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Archive for the ‘Patient Experience: Personal Memories of Invasive Medical Intervantion’ Category


Nathalie’s Story: A Health Journey With A Happy Ending

Patient was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the duodenum over two years ago and had tumor removed at age 35. Interview was conducted 2+ years post-surgery.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Nathalie Monette of Laval, the third largest city in Quebec, Canada, counts her blessings each and every day. The 35-year-old is looking forward to making her mark on a bright and promising future as a newly married woman with a supportive family, new job as head of internal communications for a public service organization, and a new lease on life. Diagnosed a little over two years ago with a rare cancer called adenocarcinoma of the duodenum, Nathalie never envisioned that her life would take many twists and turns before she and her doctors arrived at an optimal treatment regimen.

Nathalie describes some of the classic warning signs she had for about six months before her actual medical diagnosis: abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, acid reflux and loss of weight.

“I felt sick all the time. I was losing weight and had pain in my upper abdomen after eating. My condition was getting worse with each week. My boyfriend, Jeff, at the time, who is now my husband, took me to several doctors who initially listened to my list of symptoms, examined me and told me to take antacids and avoid stress – and sent me home. It was increasingly becoming more difficult to manage my life, my relationships, and my job.”

The doctors in one hospital that she visited even considered she might be having a cardiovascular incident, since she was vomiting, was nauseous and had a stomach ache. Her blood levels were normal, which didn’t help the doctors, who, again, could find no serious health issue and sent her home.

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Nathalie Monette on the day of her wedding to Jeff. Top Left: Nathalie with her parents, Céline and Jean-Claude. Top Right: Nathalie with Jeff, and her two sisters, Julie and Marie-Claude. Below Right: Nathalie and Jeff.

For the next few weeks, Nathalie visited hospital after hospital in search of finding a more steadfast diagnosis of her condition – and a doctor who would listen to her and treat her symptoms.

“I was weak and vomiting. At this point, I kept losing weight — about 40 pounds in a total of six months.”

She decided to take the situation in her own hands and changed her diet, eliminating gluten, spices, and other major food groups. Nothing seemed to relieve her symptoms. She knew reading about possible medical conditions on the internet could cause additional stress. Having worked in the pharmaceutical industry, she was glad she knew where to look and what sources of information could be trusted.

Continued Search For Answers

“The medical system in Quebec is complicated,” she said. “In this public system, there is no family doctor assigned to you who follows your care year after year. And since I was perceived by the system as a young, relatively healthy woman, I was put on a waiting list for 3 to 4 years to be assigned to a general practitioner.”

Frustrated, hopeless and fearful for her health, Jeff got more involved in her diagnosis and took her to yet another hospital. Nathalie’s search took her from hospital to hospital and doctor to doctor with no known diagnosis.

“I was very angry, disappointed and at the end my rope. I just wanted to feel better and live my life.”

Then, one day, there was a ray of hope – and it took six months to find it. At a nearby hospital called Hôpital de St-Eustache where Jeff decided to take her, she came across two young physicians, Dr. Annie-Claude Bergeron, an emergency room doctor, and Dr. Marie-Hélène Gingras, a gastroenterologist, who happened to be Nathalie’s same age. Dr. Bergeron listened to her symptoms, examined her, and was determined to help her. A day later, Dr. Gingras ran several diagnostic tests, including an endoscopy and ultrasound, and more specialized blood tests.

“While undergoing the endoscopy, the doctor couldn’t find anything remarkable and was about to remove it. She decided to push the camera 5cm farther into my duodenum – and found the cause of my illness.”

Finally, Nathalie had definitive results. She had a 3½ cm (1.4 inches) tumor in her duodenum.

Dr. Gingras was devastated by the news she had to share. She called specialists in Montreal who would operate on Nathalie. Dr. Simon Turcotte, physician, hepatopancreatobiliary and liver transplantation expert who specializes in gastrointestinal cancer immunobiology and solid tumor immunotherapy, took her case.

“When Dr. Gingras told me about my condition, I was relieved and afraid at the same time. My heart sank when I got the news.”

Nathalie had a rare cancerous condition that only shows up in a handful of older people. It also was unusual that the tumor was situated in the duodenum rather than the colon, where most tumors of this variety normally occur. She also didn’t have history of that type of cancer in her family. She couldn’t even be tested for any genetic markers, since no genes have been identified as markers for this rare condition.

So, three weeks later, Nathalie was transferred to Hôpital Saint-Luc in Montreal, for a, hopefully, life-saving surgery. She had to trust her new expert, Dr. Turcotte, with her life.

“There was no room for error in removing the tumor. It was situated 1mm from my pancreas and every other vital organ I needed to survive.”

By nature, Nathalie is a strong, fiercely independent woman and there was no doubt she would come through the operation with flying colors.

About one month after surgery, she was scheduled for six months of chemotherapy to ensure that the cancer was eradicated. One day every two weeks, she received a powerful cocktail of Folfox (Leucovorin®, 5-FU, Adrucil® and Eloxatin®).

“Because of the chemotherapy, I had a minimal appetite, could not taste any food, could not drink or touch anything cold and needed to keep my weight at the same level.”

Her parents, Céline and Jean-Claude, two sisters, Julie and Marie-Claude, and Jeff, of course — were of great support and encouragement for her. Jeff insisted to meet with her nutritionist to determine a health plan so that she received the necessary nutrients in her food. Because Nathalie could not taste any food because of the chemotherapy, she tricked her mind by eating meals that she remembered from her childhood days. In that way, she was transported back in time mentally and she thought about the great food she had when she was growing up. Her parents were always on hand to cook these traditional meals that were filled with protein, spices, salt and fat to give her the added boost (and some taste) to help her system recover.

