastolic failure, stiff heart) and inotropy (systolic failure, weak heart).

2.      Isolated Systolic Hypertension caused by Arterial Stiffening may be inadequately treated by Diuretics or Vasodilatation Antihypertensive Medications

3. Physiology of Circulation and Compensatory Mechanism of Arterial Elasticity

Antihypertensive agents have focused on the following approaches:

  1. The most common prescriptions, a mild diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), is known to improve blood vessel compliance by reducing cell turgor, which explains why its full onset of benefit as well as its slow offset when stopped can take more than one month.
  2. Chlorthalidone  – Some evidence suggests that chlorthalidone may be superior to hydrochlorothiazide for the treatment of hypertension. However, a recent study concluded: chlorthalidone in older adults was not associated with fewer adverse cardiovascular events or deaths than hydrochlorothiazide. However, it was associated with a greater incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, particularly hypokalemia.
  • Increased vascular space (vasodilation)

    • Alternatively, the pressure can be lowered by increasing the vascular space for a given vascular volume. Examples of mediators for arterial tone (degree of dilation) include nitric oxide, prostacyclin and endothelin.

 

Class

Description

Hyperpolarization mediated (Calcium channel blocker) Changes in the resting membrane potential of thecell affects the level of intracellular calciumthrough modulation of voltage sensitive calcium channelsin the plasma membrane.
cAMP mediated Adrenergic stimulation results in elevated levelsof cAMP and protein kinase A, which results inincreasing calcium removal from the cytoplasm.
cGMP mediated (Nitrovasodilator) Through stimulation of protein kinase G.Until 2002, the enzyme for this conversion wasdiscovered to be mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102 (34): 12159–12164. doi:10.1073/pnas.0503723102http://www.pnas.org/content/102/34/12159.long

Class

Example

Hyperpolarization mediated (Calcium channel blocker) adenosineamlodipine (Norvasc),diltiazem (Cardizem,Dilacor XR) andnifedipine (Adalat, Procardia).
cAMP mediated prostacyclin
cGMP mediated (Nitrovasodilator) nitric oxide
  • Reduced pulsatile force (beta blockers)

These work by blocking certain nerve and hormonal signals to the heart and blood vessels, thus lowering blood pressure. Frequently prescribed beta blockers include

  • metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
  • carvedilol (Coreg)
  • nadolol (Corgard)
  • penbutolol (Levatol).
  • Metabolized nebivolol increases vascular NO production, involves endothelial ß2-adrenergic receptor ligation, with a subsequent rise in endothelial free [Ca2+]i and endothelial NO synthase–dependent NO production
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors

These allow blood vessels to widen by preventing the hormone angiotensin from affecting blood vessels. Frequently prescribed ACE inhibitors include captopril (Capoten), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) and ramipril (Altace).

  • Angiotensin II receptor blockers

These help blood vessels relax by blocking the action of angiotensin. Frequently prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers include losartan (Cozaar), olmesartan (Benicar) and valsartan (Diovan).
Another very commonly prescribed drug class of medication counteracts hardening of arteries.

Atheroma lipids have enzyme systems that explicitly disassemble cholesterol esters and reconstruct them inside blood vessel walls,e.g.,  Anacetrapib, Genetic variants that improve cholesterol levels are stimulating development of additional medications.

We can propose that atheroma build up in arterial blood vessel walls constitutes a maladaptive defense against aneurysm and risk of vessel rupture from hypertension.

Arguably, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors,  statin therapy is a second example of a medication that helps protect vascular elasticity, both by its lipid effects and its anti-inflammatory effects.

The best-selling statin is atorvastatin, marketed as Lipitor (manufactured by Pfizer) and Torvast. By 2003, atorvastatin became the best-selling pharmaceutical in history,[4] with Pfizer reporting sales of US$12.4 billion in 2008.[5] As of 2010, a number of statinsare on the market: atorvastatin (Lipitor and Torvast), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor, Altocor, Altoprev), pitavastatin(Livalo, Pitava), pravastatin (Pravachol, Selektine, Lipostat), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor, Lipex).[6] Several combination preparations of a statin and another agent, such as ezetimibe/simvastatin, are also available.

References for Statins from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statin

Clinical Considerations of Statin Therapy’s manifold effects, in

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/08/statins-nonlipid-effects-on-vascular-endothelium-through-enos-activation/

Compensatory Effects in the Physiology of Circulation

Before declaring vessel elasticity a new and highly desirable treatment target, consider that it is not firmly established that hardening of arteries (loss of elasticity) is entirely maladaptive.

In parallel with any focus on increasing vascular elasticity or compliance, each of the issues discussed, below merits scrutiny and investigation.

Cardiac Circulation Dynamics

Endothelium morphology, rheological properties of intra vasculature fluid dynamics and blood viscosity provided explanation for shear stress of vessels under arterial pressure

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/28/special-considerations-in-blood-lipoproteins-viscosity-assessment-and-treatment/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/28/what-is-the-role-of-plasma-viscosity-in-hemostasis-and-vascular-disease-risk/

Aging and Vasculature Diminished Elasticity

While among other reasons for Hypertension increasing prevalence with aging, arterial stiffening is one.

Yet, stiffer vessels are more efficient at transmitting pressure to distal targets. With aging, muscle mass diminishes markedly and the contribution to circulation from skeletal muscle tissue compressions combined with competent venous valves fades.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/27/endothelial-dysfunction-diminished-availability-of-cepcs-increasing-cvd-risk-for-macrovascular-disease-therapeutic-potential-of-cepcs/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/19/clinical-trials-results-for-endothelin-system-pathophysiological-role-in-chronic-heart-failure-acute-coronary-syndromes-and-mi-marker-of-disease-severity-or-genetic-determination/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/13/peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-ppar-gamma-receptors-activation-pparγ-transrepression-for-angiogenesis-in-cardiovascular-disease-and-pparγ-transactivation-for-treatment-of-dia/

Aging and Myocardial Diminished Contractility and Ejection Fraction

With aging heart contractility diminishes. These issues can cause under perfusion of tissues, inadequate nutrient blood delivery (ischemia), lactic acidosis, tissue dysfunction and multi-organ failure. Hardened arteries may compensate. Thus, pharmacotherapy to increase Arterial Elasticity may be counterindicated for patients with mild to progressive CHF.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/05/bioengineering-of-vascular-and-tissue-models/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/20/nitric-oxide-and-sepsis-hemodynamic-collapse-and-the-search-for-therapeutic-options/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/17/chronic-heart-failure-personalized-medicine-two-gene-test-predicts-response-to-beta-blocker-bucindolol/
Our biosystems are highly interdependent, and we cannot leap to conclusions without careful thorough evidence. Increasing arterial elastance will lower vascular impedance and change the frequency components of our pulsatile perfusion system.

MOST comprehensive review of the Human Cardiac Conduction System presented to date:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/28/genetics-of-conduction-disease-atrioventricular-av-conduction-disease-block-gene-mutations-transcription-excitability-and-energy-homeostasis/

Diminished contractility will increase the amount of energy needed to maintain circulation. It will change efficiency dramatically – consider the difference between periodically pushing someone sitting on a swing at the resonance frequency if the pendulum versus significantly off resonance.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/14/mitochondrial-metabolism-and-cardiac-function/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/28/mitochondrial-damage-and-repair-under-oxidative-stress/

Increased Arterial Elasticity – Potential Risk to Myocardium

The hypothesis that we should focus on cellular therapies to increase vascular compliance may decrease the circulation efficiency and result in worsening of cardiac right ventricular morphology and development of Dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (muscle thickening and diastolic failure), an undesirable outcome resulting from an attempt to treat the hypertension.

4. Vascular Compliance – The Potential of Noval Therapies

  • Novel Mechanism for Disease Etiology for the Cardiac Phenotype: Modulation of Nuclear and Cytoskeletal Actin Polymerization.

Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1–SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics

Chin Yee Ho,

Diana E. Jaalouk,

Maria K. Vartiainen

Jan Lammerding

Nature (2013) doi:10.1038/nature12105

Published online 05 May 2013

Affiliations

Cornell University, Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology/Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA

Chin Yee Ho &

Jan Lammerding

Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Boston 02115, Massachusetts, USA

Chin Yee Ho,

Diana E. Jaalouk &

Jan Lammerding

Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Maria K. Vartiainen

Present address: American University of Beirut, Department of Biology, Beirut 1107 2020, Lebanon.

Diana E. Jaalouk

Contributions

C.Y.H., D.E.J. and J.L. conceived and designed the overall project, with valuable help from M.K.V. C.Y.H. and D.E.J. performed the experiments. C.Y.H., D.E.J. and J.L. analysed data. C.Y.H. and J.L. wrote the paper.

Corresponding author Jan Lammerding

Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison–Gilford progeria syndrome1. Most LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and altered interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes1. Here we report in mice that lamin-A/C-deficient (Lmna/) and LmnaN195K/N195K mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signalling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function2. Altered nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna/ and LmnaN195K/N195K mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmnamutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease aetiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamin A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization.

 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature12105.html

  • Genetic Therapy to Conductivity Disease

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/01/ngs-cardiovascular-diagnostics-long-qt-genes-sequenced-a-potential-replacement-for-molecular-pathology/

  • Regenerative Medicine for Vasculature Function Protection

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/29/positioning-a-therapeutic-concept-for-endogenous-augmentation-of-cepcs-therapeutic-indications-for-macrovascular-disease-coronary-cerebrovascular-and-peripheral/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/28/cardiovascular-outcomes-function-of-circulating-endothelial-progenitor-cells-cepcs-exploring-pharmaco-therapy-targeted-at-endogenous-augmentation-of-cepcs/

and

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/28/the-heart-vasculature-protection-a-concept-based-pharmacological-therapy-including-thymosin/

5. Stabilizing BP Variability is the next Big Target in Hypertension Management

Hypertension caused by Arterial Stiffening is Ineffectively Treated by Diuretics and Vasodilatation Antihypertensives

Barcelona, Spain – An aging population grappling with rising rates of hypertension and other cardiometabolic risk factors should prompt an overhaul of how hypertension is diagnosed and monitored and should spur development of drugs with entirely new mechanisms of action, one expert says. Speaking here at the 2013 International Conference on Prehypertension and Cardiometabolic Syndrome, meeting cochair Dr Reuven Zimlichman (Tel Aviv University, Israel) argued that the definitions of hypertension, as well as the risk-factor tables used to guide treatment, are no longer appropriate for a growing number of patients.

Most antihypertensives today work by producing vasodilation or decreasing blood volume and so are ineffective treatments in ISH patients. In the future, he predicts, “we will have to start looking for a totally different medication that will aim to improve or at least to stabilize arterial elasticity: medication that might affect factors that determine the stiffness of the arteries, like collagen, like fibroblasts. Those are not the aim of any group of antihypertensive medications today.”

Zimlichman believes existing databases could be used to develop algorithms that take this progression of disease into account, in order to better guide hypertension management. He also points out that new ambulatory blood-pressure-monitoring devices also measure arterial elasticity. “Unquestionably, these will improve our ability to diagnose both the status of the arteries and the changes of the arteries with time as a result of our treatment. So if we treat the patient and we see no improvement in arterial elasticity, or the patient is worse, something is wrong, something is not working—either the patient is not taking the medication, or our choice of medication is not appropriate, or the dose is insufficient, etc.”

http://www.theheart.org/article/1502067.do

Oslo, Norway – New research that is only just starting to be digested by the hypertension community indicates that visit-to-visit variability in blood-pressure readings will likely become another way of looking for “at-risk” hypertensive patients and in fact is likely to be more reliable as an indicator of cardiovascular risk than the currently used mean BP.

The Goal of Stabilizing BP variability 

June 29, 2010  

Discussing the importance of this issue for guidelines and clinical practice, Dr Tony Heagerty (University of Manchester, UK) told the recent European Society of Hypertension (ESH) European Meeting on Hypertension 2010: “We are poking around in the dark, offering treatment blankly across a large community, and probably treating a lot of people who don’t need to be treated, while not necessarily treating the highest-risk patients. We should stop being reassured by ‘occasional’ normal BPs. The whole game now is, can we improve the identification of our ‘at-risk’ individuals?”

Heagerty was speaking at a special plenary session on late-breaking research discussing BP variability as a risk factor. This issue has emerged following new analyses reported at the ACC meeting and published in a number of papers in the Lancet and Lancet Neurology earlier this year, which showed that variability in blood pressure is a much stronger determinant of both stroke and coronary disease outcome than average blood pressure.

http://www.theheart.org/article/1093553.do

Three years later, 2/1/2013, Zimlichman also argued that definitions of essential and secondary hypertension have changed very little over the past few decades and have typically only been tweaked up or down related to other CV risk factors. Diastolic hypertension has been the primary goal of treatment, and treatment goals have not adequately taken patient age into account (in whom arterial stiffening plays a larger role), and they have typically relied too heavily on threshold cutoffs, rather than the “linear progression” of risk factors and their impact on organ damage.

