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Lesson 5 Cell Signaling And Motility: Cytoskeleton & Actin: Curations and Articles of reference as supplemental information: #TUBiol3373

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

Cell motility or migration is an essential cellular process for a variety of biological events. In embryonic development, cells migrate to appropriate locations for the morphogenesis of tissues and organs. Cells need to migrate to heal the wound in repairing damaged tissue. Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) migrate to form new capillaries during angiogenesis. White blood cells migrate to the sites of inflammation to kill bacteria. Cancer cell metastasis involves their migration through the blood vessel wall to invade surrounding tissues.

Please Click on the Following Powerpoint Presentation for Lesson 4 on the Cytoskeleton, Actin, and Filaments

CLICK ON LINK BELOW

cell signaling 5 lesson

This post will be updated with further information when we get into Lesson 6 and complete our discussion on the Cytoskeleton

Please see the following articles on Actin and the Cytoskeleton in Cellular Signaling

Role of Calcium, the Actin Skeleton, and Lipid Structures in Signaling and Cell Motility

This article, constitutes a broad, but not complete review of the emerging discoveries of the critical role of calcium signaling on cell motility and, by extension, embryonic development, cancer metastasis, changes in vascular compliance at the junction between the endothelium and the underlying interstitial layer.  The effect of calcium signaling on the heart in arrhtmogenesis and heart failure will be a third in this series, while the binding of calcium to troponin C in the synchronous contraction of the myocardium had been discussed by Dr. Lev-Ari in Part I.

Universal MOTIFs essential to skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac syncytial muscle, endothelium, neovascularization, atherosclerosis and hypertension, cell division, embryogenesis, and cancer metastasis. The discussion will be presented in several parts:
1.  Biochemical and signaling cascades in cell motility
2.  Extracellular matrix and cell-ECM adhesions
3.  Actin dynamics in cell-cell adhesion
4.  Effect of intracellular Ca++ action on cell motility
5.  Regulation of the cytoskeleton
6.  Role of thymosin in actin-sequestration
7.  T-lymphocyte signaling and the actin cytoskeleton

 

Identification of Biomarkers that are Related to the Actin Cytoskeleton

In this article the Dr. Larry Bernstein covers two types of biomarker on the function of actin in cytoskeleton mobility in situ.

  • First, is an application in developing the actin or other component, for a biotarget and then, to be able to follow it as

(a) a biomarker either for diagnosis, or

(b) for the potential treatment prediction of disease free survival.

  • Second, is mostly in the context of MI, for which there is an abundance of work to reference, and a substantial body of knowledge about

(a) treatment and long term effects of diet, exercise, and

(b) underlying effects of therapeutic drugs.

Microtubule-Associated Protein Assembled on Polymerized Microtubules

(This article has a great 3D visualization of a microtuble structure as well as description of genetic diseases which result from mutations in tubulin and effects on intracellular trafficking of proteins.

A latticework of tiny tubes called microtubules gives your cells their shape and also acts like a railroad track that essential proteins travel on. But if there is a glitch in the connection between train and track, diseases can occur. In the November 24, 2015 issue of PNAS, Tatyana Polenova, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and her team at the University of Delaware (UD), together with John C. Williams, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope in Duarte, California, reveal for the first time — atom by atom — the structure of a protein bound to a microtubule. The protein of focus, CAP-Gly, short for “cytoskeleton-associated protein-glycine-rich domains,” is a component of dynactin, which binds with the motor protein dynein to move cargoes of essential proteins along the microtubule tracks. Mutations in CAP-Gly have been linked to such neurological diseases and disorders as Perry syndrome and distal spinal bulbar muscular dystrophy.

 

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Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Interviewer, Curator

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Intelligence

Biochemical Insights of Dr. Jose Eduardo de Salles Roselino

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/12/24/2014/larryhbern/Biochemical_
Insights_of_Dr._Jose_Eduardo_de_Salles_Roselino/

Biochemical Insights of Dr. Jose Eduardo de Salles Roselino

How is it that developments late in the 20th century diverted the attention of
biological processes from a dynamic construct involving interacting chemical
reactions under rapidly changing external conditions effecting tissues and cell
function to a rigid construct that is determined unilaterally by the genome
construct, diverting attention from mechanisms essential for seeing the complete
cellular construct?

Larry, I assume that in case you read the article titled Neo – Darwinism, The
Modern Synthesis and Selfish Genes that bares no relationship with Physiology
with Molecular Biology J. Physiol 2011; 589(5): 1007-11 by Denis Noble, you might
find that it was the key factor required in order to understand the dislodgment
of physiology as a foundation of medical reasoning. In the near unilateral emphasis
of genomic activity as a determinant of cellular activity all of the required general
support for the understanding of my reasoning. The DNA to protein link goes
from triplet sequence to amino acid sequence. That is the realm of genetics.
Further, protein conformation, activity and function requires that environmental
and micro-environmental factors should be considered (Biochemistry). If that
were not the case, we have no way to bridge the gap between the genetic
code and the evolution of cells, tissues, organs, and organisms.

  • Consider this example of hormonal function. I would like to stress in
    the cAMP dependent hormonal response, the transfer of information
    that 
    occurs through conformation changes after protein interactions.
    This mechanism therefore, requires that proteins must not have their
    conformation determined by sequence alone.
    Regulatory protein conformation is determined by its sequence plus
    the interaction it has in its micro-environment. For instance, if your
    scheme takes into account what happens inside the membrane and
    that occurs before cAMP, then production is increased by hormone
    action. A dynamic scheme  will show an effect initially, over hormone
    receptor (hormone binding causing change in its conformation) followed
    by GTPase change in conformation caused by receptor interaction and
    finally, Adenylate cyclase change in conformation and in activity after
    GTPase protein binding in a complex system that is dependent on self-
    assembly and also, on changes in their conformation in response to
    hormonal signals (see R. A Kahn and A. G Gilman 1984 J. Biol. Chem.
    v. 259,n 10 pp6235-6240. In this case, trimeric or dimeric G does not
    matter). Furthermore, after the step of cAMP increased production we
    also can see changes in protein conformation.  The effect of increased
    cAMP levels over (inhibitor protein and protein kinase protein complex)
    also is an effect upon protein conformation. Increased cAMP levels led
    to the separation of inhibitor protein (R ) from cAMP dependent protein
    kinase (C ) causing removal of the inhibitor R and the increase in C activity.
    R stands for regulatory subunit and C for catalytic subunit of the protein
    complex.
  • This cAMP effect over the quaternary structure of the enzyme complex
    (C protein kinase + R the inhibitor) may be better understood as an
    environmental information producing an effect in opposition to
    what may be considered as a tendency  towards a conformation
    “determined” by the genetic code. This “ideal” conformation
    “determined” by the genome  would be only seen in crystalline
    protein.
     In carbohydrate metabolism in the liver the hormonal signal
    causes a biochemical regulatory response that preserves homeostatic
    levels of glucose (one function) and in the muscle, it is a biochemical
    regulatory response that preserves intracellular levels of ATP (another
    function).
  • Therefore, sequence alone does not explain conformation, activity
    and function of regulatory proteins
    .  If this important regulatory
    mechanism was  not ignored, the work of  S. Prusiner (Prion diseases
    and the BSE crisis Stanley B. Prusiner 1997 Science; 278: 245 – 251,
    10  October) would be easily understood.  We would be accustomed
    to reason about changes in protein conformation caused by protein
    interaction with other proteins, lipids, small molecules and even ions.
  • In case this wrong biochemical reasoning is used in microorganisms.
    Still it is wrong but, it will cause a minor error most of the time, since
    we may reduce almost all activity of microorganism´s proteins to a
    single function – The production of another microorganism. However,
    even microorganisms respond differently to their micro-environment
    despite a single genome (See M. Rouxii dimorphic fungus works,
    later). The reason for the reasoning error is, proteins are proteins
    and DNA are DNA quite different in chemical terms. Proteins must
    change their conformation to allow for fast regulatory responses and
    DNA must preserve its sequence to allow for genetic inheritance.