Duodenum, A Complex, Powerful Organ

Nathalie describes the duodenum as a complex organ – a C-shaped, hollow tube about 25-38 cm (10-15 inches) long, largely responsible for the enzymatic breakdown of food in the small intestine.

“This small but powerful organ is the shortest part of the small intestine which regulates the rate of how the stomach empties.”

According to the Inner Body web site, the duodenum receives partially digested food, called chyme, from the stomach and plays a vital role in the chemical digestion of chyme in preparation for absorption in the small intestine. Many chemical secretions from the pancreas, liver and gallbladder mix with the chyme in the duodenum to help chemical digestion. http://www.innerbody.com/image_dige02/dige21.html

Back to Normal

Nathalie’s life is back to normal, as much as it can be after such a medical ordeal.

“The past is just the past. I try not to think about the trauma that I’ve been through. I look forward as that is what is important.”

She got married last August (2015) to Jeff, who demonstrated his love to her the best way possible in caring for her throughout this ordeal. They met on the internet in 2010, at a moment when Nathalie wanted to leave the dating scene to focus on personal projects. They talked, met shortly after, and became great friends. Only a year later did Nathalie accept to be in a relationship with Jeff.

“About one week after my surgery when I was home, Jeff proposed marriage to me. I was visiting my family for Easter and Jeff had prepared everything. He had first asked my parents for my hand in marriage in the hospital a few weeks prior to my surgery. Then he prepared a charade with answers that related to the strength of his feelings for me. Funny enough, I did not understand what was going on at that point. Little did I know, he was declaring his love and it’s when he showed me a ring that I understood. Of course, I was overwhelmed with emotion and very touched that he got my family involved in the event.

“I am under regular care of my medical team of seven doctors – a gastroenterologist, oncologist surgeon, family general practitioner and many other specialists. I’ve had follow-up appointments at three months, six months, and one year. Those appointments include a gastroscopy, colonoscopy, scan, and blood tests, and so far, my health is the best ever. I like to tease the doctors when I see my charts – I look like an athlete on paper! In our Canadian medical system, each specialist treats only that part of the body. I make sure that all my test results are xeroxed and sent in advance of my appointment to each doctor. That takes time, but I am assured that everyone sees the same test results and can make educated decisions. That also makes for a more holistic view of my life.”

Advocate for Patient’ Rights

“Knowledge, access to information and caregiver support are probably the three most important factors in patient care. Medicine on its own is just not enough. Patients need a support system to balance out the highs and lows of searching through a medical condition, diagnosis and treatment plan. I hope one day to advocate for patient voices as it is a much needed part of our medical system.

“In hindsight, I realize all the doctors who saw me during the six months that I suffered prior to my diagnosis could not have known about my condition, unless they ran more tests. Surprisingly, I had done blood tests before that time for long-term disability insurance. The insurer had refused to insure me without explanation. Starting to be very sick, I did not pursue the work with them to understand their decision. Unfortunately, I learned a few weeks after my surgery that their test revealed the count of a certain type of protein was too high, therefore, too risky for them to insure me. They knew I was seriously sick but took about eight months to let me know. Had the insurer shared their results sooner, had doctors ran similar blood tests, or done a scan, I would have been diagnosed way sooner, which could have resulted in not needing chemotherapy.”

Incidence of Adenocarcinoma

Adenocarcinomas or malignant tumors of the duodenum are extremely rare, uncommon and difficult to manage and treat, according to Drs. P.L. Fagniez and N. Rotman in a book chapter in Surgical Treatment – Evidence-Based and Problem-Oriented, a medical textbook that assesses currently accepted clinical practice that takes into account when recommendations for patient treatment are made.The tumors represent 0.3 percent of gastrointestinal tract tumors and up to 50 percent of small bowel malignancies. They may arise from duodenal polyps or they may be associated with Celiac Disease. Five-year-survival varies widely according to published reports in the medical literature, but it is generally reported to be greater than 40 percent if the tumor is surgically removed. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK6953/.

Due to the low incidence of the disease globally, there is no randomized study comparing different types of treatment. In fact, the medical literature only discusses a small number of patients with this condition, who are usually older, or patients who are seen over a period of time. The treatment plan is complete surgical removal of the tumor, which is the only hope for a cure. Nonetheless, good long-term results have been observed with segmented tumor removal, particularly for tumors of the distal part of the duodenum, according to the same book chapter mentioned in the paragraph above.

A Bright Future Ahead

Nathalie believes in second chances and the value of waking up each and every day to new challenges and opportunities.

“Life is to be lived and enjoyed. I love what I do and I cherish my relationships, my work and my free time. In whatever I do, I give 100 percent.”

She believes she is very lucky to have had the diagnosis at this time of her life.

“In a way, my parents, my family, my husband were always present in my health journey. They followed up on doctors’ appointments, helped me with daily living chores, researched the medical literature, contacted new doctors, and generally, were my sounding board on everything. They were invaluable to me and it was my privilege that I am blessed with such a supportive family.

“I believe the road is set for you in life and it is up to all of us to seize the moment. My condition has given me strength to explore who I am and validate the way I always approach life.”

Nathalie Monette provided her permission to publish this interview on July 30, 2016.

 

Search Title:

Duodenum AND Cancer | Open Studies | Exclude Unknown in ClinicalTrials.gov Database. The search was conducted on July 30, 2016 and there were  45 studies found.