6. Mathematical Modeling: Arterial stiffening provides sufficient explanation for primary hypertension

Klas H. PettersenScott M. BugenhagenJavaid NaumanDaniel A. BeardStig W. Omholt

(Submitted on 3 May 2013 (v1), last revised 6 May 2013 (this version, v2))

Hypertension is one of the most common age-related chronic diseases and by predisposing individuals for heart failure, stroke and kidney disease, it is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Its etiology remains enigmatic despite intense research efforts over many decades. By use of empirically well-constrained computer models describing the coupled function of the baroreceptor reflex and mechanics of the circulatory system, we demonstrate quantitatively that arterial stiffening seems sufficient to explain age-related emergence of hypertension. Specifically, the empirically observed chronic changes in pulse pressure with age, and the impaired capacity of hypertensive individuals to regulate short-term changes in blood pressure, arise as emergent properties of the integrated system. Results are consistent with available experimental data from chemical and surgical manipulation of the cardio-vascular system. In contrast to widely held opinions, the results suggest that primary hypertension can be attributed to a mechanogenic etiology without challenging current conceptions of renal and sympathetic nervous system function. The results support the view that a major target for treating chronic hypertension in the elderly is the reestablishment of a proper baroreflex response.

Klas H. Pettersen1, Scott M. Bugenhagen2, Javaid Nauman3, Daniel A. Beard2 & Stig W. Omholt3

1Department of Mathematical and Technological Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Science, Norway

2Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA

3NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Cardiac Exercise Research Group, Trondheim, Norway

Correspondence should be addressed to: KHP (klas.pettersen@gmail.com)

Keywords: hypertension, mechanogenic, baroreceptor signaling, cardiovascular model, arterial stiffening

Author contributions: K.H.P. and S.W.O. designed the study. K.H.P. constructed the

integrated model and performed the numerical experiments with contributions from

D.A.B. and S.M.B.. J.N. extracted and compiled empirical test data from the HUNT2

Survey. S.W.O, K.H.P. and D.A.B. wrote the paper.

http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.0727v2

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1305.0727v2.pdf

 

7. Classification of Blood Pressure and Hypertensive Treatment:

Best Practice of Care in the US

8. Genetic Risk for High Blood Pressure

Hypertension.2013; 61: 931doi: 10.1161/​HYP.0b013e31829399b2

Blood Pressure Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Coronary Artery Sisease (page 995)

Blood pressure (BP) is considered a major cardiovascular risk factor that is influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. However, the precise genetic underpinning influencing interindividual BP variation is not well characterized; and it is unclear whether BP-associated genetic variants also predispose to clinically apparent cardiovascular disease. Such an association of BP-related variants with cardiovascular disease would strengthen the concept of BP as a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In this issue of Hypertension, analyses within the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis consortium indicate that common genetic variants associated with BP in the population, indeed, contribute to the susceptibility for coronary artery disease (CAD). Lieb et al tested 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms—that based on prior studies were known to affect BP—for their association with CAD. In total, data from 22 233 CAD cases and 64 762 controls were analyzed. The vast majority (88%) of BP-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms were also shown to increase the risk of CAD (as defined by an odds ratio for CAD >1; Figure). On average, each of the multiple BP-raising alleles was associated with a 3% (95% confidence interval, 1.8%–4.3%) risk increase for CAD.

Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus (page 964)

The first important finding in the IDACO study of masked hypertension (MH) in the population with diabetes mellitus and non–diabetes mellitus was that antihypertensive treatment converted some sustained hypertensives into sustained normotensives; this resulted in an increased cardiovascular disease risk in the treated versus untreated normotensive comparator group (Figure). Not surprisingly, normalization of blood pressure (BP) with treatment did not eliminate the lifetime cardiovascular disease burden associated with prior elevated BP nor did it correct other cardiometabolic risk factors that clustered with the hypertensive state.

The second important IDACO finding was that treatment increased the prevalence of MH by decreasing conventional BP versus daytime ambulatory BP (ABP) by a ratio of ≈3 to 2. The clinical implication of increased prevalence of MH with therapy in the population of both diabetes mellitus and non–diabetes mellitus was that these subjects did not receive sufficient antihypertensive therapy to convert MH into normalized ABP (ie, treated, normalized ABP being the gold standard for minimizing cardiovascular disease risk). Indeed, there is a transformation-continuum from sustained hypertension to MH and finally to sustained normotension with increasing antihypertensive therapy. These IDACO findings strongly suggest that many physicians mistakenly have their primary focus on normalizing in-office rather than out-of-office home BP and/or 24-hour ABP values and this results in an increased prevalence of MH. However, what constitutes optimal normalized ABP will remain empirical until established in randomized controlled trials.

Genetic Risk Score for Blood Pressure (page 987)

Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a strong, independent, and modifiable risk factor for stroke and heart disease. BP is a heritable trait, and genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic loci that are associated with systolic BP, diastolic BP, or both. Although the variants have modest effects on BP, typically 0.5 to 1.0 mm Hg, their presence may act over the entire life course and, therefore, lead to substantial increase in risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the independent impact of these variants on CVD risk has not been established in a prospective setting. Havulinna et al genotyped 32 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in several Finnish cohorts, with up to 32 669 individuals after exclusion of prevalent CVD cases. The median follow-up was 9.8 years, during which 2295 incident CVD events occurred. Genetic risk scores were created for systolic BP and diastolic BP by multiplying the risk allele count of each single-nucleotide polymorphism by the effect size estimated in published genome-wide association studies on BP traits. The GRSs were strongly associated with baseline systolic BP, diastolic BP, and hypertension (all P<10–62). Hazard ratios for incident CVD increased roughly linearly by quintile of systolic BP or diastolic BP GRS (Figure). GRSs remained significant predictors of CVD risk after adjustment for traditional risk factors, even including BP and use of antihypertensive medication. These findings are consistent with a lifelong effect of these variants on BP and CVD risk.

Related Articles on Genetics and Blood Pressure

Genetic Predisposition to Higher Blood Pressure Increases Coronary Artery Disease Risk

  • Wolfgang Lieb,
  • Henning Jansen,
  • Christina Loley,
  • Michael J. Pencina,
  • Christopher P. Nelson,
  • Christopher Newton-Cheh,
  • Sekar Kathiresan,
  • Muredach P. Reilly,
  • Themistocles L. Assimes,
  • Eric Boerwinkle,
  • Alistair S. Hall,
  • Christian Hengstenberg,
  • Reijo Laaksonen,
  • Ruth McPherson,
  • Unnur Thorsteinsdottir,
  • Andreas Ziegler,
  • Annette Peters,
  • John R. Thompson,
  • Inke R. König,
  • Jeanette Erdmann,
  • Nilesh J. Samani,
  • Ramachandran S. Vasan,
  • andHeribert Schunkert
  • , on behalf of CARDIoGRAM

Hypertension. 2013;61:995-1001, published online before print March 11 2013,doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00275

Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus: Treatment Implications for Clinical Practice

  • Stanley S. Franklin,
  • Lutgarde Thijs,
  • Yan Li,
  • Tine W. Hansen,
  • José Boggia,
  • Yanping Liu,
  • Kei Asayama,
  • Kristina Björklund-Bodegård,
  • Takayoshi Ohkubo,
  • Jørgen Jeppesen,
  • Christian Torp-Pedersen,
  • Eamon Dolan,
  • Tatiana Kuznetsova,
  • Katarzyna Stolarz-Skrzypek,
  • Valérie Tikhonoff,
  • Sofia Malyutina,
  • Edoardo Casiglia,
  • Yuri Nikitin,
  • Lars Lind,
  • Edgardo Sandoya,
  • Kalina Kawecka-Jaszcz,
  • Jan Filipovský,
  • Yutaka Imai,
  • Jiguang Wang,
  • Hans Ibsen,
  • Eoin O’Brien,
  • and Jan A. Staessen
  • , on behalf of the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes (IDACO) Investigators

Hypertension. 2013;61:964-971, published online before print March 11 2013,doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00289

A Blood Pressure Genetic Risk Score Is a Significant Predictor of Incident Cardiovascular Events in 32 669 Individuals

  • Aki S. Havulinna,
  • Johannes Kettunen,
  • Olavi Ukkola,
  • Clive Osmond,
  • Johan G. Eriksson,
  • Y. Antero Kesäniemi,
  • Antti Jula,
  • Leena Peltonen,
  • Kimmo Kontula,
  • Veikko Salomaa,
  • and Christopher Newton-Cheh

Hypertension. 2013;61:987-994, published online before print March 18 2013,doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00649

9. Is it Hypertension or Physical Inactivity: Cardiovascular Risk and Mortality – New results in 3/2013.

Heart doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2012-303461

  • Epidemiology
  • Original article

Estimating the effect of long-term physical activity on cardiovascular disease and mortality: evidence from the Framingham Heart Study

  1. Susan M Shortreed1,2,
  2. Anna Peeters1,3,
  3. Andrew B Forbes1

+Author Affiliations


  1. 1Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

  2. 2Biostatistics Unit, Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA

  3. 3Obesity and Population Health Unit, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence toDr Susan M Shortreed, Biostatistics Unit, Group Health Research Institute, 1730 Minor Avenue, Suite 1600, Seattle, WA 98101, USA; shortreed.s@ghc.org

  • Published Online First 8 March 2013

Abstract

Objective In the majority of studies, the effect of physical activity (PA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality is estimated at a single time point. The impact of long-term PA is likely to differ. Our study objective was to estimate the effect of long-term adult-life PA compared with long-term inactivity on the risk of incident CVD, all-cause mortality and CVD-attributable mortality.

Design Observational cohort study.

Setting Framingham, MA, USA.

Patients 4729 Framingham Heart Study participants who were alive and CVD-free in 1956.

Exposures PA was measured at three visits over 30 years along with a variety of risk factors for CVD. Cumulative PA was defined as long-term active versus long-term inactive.

Main outcome measures Incident CVD, all-cause mortality and CVD-attributable mortality.

Results During 40 years of follow-up there were 2594 cases of incident CVD, 1313 CVD-attributable deaths and 3521 deaths. Compared with long-term physical inactivity, the rate ratio of long-term PA was 0.95 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.07) for CVD, 0.81 (0.71 to 0.93) for all-cause mortality and 0.83 (0.72 to 0.97) for CVD-attributable mortality. Assessment of effect modification by sex suggests greater protective effect of long-term PA on CVD incidence (p value for interaction=0.004) in men (0.79 (0.66 to 0.93)) than in women (1.15 (0.97 to 1.37)).

Conclusions

  • Cumulative long-term PA has a protective effect on incidence of all-cause and CVD-attributable mortality compared with long-term physical inactivity.
  • In men, but not women, long-term PA also appears to have a protective effect on incidence of CVD.

Summary – PENDING

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Vascular Repair: Stents and Biologically Active Implants

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP
and
Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

This is the second article of a three part series recognizing the immense contribution of Elazer Edelman, MD, PhD, and his laboratory group at MIT to vascular biology, cardiovascular disease studies, and the bioengineering, development, and use of stenting technology for drug delivery, vascular repair, and limitation of vessel damage caused by stent placement.

The first article, published on this Open Access Online Scientific Journal
was concerned with vascular biology, and largely on both the impact of drug delivery design and placement on the endothelium of the vessel wall, and on the kinetics of drug delivery based on the location of stent placement versus intravascular injection as well as the metabolic events taking place in the arterial endothelium, intima, and muscularis.
This second article, is concerned with stents and drug delivery as it has evolved since the last decade of the 20th century based on biomaterials development and vascular biology principles to minimize inherent injury risk over this period.
The third. will be concerned with the lessons from biomaterials and stent mechanics going forward.
Heart care is in the midst of a transformation. Patients who once required heart surgery are treated with a stent, catheters for repair of valves, rhythm abnormalities, and a growing number of heart or vascular distrbances.
The catheters are threaded in through the femoral artery, and sometimes through the radial artery. The American College of Cardiology annual meeting highlights research on these devices.  The procedure allows patients to leave the hospital after a day or two post-implant, but the initial cost of the novel devices is high.  Not everyone qualifies for the treatment, and it will take a few years to compare the long term results with the benefits from surgery. But these procedures have allowed many patients treatment alternatives to surgery, and they offer an option for people who cannot be successfully managed by conservative medical therapy.

The effects of stent placement on vascular injury and the initiation of an inflammatory response

Leukocytes are recruited early and abundantly to experimentally injured vessels,

  • in direct proportion to cell proliferation and intimal growth.
Activated circulating leukocytes and Mac-1 (CD11 by CD18, aMb2) (monocytic) expression are
  • markers of restenosis risk in patients undergoing angioplasty.
Angioplastied vessels lack endothelium but have extensive fibrin(ogen) and platelet deposition.  Consequently, Mac-1-dependent adhesion to fibrin(ogen)  would be expected to
  • signal leukocyte recruitment and function, thereby
  • promote intimal growth
In this study
  • M1/70, an anti-CD11b blocking mAb, was  administered to rabbits before, and every 48 hr for 3, 6, or 14 days after iliac artery balloon denudation.
  • M1/70 was bound to isolated rabbit monocytes.