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Cytoskeleton and Cell Membrane Physiology

 

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

cell-membrane

cell-membrane

early evolution of lipid membranes and the three domains of life

early evolution of lipid membranes and the three domains of life

Definition and Function

The cytoskeleton is a series of intercellular proteins that help a cell with

  1. shape,
  2. support, and
  3. movement.

Cytoskeleton has three main structural components:

  1. microfilaments,
  2. intermediate filaments, and
  3. movement

The cytoskeleton mediates movement by

  • helping the cell move in its environment and
  • mediating the movement of the cell’s components.

Thereby it provides an important structural framework for the cell –

  • the framework for the movement of organelles, contiguous with the cell membrane, around the cytoplasm. By the activity of
  • the network of protein microfilaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules.

The structural framework supports cell function as follows:

Cell shape. For cells without cell walls, the cytoskeleton determines the shape of the cell. This is one of the functions of the intermediate filaments.

Cell movement. The dynamic collection of microfilaments and microtubles can be continually in the process of assembly and disassembly, resulting in forces that move the cell. There can also be sliding motions of these structures. Audesirk and Audesirk give examples of white blood cells “crawling” and the migration and shape changes of cells during the development of multicellular organisms.

Organelle movement. Microtubules and microfilaments can help move organelles from place to place in the cell. In endocytosis a vesicle formed engulfs a particle abutting the cell. Microfilaments then attach to the vesicle and pull it into the cell. Much of the complex synthesis and distribution function of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex makes use of transport vescicles,  associated with the cytoskeleton.

Cell division. During cell division, microtubules accomplish the movement of the chromosones to the daughter nucleus. Also, a ring of microfilaments helps divide two developing cells by constricting the central region between the cells (fission).

References:
Hickman, et al. Ch 4 Hickman, Cleveland P., Roberts, Larry S., and Larson, Allan, Integrated Principles of Zoology, 9th. Ed., Wm C. Brown, 1995.
Audesirk & Audesirk Ch 6 Audesirk, Teresa and Audesirk, Gerald, Biology, Life on Earth, 5th Ed., Prentice-Hall, 1999.
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/biology/bioref.html#c1
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/biology/cytoskel.html

Intermediate filaments are 8-12 nanometers in diameter and are twisted together in a cord shape. They are composed of keratin and keratin-like proteins.  These filaments are tough and resist tension.

Microtubules are composed of alpha and beta tubulin that form long, hollow cylinders.  These are fairly strong proteins and are the largest component of cytoskeleton at 25 nanometers. Tubular monomers can be lengthened or shortened from the positive end.

Microtubules have three different functions.

They make up the cell’s

  1. centriole
  2. the flagella and cilia of a cell, and
  3. they serve as “tracks” for transport vesicles to move along.

http://biology.kenyon.edu/HHMI/Biol113/cytoskeleton.htm

Key Points 

Microtubules

  1. help the cell resist compression,
  2. provide a track along which vesicles can move throughout the cell, and
  3. are the components of cilia and flagella.

Cilia and flagella are hair-like structures that

  1. assist with locomotion in some cells, as well as
  2. line various structures to trap particles.

The structures of cilia and flagella are a “9+2 array,” meaning that

  • a ring of nine microtubules is surrounded by two more microtubules.

Microtubules attach to replicated chromosomes

  • during cell division and
  • pull them apart to opposite ends of the pole,
  • allowing the cell to divide with a complete set of chromosomes in each daughter cell.

Microtubules are the largest element of the cytoskeleton.

The walls of the microtubule are made of

  • polymerized dimers of α-tubulin and β-tubulin, two globular proteins.

https://figures.boundless.com/18608/full/figure-04-05-04ab.jpe

With a diameter of about 25 nm, microtubules are the widest components of the cytoskeleton.

https://figures.boundless.com/18608/full/figure-04-05-04ab.jpe

They help the cell

  • resist compression,
  • provide a track along which vesicles move through the cell, and
  • pull replicated chromosomes to opposite ends of a dividing cell.

Like microfilaments, microtubules can dissolve and reform quickly.

Microtubules are also the structural elements of flagella, cilia, and centrioles (the latter are the two perpendicular bodies of the centrosome). In animal cells, the centrosome is the microtubule-organizing center. In eukaryotic cells, flagella and cilia are quite different structurally from their counterparts in prokaryotes.

Intermediate Filaments

Intermediate filaments (IFs) are cytoskeletal components found in animal cells. They are composed of a family of related proteins sharing common structural and sequence features.

epithelial cells

epithelial cells

https://figures.boundless.com/22035/full/epithelial-cells.jpe

flagella and cilia share a common structural arrangement of microtubules called a “9 + 2 array.” This is an appropriate name because a single flagellum or cilium is made of a ring of nine microtubule doublets surrounding a single microtubule doublet in the center.

9+2 array

9+2 array

https://figures.boundless.com/18609/full/figure-04-05-05.jpe

https://www.boundless.com/physiology/textbooks/boundless-anatomy-and-physiology-textbook/cellular-structure-and-function-3/the-cytoskeleton-46/the-composition-and-function-of-the-cytoskeleton-348-11460/

http://jcs.biologists.org/content/115/22/4215/F4.large.jpg

The `Spectraplakins’: cytoskeletal giants with characteristics of both spectrin and plakin families

Katja Röper, Stephen L. Gregory and Nicholas H. Brown
J Cell Sci Nov 15, 2002; 115: 4215-4225
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1242/​jcs.00157

cytoskel

cytoskel

http://plantphys.info/plant_physiology/images/cytoskelfcns.gif

cytoskeleton

cytoskeleton

http://img.sparknotes.com/figures/D/d479f5da672c08a54f986ae699069d7a/cytoskeleton.gif

The sequential endosymbiotic origins of eukaryotes: Compared to bacteria and archaea, the typical eukaryotic cell is much more structurally complex.