Presented, below, is a Subset of Clinical Trials on the List of 45 Studies related to Duodenum AND Cancer

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=duodenum+AND+Cancer&recr=Open&no_unk=Y

SEE LINK, Below for the list of clinical trials currently recruiting:

Subset of Clinical Trials on the List of 45 Studies – Duodenum AND Cancer (6)

Or you may click on the following individual links below for clinical trials that are currently recruiting:

Spectroscopy From Duodenum

Condition: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma
Intervention: Other: Spectroscopy device

A Randomized Trial of Two Surgical Techniques for Pancreaticojejunostomy in Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy

Conditions: Pancreatic Neoplasms;   Biliary Tract Neoplasms;   Pancreatitis, Chronic;   Duodenal Neoplasms
Intervention: Procedure: pancreaticojejunostomy

Endoscopic Characteristics of Duodenal and Ampullary Lesions

Condition: Duodenal Diseases
Intervention: Other: Tissue Sampling

EUS GUIDED Transduodenal Biopsy Using the 19G Flex

Condition: Abdominal Neoplasms
Intervention: Device: Expect™19Flex needle (Boston Scientific Corp.,Natick,MA,USA)

Study of Gastroduodenal Metallic Stent vs Gastrojejunostomy

Condition: Gastric Cancer
Interventions: Device: gastroduodenal stent placement;   Procedure: gastrojejunostomy

Prevalence of Small Bowel Polyps in Patients With Sporadic Duodenal Adenomas

Condition: Polyps
Intervention: Device: Small bowel video capsule endoscopy (VCE) GIVEN/COVIDIEN LTD

Long-term Outcomes of Endoscopic Resection (ER) of Lesions of the Duodenum and Ampulla

Condition: Adenoma, Villous
Intervention: Procedure: Endoscopic Mucosal Resection

Prophylactic Octreotide to Prevent Post Duodenal EMR and Ampullectomy Bleeding

Condition: Adenoma
Interventions: Drug: octreotide;   Other: No octreotide

 

The Use of a Restrictive Fluid Regimen With Hypertonic Saline for Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy

Condition: Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Interventions: Drug: 3% NaCl Solution;   Drug: Lactated Ringers Solution

Effects of Pancreaticoduodenectomy on Glucose Metabolism

Conditions: Diabetes Mellitus;   Glucose Intolerance
Intervention:  —

 

 

REFERENCES/SOURCES

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=duodenum+AND+Cancer&recr=Open&no_unk=Y

http://www.innerbody.com/image_dige02/dige21.html

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK6953/.

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 2016

LIVE 8:10 am – 11:20 am 4/27/2016 Combination Cancer Therapies: Drug Resistance and Therapeutic Index & Cancer Diagnostics: New Uses, New Reimbursements? & New Philanthropy: Patients Driving Innovation@2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/live-810-am-1120-am-4272016-combination-cancer-therapies-drug-resistance-and-therapeutic-index-cancer-diagnostics-new-uses-new-reimbursements-new-philanthropy-patients-driving-i/

Colon cancer and organoids

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/15/colon-cancer-and-organoids/

Checkpoint inhibitors for gastrointestinal cancers

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/14/checkpoint-inhibitors-for-gastrointestinal-cancers/

2015

Gluten-free Diets

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/01/gluten-free-diets/

Gastrointestinal Endocrinology

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/10/gastrointestinal-endocrinology/

 

 

 

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Ralph’s Story: An Entertainer at Heart

Patient was diagnosed with heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in January 2016 and had a triple-bypass operation at age 69. Interview was conducted six months post-surgery.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Evergreen, Colorado, an idyllic, peaceful community with an elevation of 8,000 feet west of Denver, offers its residents and visitors a beautiful place for arts and culture, summer and winter sporting activities, and scenic beauty. In fact, Ralph Nichols has lived in the town for more than 20 years.

“This past September [2015] was, particularly, challenging for me, where winter begins quite early for us. It became increasingly painful and difficult to breathe in the freezing temperatures. It seemed that my lungs were inflamed and I couldn’t even stand the cold weather. I thought it might be the beginning of a bad cold, and I wasn’t overly concerned that there was anything terribly wrong.”

At that time, Ralph went to his family physician who performed the usual routine examination with no significant results.

“Many years ago, I developed a mild case of scleroderma, a chronic connective tissue disease. I thought that perhaps my symptoms were the result of some type of inflammation in my body that could be managed with prescription medications.”

Scleroderma is known as an autoimmune disease, which adds an inappropriate amount of collagen to various parts of the body, such as the joints, skin, and later stages, various organs, such as the lungs, in Ralph’s case. Scleroderma can cause the organs to shut down and, eventually, cause death.

“I never let this condition stop me from doing anything as it is life-long condition. It was always something I had to tolerate and work through.”

http://www.scleroderma.org/site/PageNavigator/patients_whatis.html#.V5Zrm84luKo

 

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Ralph Nichols and Gabriela Contreras.  Top left: Ralph today. Top right: Ralph recovering one month after surgery. Bottom left and center: Ralph with his medical team. Bottom right: Ralph in rehabilitation center.

Over the brutal Colorado winter, Ralph’s symptoms were getting worse. He had no idea that his life would dramatically change over the next few months. He went to see his family physician again. During this physical examination, Ralph was referred to pulmonary and cardiovascular specialists for a routine electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and stress test in order to further diagnose his symptoms. He had always been relatively healthy and fit and never been seriously ill or hospitalized.

“On the outside, Ralph was the picture of good health,” said his wife, Gabriela. “On the inside, his body was telling him that something was wrong.”

Three months later in December 2015, Ralph met with Dr. Alexandra Smart, a pulmonologist, who ordered a chest x-ray and other diagnostic tests, including a right heart catheterization. At that point, Ralph’s medical team grew. It was then determined that Ralph needed to see other cardiovascular specialists and undergo more tests. In January 2016, he met with Dr. Sameer Mehta, cardiologist at Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery Associates, in Lakewood, Colorado, who reviewed his tests to date, listened to Ralph’s symptoms, and told him he needed both a right and left heart cardiac catheterization.

 “They gave me sedation for the catheterization procedure and went through my neck with a camera to see what was going on with my lungs and heart. We were all singing together on the way to the operating room. During the procedure, my cardiologist found more than he had anticipated.”