The result was

  • Mac-1-mediated dose-dependent
  • inhibition of fibrinogen binding in vitro, thereby,
  • reducing by half leukocyte recruitment at 3, 6, and 14 days after injury.
Neointimal growth 14 days after injury was markedly attenuated by treatment with M1/70 –
intimal area after balloon injury, 0.12+0.09 mm2, compared with
  •  0.32+0.08 mm2 in vehicle treated controls, P<0.01, and
  •  0.38+0.08mm2 in IgG-treated controls, P<0.005;
intimal area after stent injury, 0.56+0.16 mm2, compared with
  •  0.84+ 0.13 mm2 in vehicle-treated controls, P <0.05, and
  •  0.90+0.15 mm2 in IgG-treated controls, P <0.02).
Mac-1 blockade reduces experimental neointimal thickening. These findings suggest that
  • leukocyte recruitment to and
  • infiltration of injured arteries

may be a valid target for preventing intimal hyperplasia. (1) Emerging data indicate that the inflammatory response after mechanical arterial injury

  • correlates with the severity of neointimal hyperplasia in animal models
  • and post angioplasty restenosis in humans.
The present study was designed to examine whether a nonspecific
  • stimulation of the innate immune system,
  • induced in close temporal proximity to the vascular injury,
  • would modulate the results of the procedure.
A LPS dose was chosen to be sufficient to induce systemic inflammation but not septic shock. Key markers of inflammation increased after LPS administration were:
  • serum interleukin-1 levels, and
  • monocytic stimulation (CD14 levels on monocytes)
Arterial macrophage infiltration at 7 days after injury was
  • 1.7+1.2% of total cells in controls and
  • 4.2+1.8% in LPS-treated rabbits (n=4, P<0.05).
The injured arteries 4 weeks after injury had significantly increased
  • luminal stenosis:   38+4.2% versus 23+2.6%, mean+SEM; n=8, P<0.05; and
  • neointima-to-media ratio:  1.26+0.21 versus 0.66+0.09, P<0.05 in LPS-treated animals compared with controls.
This effect was abolished by anti-CD14 Ab administration. Serum Il-1 levels and monocyte CD14 expression were significantly increased
  • in correlation with the severity of intimal hyperplasia.
  • LPS treatment increased neointimal area after stenting
    • from 0.57+0.07 to 0.77+0.1 mm2, and
  • stenosis from 9+1% to 13+1.7% (n=5, P<0.05).
Nonspecific systemic stimulation of the innate immune system
  • concurrently with arterial vascular injury
  • facilitates neointimal formation, and conditions associated with
  • increased inflammation may increase restenosis.(2)
Millions of patients worldwide have received drug-eluting stents
  • to reduce their risk for in-stent restenosis.
The efficacy and toxicity of these local therapeutics depend upon
  • arterial drug deposition,
  • distribution, and
  • retention.
To examine how administered dose and drug release kinetics control arterial drug uptake, a model was created using principles of
  • computational fluid dynamics and
  • transient drug diffusion–convection.
The modeling predictions for drug elution were validated using
  • empiric data from stented porcine coronary arteries.
Inefficient, minimal arterial drug deposition was predicted when a bolus of drug was released and depleted within seconds.
Month-long stent-based drug release
  • efficiently delivered nearly continuous drug levels, but
  • the slow rate of drug presentation limited arterial drug uptake.
Uptake was only maximized when
  • the rates of drug release and absorption matched,
  • which occurred for hour-long drug release.
Of the two possible means for increasing the amount of drug on the stent,
  • modulation of drug concentration potently impacts
  • the magnitude of arterial drug deposition,
  • while changes in coating drug mass affect duration of release.
We demonstrate the importance of drug release kinetics and administered drug dose
  • in governing arterial drug uptake and suggest
  • novel drug delivery strategies for controlling spatio-temporal arterial drug distribution.(3)
Arterial drug concentrations determine local toxicity. Therefore, the emergent safety concerns surrounding drug-eluting stents mandate an investigation of the factors contributing to fluctuations in arterial drug uptake.
  • Drug-eluting stents were implanted into porcine coronary arteries, arterial drug uptake was followed and modeled using 2-dimensional computational drug transport.
Arterial drug uptake in vivo occurred faster than predicted by free drug diffusion, thus
  • an alternate, mechanism for rapid transport has been proposed involving carrier-mediated transport.
Though there was minimal variation in vivo in release kinetics from stent to stent,
  • arterial drug deposition varied by up to 114% two weeks after stent implantation.
  • extent of adherent mural thrombus fluctuated by 113% within 3 days.
The computational drug transport model predicted that focal and diffuse thrombi
  • elevate arterial drug deposition in proportion to the thrombus size
  • by reducing drug washout subsequently increasing local drug availability.
Variable peristrut thrombus can explain fluctuations in arterial drug uptake even in the face of a narrow range of drug release from the stent. The mural thrombus effects on arterial drug deposition may be circumvented by forcing slow rate limiting arterial transport, that cannot be further hindered by mural thrombus. (4)
1.  A mAb to the b2-leukocyte integrin Mac-1 (CD11byCD18) Reduces Intimal Thickening after Angioplasty or Stent Implantation in Rabbits. C Rogers, ER Edelman, and DI Simon. PNAS Aug 1998; 95: 10134–10139.
2.  Formation After Balloon and Stent Injury in Rabbits Systemic Inflammation Induced by Lipopolysaccharide increases Neointimal Formation After Balloon and Stent Injury in Rabbits. HD Danenberg, FGP Welt, M Walker, III, P Seifert, et al. Circulation 2002;105;2917-2922; http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.0000018168.15904.BB
3.  Intravascular drug release kinetics dictate arterial drug deposition, retention, and distribution.
B Balakrishnan, JF Dooley, G Kopia, ER Edelman. J Controlled Release  2007;123:100–108.
http://dx. doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2007.06.025.
4.  Thrombus causes fluctuations in arterial drug delivery from intravascular stents. B Balakrishnan, J Dooley, G Kopia, ER Edelman. J Control Release 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2008.07.027

Perivascular Graft Repair

Heparin remains the gold-standard inhibitor of the processes involved in the vascular response to injury. Though this compound has profound and wide-reaching effects on vascular cells, its clinical utility is unclear. It is clear that the mode of heparin delivery is critical to its potential and it may well be that
  • routine forms of administration are insufficient
  • to observe benefit given the heparin’s short half-life and complex pharmacokinetics.
When ingested orally, heparin is degraded to inactive oligomer fragments while systemic administration
  • is complicated by the need for continuous infusion
  • and the potential for uncontrolled hemorrhage.
Thus alternative heparin delivery systems have been proposed to maximize regional effects while limiting systemic toxicity. Yet, as heparin is such a potent antithrombotic compound and since existing local delivery systems lack the ability to
  • precisely regulate release kinetics,
  • even site-specific therapy is prone to bleeding.
Authors now describe the design and development of a novel biodegradable system for the perivascular delivery of heparin to the blood vessel wall with well-defined release kinetics.
This system consists of heparin-encapsulated
  • poly(DL lactide-co-glycolide) (pLGA) microspheres sequestered in an alginate gel.
Controlled release of heparin from this heterogeneous system is obtained for a period of 25 days.
The experimental variables affecting heparin release from these matrices were investigated by
  • gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)
  • to monitor the degradation process and correlated well with the release kinetics.
Heparin-releasing gels inhibited growth in tissue culture of
  • bovine vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner.
  • and also controlled vascular injury in denuding and
  • interposition vascular graft animal models of disease even when uncontrolled bleeding was evident with standard matrix-type release.
This system provided an effective means of examining
  • the effects of various compounds in
  • the control of smooth muscle cell proliferation in accelerated arteriopathies and also
  • shed light on the biologic nature of these processes.(1)
Soft tissue adhesives are employed to repair and seal many different organs that range in both
  • tissue surface chemistry and
  • mechanical effects during organ function.
This complexity motivates the development of tunable adhesive materials with
  • high resistance to uniaxial or multiaxial loads
  • dictated by a specific organ environment.
Co-polymeric hydrogels comprising
  • aminated star polyethylene glycol and
  • dextran aldehyde (PEG:dextran)
are materials exhibiting physico-chemical properties that can be modified
Here we report that resistance to failure
  • under specific loading conditions, as well as
  • tissue response at the adhesive material–tissue interface, can be modulated through regulation of
  • the number and density of adhesive aldehyde groups.
Author found that atomic force microscopy (AFM) can
  • characterize the material aldehyde density available for tissue interaction,
  • facilitating rapid, informed material choice.

Further, the correlation between AFM quantification of nanoscale unbinding forces

  • with macroscale measurements of adhesion strength
  • by uniaxial tension or multiaxial burst pressure allows the design of materials with specific cohesion and adhesion strengths.
However, failure strength alone does not predict optimal in vivo reactivity. The development of adhesive materials is significantly enabled when
  • experiments are integrated along length scales to consider
  • organ chemistry and mechanical loading states concurrently
  • with adhesive material properties and tissue response. (2)
Cell culture and animal data support the role of endothelial cells and endothelial-based compounds in regulating vascular repair after injury.
Authors describe a long-term study in pigs in which the biological and immunological
  • responses to endothelial cell implants were investigated 3 months after angioplasty,
  • approximately 2 months after the implants have degraded.
Confluent porcine or bovine endothelial cells grown in polymer matrices were implanted adjacent to 28 injured porcine carotid arteries.
Porcine and bovine endothelial cell implants significantly
  • reduced experimental restenosis compared to control by 56 and 31%, respectively.
Host humoral responses were investigated by detection of an increase in serum antibodies that bind to the bovine or porcine cell strains used for implantation.
A significant increase in titer of circulating antibodies to the bovine cells was observed
  • after 4 days in all animals implanted with xenogeneic cells.
Detected antibodies returned to presurgery levels after Day 40.
No significant increase in titer of antibodies to the porcine cells was observed during the experiment in animals implanted with porcine endothelial cells.
No implanted cells, Gelfoam, or focal inflammatory reaction could be detected
  • histologically at any of the implant sites at 90 days.

Suggesting that tissue engineered endothelial cell implants

  • may provide long term control of vascular repair after injury,
  • rather than simply delaying lesion formation and that
  • allogeneic implants are able to provide a greater benefit than xenogeneic implants. (3)
Vascular access complications are a major problem in hemodialysis patients. Native arteriovenous fistulae, historically the preferred mode of access, have a patency rate of only 60% at 1 year.
The most common mode of failure is due to progressive stenosis at the anastomotic site.
Authors have previously demonstrated that perivascular endothelial cell implants
  • inhibit intimal thickening following acute balloon injury in pigs, and now seek to determine if these
  • implants provide a similar benefit in the chronic and more complex injury model of arteriovenous anastomoses.
Side-to-side femoral artery-femoral vein anastomoses were created in 24 domestic swine.
  • toxicological,
  • biological and
  • immunological responses

were investigated 3 days and 1 and 2 months postoperatively to allogeneic endothelial cell implants . The anastomoses were wrapped with polymer matrices containing

  • confluent porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE; n = 14) or
  • control matrices without cells (n = 10).
PAE implants significantly reduced intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic sites
  • compared to controls by 68% (p ! 0.05) at 2 months.
The beneficial effects of the PAE implants were not due to
  • differences in the rates of reendothelialization between the groups.
No significant immunological response to the allogeneic endothelial cells that impacted on efficacy was detected in any of the pigs.
No apparent toxicity was observed in any of the animals treated with endothelial implants.
These data suggest that perivascular endothelial cell implants
  • are safe and reduce early intimal hyperplasia in a porcine model of arteriovenous anastomoses. (4)
1.  Perivascular graft heparin delivery using biodegradable polymer wraps. ER Edelman, A Nathan,
M Katada, J Gates, MJ Karnovsky. Biomaterials 2000; 21:2279 -2286.
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anie.200461360/full
2.  Tuning adhesion failure strength for tissue-specific applications. N Artzi, A Zeiger, F Boehning,
A bon Ramos, K Van Vliet, ER Edelman.  Acta Biomateriala 2010.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2010.07.008.
3. Endothelial Implants Provide Long-Term Control of Vascular Repair in a Porcine Model of Arterial Injury. HM Nugent, ER Edelman. J Surg Res 2001; 99:228–234.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jsre.2001.6198
4.  Perivascular Endothelial Implants Inhibit Intimal Hyperplasia in a Model of Arteriovenous Fistulae: A Safety and Efficacy Study in the Pig. HM Nugent, A Groothuis, P Seifert, et al. J Vasc Res 2002;39:524–533.

