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Posts Tagged ‘endovascular thrombectomy’


The Golden Hour of Stroke Intervention

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

The removal of thrombus under the image guidance, endovascular thrombectomy is preferred for an arterial embolism which is characteristic for an arterial blockage frequently caused by atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm disorder. An arterial embolism causes restricted blood supply which leads to pain in the affected area. A thrombectomy can too be used to treat conditions in your organs which is usually associated with less benefit and more risk, a large retrospective study found.

Alejandro Spiotta, MD from Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston stated that functional independence rates were 45% for those treated in less than 30 minutes, 33% with procedures 30 to 60 minutes long, and 27% when procedures took more than 60 minutes. The results indicate that complications double after 50 minutes and the mortality risk is significantly for the over 60-minute group than in those treated in 30 to 60 minutes.

Earlier research has shown that when it comes to mechanical thrombectomy, procedure time has a noteworthy effect on patient outcomes. Based on these findings, it seems reasonable to conclude that at 60 minutes, one should consider the futility of continuing the procedure. However, procedures that last longer were connected with increased cost, worse outcomes, and increased incidence of complications, the investigators noted. Yet, the findings underscore the importance of timely recanalization and suggest there’s a point at which continuing to manipulate the intracranial artery may not be helpful for the patient.

Spiotta’s group evaluated 1,357 participants at seven U.S. medical centers, but only 12% out of the patients showed signs of posterior circulation stroke and 46% of cases received IV tissue-type plasminogen activator. The scientists use a prospectively-maintained database which consists of clinical and technical outcomes and baseline variables and can evaluate patients that underwent endovascular thrombectomy with direct aspiration as first pass technique or a stent retriever.

They collected their experience with the benefit of hindsight and joint it together, so there’s always a chance of case ascertain bias or other bias in the collection of the cases. One limitation is the fact that these are quality, busy centers, and the results might even worse if less experienced centers were included. It’s a little bit like getting the cream of the crop and analyzing their data. Upcoming studies should gather data on the relationship between specific thrombectomy devices and techniques and the success of recanalization procedures for patients with AIS.

SOURCE
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/strokes/78251

 

 

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