The result was not good. Ralph had major blockages in two main arteries that supply blood to his heart muscle compounded by the fact that his lungs were affected by scleroderma.

“The catheterization was alarming. It showed that my arteries were in bad shape. They were both clogged with atherosclerotic plaque; one of them was 99 percent blocked and the other was 85 percent blocked.”

His cardiologist believed that the blockages would not respond to medications quickly or a stent.

“Even though my father had major heart disease and died two years later of cancer at the age of 56, I thought that I would be immune to this particular experience. After all, I was in good health, exercised regularly, lived a reasonable lifestyle and had a great diet.”

 Preparing for Life-Saving and Life-Changing Surgery

Unfortunately, surgery was the next step. Ralph was referred to Dr. Mehta’s colleague, Dr. Patrick D. Rudersdorf, cardiothoracic surgeon at Cardiac & Thoracic Surgery Associates.

“I didn’t leave the hospital that day as expected. Instead, I got a visit from Dr. Rudersdorf and couldn’t believe what he was telling me. My only chance to live was having triple bypass surgery which needed to be done immediately. The doctor met with me that same day to explain the procedure, answer my questions and talk through the details of the rehabilitation period after the surgery.”

Dr. Rudersdorf reassured Ralph that he was doing the right thing and calmed my fears.

“He said that I needed this life-saving surgery because I was at high risk for having a major heart attack. I was shocked, at first, at the thought of the intensity of surgery on my body. It’s a situation that no one likes to be in, but I had to make a decision about alleviating the ongoing pain and pressure in my chest along with shortness of breath due to diseased heart arteries. Coronary bypass surgery was my answer to feeling better — and it essentially gave me my life back.”

Dr. Rudersdorf moved his previously planned morning surgery to another day to accommodate me first thing in the morning. Ralph underwent triple bypass surgery at St. Anthony Hospital in Lakewood, Colorado. The procedure was complex and took eight hours. He was in the hospital for a total of 31 days.

“It was an ordeal that I thought I’d never have to experience. I had no time to call anyone, or time to even contemplate life and death…or even being scared.  My wife Gabriela spent the entire time in the hospital, supported by our dearest friends, Norma Delaney and Garret Annofsky, in addition to keeping family and friends in other parts of the United States and Mexico updated as well. Once the surgery was over, the medical team woke me up and said the procedure was successful, but I was far from being out of the woods.”

Ralph had some complications because of a condition called pulmonary hypertension, a type of high blood pressure that affects the arteries in the lungs and the right side of the heart. According to the Mayo Clinic’s web site, in one form of pulmonary hypertension, tiny arteries in the lungs, called pulmonary arterioles, and capillaries become narrowed, blocked or destroyed. This makes it harder for blood to flow through the lungs, and raises pressure within the lungs’ arteries. As the pressure builds, the heart’s lower right chamber (right ventricle) must work harder to pump blood through the lungs, eventually causing the heart muscle to weaken and fail. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pulmonary-hypertension/home/ovc-20197480

“The pulmonary hypertension limited some of the medications that the doctors would have used during my recovery. It was a tough few days for me in intensive care, hooked up to about 18 monitors. The medical team had to stop and re-start my heart four different times because of atrial fibrillation — finally getting both parts of the heart to dance together in the same rhythm.”

Ralph’s heart was beating abnormally fast and irregular and not functioning the way it should. The doctors restore regular rhythm to the heart by sending an electrical shock to the heart, which is called electrical cardioversion or chemically using antiarrhythmia medications, which is called pharmacologic or chemical cardioversion.

“The doctors shocked my heart first chemically with medications when I was awake. This procedure was the scariest. I was sitting up in bed and felt my heart stop, then the medical team flushed the medication out with saline in order to restart my heart. That procedure was not successful, so that is why the doctors had to shock my heart three more times electrically.

“The reason the doctors stopped my heart was to correct the atrial fibrillation and to get my heart into regular sinus rhythm, which is a wave mode of the heart where everything is synchronized. The doctors did not want me to continue to experience atrial fibrillation because if continued, I would not be able to regain my strength.”

Ralph was finally moved from intensive care to intermediate care after five days and the medical team kept him in intermediate care another 12 days until his heart and lungs got stronger.

“From there, I didn’t go home but instead went to Evergreen Life Center for rehabilitation for two weeks to learn how to walk, climb stairs so that I could access my home on my own, and develop my strength again. The rehab team would let me leave only after making sure I had oxygen in my home.”

After that, Ralph started another phase of his rehabilitation at St. Anthony Cardiac Rehabilitation and Wellness Center. For the next three months, he took part in cardiac rehabilitation three days a week. He passed that with flying colors. Now, he is in another phase of rehabilitation, building his lung capacity two days a week.

Ralph didn’t have the means or even the will to communicate with friends during this tumultuous time, except Gabriela and several close friends who were always at the hospital and rehabilitation center who gave him the strength to continue.

“I finally returned home after many weeks with an enormous feeling of gratitude for each and every one of my friends, as well as the St. Anthony’s hospital team of doctors, nurses, and therapists, who supported me and Gabriela during this exceptional adventure that has certainly changed my life.”

Surely, this experience has been a life-changing experience for Ralph.