Luminal Flow and Arterial Drug Delivery

Endovascular stents reside in a dynamic flow environment and yet the impact of flow
  • on arterial drug deposition after stent-based delivery is only now emerging.
Authors employed computational fluid dynamic modeling tools to investigate
  • the influence of luminal flow patterns on arterial drug deposition and distribution.
Flow imposes recirculation zones distal and proximal to the stent strut that extend
  • the coverage of tissue absorption of eluted drug and
  • induce asymmetry in tissue drug distribution.
Our analysis now explains how the disparity in
  • sizes of the two recirculation zones and
  • the asymmetry in drug distribution are determined by a complex interplay of local flow and strut geometry.
When temporal periodicity was introduced as a model of
  • pulsatile flow,
  • the net luminal flow served as an index of flow-mediated spatiotemporal tissue drug uptake.
Dynamically changing luminal flow patterns are intrinsic to the coronary arterial tree. Coronary drug-eluting stents should be appropriately considered where
  • luminal flow,
  • strut design and
  • pulsatility
have direct effects on tissue drug uptake after local delivery.(1)
The efficacy of drug-eluting stents (DES) requires delivery of potent compounds directly to the underlying arterial tissue.
The commercially available DES drugs rapamycin and paclitaxel bind specifically to
  • their respective therapeutic targets, FKBP12 and polymerized microtubules,
  • while also associating in a more general manner with other tissue elements.
As it is binding that provides biological effect, the question arises as to whether other
  • locally released or systemically circulating drugs can
  • displace DES drugs from their tissue binding domains.
Specific and general binding sites for both drugs are distributed across the media and adventitia with higher specific binding associated with the binding site densities in the media.
The ability of rapamycin and paclitaxel to compete for specific protein binding and general tissue deposition
  • was assessed for both compounds simultaneously and
  • in the presence of other commonly administered cardiac drugs.
Drugs classically used to treat standard cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and hypercoaguability,
  • displace rapamycin and paclitaxel from general binding sites, possibly
  • decreasing tissue reserve capacity for locally delivered drugs.
Paclitaxel and rapamycin do not affect the other’s binding
  • to their biologically relevant specific protein targets, but
  • can  displace each other from tissue at three log order molar excess,
  • decreasing arterial loads by greater than 50%.
Local competitive binding therefore should not limit the placement of rapamycin and paclitaxel eluting stents in close proximity.(2)
Stent thrombosis is a lethal complication of endovascular intervention. There is concern about the inherent risk associated with specific stent designs and drug-eluting coatings
Authored examined whether drug-eluting coatings are inherently thrombogenic and whether the response to these materials was determined to any degree
  • by stent design and
  • stent deployment with custom-built stents.
Drug/polymer coatings uniformly reduce rather than increase thrombogenicity relative to matched bare metal counterparts (0.65-fold; P 0.011).
Thick-strutted (162 m) stents were 1.5-fold more thrombogenic than otherwise
  • identical thin-strutted (81 m) devices in ex vivo flow loops (P< 0.001),
commensurate with 1.6-fold greater thrombus coverage
  • 3 days after implantation in porcine coronary arteries (P 0.004).
When bare metal stents were deployed in
  • malapposed or overlapping configurations, thrombogenicity increased compared with apposed, length-matched controls (1.58-fold, P < 0.001; and 2.32-fold, P <0.001).
The thrombogenicity of polymer-coated stents with thin struts was
  • lowest in all configurations and remained insensitive to incomplete deployment.
Computational modeling– based
  • predictions of stent-induced flow derangements
  • correlated with spatial distribution of formed clots.
Drug/polymer coatings do not inherently increase acute stent clotting;
  • they reduce thrombosis.
However, strut dimensions and positioning relative to the vessel wall
  • are critical factors in modulating stent thrombogenicity.
Optimal stent geometries and surfaces, as demonstrated with thin stent struts,
  • help reduce the potential for thrombosis
  • despite complex stent configurations and variability in deployment. (Circulation. 2011;123:1400-1409.) (3)
1. Luminal flow patterns dictate arterial drug deposition in stent-based delivery.
VB Kolachalama, AR Tzafriri, DY Arifin, ER Edelman. J Control Release 2009; 133:24–30.
2. Local and systemic drug competition in drug-eluting stent tissue deposition properties.
AD Levin, M Jonas, Chao-Wei Hwang, ER Edelman.  J Control Release 2005; 109:236-243.
3. Stent Thrombogenicity Early in High-Risk Interventional Settings Is Driven by
Stent Design and Deployment and Protected by Polymer-Drug Coatings
Kumaran Kolandaivelu, Rajesh Swaminathan, William J. Gibson,.. ER Edelman

Management of Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

Multiple studies have shown that diabetes mellitus (DM) can affect the
  • efficacy of revascularization therapies and subsequent clinical outcomes.
Selecting the appropriate myocardial revascularization strategy is critically important
  • in the setting of multivessel coronary disease.
Optimal medical therapy is an appropriate first-line strategy in patients with DM and mild symptoms. When medical therapy does not adequately control symptoms,
  • revascularization with either PCI or CABG may be used.
In patients with treated DM, moderate to severe symptoms and complex multivessel coronary disease,
  • coronary artery bypass graft surgery provides better survival,
  • fewer recurrent infarctions and
  • greater freedom from re-intervention.
Decisions regarding revascularization in patients with DM must take into account multiple factors and as such require a multidisciplinary team approach (‘heart team’). (1)
An incomplete understanding of the transport forces and local tissue structures
  • that modulate drug distribution has hampered
  • local pharmacotherapies in many organ systems.
These issues are especially relevant to arteries, where stent-based delivery allows fine control of locally directed drug release.
Local delivery produces tremendous drug concentration gradients
  • these are in part derived from transport forces,
  • differences in deposition from tissue to tissue

This suggests that tissue ultrastructure also plays an important role.

Authors measured the equilibrium drug uptake and the penetration and diffusivity of
  • dextrans (a model hydrophilic drug similar to heparin) and albumin
  • in orthogonal planes in arteries explanted from different vascular beds.
Authors found significant variations in drug distribution with
  • geometric orientation and
  • arterial connective tissue content.
Drug diffusivities parallel to the connective tissue sheaths were
  • one to two orders of magnitude greater than across these sheaths.
This diffusivity difference remained relatively constant for drugs up to 70 kDa
  • before decreasing for larger drugs.
Drugs also distributed better into elastic arteries, especially at lower molecular weights,
  • with almost 66% greater transfer into the thoracic aorta
  • than into the carotid artery.
Arterial drug transport is thus highly anisotropic and
  • dependent on arterial tissue content.
The role of the local composition and geometric organization of arterial tissue
  • in influencing vascular pharmacokinetics
is likely to become a critical consideration for local vascular drug delivery (2)
Radiolabeled drug-eluting stents have been proposed
  • to potentially reduce restenosis in coronary arteries.
A P-32 labeled oligonucleotide (ODN) loaded on a polymer coated stent
  • is slowly released in the arterial wall to deliver a therapeutic dose to the target tissue.
A relatively low proportion of drugs is transferred to the arterial wall (< 2%– 5% typically). This raises questions about the degree to which radiolabeled drugs eluted from the stent
  • can contribute to the total radiation dose delivered to tissues.
A three-dimensional diffusion-convection transport model is used
  • to model the transport of a hydrophilic drug released
  • from the surface of a stent to the arterial media.
Large drug concentration gradients are observed
  • near the stent struts giving rise to a
  • non-uniform radiation activity distribution for the drug
  • in the tissues as a function of time.
A voxel-based kernel convolution method is used to calculate the radiation dose rate
  • resulting from this activity build-up in the arterial wall
  • based on the medical internal radiation dose formalism.
Measured residence time for the P-32 ODN in the arterial wall and
  • at the stent surface obtained from animal studies
  • are used to normalize the results in terms of absolute dose to tissue.
The results indicate radiation due to drug eluted from the stent
  • contributes only a small fraction of the total radiation delivered to the arterial wall,
  • the main contribution comes from the activity embedded in the stent coating.
For hydrophilic compounds with rapid transit times in arterial tissue and minimal binding interactions,
  • the activity build-up in the arterial wall contributes only a small fraction
  • to the total dose delivered by the P-32 ODN stent.
For these compounds, it is concluded that radiolabeled drug-eluting stent
  • would not improve the performance of radioactive stents in treating restenosis.
Also, variability in the efficacy of drug delivery devices
  • makes accurate dosimetry difficult and
  • the drug washout in the systemic circulatory system
may yield an unnecessary activity build-up and dose to healthy organs. (3)
The first compounds considered for stent-based delivery,
  • such as heparin have failed to stop restenosis clinically.
More recent compounds, such as paclitaxel, are of a different sort.
They are hydrophobic, and their effects after local release seem far more profound.
This dichotomy raises the question of whether drugs that have an effect when released from a stent do so because of
  • differences in biology or differences in physicochemical properties and targeting.
Authored applied continuum pharmacokinetics to examine the effects of
  • transport forces and device geometry on
the distribution of stent-delivered hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs.
Stent-based delivery leads to large concentration gradients.
Drug concentrations range from nil to several times the
  • mean tissue concentration over a few micrometers.
Concentration variations were a function of the Peclet number (Pe),
  • the ratio of convective to diffusive forces.
Although hydrophobic drugs exhibit greater variability than hydrophilic drugs,
  • they achieve higher mean concentrations and
  • they remain closer to the intima.
Inhomogeneous strut placement influences hydrophilic drugs
  • more negatively than hydrophobic drugs, and notably
  • affect local concentrations without changing mean concentrations.
Local concentrations and gradients are inextricably linked to biological effect. Therefore,
  • these results provide a potential explanation for the variable success of stent-based delivery.
Authors conclude that mere proximity of delivery devices to tissues
  • does not ensure adequate targeting,
  • because physiological transport forces cause
  • local concentrations to deviate significantly from mean concentrations. (4)
1.  Role of CABG in the management of obstructive coronary arterial disease in patients with diabetes mellitus. D Aronson, ER Edelman.  Curr Opin Pharmacol 2012, 12:134–141. Issue on Cardiovascular and renal. [Eds: JY Jeremy, K Zacharowski, N Shukla, S Wan].  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coph.2012.01.011
2.  Arterial Ultrastructure Influences Transport of Locally Delivered Drugs. Chao-Wei Hwang, ER Edelman. Circ Res. 2002; 90:826-832. http://www.circresaha.org/dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.0000016672.26000.9E
3.  Dose model for stent-based delivery of a radioactive compound for the treatment of restenosis in coronary arteries. C Janickia, Chao-Wei Hwang, ER Edelman.  Med Phys 2003; 30(10), 2622-7.    http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.1607506
4.  Physiological Transport Forces Govern Drug Distribution for Stent-Based Delivery. Chao-Wei Hwang, D Wu, ER Edelman. Circulation. 2001;104(5) :600-605; e14 – e9010.     http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/hc3101.09221
Stent-Versus-Stent Equivalency Trials. Are Some Stents More Equal Than Others? Elazer R. Edelman, Campbell Rogers Circulation. 1999; 100(9): 896-898; e47 – e47.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.CIR.100.9.896
New endovascular stent designs are displacing tried and-true devices for use in an ever-broader array of lesions. There is disagreement as to which device is most advantageous and whether design determines outcome. Preclinical research says that this should be the case. Clinical trials have failed to validate design dependence. Can the divergent results be reconciled? More than 50 different stent configurations are available. The processes of industrial development and federal regulatory evaluation support the importance of design.
Stents are made from
  • a spectrum of materials
  • a range of manufacturing techniques, and have
    • variable surfaces,
    • dimensions,
    • surface coverage, and
    • strut configurations.
The number of parameters involved may doom the number of subsets to approach the number of designs. Moreover, each device seems to have a unique optimal mode of placement.  Differences have been reported in
  • flexibility,
  • tracking ability,
  • expansion,
  • radiovisibility,
  • side-branch access, and
  • resistance to compression and recoil for different devices.
Regulatory approval includes standards for safety:
  • toxicity,
  • biocompatibility,
  • structural and material analysis, and
  • fatigue testing
It has been suggested that
  • hoop strength,
  • surface cracking,
  • uniformity of expansion, and
  • other features become standardized as well.
Four different direct comparisons of first-generation Palmaz-Schatz slotted-tube stents and
second-generation stents have been made. In several studies there were no significant differences
in restenosis at follow-up, including
  • minimal luminal diameter (MLD),
  • percent diameter stenosis,
  • late loss, or
  •  binary restenosis rate.
In the fourth study, restenosis was far greater for the Gianturco-Roubin II (GR-II) stent (Cook) than
  • the Palmaz-Schatz stent (Cordis-Johnson & Johnson).
The data for all stents bunch across trials: with the exception of the GR-II stent,
variability between the test stent groups was no greater than
  • the variability between the Palmaz-Schatz stent groups in the different trials.
Three distinct possibilities exist to explain the absence of clinical evidence that different designs behave differently:
(1) no differences in clinical outcomes exist between devices;
(2) differences exist but are so slight as to be clinically meaningless; and
(3) differences exist that may be clinically meaningful, but trials performed to date were not designed to detect them.
Schematic representation of device performance plotting outcome against indication indicates that
  • complication rates rise as lesion complexity increases.
When 2 devices are clinically different, their curves are displaced, and when they are indistinguishable, their curves overlap.
Clinical trials that restrict the test population to lesions low on the complexity scale
  • ensure safety for all patients but are not the ideal venues in which to detect differences between devices.
Thus, although stents 1 and 2 may have different clinical outcomes, in a restricted-criteria equivalency trial with low complexity, they appear identical. It is only when the test device performs worse than the standard, that differences can be appreciated.
In contrast, an open registry will not only show when a test stent is worse than the standard stent but also when it is better.