While the prokaryotes have a rigid cell wall, the ancestral eukaryote appears to have been wall-less (the walls of plant cells appear to represent a adaptation, and are not homologous to prokaryotic cell walls).

In addition to a nucleus (wherein the cell’s DNA is located, and which we will return to in the next section), there are cytoskeletal structures, including distinctive flagella (quite different from those found in prokaryotes), an active (motile) plasma membrane, capable of engulfing other cells, and multiple internal membrane systems. (A more complete description of cell structure is beyond this version of Biofundamentals).

In aerobic bacteria and cyanobacteria, the electron transport chains associated with ATP synthesis (through either photosynthesis or aerobic respiration) located within the plasma membrane (and in the case of cyanobacteria, internal membrane systems as well).

The same processes (aerobic respiration and photosynthesis) occur within eukaryotic cells. Animals have aerobic respiration, while plants have both).

However, these processes do not occur on the plasma membrane, but rather within distinct cytoplasmic organelles: mitochondria for aerobic respiration and chloroplasts for photosynthesis. All eukaryotic cells have mitochondria, plants (which are eukaryotic) have both mitochondria and chloroplasts.

An intriguing evolutionary question was, are these processes related, that is, are the processes of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis found in eukaryotes homologous to the processes found in bacteria and cyanobacteria, or did they originate independently.

The path to understanding that homologous nature of these processes began with studies of cell structure.

http://virtuallaboratory.colorado.edu/Biofundamentals/lectureNotes-Revision/Topic2I_Symbiosis.htm

spectrin protein superfamily.large

spectrin protein superfamily.large

http://mmbr.asm.org/content/70/3/605/F4.large.jpg

The role of secreted factors and extracellular matrix

The role of secreted factors and extracellular matrix

Focal Adhesions: Transmembrane Junctions Between the Extracellular Matrix and the Cytoskeleton

K Burridge, K Fath, T Kelly, G Nuckolls, and C Turner
Ann Rev Cell Biol Nov 1988; 4: 487-525

http://dx.doi.org:/10.1146/annurev.cb.04.110188.002415

the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a collection of extracellular molecules secreted by cells that

  • provides structural and biochemical support to the surrounding cells.[1]

Because multicellularity evolved independently in different multicellular lineages, the composition of ECM varies between multicellular structures; however,

  • cell adhesion,
  • cell-to-cell communication and
  • differentiation

are common functions of the ECM.[2]

The animal extracellular matrix includes

  • the interstitial matrix and
  • the basement membrane.[3]

Interstitial matrix is present between various animal cells (i.e., in the intercellular spaces).

Gels of polysaccharides and fibrous proteins

  • fill the interstitial space and act as
  • a compression buffer against the stress placed on the ECM.[4]

Basement membranes are sheet-like depositions of ECM on which various epithelial cells rest.

The Extracellular Matrix (ECM)
http://userpage.chemie.fu-berlin.de/biochemie/aghaucke/lehre/cytoskelet-ECM.pdf

Mechanical support to tissues

http://www.nature.com/scitable/content/ne0000/ne0000/ne0000/ne0000/14707425/U4CP5-1_FibronectinIntegri_ksm.jpg

http://www.nature.com/scitable/content/integrin-connects-the-extracellular-matrix-with-the-14707425

Organization of cells into tissues

  1. Activation of signaling pathways (cell growth, proliferation; development); examples:
  2. TGF-β, integrins
  3. specialized roles (tendon, bone; cartilage; cell movement during development; basal lamina in epithelia)

Components

  1. proteoglycans
  2. collagen fibers (mechanical strength)
  3. multiadhesive matrix proteins (linking cell surface receptors to the (ECM)

Integrin connects the extracellular matrix with the actin cytoskeleton inside the cell

Fibronectin Integrin

Fibronectin Integrin

http://www.nature.com/scitable/content/ne0000/ne0000/ne0000/ne0000/14707425/U4CP5-1_FibronectinIntegri_ksm.jpg

http://www.nature.com/scitable/content/integrin-connects-the-extracellular-matrix-with-the-14707425

Continuous membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion requires continuous accommodation to lipid and cytoskeleton dynamics.

Sheetz MP, Sable JE, Döbereiner HG.
Annu Rev Biophys Struct Biomol. 2006;35:417-34.

The plasma membrane of most animal cells conforms to the cytoskeleton and only occasionally separates to form blebs. Previous studies indicated that

  • many weak interactions between cytoskeleton and the lipid bilayer
  • kept the surfaces together to counteract the normal outward pressure of cytoplasm.

Either the loss of adhesion strength or the formation of gaps in the cytoskeleton enables the pressure to form blebs. Membrane-associated cytoskeleton proteins, such as spectrin and filamin, can

  • control the movement and aggregation of membrane proteins and lipids,
    e.g., phosphoinositol phospholipids (PIPs), as well as blebbing.

At the same time, lipids (particularly PIPs) and membrane proteins affect

  • cytoskeleton and signaling dynamics.

We consider here the roles of the major phosphatidylinositol-4,5-diphosphate (PIP2) binding protein, MARCKS, and PIP2 levels in controlling cytoskeleton dynamics. Further understanding of dynamics will provide important clues about how membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion rapidly adjusts to cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16689643

Interaction of membrane/lipid rafts with the cytoskeleton: impact on signaling and function: membrane/lipid rafts, mediators of cytoskeletal arrangement and cell signaling.

Head BP, Patel HH, Insel PA   Epub 2013 Jul 27.
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2014 Feb;1838(2):532-45.
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/j.bbamem.2013.07.018

The plasma membrane in eukaryotic cells contains microdomains that are

  • enriched in certain glycosphingolipids, gangliosides, and sterols (such as cholesterol) to form membrane/lipid rafts (MLR).

These regions exist as caveolae, morphologically observable flask-like invaginations, or as a less easily detectable planar form. MLR are scaffolds for many molecular entities, including

  • signaling receptors and ion channels that
  • communicate extracellular stimuli to the intracellular milieu.

Much evidence indicates that this organization and/or the clustering of MLR into more active signaling platforms

  • depends upon interactions with and dynamic rearrangement of the cytoskeleton.

Several cytoskeletal components and binding partners, as well as enzymes that regulate the cytoskeleton, localize to MLR and help

  • regulate lateral diffusion of membrane proteins and lipids in response to extracellular events
    (e.g., receptor activation, shear stress, electrical conductance, and nutrient demand).

MLR regulate

  • cellular polarity,
  • adherence to the extracellular matrix,
  • signaling events (including ones that affect growth and migration), and
  • are sites of cellular entry of certain pathogens, toxins and nanoparticles.