 Coronary Artery Bypass Facts

 Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, often pronounced “cabbage”) is a surgical treatment for blocked coronary arteries. Coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle and when blockages in these arteries form, chest pain, shortness of breath and heart attacks can occur. Catheter procedures performed by interventional cardiologists address the blockages themselves with stents. Coronary bypass surgery performed by cardiac surgeons reroutes the blood around the blockages to supply better blood supply to the heart muscle and is a better treatment option, although more invasive, for certain patients and more durable for most patients.

http://ctsurgery.com/conditions-procedures/heart-aorta/cardiac-surgery/coronary-artery-bypass-grafting-cabg/

Life for Ralph Today

Today, Ralph is regaining his strength both in mind and body. He visits the cardiovascular and pulmonary rehabilitation center three times a week for the past few months and walks on their treadmill, lifts weights and pedals the bicycle for one hour, supervised by the therapists. He also sees his medical team for regular check-ups every month, eats healthier with no fat and no salt, and takes a cocktail of medicines daily for his heart and lungs, including amiodarone, furosemide, pitavastatin, and aspirin.

“Almost six months after my surgery, although I am not in the best shape of my life, however, I am in the best spiritual place than ever before. This is a huge milestone for me. I continue to improve my strength, which will make my heart more resilient. There is nothing that I can’t do now, and I am doing everything I can to experience a normal life as far as work and regaining my strength. I find it necessary to move to a warmer climate and lower altitude in order to continue to improve.”

Ralph also is the former lead singer of The Letterman and The Sandpipers, two American easy-listening bands during the 1960-70-80s. He is an entertainer at heart with over 3,000 professional appearances to his credit. He has been performing and recording for over 50 years, traveled the world extensively and performed before members of the Vatican with Pope Pius XII and Royalty with Prince Rainier and Princess Grace Kelly, as well as notables such as Frank and Nancy Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Ronald Reagan, Merv Griffin, Danny Thomas, Shirley Bassey, Rosalind Russell and Bob Hope.

Ralph and his vocal group were dubbed by Billboard Magazine as “the greatest romantic vocal group of all time.” He is also a member of the Vocal Group Hall of Fame, a prestigious honor. He is a true legend as his group has sold more than 20 million recordings, performed live thousands of times, and whose recording of the song “Love” was left by NASA astronauts in a time capsule on the moon.

“I enjoy each and every day and appreciate all that life has to offer.”

Ralph’s next step is to get back to singing and his solo entertainment business, which he holds dear to his heart. That should be a task that he can easily accomplish.

 

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank Gabriela Contreras, a global communications consultant and patient advocate, for the tremendous help and support that she provided in scheduling time to talk with Ralph Nichols.

Ralph Nichols provided his permission to publish this interview on July 30, 2016.

 

REFERENCES/SOURCES

http://www.scleroderma.org/site/PageNavigator/patients_whatis.html#.V5Zrm84luKo

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pulmonary-hypertension/home/ovc-20197480

http://ctsurgery.com/conditions-procedures/heart-aorta/cardiac-surgery/coronary-artery-bypass-grafting-cabg/

 

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://www.sunset.com/travel/rockies/evergreen-colorado-day-trip-travel-planner

Retrieved from http://www.secondscount.org/heart-condition-centers/info-detail-2/benefits-risks-of-coronary-bypass-surgery-2#.V5dkK_krKUk

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

People with blood type O have been reported to be protected from coronary heart disease, cancer, and have lower cholesterol levels.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/11/people-with-blood-type-o-have-been-reported-to-be-protected-from-coronary-heart-disease-cancer-and-have-lower-cholesterol-levels/

2015

A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery from Diagnosis and Intervention to Recovery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/10/a-patients-perspective-on-open-heart-surgery-from-diagnosis-and-intervention-to-recovery/

No evidence to change current transfusion practices for adults undergoing complex cardiac surgery: RECESS evaluated 1,098 cardiac surgery patients received red blood cell units stored for short or long periods

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/08/no-evidence-to-change-current-transfusion-practices-for-adults-undergoing-complex-cardiac-surgery-recess-evaluated-1098-cardiac-surgery-patients-received-red-blood-cell-units-stored-for-short-or-lon/

2013

ACC/AHA Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/05/accaha-guidelines-for-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-surgery/

On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac SurgeryPrediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/

 

Editor’s note:

I wish to encourage the e-Reader of this Interview to consider reading and comparing the experiences of other Open Heart Surgery Patients, voicing their private-life episodes in the ER that are included in this volume.

I also wish to encourage the e-Reader to consider, if interested, reviewing additional e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases from the same Publisher, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, on Amazon.com.

  •  Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms, on Amazon since 6/2/12013

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

  • Cardiovascular, Volume Two: Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation, on Amazon since 11/30/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics, on Amazon since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four: Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases, on Amazon since 12/26/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

onepagecvdseriesaflyervol1-4

 

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Marcela’s Story:  A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life

Patient is HCV Positive, liver transplanted from a 22-year-old donor performed at age 70. Interview conducted 14 years post-liver transplant.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

For Marcela Almada Calles of Valle de Bravo, Mexico, a picturesque town on the shores of Lake Avándaro about two hours outside of Mexico City where she has lived for 30 years, life is about seizing the moment and having “an open mind and positive attitude.”  An active woman in her 80’s, Marcela’s days are full of professional and personal achievements and a long list of activities still to accomplish. However, life wasn’t always so positive as she put her life on hold for two-and-a-half years to relocate to Los Angeles, California, so that she could have a liver transplant.

“My spirit and attitude have always been what has carried me through life and difficult situations. This time was no different.”

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Marcela Almada Calles.   

Marcela’s story started 20 years ago during a time when she operated a successful event planning and catering business for high-profile government and social dignitaries, pharmaceutical companies, and luxury department stores.

“I normally worked long hours from early morning until evening, until one day, I felt exceptionally tired and it became a huge effort to concentrate. My ankles were swollen and I was out of breath all the time and my skin was yellow. I felt sleepy and would sometimes become tired during the day. This was unusual for me. I knew something was not right.”