Equivalency Trials

Stent-versus-stent trials are equivalency trials, designed to show that a test device performs “as well as” a standard, currently acceptable device.  This is a valid regulatory threshold but
  • not the means to evaluate the full potential of a device.
Equivalency trials must by definition commence with a patient population for whom the standard device is safe. Trials with currently approved devices as the standard necessitate that
  • patient entry and lesion selection be determined by
  • limitations of the standard, not the device.
to observe a difference in such a trial
  •  the test device performs worse
For the test device to perform better, both the test and the standard must be challenged.
This was not the case for the trials in which
  • the average reference vessel size was 3.0+0.05 mm and
  • American College of Cardiology type B2 and C lesions accounted for only ~65% of lesions.
These lesions are those for which the Palmaz-Schatz stent is approved and technically suited, but
  • they represent only a minority of those lesions now receiving stents

Complexity, Equivalence, and Better

In truth, it may be most appropriate to think about parameters of device success and safety as a continuum, describing a correlation between events such as
  • thrombosis or restenosis and
  • a continuous measure of indication,
  • vessel dimension, or lesion complexity (Figure).
A given device may be represented by a characteristic response over a range of indications.
When there is a lateral offset to the curves,
  • differences in potential performance are anticipated.
Curves might even cross, rather than run parallel, indicating that devices might be matched
to lesions and indications. Open trials would consider the entire range of the curves.
  • equivalency trials are limited to a small region of the curve.
The first-generation stents were a major innovation in interventional cardiology, and their place in medical history and biotechnology is unassailable.
Demonstration that new stents are better than old will require that evaluations be
  • performed in lesions for which current devices have marginal or limited application.
Complex or acutely unstable lesions, small arteries, and diseased bypass grafts are
  • the next great challenges of interventional cardiology.
Perhaps in these settings, future stent trials will provide firm evidence that
  • the manner in which blood vessels are manipulated dictates biological sequelae.
Proof that stent design can alter clinical outcomes may then unleash the potential
  • to change the way in which we consider design, approval, and use of new devices.
REFERENCES

Menichelli, M. (2006). Sirolimus Stent vs. Bare Stent in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial. Presented at The European Paris Course on Revascularization (EuroPCR), May 16-19, 2006, Paris, France Paris, France.http://www.medscape.com/viewprogram/5505?rss

Pfisterer, P.E. (2006). Basel Stent Cost-effectiveness Trial-Late Thrombotic events (BASKET LATE) Trial. Presented at American College of Cardiology 55th Annual Scientific Session, March 11 – 14, 2006, Atlanta, Georgia.http://www.medscape.com/viewprogram/5185 

Rogers, C. Edelman E.R. (2006). Pushing drug-eluting stents into uncharted territory, Simpler then you think – more complex than you imagine. Circulation,113, 2262-2265.

Shirota, T., Yasui, H., Shimokawa, H. & Matsuda, T. (2003). Fabrication of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-seeded intravascular stent devices and in vitro endothelialization on hybrid vascular tissue. Biomaterials 24(13), 2295–2302.

Simonton, C. (2006). The STENT Registry: A real-world look at Sirolimus- and Pacitaxel-Eluting Stents. Cath Lab Digest, 14 (1), 1-10.

Turco, M. (2006). TAXUS ATLAS Trial – 9-Month results: Evaluation of TAXUS Liberte vs. TAXUS Express. Presented at The European Paris Course on Revascularization (EuroPCR), May 16-19, 2006, Paris, France Paris, France.http://www.medscape.com/viewprogram/5505?rss

Verma, S. and Marsden, P.A. (2005). Nitric Oxide-Eluting Polyurethanes – Vascular Grafts of the Future? New England Journal Medicine, 353 (7), 730-731.

Wood, S. (2006). Guidant suspends release of Xience V everolimus-eluting stent due to manufacturing standards http://www.theheart.org/article/679851.do 

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Endothelial Function and Cardiovascular Disease

Pathologist and AuthorLarry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

 

This discussion is a continuation of a series on Nitric Oxide, vascular relaxation, vascular integrity, and systemic organ dysfunctions related to inflammatory and circulatory disorders. In some of these, the relationships are more clear than others, and in other cases the vascular disorders are aligned with serious metabolic disturbances. This article, in particular centers on the regulation of NO production, NO synthase, and elaborates more on the assymetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) inhibition brought up in a previous comment, and cardiovascular disease, including:

Recall, though, that in SIRS leading to septic shock, that there is a difference between the pulmonary circulation, the systemic circulation and the portal circulation in these events. The comment calls attention to:
Böger RH. Asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, explains the ‘L-arginine paradox’ and acts as a novel cardiovascular risk factor. J Nutr 2004; 134: 2842S–7S.

This observer points out that ADMA inhibits vascular NO production at concentrations found in pathophysiological conditions (i.e., 3–15 μmol/l); ADMA also causes local vasoconstriction when it is infused intra-arterially. ADMA is increased in the plasma of humans with hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, hypertension, chronic renal failure, and chronic heart failure.

Increased ADMA levels are associated with reduced NO synthesis as assessed by impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. We’ll go into that more with respect to therapeutic targets – including exercise, sauna, and possibly diet, as well as medical drugs.

It is remarkable how far we have come since the epic discovery of 17th century physician, William Harvey, by observing the action of the heart in small animals and fishes, proved that heart receives and expels blood during each cycle, and argued for the circulation in man. This was a huge lead into renaissance medicine. What would he think now?

Key Words: eNOS, NO, endothelin, ROS, oxidative stress, blood flow, vascular resistance, cardiovascular disease, chronic renal disease, hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis, MI, exercise, nutrition, traditional chinese medicine, statistical modeling for targeted therapy.

Endothelial Function
The endothelium plays a crucial role in the maintenance of vascular tone and structure by means of eNOS, producing the endothelium-derived vasoactive mediator nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous messenger molecule formed in healthy vascular endothelium from the amino acid precursor L-arginine. Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are the enzymes responsible for nitric oxide (NO) generation. The generation and actions of NO under physiological and pathophysiological conditions are exquisitely regulated and extend to almost every cell type and function within the circulation. While the molecule mediates many physiological functions, an excessive presence of NO is toxic to cells.

The enzyme NOS, constitutively or inductively, catalyses the production of NO in several biological systems. NO is derived not only from NOS isoforms but also from NOS-independent sources. In mammals, to date, three distinct NOS isoforms have been identified:

  1. neuronal NOS (nNOS),
  2. inducible NOS (iNOS), and
  3. endothelial NOS (eNOS).

The molecular structure, enzymology and pharmacology of these enzymes have been well defined, and reveal critical roles for the NOS system in a variety of important physiological processes. The role of NO and NOS in regulating vascular physiology, through neuro-hormonal, renal and other non-vascular pathways, as well as direct effects on arterial smooth muscle, appear to be more intricate than was originally thought.

Vallance et al. described the presence of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) as an endogenous inhibitor of eNOS in 1992. Since then, the role of this molecule in the regulation of eNOS has attracted increasing attention.
Endothelins are 21-amino acid peptides, which are active in almost all tissues in the body. They are potent vasoconstrictors, mediators of cardiac, renal, endocrine and immune functions and play a role in bronchoconstriction, neurotransmitter regulation, activation of inflammatory cells, cell proliferation and differentiation.

Endothelins were first characterised by Yanagisawa et al. (1988). The three known endothelins ET-1, -2 and -3 are structurally similar to sarafotoxins from snake venoms. ET-1 is the major isoform generated in blood vessels and appears to be the isoform of most importance in the cardiovascular system with a major role in the maintenance of vascular tone.

The systemic vascular response to hypoxia is vasodilation. However, reports suggest that the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) is released from the vasculature during hypoxia. ET-1 is reported to augment superoxide anion generation and may counteract nitric oxide (NO) vasodilation. Moreover, ET-1 was proposed to contribute to increased vascular resistance in heart failure by increasing the production of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA).

A study investigated the role of ET-1, the NO pathway, the potassium channels and radical oxygen species in hypoxia-induced vasodilation of large coronary arteries and found NO contributes to hypoxic vasodilation, probably through K channel opening, which is reversed by addition of ET-1 and enhanced by endothelin receptor antagonism. These latter findings suggest that endothelin receptor activation counteracts hypoxic vasodilation.

Endothelial dysfunction
Patients with Raynaud’s Phemonenon had abnormal vasoconstrictor responses to cold pressor tests (CPT) that were similar in primary and secondary RP. There were no differences in median flow-mediated and nitroglycerin mediated dilation or CPT of the brachial artery in the 2 populations. Patients with secondary RP were characterized by abnormalities in microvascular responses to reactive hyperemia, with a reduction in area under the curve adjusted for baseline perfusion, but not in time to peak response or peak perfusion ratio.

Plasma ET-1, ADMA, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 levels were significantly elevated in secondary RP compared with primary RP. There was a significant negative correlation between ET-1 and ADMA values and measures of microvascular perfusion but not macrovascular endothelial function. Secondary RP is characterized by elevations in plasma ET-1 and ADMA levels that may contribute to alterations in cutaneous microvascular function.

ADMA inhibits vascular NO production within the concentration range found in patients with vascular disease. ADMA also causes local vasoconstriction when infused intra-arterially, and increases systemic vascular resistance and impairs renal function when infused systemically. Several recent studies have supplied evidence to support a pathophysiological role of ADMA in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. High ADMA levels were found to be associated with carotid artery intima-media-thickness in a study with 116 clinically healthy human subjects. Taking this observation further, another study performed with hemodialysis patients reported that ADMA prospectively predicted the progression of intimal thickening during one year of follow-up.

In a nested, case-control study involving 150 middle-aged, non-smoking men, high ADMA levels were associated with a 3.9-fold elevated risk for acute coronary events. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests elevation of ADMA can cause a relative L-arginine deficiency, even in the presence of “normal” L-arginine levels. As ADMA is a competitive inhibitor of eNOS, its inhibitory action can be overcome by increasing the concentration of the substrate, L-arginine. Elevated ADMA concentration is one possible explanation for endothelial dysfunction and decreased NO production in these diseases.
Metabolic Regulation of L-arginine and NO Synthesis 
Methylation of arginine residues within proteins or polypeptides occurs through N-methyltransferases, which utilize S-adenosylmethionine as a methyl donor. After proteolysis of these proteins or polypeptides, free ADMA is present in the cytoplasm. ADMA can also be detected in circulating blood plasma. ADMA acts as an inhibitor of eNOS by competing with the substrate of this enzyme, L-arginine. The ensuing reduction in nitric oxide synthesis causes vascular endothelial dysfunction and, subsequently, atherosclerosis. ADMA is eliminated from the body via urinary excretion and via metabolism by the enzyme DDAH to citrulline and dimethylamine.
Supplementation with L-arginine in animals with experimentally-induced vascular dysfunction atherosclerosis improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Moreover, L-arginine supplementation results in enhanced endothelium-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation, inhibition of monocyte adhesion, and reduced vascular smooth muscle proliferation. One mechanism that explains the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction is the presence of elevated blood levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) – an L-arginine analogue that inhibits NO formation and thereby can impair vascular function. Supplementation with L-arginine has been shown to restore vascular function and to improve the clinical symptoms of various diseases associated with vascular dysfunction.

Beneficial Effects of L-Arginine

  • Angina
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Hypertension
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

The ratio of L-arginine to ADMA is considered to be the most accurate measure of eNOS substrate availability. This ratio will increase during L-arginine supplementation, regardless of initial ADMA concentration. Due to the pharmacokinetics of oral L-arginine and the positive results from preliminary studies, it appears supplementation with a sustained-release L-arginine preparation will achieve positive therapeutic results at lower dosing levels.

Many prospective clinical trials have shown that the association between elevated ADMA levels and major cardiovascular events and total mortality is robust and extends to diverse patient populations. However, we need to define more clearly in the future who will profit from ADMA determination, in order to use this novel risk marker as a more specific diagnostic tool.
Elimination of ADMA by way of DDAH
Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA) are endogenously produced amino acids that inhibit all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). ADMA accumulates in various disease states, including renal failure, diabetes and pulmonary hypertension, and its concentration in plasma is strongly predictive of premature cardiovascular disease and death. Both LNMMA and ADMA are eliminated largely through active metabolism by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) and thus DDAH dysfunction may be a crucial unifying feature of increased cardiovascular risk. These investigators ask whether ADMA is the underlying issue related to the pathogenesis of the vascular disorder.
They identified the structure of human DDAH-1 and probed the function of DDAH-1 both by deleting the Ddah1 gene in mice and by using DDAH-specific inhibitors that is shown by crystallography, bind to the active site of human DDAH-1. The loss of DDAH-1 activity leads to accumulation of ADMA and reduction in NO signaling. This in turn causes vascular pathophysiology, including endothelial dysfunction, increased systemic vascular resistance and elevated systemic and pulmonary blood pressure. The results suggest that DDAH inhibition could be harnessed therapeutically to reduce the vascular collapse associated with sepsis.
Methylarginines are formed when arginine residues in proteins are methylated by the action of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), and free methylarginines are liberated following proteolysis. Clear demonstration of an effect of endogenous ADMA and L-NMMA on cardiovascular physiology would be of importance, not only because of the implications for disease, but also because it would expose a link between post-translational modification of proteins and signaling through a proteolytic product of these modified proteins.
Which is it? ADMA or DDHA: Intrusion of a Genetic alteration.
The study showed that loss of DDAH expression or activity causes endothelial dysfunction, we believe that DDAH inhibition could potentially be used therapeutically to limit excessive NO production, which can have pathological effects. They then showed treated cultured isolated blood vessels with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced expression of the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) and generated high levels of NO, which were blocked by the iNOS-selective inhibitor 1400W and by DDAH inhibitors. Treatment of isolated blood vessels with DDAH inhibitors significantly increased ADMA accumulation in the culture medium. Treatment of isolated blood vessels with bacterial LPS led to the expected hyporeactivity to the contractile effects of phenylephrine, which was reversed by treatment with a DDAH inhibitor. The effect of the DDAH inhibitor was large and stereospecific, and was reversed by the addition of L-arginine.
In conclusion, genetic and chemical-biology approaches provide compelling evidence that loss of DDAH-1 function results in increased ADMA concentrations and thereby disrupts vascular NO signaling. A broader implication of this study is that post-translational methylation of arginine residues in proteins may have downstream effects by affecting NO signaling upon hydrolysis and release of the free methylated amino acid. This signaling pathway seems to have been highly conserved through evolution.