The dynamic interaction between MLR and the underlying cytoskeleton thus regulates many facets of the function of eukaryotic cells and their adaptation to changing environments. Here, we review general features of MLR and caveolae and their role in several aspects of cellular function, including

  • polarity of endothelial and epithelial cells,
  • cell migration,
  • mechanotransduction,
  • lymphocyte activation,
  • neuronal growth and signaling, and
  • a variety of disease settings.

This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé.

Cell control by membrane–cytoskeleton adhesion

Michael P. Sheetz
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 2, 392-396 (May 2001) | http://dx.doi.doi:/10.1038/35073095

The rates of mechanochemical processes, such as endocytosis, membrane extension and membrane resealing after cell wounding, are known to be controlled biochemically, through interaction with regulatory proteins. Here, I propose that these rates are also controlled physically, through an apparently continuous adhesion between plasma membrane lipids and cytoskeletal proteins.

Lipid Rafts, Signalling and the Cytoskeleton
http://www.bms.ed.ac.uk/research/others/smaciver/Cyto-Topics/lipid_rafts_and_the_cytoskeleton.htm

Lipid rafts are specialised membrane domains enriched in certain lipids cholesterol and proteins. The existence of lipid rafts was first hypothesised in 1988 (Simons & van Meer, 1988; Simon & Ikonen, 1997), but what we know as “caveolae” were first observed  much earlier (Palade, 1953; Yamada, 1955).  Caveolae are flask shaped invaginations on the cell surface that are a type of membrane raft, these were named “caveolae intracellulare” (Yamada, 1955).  After a long argument (Jacobson & Dietrich, 1999), most now consider that these rafts actually exist, however, there is some confusion surrounding the classification of these rafts. It presently seems that there could be three types; caveolae, glycosphingolipid enriched membranes (GEM), and polyphospho inositol rich rafts. It may also be that there are inside rafts (PIP2 rich and caveolae) and outside rafts (GEM).

The fatty-acid chains of lipids within the rafts tend to be extended and so more tightly packed, creating domains with higher order. It is therefore thought that  rafts exist in a separate ordered phase that floats in a sea of poorly ordered lipids.  Glycosphingolipids, and other lipids with long, straight acyl chains are preferentially incorporated into the rafts.

Caveolae are similar in composition to GEMs that lack caveolae and in fact cells that lack caveolin-1 do not have morphologically identifiable caveolae but instead have extra GEM.  These cells can then be transfected with caveolin-1 cDNA and the caveolae then appear.  This suggests that GEM are merely caveolae without caveolin-1.  Caveolin-1 is a 21kDa integral membrane protein that binds cholesterol (Maruta et al, 1995). In cells lacking caveolin-1, caveolin-2 is synthesised but remains in the Golgi.  Caveolin 1 and 2 colocalise when expressed in the same cells and they may form hetero-dimers (Scherer et al, 1997). Caveolin-3 is expressed in muscle where it forms muscle-type caveolae.  Caveolin-3 is involved in certain types of muscular dystrophy (Galbiati et al, ). A slightly confusing finding is that caveolae are the reported site of integrin signalling ().  It is difficult to imagine integrins being available in the depths of membrane invaginations for binding extra-cellular ligands.

The function of rafts

Many functions have been attributed to rafts, from cholesterol transport, endocytosis and signal transduction.  The later is almost certainly the case. It has been suggested that the primary function of caveolae was in constitutive endocytic trafficking but recent data show that this is not the case, instead caveolae are very stable regions of membranes that are not involved in  endocytosis (Thompsen et al, 2002).

lipid raft

lipid raft

Rafts and the Cytoskeleton

Many actin binding proteins are known to bind to polyphosphoinositides and to be regulated by them (see PI and ABPs), by a series of protein domains such as PH, PX and ENTH (see Domains).  It is consequently scarcely surprising that some ABPs are suggested to link the actin cytoskeleton and PIP2-enriched rafts. One of these is gelsolin, a Ca2+, pH and polyphosphoinositide regulated actin capping and severing protein (see Gelsolin Family), that partitions into rafts isolated biochemically from brain (Fanatsu et al, 2000).

GEMs too are suggested to link to the actin cytoskeleton through ABPs particularly ERM proteins through EBP50, a protein that binds members of the ERM proteins through the ERM C-terminus (Brdickova et al, 2001).

References:

Brdickova, N., Brdicka, T., Andrea, L., Spicka, J., Angelisova, P., Milgram, S. L. & Horejsi, V. (2001) Interaction between two adaptor proteins, PAG and EBP50: a possible link between membrane rafts and actin cytoskeleton.  FEBS letters. 507, 133-136.

Cary, L. A. & Cooper, J. A. (2000) Molecular switches in lipid rafts.  Nature. 404, 945-947.

Czarny, M., Fiucci, G., Lavie, Y., Banno, Y., Nozawa, Y. & Liscovitch, M. (2000) Phospholipase D2: functional interaction with caveolin in low-density membrane microdomains.,  FEBS letters.

Foger, N., Funatsu, N., Kumanogoh, H., Sokawa, Y. & Maekawa, S. (2000) Identification of gelsolin as an actin regulatory component in a Triton insoluble low density fraction (raft) of newborn bovine brain.  Neuroscience Research. 36, 311-317.

Galbiati, F., Engelman, J. A., Volonte, D., Zhang, X. L., Minetti, C., Li, M., Hou jr, H., Kneitz, B., Edelman, W. & Lisanti, M. P. (2001) Caveolin-3 null mice show a loss of caveolae, changes in the microdomain distribution of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, and T-tubule abnormalities.  J. Biol.Chem. 276, 21425-21433.

…  (more)

centralpore-small  Gating and Ion Conductivity

centralpore-small Gating and Ion Conductivity

Interaction of epithelial ion channels with the actin-based cytoskeleton.

Mazzochi C, Benos DJ, Smith PR.
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2006 Dec;291(6):F1113-22. Epub 2006 Aug 22

The interaction of ion channels with the actin-based cytoskeleton in epithelial cells

  • not only maintains the polarized expression of ion channels within specific membrane domains,
  • it also functions in the intracellular trafficking and regulation of channel activity.

Initial evidence supporting an interaction between

  • epithelial ion channels and the
  • actin-based cytoskeleton

came from patch-clamp studies of the effects of cytochalasins on channel activity. Cytochalasins were shown to

  • either activate or inactivate epithelial ion channels.

An interaction between

  • the actin-based cytoskeleton and epithelial ion channels

was further supported by the fact that the addition of monomeric or filamentous actin to excised patches had an effect on channel activity comparable to that of cytochalasins. Through the recent application of molecular and proteomic approaches, we now know that

  • the interactions between epithelial ion channels and actin can either be direct or indirect,
  • the latter being mediated through scaffolding or actin-binding proteins
  • that serve as links between the channels and the actin-based cytoskeleton.