At that point, Marcela decided to make an appointment with her local physician and friend, Dr. Sergio Ulloa, a highly regarded rheumatologist and corporate and government affairs leader in Mexico, who examined her and took several blood tests. When the blood results came back, Dr. Ulloa immediately referred her to Dr. Sergio Kershenovich, a well-regarded hepatologist, at his private clinic, who checked her for symptoms of Hepatitis C. After that Marcela decided to get another opinion and went to see Dr. Fernando Quijano, a general surgeon, who immediately wanted her to have surgery because he had found a cancerous tumor in her liver.

“My doctors’ opinions were that I needed to have a liver transplant immediately because I was in liver failure. It appeared that I had a failing liver — and a tumor there as well and my liver was not working properly.”

Relocating Life to the United States

At that point, my six children – Marcela, Luis, Diego, Rodolfo, Gabriela, Mario — who live in parts of Mexico and Singapore became involved in my health care decisions and treatment plan.

“My son, Luis, believed the best treatment for me was to see a liver specialist in the United States so that I received the best care from a leading liver transplantation hospital. He made some connections with friends and that next day, Dr. Francisco Durazo, chief of Transplant Hepatology and medical director of the Dumont UCLA Liver Transplant Center in Los Angeles, told me to come immediately to see him. I remember my children were supportive and concerned, but were afraid for me as we all knew that I had a long road ahead of me.”

At that time, she was put on a national liver transplant list by the UCLA Transplant Center.

“What I didn’t know was that more than 9,000 potential recipients are currently awaiting liver transplants.”  http://transplants.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=397

“Dr. Durazo was very concerned and told me that my liver was not working at all and I had to have a liver transplant as soon as possible, so he asked me to stay in Los Angeles, since I was now part of a transplant list.”

Evaluation By Transplant Team

Marcela’s case is no different than any other patient awaiting a liver transplant. According to their web site, the UCLA Transplant Center conducts evaluations over two or three days. During this time, the patients meets with a social worker, transplant hepatologist, surgeon, transplant coordinator, psychiatrist and dietitian, as well as other specialists as needed. The evaluation is customized to each patient’s medical condition. Once the evaluation is completed, each patient’s case is presented at a weekly meeting of the UCLA Liver Transplant Consultation Team. This group includes specialists from surgery, adult and pediatric hepatology, cardiology, pulmonary, nephrology, hematology, infectious disease, as well as transplant coordinators and social workers. At this time, the team determines if any other tests are required to ensure the patient’s candidacy for transplant, then the patient and the physician are notified of the recommendation made by the transplant team. http://transplants.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=401

Waiting For Answers

Marcela arrived at UCLA in Los Angeles with her family on Mother’s Day — May 10, 1999 — for what she describes as “the best time in her life to be alive with the help of medicine and technology.” That meant that she needed to rent an apartment and live near the hospital in case the doctors received an anonymous donor who would give her the gift of life.

“I had to wear a beeper 24 hours a day and I was never alone. My children took turns over the next two-and-a-half years to give up their lives with their families to live with me and help me navigate the health care system and my upcoming surgery.”

Marcela filled her days at her new apartment in Los Angeles reading about her condition, meditating to quiet her mind, watching television, and talking with family, friends and neighbors.

“The doctors called me two times over the next few months, saying they had an anonymous liver donor and I needed to come now to the hospital for tests. Unfortunately, those blood tests and other diagnostic tests showed that I was not a good match, so the doctors sent me home. It was a frustrating time because I wanted to have the liver transplant surgery and move on with my life.”

Finally, after waiting eight months for a liver transplant, Marcela’s outlook on life was greatly improved when an anonymous donor gave her the gift of life – a new, healthy liver.

“The donor’s blood type was a match for me. The surgery took eight hours and it was successful. The doctors told me that my immune system might reject my new liver, so I was given a cocktail of medicines, such as anti-rejection drugs, corticosteroids, calcinurin inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, and antibiotics and watched very closely in the hospital.”

Marcela was then permitted to leave the hospital only a week after her surgery.

“That was the happiest day of my life. My spirits were high and I had a life to live.”

Her children served as her strength.

“My children took turns flying back and forth to Los Angeles to stay with me. They had a long list of instructions from the doctor. I could take some walks and eat small meals for the next few weeks, but I couldn’t exert myself in any way. I developed a cold over the next few weeks, as my immune system was low, so I had to take special care to eat right, get enough sleep and, most of all, relax. My body, spirit and mind had much healing to do.”

For the next 1 ½ years, Los Angeles was my “second” home.

“I needed to remain there after the procedure so my doctors could monitor my progress. During that time, I felt stronger each day. The support of my family was a true blessing for me. They were my eyes and ears – and my greatest advocates. My doctor recommended that I come weekly for check-ups and go through a physical therapy program so that I could regain my liver function and physical strength. I followed all my doctor’s orders.”

Day by day, Marcela believed as if she could conquer the world.

“I decided, one day many months after the surgery, to become ‘irresponsible’ and spent time with a few good friends, Gabriela and Guadalupe, who traveled to see me. For a weekend, we went to Las Vegas to see shows and go to the casinos. I laughed, played and walked all I could. My children didn’t even know what I was up to, but I felt good and wanted to enjoy the world and my new freedom.”

Marcela was able to return home to Valle de Bravo with a fresh perspective, a long list of things to do, and many happy memories.

“Since that time, I have kept myself active and busy; I never let my mind and heart rest. I am also forever grateful to my anonymous liver donor because it is because of a 22-year-old young man who died in an unfortunate automobile accident that I am here today.”