The crucial role of nitric oxide (NO) for normal endothelial function is well known. In many conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity, diabetes and smoking, NO biosynthesis is dysregulated, leading to endothelial dysfunction. The growing evidence from animal and human studies indicates that endogenous inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) are associated with the endothelial dysfunction and potentially regulate NO synthase.

Nitric Oxide Synthase

Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is one of three known endogenously produced circulating methylarginines (i.e. ADMA, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and symmetrically methylated NG, NG-dimethyl-L-arginine). ADMA is formed by the action of protein arginine methyltransferases that methylate arginine residues in proteins and after which free ADMA is released. ADMA and L-NMMA can competitively inhibit NO elaboration by displacing L-arginine from NO synthase (NOS). The amount of methylarginines is related to overall metabolic activity and the protein turnover rate of cells. Although methylarginines are excreted partly by the kidneys, the major route of elimination of ADMA in humans is metabolism by the dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase enzymes[ dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 and -2 (DDAH)] enzymes. Inhibition of DDAH leads to the accumulation of ADMA and consequently to inhibition of NO-mediated endothelium dependent relaxation of blood vessels.
The potential role of ADMA in angina pectoris has been evaluated by Piatti and co-workers, who reported ADMA levels to be higher in patients with cardiac syndrome X (angina pectoris with normal coronary arteriograms) than in controls. According to preliminary results from the CARDIAC (Coronary Artery Risk Determination investigating the influence of ADMA Concentration) study, patients with coronary heart disease (n 816) had a higher median ADMA plasma concentration than age and sex matched controls (median 0.91 vs. 0.70 mol/l; p 0.0001). Further, in a prospective Chinese study, a high plasma ADMA level independently predicted subsequent cardiovascular adverse events (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and repeated revascularization of a target vessel).

Protein detoxification pathway.

Protein detoxification pathway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are only few published findings concerning variations in human DDAH. However, polymorphisms in other genes potentially related to risk factors for endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular events have been studied. Reduced NO synthesis has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. For example, there are some functionally important variants of the NOS that could affect individual vulnerability to atherosclerosis by changing the amount of NO generated by the endothelium.
There are probably several functional variations in genes coding DDAH enzymes in different populations. Some of them could confer protection against the harmful effects of elevated ADMA and others impair enzyme function causing accumulation of ADMA in cytosol and/or blood.
In a study of 16 men with either low or high plasma ADMA concentrations were screened to identify DDAH polymorphisms that could potentially be associated with increased susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. In that study a novel functional mutation of DDAH-1 was identified; the mutation carriers had a significantly elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and a tendency to develop hypertension. These results confirmed the clinical role of DDAH enzymes in ADMA metabolism. Furthermore, it is possible that more common variants of DDAH genes contribute more widely to increased cardiovascular risk.
We found a rare variation in the DDAH-1 gene, which is associated with elevated plasma concentrations of ADMA in heterozygous mutation carriers. There was also an increased prevalence of CHD and a tendency to hypertension among individuals with this DDAH-1 mutation. These observations highlight the importance of ADMA as a possible risk factor and emphasize the essential role of DDAH in regulating ADMA levels.

ADMA Elevation and Coronary Artery Disease
Endothelial dysfunction may be considered as a systemic disorder and involves different vascular beds. Coronary endothelial dysfunction (CED) precedes the development of coronary. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a reduction in endogenous nitric oxide (NO) activity, which may be accompanied by elevated plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels. ADMA is a novel endogenous competitive inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS), an independent marker for cardiovascular risk.

English: Structure of asymmetric dimethylargin...

English: Structure of asymmetric dimethylarginine; ADMA; N,N-Dimethylarginine Deutsch: Asymmetrisches Dimethylarginin; N,N-Dimethyl-L-arginin; Guanidin-N,N-dimethylarginin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In a small study fifty-six men without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent coronary endothelial function testing were studied. Men with CED had significant impairment of erectile function (P ¼ 0.008) and significantly higher ADMA levels (0.50+0.06 vs. 0.45+0.07 ng/mL, P ¼ 0.017) compared with men with normal endothelial function. Erectile function positively correlated with coronary endothelial function. This correlation was independent of age, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein, C-reactive protein, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, and smoking status, suggesting that CED is independently associated with ED and plasma ADMA concentration in men with early coronary atherosclerosis.

ADMA and Chronic Renal Failure in Hepatorenal Syndrome
The concentration of SDMA was significantly higher in the patients with HRS compared to the patients without HRS and it was also higher than the values obtained from the healthy participants (1.76 ± 0.3 μmol/L; 1.01 ± 0.32 and 0.520 ± 0.18 μmol/L, respectively; p < 0.01). The concentrations of ADMA were higher in the cirrhotic patients with HRS than in those without this serious complication of cirrhosis. The concentration of ADMA in all the examined cirrhotic patients was higher than those obtained from healthy volunteers (1.35 ± 0.27 μmol/L, 1.05 ± 0.35 μmol/L and 0.76 ± 0.21 μmol/L, respectively). In the patients with terminal alcoholic liver cirrhosis, the concentrations
of ADMA and SDMA correlated with the progress of cirrhosis as well as with the development of cirrhosis complications. In the patients with HRS there was a positive correlation between creatinine and SDMA in plasma (r2 = 0.0756, p < 0.001) which was not found between creatinine and ADMA. The results demonstrate that the increase in SDMA concentration is proportionate to the progression of chronic damage of the liver and kidneys. Increased ADMA concentration can be a causative agent of renal insufficiency in patients with cirrhosis.

In patients with cirrhosis, ADMA, as well as SDMA could be markers for kidney insufficiency development. Accumulation of ADMA in plasma causes kidney
vasoconstriction and thereby retention of SDMA. Considering that ADMA has several damaging effects, it can be concluded that modulation of the activity of enzyme which participates in ADMA catabolism may represent a new therapeutic goal which is intended to reduce the progress of liver and kidney damage and thus the development of HRS.

ADMA Therapeutic Targets
Elevated plasma concentrations of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase
inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are found in various clinical settings, including

  • renal failure,
  • coronary heart disease,
  • hypertension,
  • diabetes and
  • preeclampsia.

In healthy people acute infusion of ADMA promotes vascular dysfunction,
and in mice chronic infusion of ADMA promotes progression of atherosclerosis.
Thus, ADMA may not only be a marker but also an active player in cardiovascular disease, which makes it a potential target for therapeutic interventions.

This review provides a summary and critical discussion of the presently available data concerning the effects on plasma ADMA levels of cardiovascular drugs, hypoglycemic agents, hormone replacement therapy, antioxidants, and vitamin supplementation.
We assess the evidence that the beneficial effects of drug therapies on vascular function can be attributed to modification of ADMA levels. To develop more specific ADMA-lowering therapies, mechanisms leading to elevation of plasma ADMA concentrations in cardiovascular disease need to be better understood.

ADMA is formed endogenously by degradation of proteins containing arginine residues that have been methylated by S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases (PRMTs). There are two major routes of elimination: renal excretion and enzymatic degradation by the dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH-1 and -2).

Oxidative stress causing upregulation of PRMT expression and/or attenuation of DDAH activity has been suggested as a mechanism and possible drug target in clinical conditions associated with elevation of ADMA. As impairment of DDAH activity or capacity is associated with substantial increases in plasma ADMA concentrations, DDAH is likely to emerge as a prime target for specific therapeutic interventions.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in diabetic patients have endothelial dysfunction as a key pathogenetic event. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), plays a pivotal role in endothelial dysfunction. Different natural polyphenols have been shown to preserve endothelial function and prevent CVD. Another study assessed the effect of silibinin, a widely used flavonolignan from milk thistle, on ADMA levels and endothelial dysfunction in db/db mice.

Plasma and aorta ADMA levels were higher in db/db than in control lean mice. Silibinin administration markedly decreased plasma ADMA; consistently, aorta ADMA was reduced in silibinin-treated animals. Plasma and aorta ADMA levels exhibited a positive correlation, whereas liver ADMA was inversely correlated with both plasma and aorta ADMA concentrations. Endothelium-(NO)-dependent vasodilatation to ACh was impaired in db/db mice and was restored in the silibinin group, in accordance with the observed reduction of plasma and vascular levels of ADMA. Endothelium-independent vasodilatation to SNP was not modified by silibinin administration.

Endothelin Inhibitors
Endothelins are potent vasoconstrictors and pressor peptides and are important mediators of cardiac, renal andendocrine functions. Increased ET-1 levels in disease states such as congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, and renal failure suggest the endothelin system as an attractive target for pharmacotherapy. A non-peptidic, selective, competitive endothelin receptor antagonist with an affinity for the ETA receptor in the subnanomolar range was administered by continuous intravenous infusion to beagle dogs, rats, and Goettingen minipigs. It caused mild arteriopathy characterised by segmental degeneration in the media of mid- to large-size coronary arteries in the heart of dog, but not rat or minipig.

The lesions only occurred in the atrium and ventricle. Frequency and severity of the vascular lesions was not sex or dose related. No effects were noted in blood vessels in other organs or tissue. Plasma concentrations at steady state, and overall exposure in terms of AUC(0–24h) were higher in minipig and rat than the dog but did not cause cardiac arteriopathy. These findings concur with those caused by other endothelin anatagonists, vasodilators and positive inotropic: vasodilating drugs such as potassium channel openers, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and peripheral vasodilators.

Results by echocardiography indicate treatment-related local vasodilatation in the coronary arteries. These data suggest that the coronary arteriopathy may be the result of exaggerated pharmacology. Sustained vasodilatation in the coronary vascular bed may alter flow dynamics and lead to increased shear stress and tension on the coronary wall with subsequent microscopic trauma. In our experience with a number of endothelin receptor antagonists, the cardiac arteriopathy was only noted in studies with multiple daily or continuous intravenous infusion inviting speculation that sustained high plasma levels are needed for development of the lesions.

Up-regulation of vascular endothelin type B (ETB) receptors is implicated in the
pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Culture of intact arteries has been shown to induce similar receptor alterations and has therefore been suggested as a suitable method for, ex vivo, in detail delineation of the regulation of endothelin receptors. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) are involved in the regulation of endothelin ETB receptors in human internal mammary arteries.

The endothelin-1-induced contraction (after endothelin ETB receptor desensitization) and the endothelin ETA receptor mRNA expression levels were not altered by culture. The sarafotoxin 6c contraction, endothelin ETB receptor protein and mRNA expression levels were increased. This increase was antagonized by;

PKC inhibitors (10 μM bisindolylmaleimide I and 10 μM Ro-32-0432), and
inhibitors of the p38, extracellular signal related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and C-jun terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK pathways
Endothelin Receptor Antagonist Tezosentan
The effects of changes in the mean (Sm) and pulsatile (Sp) components of arterial wall shear stress on arterial dilatation of the iliac artery of the anaesthetized dog were examined in the absence and presence of the endothelin receptor antagonist tezosentan (10 mg kg_1 I.V.; Ro 61-0612; [5-isopropylpyridine-2-sulphonic acid 6-(2-hydroxy-ethoxy)-5-(2-methoxy-phenoxy)-2-(2-1H-tetrazol-5-ylpyridin-4-yl)-pyrimidin-4-ylamide]).

Changes in shear stress were brought about by varying local peripheral resistance and stroke volume using a distal infusion of acetylcholine and stimulation of the left ansa subclavia. An increase in Sm from 1.81 ± 0.3 to 7.29 ± 0.7 N m_2 (means ± S.E.M.) before tezosentan caused an endothelium-dependent arterial dilatation which was unaffected by administration of tezosentan for a similar increase in Sm from 1.34 ± 0.6 to 5.76 ± 1.4 N m_2 (means ± S.E.M.).

In contrast, increasing the Sp from 7.1 ± 0.8 to a maximum of 11.5 ± 1.1 N m_2 (means ± S.E.M.) before tezosentan reduced arterial diameter significantly. Importantly, after administration of tezosentan subsequent increases in Sp caused arterial dilatation for the same increase in Sp achieved prior to tezosentan, increasing from a baseline of 4.23 ± 0.4 to a maximum of 9.03 ± 0.9 N m_2 (means ± S.E.M.; P < 0.001). The results of this study provide the first in vivo evidence that pulsatile shear stress is a stimulus for the release of endothelin from the vascular endothelium.

Exercise and Diet
Vascular endotheliumis affected by plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and it is induced by inflammatory cytokines of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-a in vitro. Would a tight glycemic control restore endothelial function in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) with modulation of TNF-a and/or reduction of ADMA level? In 24 patients with type-2 DM, the flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation (FMD: %) of brachial arteries during reactive hyperaemia was determined by a high-resolution ultrasound method. Blood samples for glucose, cholesterol, TNF-a, and ADMA analyses were also collected from these patients after fasting. No significant glycemic or FMD changes were observed in 10 patients receiving the conventional therapy.

In 14 patients who were hospitalized and intensively treated, there was a significant decrease in glucose level after the treatment [from 190+55 to 117+21 (mean+SD) mg/dL, P , 0.01]. After the intensive control of glucose level, FMD increased significantly (from 2.5+0.9 to 7.2+3.0%), accompanied by a significant (P , 0.01) decrease in TNF-a (from 29+16 to 11+9 pg/dL) and ADMA (from 4.8+1.5 to 3.5+1.1 mM/L) levels. The changes in FMD after treatment correlated inversely with those in TNF-a (R ¼ 20.711, P , 0.01) and ADMA (R ¼ 20.717, P , 0.01) levels.
The exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise (EBPR) is an independent predictor of hypertension. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous nitric oxide inhibitor and higher plasma levels of ADMA are related to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study is to identify the relationship between ADMA and EBPR.