This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the interactions between epithelial ion channels and the actin-based cytoskeleton, and the roles these interactions play in regulating the cell surface expression, activity, and intracellular trafficking of epithelial ion channels.

epithelial ion channels

epithelial ion channels

Actin cytoskeleton regulates ion channel activity in retinal neurons.

Maguire G, Connaughton V, Prat AG, Jackson GR Jr, Cantiello HF.
Neuroreport. 1998 Mar 9;9(4):665-70

The actin cytoskeleton is an important contributor to the integrity of cellular shape and responses in neurons. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with functional interactions between the actin cytoskeleton and neuronal ion channels are largely unknown. Whole-cell and single channel recording techniques were thus applied to identified retinal bipolar neurons of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) to assess the role of acute changes in actin-based cytoskeleton dynamics in the regulation of voltage-gated ion channels. Disruption of endogenous actin filaments after brief treatment (20-30 min) with cytochalasin D (CD) activated voltage-gated K+ currents in bipolar cells, which were largely prevented by intracellular perfusion with the actin filament-stabilizer agent, phalloidin. Either CD treatment under cell-attached conditions or direct addition of actin to excised, inside-out patches of bipolar cells activated and/or increased single K+ channels. Thus, acute changes in actin-based cytoskeleton dynamics regulate voltage-gated ion channel activity in bipolar cells.

Cytoskeletal Basis of Ion Channel Function in Cardiac Muscle

Matteo Vatta, Ph.D1,2 and Georgine Faulkner, Ph.D3

The publisher’s final edited version of this article is available at Future Cardiol

The heart is a force-generating organ that responds to self-generated electrical stimuli from specialized cardiomyocytes. This function is modulated by sympathetic and parasympathetic activity.

In order to contract and accommodate the repetitive morphological changes induced by the cardiac cycle,

  • cardiomyocytes depend on their highly evolved and specialized cytoskeletal apparatus.

Defects in components of the cytoskeleton, in the long term, affect

  • the ability of the cell to compensate at
  • both functional and structural levels.

In addition to the structural remodeling, the myocardium becomes

  • increasingly susceptible to altered electrical activity leading to arrhythmogenesis.

The development of arrhythmias secondary to structural remodeling defects has been noted, although the detailed molecular mechanisms are still elusive. Here I will review the current knowledge of the molecular and functional relationships between the cytoskeleton and ion channels and, I will discuss the future impact of new data on molecular cardiology research and clinical practice. 

Stretch-activated ion channel

Stretch-activated or stretch-gated ion channels are

  • ion channels which open their pores in response to
  • mechanical deformation of a neuron’s plasma membrane.

[Also see mechanosensitive ion channels and mechanosensitive channels, with which they may be synonymous]. Opening of the ion channels

  • depolarizes the afferent neuron producing an action potential with sufficient depolarization.[1]

Channels open in response to two different mechanisms: the prokaryotic model and the mammalian hair cell model.[2][3] Stretch-activated ion channels have been shown to detect vibration, pressure, stretch, touch, sounds, tastes, smell, heat, volume, and vision.[4][5][6] Stretch-activated ion channels have been categorized into

three distinct “superfamilies”:

  1. the ENaC/DEG family,
  2. the TRP family, and
  3. the K1 selective family.

These channels are involved with bodily functions such as blood pressure regulation.[7] They are shown to be associated with many cardiovascular diseases.[3] Stretch-activated channels were first observed in chick skeletal muscles by Falguni Guharay and Frederick Sachs in 1983 and the results were published in 1984.[8] Since then stretch-activated channels have been found in cells from bacteria to humans as well as plants.

Mechanosensitivity of cell membranes. Ion channels, lipid matrix and cytoskeleton.

Petrov AG, Usherwood PN.
Eur Biophys J. 1994;23(1):1-19

Physical and biophysical mechanisms of mechano-sensitivity of cell membranes are reviewed. The possible roles of

  • the lipid matrix and of
  • the cytoskeleton in membrane mechanoreception

are discussed. Techniques for generation of static strains and dynamic curvatures of membrane patches are considered. A unified model for

  • stress-activated and stress-inactivated ion channels

under static strains is described. A review of work on

  • stress-sensitive pores in lipid-peptide model membranes

is presented. The possible role of flexoelectricity in mechano-electric transduction, e.g. in auditory receptors is discussed. Studies of

  • flexoelectricity in model lipid membranes, lipid-peptide membranes and natural membranes containing ion channels

are reviewed. Finally, possible applications in molecular electronics of mechanosensors employing some of the recognized principles of mechano-electric transduction in natural membranes are discussed.Marhaba, R. & Zoller, M. (2001) Involvement of CD44 in cytoskeleton rearrangement and raft reorganization in T cells.  J.Cell Sci. 114, 1169-1178.

FIGURE 2 | The transient pore model.

peroxisomal matrix protein

peroxisomal matrix protein

FROM THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE:
Peroxisomal matrix protein import: the transient pore model

Ralf Erdmann & Wolfgang Schliebs
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 6, 738-742 (September 2005)
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/nrm1710

Peroxisomal matrix protein import: the transient pore model
The transient pore model

The peroxisomal import receptor peroxin-5 (Pex5) recognizes peroxisomal targeting signal-1 (PTS1)-containing cargo proteins in the cytosol. It then moves to the peroxisome where it inserts into the peroxisomal membrane to become an integral part of the protein-import apparatus. Pex14 and/or Pex13, which are associated with Pex17, are proposed to be involved in tethering the receptor to the membrane and in the assembly, stabilization and rearrangement of the translocon. Cargo release into the peroxisomal matrix is thought to be initiated by intraperoxisomal factors — for example, the competitive binding of the intraperoxisomal Pex8, which also has a PTS1. The disassembly and recycling of Pex5 is triggered by a cascade of protein–protein interactions at the peroxisomal membrane that results in the Pex1-, Pex6-driven, ATP-dependent dislocation of Pex5 from the peroxisomal membrane to the cytosol. Pex1 and Pex6 are AAA+ (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) peroxins that are associated with the peroxisome membrane through Pex15 in yeast or its orthologue PEX26 in mammals. Pex4, which is membrane-anchored through Pex22, is a member of the E2 family of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, and Pex2, Pex10 and Pex12 contain the RING-finger motif that is a characteristic element of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Mono- or di-ubiquitylation are reversible steps that seem to be required for the efficient recycling of import receptors, whereas polyubiquitylation might signal the proteasome-dependent degradation of receptors when the physiological dislocation of receptors is blocked. Ub, ubiquitin.

Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 6, 738-742 (September 2005) |
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/nrm1710

FROM THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE:

peroxisomal protein pore model

peroxisomal protein pore model


Peroxisomal matrix protein import: the transient pore model

Ralf Erdmann & Wolfgang Schliebs
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology 6, 738-742 (September 2005)
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/nrm1710

Peroxisomal matrix protein import: the transient pore model

Peroxin-13 (Pex13), Pex14 and Pex17 are constituents of the docking complex for cycling peroxisomal import receptors. Another protein assembly in the peroxisomal membrane comprises the RING-finger-motif-containing peroxins Pex2, Pex10 and Pex12. This motif is a characteristic element of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and this subcomplex is linked to the docking complex by Pex8, which is peripherally attached to the lumenal side of the peroxisomal membrane. Pex4 is a member of the E2 family of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and is anchored to the peroxisomal membrane through the cytosolic domain of Pex22. Pex1 and Pex6 are interacting AAA+ proteins (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities), which are attached to the membrane through binding to Pex15 in yeast or to its mammalian counterpart PEX26.

Peroxisomal matrix protein import: the transient pore model

Ralf Erdmann & Wolfgang Schliebs

Peroxisomes import folded, even oligomeric, proteins, which distinguishes the peroxisomal translocation machinery from the well-characterized translocons of other organelles. How proteins are transported across the peroxisomal membrane is unclear. Here, we propose a mechanistic model that conceptually divides the import process into three consecutive steps: the formation of a

  • translocation pore by the import receptor,
  • the ubiquitylation of the import receptors, and
  • pore disassembly/receptor recycling.

Phytosphingosine

Masoud Naderi Maralani

Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids

The long-chain base ​phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. ​Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that ​phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of ​phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that ​2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast ​MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in ​phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized.  nature.com nature.com

About GPCRs

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a class of membrane proteins that allow the transmission of a wide variety of signals over the cell membrane, between different cells and over long distances inside the body. The molecular mechanisms of action of GPCRs were worked in great detail by Brian Kobilka and Robert Lefkowitz for which they were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2012. Read More

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Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/22/Proteomics – The Pathway to Understanding and Decision-making in Medicine

This dialogue is a series of discussions introducing several perspective on proteomics discovery, an emerging scientific enterprise in the -OMICS- family of disciplines that aim to clarify many of the challenges toward the understanding of disease and aiding in the diagnosis as well as guiding treatment decisions. Beyond that focus, it will contribute to personalized medical treatment in facilitating the identification of treatment targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Despite enormous advances in genomics research over the last two decades, there is a still a problem in reaching anticipated goals for introducing new targeted treatments that has seen repeated failures in stage III of clinical trials, and even when success has been achieved, it is temporal.  The other problem has been toxicity of agents widely used in chemotherapy.  Even though the genomic approach brings relieve to the issues of toxicity found in organic chemistry derivative blocking reactions, the specificity for the target cell without an effect on normal cells has been elusive.

This is not confined to cancer chemotherapy, but can also be seen in pain medication, and has been a growing problem in antimicrobial therapy.  The stumbling block has been inability to manage a multiplicity of reactions that also have to be modulated in a changing environment based on 3-dimension structure of proteins, pH changes, ionic balance, micro- and macrovascular circulation, and protein-protein and protein- membrane interactions. There is reason to consider that the present problems can be overcome through a much better modification of target cellular metabolism as we peel away the confounding and blinding factors with a multivariable control of these imbalances, like removing the skin of an onion.

This is the first of a series of articles, and for convenience we shall here  only emphasize the progress of application of proteomics to cardiovascular disease.

growth in funding proteomics 1990-2010

growth in funding proteomics 1990-2010

Part I.

Panomics: Decoding Biological Networks  (Clinical OMICs 2014; 5)

Technological advances such as high-throughput sequencing are transforming medicine from symptom-based diagnosis and treatment to personalized medicine as scientists employ novel rapid genomic methodologies to gain a broader comprehension of disease and disease progression. As next-generation sequencing becomes more rapid, researchers are turning toward large-scale pan-omics, the collective use of all omics such as genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics and lipoprotein proteomics, to better understand, identify, and treat complex disease.

Genomics has been a cornerstone in understanding disease, and the sequencing of the human genome has led to the identification of numerous disease biomarkers through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). It was the goal of these studies that these biomarkers would serve to predict individual disease risk, enable early detection of disease, help make treatment decisions, and identify new therapeutic targets. In reality, however, only a few have gone on to become established in clinical practice. For example in human GWAS studies for heart failure at least 35 biomarkers have been identified but only natriuretic peptides have moved into clinical practice, where they are limited primarily for use as a diagnostic tool.

Proteomics Advances Will Rival the Genetics Advances of the Last Ten Years

Seventy percent of the decisions made by physicians today are influenced by results of diagnostic tests, according to N. Leigh Anderson, founder of the Plasma Proteome Institute and CEO of SISCAPA Assay Technologies. Imagine the changes that will come about when future diagnostics tests are more accurate, more useful, more economical, and more accessible to healthcare practitioners. For Dr. Anderson, that’s the promise of proteomics, the study of the structure and function of proteins, the principal constituents of the protoplasm of all cells.

In explaining why proteomics is likely to have such a major impact, Dr. Anderson starts with a major difference between the genetic testing common today, and the proteomic testing that is fast coming on the scene. “Most genetic tests are aimed at measuring something that’s constant in a person over his or her entire lifetime. These tests provide information on the probability of something happening, and they can help us understand the basis of various diseases and their potential risks. What’s missing is, a genetic test is not going to tell you what’s happening to you right now.”

Mass Spec-Based Multiplexed Protein Biomarkers

Clinical proteomics applications rely on the translation of targeted protein quantitation technologies and methods to develop robust assays that can guide diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic decision-making. The development of a clinical proteomics-based test begins with the discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers, followed by validation of those biomarkers.

“In common practice, the discovery stage is performed on a MS-based platform for global unbiased sampling of the proteome, while biomarker qualification and clinical implementation generally involve the development of an antibody-based protocol, such as the commonly used enzyme linked ELISA assays,” state López et al. in Proteome Science (2012; 10: 35–45). “Although this process is potentially capable of delivering clinically important biomarkers, it is not the most efficient process as the latter is low-throughput, very costly, and time-consuming.”

Part II.  Proteomics for Clinical and Research Use: Combining Protein Chips, 2D Gels and Mass Spectrometry in 

The next Step: Exploring the Proteome: Translation and Beyond

N. Leigh Anderson, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Large Scale Proteomics Corporation

Three streams of technology will play major roles in quantitative (expression) proteomics over the coming decade. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry represent well-established methods for, respectively, resolving and characterizing proteins, and both have now been automated to enable the high-throughput generation of data from large numbers of samples.

These methods can be powerfully applied to discover proteins of interest as diagnostics, small molecule therapeutic targets, and protein therapeutics. However, neither offers a simple, rapid, routine way to measure many proteins in common samples like blood or tissue homogenates.