Liver Transplant Facts

The liver is the body’s vital organ that you cannot live without. It serves many critical functions, including metabolism of drugs and toxins, removing degradation products of normal body metabolism and synthesis of many proteins and enzyme, which are necessary for blood to clot. Transplantation is the only cure for liver insufficiency or liver failure because no device or machine reliably performs all the functions of the liver. http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

According to a hospital transplant web site, overall, outcomes for liver transplantation are very good, but vary significantly depending on the indication for liver transplant as well as factors associated with the donor. Currently, the overall patient survival one year after liver transplant is 88 percent. Patient survival five years after liver transplant is 73 percent. These results vary significantly based on the indication for liver transplantation. The encouraging trend is that over the past 20 years short- and long-term patient survival has continued to improve. With advances in surgical technique, organ preservation, peri-operative care, and immunosuppression, survival will hopefully continue to improve in the future. http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

Life For Marcela Today

Science is helping rebalance medicine with the most innovative discoveries and new ways of treating illness.

“I am happy to be part of the solution with a happy ending, too.”

Today, Marcela leads a rich and full life.

“It’s been 14 years since my liver transplant. I continue to feel healthy and alive. Nothing will keep me from doing what I want to do.”

Marcela has an active social life. She takes frequent vacations around the world, including a three-month holiday to Asia, where she travels multiple times to Bali, Cambodia, China and Singapore, where her daughter lives. She is an avid golfer and organizes tournaments in many private golf courses. She is learning to speak French, which is an easy transition (she says) from speaking Spanish. She plays cards with a group of friends weekly, sings in a musical group, and takes dance lessons, too. Life is very, very good.

Editor’s note: We would like to thank Gabriela Contreras, a global communications consultant and patient advocate, for the tremendous help and support that she provided in locating and scheduling time to talk with Marcela Almada Calles.

Marcela Almada Calles provided her permission to publish this interview on July 21, 2016.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE 

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/digestive-diseases-liver-transplantation

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://transplants.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=397

Retrieved from http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

Retrieved from http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

AGENDA for Adoptive T Cell Therapy Delivering CAR, TCR, and TIL from Research to Reality, CHI’S 4TH ANNUAL IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY SUMMIT – SEPTEMBER 1-2, 2016 | Marriott Long Wharf Hotel – Boston, MA

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/15/adoptive-t-cell-therapy-delivering-car-tcr-and-til-from-research-to-reality-chis-4th-annual-immuno-oncology-summit-september-1-2-2016-marriott-long-wharf-hotel-boston-ma/

Technologies For Targeting And Delivering Chemotherapeutics Directly To The Tumour Site

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/technologies-for-targeting-and-delivering-chemotherapeutics-directly-to-the-tumour-site/

2015

3-D Printed Liver

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/16/3-d-printed-liver/

Newly discovered cells regenerate liver tissue without forming tumors

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/08/16/newly-discovered-cells-regenerate-liver-tissue-without-forming-tumors/

Novel Approaches to Cancer Therapy 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/11/novel-approaches-to-cancer-therapy-7-12/

 

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April 28, 2016
 

Dr. Foti Recognized With Honorary Member Award from Oncology Nursing Society

Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer (CEO) of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), was honored this morning during the opening ceremony of the 41st Annual Congress of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) in San Antonio, TX, with the Honorary Member Award for her unwavering dedication to improving cancer care and her commitment to the prevention and cure of all cancers.
The Honorary Member Award is awarded by the ONS to thank and honor an individual who is not otherwise eligible for ONS membership for his or her contributions to oncology nursing, support of the ONS, and conduct consistent with the ONS mission and core values.

 

LEARN MORE
ABOUT THE AACR

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An Emotional and Thoughtful Decision Over BRAC1 and Surgery

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

In the last several years, no celebrity decision has been more instructive and influential than the decision after childbirth and many child adoptions than that of Angelina Jolie Pitt.  She was celebrated for for her many movies at a still young age prior to moving to directing movies, known for unflinting courage in action movies by a woman gifted and excelling at actions considered to be done by a substitute.  The athleticism might recall that of Lucille Ball or of Katharine Hepburn in another generation.   She developed a small resectable breast lesion not so long after her marriage, and her mother had had breast cancer previously.  Genetic testing revealed that she had a BAC1 genetic typing.  Having consulted with the best physician advice available and with discussions with her husband, Brad Pitt, she undertook a double mastectomy.  This was still not the end of the story.  Her mutation, which is associated usually with a jewish heritage, is also associated with risk of ovarian cancer.  This led to a later decision to have an oophorectomy.  She made two of the most difficult decisions that women face, especially if they are of childbearing age.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/brad-pitt-angelina-jolie-strength_5637abc7e4b0631799132888

 

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt sat down for an emotional interview with the “Today” show to discuss their new movie “By the Sea” and her decision to undergo a double mastectomy and have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to avoid cancer. During the moving discussion, Pitt praised his wife’s braveness.

“I just remember there was no vanity to my wife’s approach,” he said, after explaining how he found out about the blood test results that showed she could have signs of early-stage ovarian cancer while away in France. “It was mature. [There] was an excitement to where this is our life, we’re gonna make the best of it. There was a strength in that. It’s just another one of those things in life that makes you tighter. She was doing it for her kids, and she was doing it for her family, so we can be together. It trumped everything, everything and anything.”

The mother of six said her husband’s support was paramount.

“He made it very, very clear to me that what he loved and what was a woman to him was somebody who was smart and capable and cared about her family. It’s not about your physical body. I knew through the surgeries that he was on my side and that that wasn’t somewhere where I was going to feel like less of a woman, because my husband wasn’t going to let that happen.”

Jolie used the same doctor as her late mother, Marcheline Bertrand, to remove her ovaries. Bertrand, who died in 2007 after an eight-year battle with ovarian cancer, made the doctors and nurses “promise” to remove her daughter’s ovaries.