A total of 66 patients (36 with EBPR and 30 as controls) were enrolled in the study. EBPR is defined as blood pressure (BP) measurements ≥200/100 mmHg during the treadmill test. All the subjects underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring. L-arginine and ADMA levels were measured using a high performance lipid chromatography technique.

The serum ADMA levels were increased in the EBPR group compared to the healthy controls (4.0±1.4 vs 2.6±1.1 μmol/L respectively, P=0.001), but L-arginine levels were similar in the 2 groups (P=0.19). The serum ADMA levels were detected as an independent predictor of EBPR (odds ratio 2.28; 95% confidence interval 1.22–4.24; P=0.002). Serum ADMA levels might play a role in EBPR to exercise.

Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in atherosclerosis in response to cardiovascular risk factors. The occurrence of endothelial dysfunction is primarily the result of reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabilty. It represents an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and predicts the prognosis of the patient. Therefore, endothelial function has been identified as a target for therapeutic intervention. Regular exercise training is a nonpharmacological option to improve endothelial dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease by increasing NO bioavailability.

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the Western world. risk factor modification and endovascular and surgical revascularisation are the main treatment options at present. However, a significant number of patients still require major amputation. There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO) and its endogenous inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) play significant roles in the pathophysiology of PAD.

This paper reviews experimental work implicating the ADMA-DDAH-NO pathway in PAD, focusing on both the vascular dysfunction and both the vascular dysfunction and effects within the ischaemic muscle, and examines the potential of manipulating this pathway as a novel adjunct therapy in PAD.

In patients with CHF, the peripheral vascular resistance is increased via activation of the neurohormonal system, namely by autonomous sympathetic nervous system, rennin -angiotensin- aldosterone system (RAAS), and endothelin system. The vascular endothelial function in patients with CHF, mainly represented by the endothelium-dependent vasodilation, is altered.

Such alteration leads to increased vascular tone and remodeling of the blood vessels, reducing the peripheral blood flow. Hence, the amount of oxygen for the skeletal muscles is compromised, with progressive exercise intolerance. The vascular endothelial dysfunction in the CHF is mainly due to the decrease of the nitric oxide production induced by the reduced gene expression of eNOS and increased oxidative stress.

The endothelium-dependent vasodilation alteration has been virtually reported in all cardiovascular diseases. Using sauna bath as therapeutic option for CHF is not very recent, since in the 1950’s the first studies with CHF patients were conducted and the potential beneficial effect of sauna was suggested. However, some time later the studies emphasized especially its risks and recommended caution in its use for cardiac patients.

Frequently, sports medicine physicians are invited to evaluate the impact of the sauna on diseases and on health in general. Sauna can be beneficial or dangerous depending on its use. In the past few years the sauna is considered beneficial for the cardiovascular diseases’ patients, as the heart failure and lifestyle-related diseases, mainly by improving the peripheral endothelial function through the increase in cardiac output and peripheral vasodilation.

It is widely known that the vasodilators, such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, improve the CHF and increase the peripheral perfusion. Since the endothelial function is altered in CHF, the endothelium is considered as a new therapeutic target in heart failure. Hence, the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and physical training improve the endothelial function in CHF patients. One of the proposed mechanisms for the alteration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilation would be through the decrease of the NO production in the peripheral vessels in CHF patients. The decrease of peripheral perfusion would decrease the shear stress. The shear stress is an important stimulus for NO production and eNOS expression. On the other hand, the heat increases the cardiac output and improves the peripheral perfusion in CHF patients. Consequently, with the cardiac output improvement in CHF patients, an increase of the shear stress, NO production and eNOS expression are expected.

Sauna bath
The sauna bath represents a heat load of 300-600 W/m2 of body surface area. The skin temperature rapidly increases to ± 40o-41oC and the thermoregulatory mechanisms are triggered. Evaporative heat transfer by sweating is the only effective body heat loss channel in dry sauna. The sweating begins rapidly and reaches its maximum level in ± 15 min. The total sweat secretion represents a heat loss of about 200 W/m2 of the body surface area. The body cannot compensate for the heat load and causing elevation of internal temperature. The skin circulation increases substantially. The skin blood flow, in the thermo-neutral condition (± 20oC) and in rest corresponding to ± 5-10% of the cardiac output, can reach ± 50-70% of the cardiac output.

Thermal therapy in 60oC produced systemic arterial, pulmonary arterial and venous vasodilation, reduced the preload and afterload and improved the cardiac output and the peripheral perfusion, clinical symptoms, life quality, and cardiac arrhythmias in CHF patients. In infants with severe CHF secondary to ventricular septal defect, the sauna therapy decreased the systemic vascular resistance and increased the cardiac output. The sauna benefits in CHF patients are possibly caused by the improvement of the vascular endothelial function and normalization of the neurohormonal system .

Ikeda et al. discovered that the observed improvements in the sauna therapy are due to the eNOS expression increase in the arterial endothelium. They later showed that the thermal therapy with sauna improves the survival of the TO-2 cardiomyopathic hamsters with CHF and, more recently, showed that the repetitive therapy with sauna increases the eNOS expression and the nitric oxide production in artery endothelium of TO-2 cardiomyopathic hamsters with CHF.
Whether n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation and/or diet intervention might have beneficial influence on endothelial function was assessed using plasma levels of ADMA and L-arginine. A male population (n = 563, age 70 ± 6 yrs) with long-standing hyperlipidemia, characterized as high risk individuals in 1970–72, was included, randomly allocated to receive placebo n-3 PUFA capsules (corn oil) and no dietary advice (control group), dietary advice (Mediterranean type), n-3 PUFA capsules, or dietary advice and n-3 PUFA combined and followed for 3 years. Fasting blood samples were drawn at baseline and the end of the study.

Compliance with both intervention regimens were demonstrated by changes in serum fatty acids and by recordings from a food frequency questionnaire. No influence of either regimens on ADMA levels were obtained. However, n-3 PUFA supplementation was accompanied by a significant increase in L-arginine levels, different from the decrease observed in the placebo group (p < 0.05). In individuals with low body mass index (<26 kg/m2), the decrease in L-arginine on placebo was strengthened (p = 0.01), and the L-arginine/ADMA ratio was also significantly reduced (p = 0.04). In this rather large randomized intervention study, ADMA levels were not influenced by n-3 PUFA supplementation or dietary counselling. n-3 PUFA did, however, counteract the age related reduction in L-arginine seen on placebo, especially in lean individuals, which might be considered as an improvement of endothelial function.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) involves a broad range of empirical testing and refinement and plays an important role in the health maintenance for people all over the world. However, due to the complexity of Chinese herbs, a full understanding of TCM’s action mechanisms is still unavailable despite plenty of successful applications of TCM in the treatment of various diseases, including especially cardiovascular diseases (CVD), one of the leading causes of death.

An integrated system of TCM has been constructed to uncover the underlying action mechanisms of TCM by incorporating the chemical predictors, target predictors and network construction approaches from three representative Chinese herbs, i.e., Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen and Corydalis yanhusuo WT Wang widely used in CVD treatment, by combined use of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) screening and network pharmacology techniques. These studies have generated 64 bioactive ingredients and identified 54 protein targets closely associated with CVD, to clarify some of the common conceptions in TCM, and provide clues to modernize such specific herbal medicines.

Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen and Corydalis yanhusuo WT Wang
Twenty-two of 194 ingredients in Ligusticum chuanxiong demonstrate good bioavailability (60%) after oral administration. Interestingly, as the most abundant bioactive compound of Chuanxiong, Ligustilide (M120) only has an adequate OB of 50.10%, although it significantly inhibits the vasoconstrictions induced by norepinephrine bitartrate (NE) and calcium chloride (CaCl2). Indeed, this compound can be metabolized to butylidenephthalide, senkyunolide I (M156), and senkyunolide H (M155) in vivo.

The three natural ingredients produce various pharmacological activities in cerebral blood vessels, the general circulatory system and immune system including spasmolysis contraction effects, inhibitory effects of platelet aggregation and anti-proliferative activity, and thus improve the therapeutic effect on patients. Cnidilide (M93, OB = 77.55%) and spathulenol (M169, OB = 82.37%) also closely correlate with the smooth muscle relaxant action, and thereby have the strongest spasmolytic activity. Carotol (M8) and Ferulic acid (M105) with an OB of 149.03% and 86.56%, respectively, demonstrate better bioavailability compared with cnidilide and spathulenol, which show strong antifungal, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

The pharmacological activity of ferulic acid results in the improvement of blood fluidity and the inhibition of platelet aggregation, which may offer beneficial effects against cancer, CVD, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. As for 3-n-butylphthalide (M85, OB = 71.28%), this compound is not only able to inhibit platelet aggregation, but also decreases the brain infarct volume and enhances microcirculation, thus benefiting patients with ischemic stroke. Platelet aggregation represents a multistep adhesion process involving distinct receptors and adhesive ligands, with the contribution of individual receptor-ligand interactions to the aggregation process depending on the prevailing blood flow conditions, implying that the rheological (blood flow) conditions are an important impact factor for platelet aggregation. Moreover, thrombosis, the pathological formation of platelet aggregates and one of the biggest risk factors for CVD, occludes blood flow causing stroke and heart attack. This explains why the traditional Chinese herb Ligusticum chuanxiong that inhibits platelet aggregates forming and promotes blood circulation can be used in treatment of CVD.

Twenty-six percent (24 of 93) of the ingredients in Dalbergia odorifera meet the OB > 60% criterion irrespective of the pharmacological activity. Relatively high bioavailability values were predicted for the mainly basic compounds odoriflavene (M275, OB = 84.49%), dalbergin (M247, OB = 78.57%), sativanone (M281, OB = 73.01%), liquiritigenin (M262, OB = 67.19%), isoliquiritigenin (M259, OB = 61.38%) and butein (M241, OB = 78.38%). Interestingly, all of the six ingredients show obvious anti-inflammatory property. Butein, liquiritigenin and isoliquiritigenin inhibit cell inflammatory responses by suppressing the NF-κB activation induced by various inflammatory agents and carcinogens, and by decreasing the NF-κB reporter activity. Inflammation occurs with CVD, and Dalbergia odorifera, one of the most potent anti-cardiovascular and anti-cerebrovascular agents, exerts great anti-inflammatory activity.

Corydalis yanhusuo has gained ever-increasing popularity in today’s world because of its therapeutic effects for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia disease, gastric and duodenal ulcer and menorrhalgia. In our work, 21% (15 of 73) of chemicals in this Chinese herb display good OB (60% or even high), and the four main effective ingredients are natural alkaloid agents.

Dehydrocorydaline blocks the release of noradrenaline from the adrenergic nerve terminals in both the Taenia caecum and pulmonary artery, and thereby inhibits the relaxation or contraction of adrenergic neurons. As for dehydrocavidine with an OB of 47.59%, this alkaloid exhibits a significant spasmolytic effect, which acts via relaxing smooth muscle.

In recent years, CVD has been at the top list of the most serious health problems. Many different types of therapeutic targets have already been identified for the management and prevention of CVD, such as endothelin and others. The key question asked is

  • what the interactions of the active ingredients of the Chinese herbs are with their protein targets in a systematic manner and
  • how do the corresponding targets change under differential perturbation of the chemicals?

The study used an unbiased approach to probe the proteins that bind to the small molecules of interest in CVD on the basis of the Random Forest (RF) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) methods combining the chemical, genomic and pharmacological information for drug targeting and discovery on a large scale. Applied to 64 ingredients derived from the three traditional Chinese medicines Dalbergia odorifera, Ligusticum chuanxiong and Corydalis yanhusuo, which show good OB, 261 ligand-target interactions have been constructed, 221 of which are enzymes, receptors, and ion channels. This indicates that chemicals with multiple relative targets are responsible for the high interconnectedness of the ligand-target interactions. The promiscuity of drugs has restrained the advance in recent TCM, because they were thought to be undesirable in favor of more target-specific drugs.

Target Identification and Validation
To validate the reliability of these target proteins, the researchers performed a docking analysis to select the ligand-protein interactions with a binding free energies of ≤−5.0 kcal/mol, which leads to the sharp reduction of the interaction number from 5982 to 760. These drug target candidates were subsequently subject to PharmGkb (available online: http://www.pharmgkb.org; accessed on 1 December 2011), a comprehensive disease-target database, to investigate whether they were related to CVD or not, and finally, 54 proteins were collected and retained.

Fourty-two proteins (76%) were identified as the targets of Ligusticum chuanxiong, such as dihydrofolate reductase (P150), an androgen receptor (P210) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (P209) that were involved in the development of CVD. Of the proteins, seven and two were recognized as those of Dalbergia odorifera and Corydalis yanhusuo, respectively. For Dalbergia odorifera, this Chinese herb has 48 potential protein targets, 13 of which have at least one link to other drugs.

The three herbs share 29 common targets, accounting for 52.7% of the total number. Indeed, as one of the most important doctrines of TCM
abstracted from direct experience and perception, “multiple herbal drugs for one disease” has played an undeniable role. These studies explored the targets of the three Chinese herbs, indicating that these drugs target the same targets simultaneously and exhibit similar pharmacological effects on CVD. This is consistent with the theory of “multiple herbal drugs for one disease”.