Protein chips do offer this possibility, and thus complete the triumvirate of technologies that will deliver the benefits of proteomics to both research and clinical users. Integration of efforts in all three approaches are discussed, highlighting the application of the Human Protein Index® database as a source of protein leads.

leighAnderson

leighAnderson

N. Leigh Anderson, Ph D. is Chief Scientific Officer of the Proteomics subsidiary of Large Scale Biology Corporation (LSBC).
Dr. Anderson obtained his B.A. in Physics with honors from Yale and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Cambridge University
(England) where he worked with M. F. Perutz as a Churchill Fellow at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Subsequently
he co-founded the Molecular Anatomy Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (Chicago) where his work in the development
of 2D electrophoresis and molecular database technology earned him, among other distinctions, the American Association for
Clinical Chemistry’s Young Investigator Award for 1982, the 1983 Pittsburgh Analytical Chemistry Award, 2008 AACC Outstanding
Research Award, and 2013 National Science Medal..

In 1985 Dr. Anderson co-founded LSBC in order to pursue commercial development and large scale applications of 2-D electro-
phoretic protein mapping technology. This effort has resulted in a large-scale proteomics analytical facility supporting research
work for LSBC and its pharmaceutical industry partners. Dr. Anderson’s current primary interests are in the automation of proteomics
technologies, and the expansion of LSBC’s proteomics databases describing drug effects and disease processes in vivo and in vitro.
Large Scale Biology went public in August 2000.

Part II. Plasma Proteomics: Lessons in Biomarkers and Diagnostics

Exposome Workshop
N Leigh Anderson
Washington 8 Dec 2011

QUESTIONS AND LESSONS:

CLINICAL DIAGNOSTICS AS A MODEL FOR EXPOSOME INDICATORS
TECHNOLOGY OPTIONS FOR MEASURING PROTEIN RESPONSES TO EXPOSURES
SCALE OF THE PROBLEM: EXPOSURE SIGNALS VS POPULATION NOISE

The Clinical Plasma Proteome
• Plasma and serum are the dominant non-invasive clinical sample types
– standard materials for in vitro diagnostics (IVD)
• Proteins measured in clinically-available tests in the US
– 109 proteins via FDA-cleared or approved tests
• Clinical test costs range from $9 (albumin) to $122 (Her2)
• 90% of those ever approved are still in use
– 96 additional proteins via laboratory-developed tests (not FDA
cleared or approved)
– Total 205 proteins (≅ products of 211genes, excluding Ig’s)
• Clinically applied proteins thus account for
– About 1% of the baseline human proteome (1 gene :1 protein)
– About 10% of the 2,000+ proteins observed in deep discovery
plasma proteome datasets

“New” Protein Diagnostics Are FDA-Cleared at a Rate of ~1.5/yr:
Insufficient to Meet Dx or Rx Development Needs

FDA clearance of protein diagnostics

FDA clearance of protein diagnostics

A  Major Technology Gulf Exists Between Discovery

Proteomics and Routine Diagnostic Platforms

Two Streams of Proteomics
A.  Problem Technology
Basic biology: maximum proteome coverage (including PTM’s, splices) to
provide unbiased discovery of mechanistic information
• Critical: Depth and breadth
• Not critical: Cost, throughput, quant precision

B.  Discovery proteomics
Specialized proteomics field,
large groups,
complex workflows and informatics

Part III.  Addressing the Clinical Proteome with Mass Spectrometric Assays

N. Leigh Anderson, PhD, SISCAPA Assay Technologies, Inc.

protein changes in biological mechanisms

protein changes in biological mechanisms

No Increase in FDA Cleared Protein Tests in 20 yr

“New” Protein Tests in Plasma Are FDA-Cleared at a Rate of ~1.5/yr:
Insufficient to Meet Dx or Rx Development Needs

See figure above

An Explanation: the Biomarker Pipeline is Blocked at the Verification Step

Immunoassay Weaknesses Impact Biomarker Verification

1) Specificity: what actually forms the immunoassay sandwich – or prevents its
formation – is not directly visualized

2) Cost: an assay developed to FDA approvable quality costs $2-5M per
protein

Major_Plasma_Proteins

Major_Plasma_Proteins

Immunoassay vs Hybrid MS-based assays

Immunoassay vs Hybrid MS-based assays

MASS SPECTROMETRY: MRM’s provide what is missing in..IMMUNOASSAYS:

– SPECIFICITY
– INTERNAL STANDARDIZATION
– MULTIPLEXING
– RAPID CONFIGURATION PROVIDED A PROTEIN CAN ACT LIKE A SMALL
MOLECULE

MRM of Proteotypic Tryptic Peptides Provides Highly Specific Assays for Proteins > 1ug/ml in Plasma

Peptide-Level MS Provides High Structural Specificity
Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) Quantitation

ADDRESSING MRM LIMITATIONS VIA SPECIFIC ENRICHMENT OF ANALYTE  PEPTIDES: SISCAPA

– SENSITIVITY
– THROUGHPUT (LC-MS/MS CYCLE TIME)

SISCAPA combines best features of immuno and MS

SISCAPA combines best features of immuno and MS

SISCAPA Process Schematic Diagram
Stable Isotope-labeled Standards with Capture on Anti-Peptide Antibodies

An automated process for SISCAPA targeted protein quantitation utilizes high affinity capture antibodies that are immobilized on magnetic beads

An automated process for SISCAPA targeted protein quantitation utilizes high affinity capture antibodies that are immobilized on magnetic beads

Antibodies sequence specific peptide binding

Antibodies sequence specific peptide binding

SISCAP target enrichmant

SISCAP target enrichmant

Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) quantitation

Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) quantitation

protein-quantitation-via-signature-peptides.png

protein-quantitation-via-signature-peptides.png

First SISCAP Assay - thyroglobulin

First SISCAP Assay – thyroglobulin

personalized reference range within population range

Glycemic control in DM

Glycemic control in DM

Part IV. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Clinical

Proteomics Working Group Report
Christopher B. Granger, MD; Jennifer E. Van Eyk, PhD; Stephen C. Mockrin, PhD;
N. Leigh Anderson, PhD; on behalf of the Working Group Members*
Circulation. 2004;109:1697-1703 doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.0000121563.47232.2A
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/109/14/1697

Abstract—The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Clinical Proteomics Working Group
was charged with identifying opportunities and challenges in clinical proteomics and using these as a
basis for recommendations aimed at directly improving patient care. The group included representatives
of clinical and translational research, proteomic technologies, laboratory medicine, bioinformatics, and
2 of the NHLBI Proteomics Centers, which form part of a program focused on innovative technology development.

This report represents the results from a one-and-a-half-day meeting on May 8 and 9, 2003. For the purposes
of this report, clinical proteomics is defined as the systematic, comprehensive, large-scale identification of
protein patterns (“fingerprints”) of disease and the application of this knowledge to improve patient care
and public health through better assessment of disease susceptibility, prevention of disease, selection of
therapy for the individual, and monitoring of treatment response. (Circulation. 2004;109:1697-1703.)
Key Words: proteins diagnosis prognosis genetics plasma

Part V.  Overview: The Maturing of Proteomics in Cardiovascular Research

Jennifer E. Van Eyk
Circ Res. 2011;108:490-498  doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.110.226894
http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/108/4/490

Abstract: Proteomic technologies are used to study the complexity of proteins, their roles, and biological functions.
It is based on the premise that the diversity of proteins, comprising their isoforms, and posttranslational modifications
(PTMs) underlies biology.

Based on an annotated human cardiac protein database, 62% have at least one PTM (phosphorylation currently dominating),
whereas 25% have more than one type of modification.

The field of proteomics strives to observe and quantify this protein diversity. It represents a broad group of technologies
and methods arising from analytic protein biochemistry, analytic separation, mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics.
Since the 1990s, the application of proteomic analysis has been increasingly used in cardiovascular research.

prevalence-of-cardiovascular-diseases-in-adults-by-age-and-sex-u-s-2007-2010.

prevalence-of-cardiovascular-diseases-in-adults-by-age-and-sex-u-s-2007-2010.

Technology development and adaptation have been at the heart of this progress. Technology undergoes a maturation,

becoming routine and ultimately obsolete, being replaced by newer methods. Because of extensive methodological
improvements, many proteomic studies today observe 1000 to 5000 proteins.

Only 5 years ago, this was not feasible. Even so, there are still road blocks. Nowadays, there is a focus on obtaining
better characterization of protein isoforms and specific PTMs. Consequentl, new techniques for identification and
quantification of modified amino acid residues are required, as is the assessment of single-nucleotide polymorphisms
in addition to determination of the structural and functional consequences.

In this series, 4 articles provide concrete examples of how proteomics can be incorporated into cardiovascular
research and address specific biological questions. They also illustrate how novel discoveries can be made and
how proteomic technology has continued to evolve. (Circ Res. 2011;108:490-498.)
Key Words: proteomics technology protein isoform posttranslational modification polymorphism

Part VI.   The -omics era: Proteomics and lipidomics in vascular research

Athanasios Didangelos, Christin Stegemann, Manuel Mayr∗

King’s British Heart Foundation Centre, King’s College London, UK

Atherosclerosis 2012; 221: 12– 17     http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.09.043

a b s t r a c t

A main limitation of the current approaches to atherosclerosis research is the focus on the investigation of individual
factors, which are presumed to be involved in the pathophysiology and whose biological functions are, at least in part, understood.

These molecules are investigated extensively while others are not studied at all. In comparison to our detailed
knowledge about the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, little is known about extracellular matrix remodelling
and the retention of individual lipid species rather than lipid classes in early and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

The recent development of mass spectrometry-based methods and advanced analytical tools are transforming
our ability to profile extracellular proteins and lipid species in animal models and clinical specimen with the goal
of illuminating pathological processes and discovering new biomarkers.

Fig. 1. ECM in atherosclerosis

Fig. 1. ECM in atherosclerosis. The bulk of the vascular ECM is synthesised by smooth muscle cells and composed primarily of collagens, proteoglycans and glycoproteins.During the early stages of atherosclerosis, LDL binds to the proteoglycans of the vessel wall, becomes modified, i.e. by oxidation (ox-LDL), and sustains a proinflammatory cascade that is proatherogenic

Lipidomics of atherosclerotic plaques

Lipidomics of atherosclerotic plaques

Fig. 2. Lipidomics of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipids were separated by ultra performance reverse phase
liquid chromatography on a Waters® ACQUITY UPLC® (HSS T3 Column, 100 mm × 2.1 mm i.d., 1.8 _m
particle size, 55 ◦C, flow rate 400 _L/min, Waters, Milford MA, USA) and analyzed on a quadrupole time-of-flight
mass spectrometer (Waters® SYNAPTTM HDMSTM system) in both positive (A) and negative ion mode (C).
In positive MS mode, lysophosphatidyl-cholines (lPCs) and lysophosphatidylethanolamines (lPEs) eluted first;
followed by phosphatidylcholines (PCs), sphingomyelin (SMs), phosphatidylethanol-amines (PEs) and cholesteryl
esters (CEs); diacylglycerols (DAGs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) had the longest retention times. In negative MS mode,
fatty acids (FA) were followed by phosphatidyl-glycerols (PGs), phosphatidyl-inositols (PIs), phosphatidylserines (PS)
and PEs. The chromatographic peaks corresponding to the different classes were detected as retention time-mass to
charge ratio (m/z) pairs and their areas were recorded. Principal component analyses on 629 variables from triplicate
analysis (C1, 2, 3 = control 1, 2, 3; P1, 2, 3 = endarterectomy patient 1, 2, 3) demonstrated a clear separation of
atherosclerotic plaques and control radial arteries in positive (B) and negative (D) ion mode. The clustering of the
technical replicates and the central projection of the pooled sample within the scores plot confirm the reproducibility
of the analyses, and the Goodness of Fit test returned a chi-squared of 0.4 and a R-squared value of 0.6.

Challenges in mass spectrometry

Mass spectrometry is an evolving technology and the technological advances facilitate the detection and quantification
of scarce proteins. Nonetheless, the enrichment of specific subproteomes using differential solubilityor isolation of cellular
organelleswill remain important to increase coverage and, at least partially, overcome the inhomogeneity of diseased tissue,
one of the major factors affecting sample-to-sample variation.

Proteomics is also the method of choice for the identification of post-translational modifications, which play an essential
role in protein function, i.e. enzymatic activation, binding ability and formation of ECM structures. Again, efficient enrichment
is essential to increase the likelihood of identifying modified peptides in complex mixtures. Lipidomics faces similar challenges.
While the extraction of lipids is more selective, new enrichment methods are needed for scarce lipids as well as labile lipid
metabolites, that may have important bioactivity. Another pressing issue in lipidomics is data analysis, in particular the lack
of automated search engines that can analyze mass spectra obtained from instruments of different vendors. Efforts to
overcome this issue are currently underway.

Conclusions

Proteomics and lipidomics offer an unbiased platform for the investigation of ECM and lipids within atherosclerosis. In
combination, these innovative technologies will reveal key differences in proteolytic processes responsible for plaque rupture
and advance our understanding of ECM – lipoprotein interactions in atherosclerosis.

references

Virtualization in Proteomics: ‘Sakshat’ in India, at IIT Bombay(tginnovations.wordpress.com)

Proteome Portraits (the-scientist.com)

A Protease for ‘Middle-down’ Proteomics(pharmaceuticalintelligence.com)

Intrinsic Disorder in the Human Spliceosomal Proteome(ploscompbiol.org)

proteome

proteome

active site of eNOS (PDB_1P6L) and nNOS (PDB_1P6H).

active site of eNOS (PDB_1P6L) and nNOS (PDB_1P6H).

Table - metabolic  targets

Table – metabolic targets

HK-II Phosphorylation

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