The three Chinese herbs possess specific targets. The therapeutic efficacy of a TCM depends on multiple components, targets and pathways. The complexity becomes a huge obstacle for the development and innovation of TCM. For example, the Chinese herb Ligusticum chuanxiong identifies the protein caspase-3 (P184), a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease, as one of its specific targets, and exhibits inhibitory effects on the activity of this protease. In fact, connective tissue growth factor enables the activation of caspase-3 to induce apoptosis in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

Thus, modulation of the activity of caspase-3 with Ligusticum chuanxiong suggests an efficient therapeutic approach to CVD. The Chinese herb Dalbergia odorifera has the α-2A adrenergic receptor (P216) as its specific target and probably blocks the release of this receptor, and thus influences its action. As for Corydalisyanhusuo, the protein tyrosine-protein kinase JAK2 (P9) is the only specific target of this Chinese herb. The results indicate different specific targets possessed by the three Chinese herbs.

Ligand-Candidate Target and Ligand-Potential Target Networks
Previous studies have already reported the relationships of the small molecules with CVD, which indicates the reliability of our results [45,46]. Regarding the candidate targets, we have found that prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (P46) and prostaglandin G/H synthase 1 (P47) possess the largest number of connected ingredients. Following are nitric-oxide synthase, endothelial (P66) and tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 1 (P8), which have 62 and 61 linked chemicals, respectively.
The 29 targets shared by the three traditional Chinese herbs exhibit a high degree of correlations with CVD, which further verifies their effectiveness for the treatment of CVD. These results provide a clear view of the relationships of the target proteins with CVD and other related diseases, which actually link the Chinese herbs and the diseases via the protein targets. This result further explains the theory of “multiple herbal drugs for one disease” based on molecular pharmacology.

Target-Pathway Network
Cells communicate with each other using a “language” of chemical signals. The cell grows, divides,or dies according to the signals it receives. Signals are generally transferred from the outside of the cell. Specialized proteins are used to pass the signal—a process known as signal transduction. Cells have a number of overlapping pathways to transmit signals to multiple targets. Ligand binding in many of the signaling proteins in the pathway can change the cellular communication and finally affect cell growth and proliferation. The authors extracted nine signal pathways closely associated with CVD in PharmGkb (available online: http://www.pharmgkb.org; accessed on 1 December 2011).

As the main components in the VEGF system, proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src, eNOS, and hsp90-α is also recognized as common targets of Dalbergia odorifera, Ligusticum chuanxiong and Corydalis yanhusuo, which are efficient for the treatment of CVD. This implies that the candidate drugs can target different target proteins involved in the same or different signal pathways, and thereby have potential effects on the whole signal system.

Target Prediction
In search of the candidate targets, the model that efficiently integrates the chemical, genomic and pharmacological information for drug targeting and discovery on a large scale is based on the two powerful methods Random Forest (RF) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The model is supported by a large pharmacological database of 6511 drugs and 3999 targets extracted from the DrugBank database (available online: http://drugbank.ca/; accessed on 1 June 2011), and shows an impressive performance of prediction for drug-target interaction, with a concordance of 85.83%, a sensitivity of 79.62% and a specificity of 92.76%. the candidate targets were selected according to the criteria that the possibility of interacting with potential candidate targets was higher than 0.6 for the RF model and 0.7 for the SVM model. The obtained candidate targets were finally reserved and were further predicted for their targets.

Target Validation
Molecular docking analysis was carried out using the AutoDock software (available online: http://autodock.scripps.edu/; accessed on 1 February 2012). This approach performs the docking of the small, flexible ligand to a set of grids describing the target protein. During the docking process, the protein was considered as rigid and the molecules as flexible. The crystal structures of the candidate targets were downloaded from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (available online: http://www.pdb.org/; accessed on 1 December 2011), and the proteins without crystal structures were performed based on homology modeling using the Swiss-Model Automated Protein Modelling Server (available online: http://swissmodel.expasy.org/; accessed on 1 February 2012).

TCM is a heritage that is thousands of years old and is still used by millions of people all over the world—even after the development of modern scientific medicine. Chinese herbal combinations generally include one or more plants and even animal products.

The study identified 54 protein targets, which are closely associated with CVD for the three Chinese herbs, of which 29 are common targets (52.7%), which clarifies the mechanism of efficiency of the herbs for the treatment of CVD.

Activation of NFkB

Extracellular stimuli for NFkB activation and NFkB regulated genes
Extracellular stimuli                       Regulated genes
TNFa                                         Growth factors (G/M-CSF)
Interleukin 1                            G/M CSF, M CSF, G CSF
ROS                                              Cell adhesion molecules
UV light                            ICAM-1, VCAM, E-Selectin, P-selectin
Ischaemia                                   Cytokines
Lipopolysaccharide               TNFa, IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, interferon
Bacteria                                        Transcription regulators
Viruses                                         P53, IkB, c-rel, c-myc
Amyloid                                      Antiapoptotic proteins
Glutamate                              TRAF-1, TRAF-2, c-IAP1, c-IAP2
Pathophysiology
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are toxic and in conditions of a dysbalance between their overproduction and the diminished activity of various antioxidant enzymes and other molecules induce cellular injury termed oxidative stress. ROS are often related to a number of diseases like atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism is not clear at all. Latest years of research have brought the idea of connection between ROS and NFkB. And indeed, in vitro studies showed a rapid activation of NFkB after exposure of certain cell types to ROS. Today, no specific receptor for ROS has been found, thus, the details of the ROS induced activation of NFkB are missing.

Natural occurring agents which actions are still a matter of debate in the theory and nouvelle small molecular derivates activate or inhibit the transcriptional factor. Synthetic oligo and polypeptide inhibitors of NFkB can penetrate the cell membrane and directly act on the Rel proteins. The most sophisticated approaches towards inhibiting the activation and translocation of NFkB into the nucleus represent gene deliveries, using plasmids or adenoviruses containing genes for various super repressors—modified IkB proteins, or so called NFkB decoys, which interact with activated NFkB and thus, inhibit the interaction between the transcription factor and nuclear DNA enhancers.

A simplified scheme of the activation of NFkB by the degradation of IkB. IkB is phosphorylated by IKK and ubiquinatated by the ubiquitine ligase system (ULS). IkB is further degradated by the 26S proteasome (26S).Activated NFkB can pass the nuclear membrane and interact with kB binding sequences in enhancers of NFkB regulated genes. LPS, lipopolysaccharide; ROS, reactive oxygen species; FasL, Fas ligand; TRAF, TNFa receptor associated factor; NIK, NFkB inducing kinase; MEKK, mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinases kinases.

The medicine of this century is a medicine of molecules, the diagnostic procedure and the therapy moves further from the “clinical picture” to the use of achievements in molecular biology and genetics. However, sober scepticism and awareness are indicated. Especially the role of NFkB in multiple signal transducing pathways and the tissue dependent variability of responses to alternations in NFkB pathway may be the reasons for unwanted side effects of the therapy that are after in vitro or in vivo experiments hardly to expect in the clinical use.

Therapeutic Targets
Modern drug discovery is primarily based on the search and subsequent testing of drug candidates acting on a preselected therapeutic target. Progress in genomics, protein structure, proteomics, and disease mechanisms has led to a growing interest in an effort for finding new targets and more effective exploration of existing targets. The number of reported targets of marketed and investigational drugs has significantly increased in the past 8 years. There are 1535 targets collected in the therapeutic target database.
Knowledge of these targets is helpful for molecular dissection of the mechanism of action of drugs and for predicting features that guide new drug design and the
search for new targets. This article summarizes the progress of target exploration and investigates the characteristics of the currently explored targets to analyze their sequence, structure, family representation, pathway association, tissue distribution, and genome location features for finding clues useful for searching for new targets. Possible “rules” to guide the search for druggable proteins and the feasibility of using a statistical learning method for predicting druggable proteins directly from their sequences are discussed.

Current Trends in Exploration of Therapeutic Targets
There are 395 identifiable targets described in 1606 patents. Of these targets, 264 have been found in more than one patent and 50 appear in more than 10 patents. The number of patents associated with a target can be considered to partly correlate with the level of effort and intensity of interest currently being directed to it. Approximately one third of the patents with an identifiable target were approved in the past year. This suggests that the effort for the exploration of these targets is ongoing, and there has been steady progress in the discovery of new investigational agents directed to these targets.

Various degrees of progress have been made toward discovery and testing of agents directed at these targets. However, for some of these targets, many difficulties remain to be resolved before viable drugs can be derived. The appearance of a high number of patents associated with these targets partly reflects the intensity of efforts for finding effective drug candidates against these targets.

There are 62 targets being explored for the design of subtype-specific drugs, which represents 15.7% of the 395 identifiable targets in U.S. patents approved in 2000 through 2004. Compared with the 11 targets of FDA approved subtype-specific drugs during the same period, a significantly larger number of targets are being explored for the design of subtype-specific drugs.

What Constitutes a Therapeutic Target?
The majority of clinical drugs achieve their effect by binding to a cavity and regulating the activity, of its protein target. Specific structural and physicochemical properties, such as the “rule of five” (Lipinski et al., 2001), are required for these drugs to have sufficient levels of efficacy, bioavailability, and safety, which define target sites to which drug-like molecules can bind. In most cases, these sites exist out of functional necessity, and their structural architectures accommodate target-specific drugs that minimally interact with other functionally important but structurally similar sites.
These constraints limit the types of proteins that can be bound by drug-like molecules, leading to the introduction of the concept of druggable proteins (Hopkins and Groom, 2002; Hardy and Peet, 2004). Druggable proteins do not necessarily become therapeutic targets (Hopkins and Groom, 2002); only those that play key roles in diseases can be explored as potential targets.

 Prediction of Druggable Proteins by a Statistical Learning Method

Currently, the support vector machine (SVM) method seems to be the most accurate statistical learning method for protein predictions. SVM is based on the structural risk minimization principle from statistical learning theory. Known proteins are divided into druggable and nondruggable classes; each of these proteins is represented by their sequence-derived physicochemical features.

These features are then used by the SVM to construct a hyperplane in a higher dimensional hyperspace that maximally separates druggable proteins and nondruggable ones. By projecting the sequence of a new protein onto this hyperspace, it can be determined whether this protein is druggable from its location with respect to the hyperplane. It is a druggable protein if it is located on the side of druggable class.
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Lev-Ari, A. Stem cells create new heart cells in baby mice, but not in adults, study shows

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/03/stem-cells-create-new-heart-cells-in-baby-mice-but-not-in-adults-study-shows/

Lev-Ari, A. Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and the Role of agent alternatives in endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Activation and Nitric Oxide Production

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/19/cardiovascular-disease-cvd-and-the-role-of-agent-alternatives-in-endothelial-nitric-oxide-synthase-enos-activation-and-nitric-oxide-production/

Lev-Ari, A. Bystolic’s generic Nebivolol – positive effect on circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells endogenous augmentation

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/16/bystolics-generic-nebivolol-positive-effect-on-circulating-endothilial-progrnetor-cells-endogenous-augmentation/

Lev-Ari, A. Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs: Reduction Methods for CV Risk

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/02/macrovascular-disease-therapeutic-potential-of-cepcs-reduction-methods-for-cv-risk/

Lev-Ari, A. Heart patients’ skin cells turned into healthy heart muscle cells

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/04/heart-patients-skin-cells-turned-into-healthy-heart-muscle-cells/

Lev-Ari, A. Resident-cell-based Therapy in Human Ischaemic Heart Disease: Evolution in the PROMISE of Thymosin beta4 for Cardiac Repair

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/04/30/93/

 Nitric Oxide and Sepsis, Hemodynamic Collapse, and the Search for Therapeutic Options

Congestive Heart Failure & Personalized Medicine: Two-gene Test predicts response to Beta Blocker Bucindolol

Mediterranean Diet is BEST for patients with established Heart Disorders

NO Nutritional remedies for hypertension and atherosclerosis. It’s 12 am: do you know where your electrons are?

Endothelin Receptors in Cardiovascular Diseases: The Role of eNOS Stimulation
Inhibition of ET-1, ETA and ETA-ETB, Induction of NO production, stimulation of eNOS and Treatment Regime with PPAR-gamma agonists (TZD): cEPCs

Endogenous Augmentation for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction – A Bibliography

Reveals from ENCODE project will invite high synergistic collaborations to discover specific targets

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

RESULTS

Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (Original Article, N Engl J Med 2011 ; 365 : 993 – 1003) . In the first paragraph of Results (page 996), the penultimate sentence should have read, “Of the 224 patients in the PTAS group, 16 (7.1%) did not have a stent placed (the procedure was not performed in 4 patients, the procedure was aborted before the lesion was accessed in 7, and angioplasty alone was performed in 5),”

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMx120039?query=TOC

BACKGROUND

Atherosclerotic intracranial arterial stenosis is an important cause of stroke that is increasingly being treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) to prevent recurrent stroke. However, PTAS has not been compared with medical management in a randomized trial.

METHODS

We randomly assigned patients who had a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke attributed to stenosis of 70 to 99% of the diameter of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management alone or aggressive medical management plus PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system. The primary end point was stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during the follow-up period or stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, aggressive medical management was superior to PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system, both because the risk of early stroke after PTAS was high and because the risk of stroke with aggressive medical therapy alone was lower than expected.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1105335

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