 

Brad Pitt & Angelina Jolie: When is it Time to Seek Help?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-jane-greer/brad-pitt-angelina-jolie-_1_b_7242196.html

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie’s marriage has been reinvigorated by couples’ counseling. Although things are on the mend now, there was trouble in paradise less than a year after they tied the knot. Not only did Brad see ex Jennifer Aniston alone, but he alsodidn’t accompany Angelina to the Critics’ Choice Awards in January. After months of fighting, they decided to seek out the help of a therapist. Now they plan to always keep counseling in their lives, because they say it has transformed their marriage and helped them fall in love with each other again. And they are not alone. Cameron Diazand Benji Madden have enlisted some outside support after just five months of marriage, as they work to put a strong foundation underneath them. This proves that it is never too early to get help.

The secret to having a lasting relationship is to not let the anger and resentment build up to the point where it drives you apart. A lot of people don’t realize that a lasting union is full of angry and questioning feelings which go hand in hand with the adoring ones, not unlike a seesaw. I call them “love you, mean it” and “hate you, mean it” moments, which I talk about in my book What About Me? Stop Selfishness From Ruining Your Relationship. It is natural to shift in and out of these emotions. The challenge is to make sure the positive ones always balance the negative ones so that they don’t consume you. The goal is always to continue to or to get back to loving and feeling connected to your partner. What happens, though, when that becomes more and more difficult to do, and you aren’t able to get past the anger anymore? How do you know when it is time to bring in a trained professional to help you sort out the issues?

Even in today’s sophisticated age, people are often reluctant to air their marital problems with an outsider, especially when it comes to sexual troubles. There are many reasons for this which include feeling embarrassed, the fear that you think something is really wrong with you or your partner, the concern that you will be told there is something wrong with your relationship that is unfixable, or maybe you do want to go but your partner doesn’t. There are also those people who think that because the idea of divorce hasn’t come up things can’t be that bad, so you don’t really need help.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001401/

Angelina Jolie is an Oscar-winning actress who became popular after playing the title role in the “Lara Croft” blockbuster movies, as well as Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005),Wanted (2008), Salt (2010) and Maleficent (2014). Off-screen, Jolie has become prominently involved in international charity projects, especially those involving refugees.

 

 

Speaking to the Daily Telegraph, she said, “I actually love being in menopause,” shocking women worldwide. The star said she’s “very fortunate” that her experience with menopause hasn’t been all that bad.

Jolie-Pitt had a double mastectomy in 2013 and then decided in March to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to decrease her chance of getting cancer, as she carries the BRCA1 gene mutation. Her most recent surgery is one that “puts women into a forced menopause,” she wrote in a heartfelt New York Times op-ed publicly announcing her decision.

“I feel older, and I feel settled being older. I feel happy that I’ve grown up,” she said. “I don’t want to be young again.”

Her husband, Brad Pitt, has been helped her overcome the physical effects of the surgery.

 

She described her experience in two op-ed articles in the New York Times. These articles have been highly influential in the lives of other women.

 

Angelina Jolie PittDiary of a Surgery – The New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/24/opinion/angelina-jolie-pitt-diary-of-a-surgery.html

Angelina Jolie Pitt Diary of a … Surgery YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DpzGYLJddQrE

Experts Back Angelina Jolie Pitt in Choices for Cancer Prevention 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/25/science/experts-back-angelina-jolie-pitt-in-choices-for-cancer-prevention.html

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Experience with Trauma Surgery

Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

In 1987, I went on vacation to Bermuda with my wife and two children.  It was a beautiful place, and the weather and the ocean were wonderful to experience.  One could travel by bus, which was very safe, which I preferred. My older daughter wanted to use a moped, which we allowed on the condition that she first be trained.  On the last day, she went to return the moped, but the station was out for lunch.  I was a photograper and wanted to photograph the white bird of Burmuda. I put my camera in the rear, but as I left the station my moped was hit by an oncoming moped that I failed to see, unaccustomed to the British style driving.  An ambulance arrived within a few minutes as I lay on the ground. My wife sent the kids home and made arrangements for my secretary to look after them.  I was impressed with the surgeon when I arrived at the hospital. He wheeled me to the bed I was to stay in. I had two blood transfusions.  He took me to the operating room, but I don’t recall any details. He had a McGill University resident who later wrote a thesis about the experience.  I was pretty knocked out, but there was another patient in the room who had fallen down his steps. He was a WWII RAF veteran who had bombed the Germans. He told me the stories about his experience.  We contacted the burn surgeon, Walter Pleban, who arranged to have me flown to Bridgeport, CT, and he arranged for the best orthopedic surgeons to admit me on arrival.  In my flight there was another patient who was dying of endstage HIV AIDS.

Herbert Hermele observed how serious this was because there were three fractures of the right tibia. The good news was that there was no need to amputate because I had the nervous innervation, but I lost a popliteal artery.  I was admitted, and at first there was only a small room. The nurse was a very competent young woman of Portuguese descent. She was able to move me as needed. I was moved when a better room became available.  It was very good when the night shift nurse came in because I was able to talk to her with some attachment.  The Vice President had me provided with good meals, as I was the director of blood bank and chemistry.  I also had visits by my supervisors and other staff.

It was not an easy time, but I was privileged because of my standing with the medical and laboratory staff.  I had a longer stay than usual because I had an infection with two gram negative resistant strains of bacteria –serratia marcesans and Enterobacter. I was put on a gram negative penicillin and the next morning I felt dizzy. When Dr. Pleban came to see me I told him that I was having a penicillin reaction because I was aware that my twin sister was allergic to penicillin. As a result, the prescription was changed and it was an improved situation.  I underwent 10 operative procedures in some weeks. Dr. Hermeles partner put an antibiotic plug into the wound and it healed.  It was only after the infection cleared that a superb reconstructive surgeon was called in and he made skin grafts to close the wound after he disconnected a tendon and pulled muscle over the wound.  I also had a call from IJ Good, University Professor of Statistics at Virginia Polytech, who had completed writing a program to analyze data that I had provided him 2 years earlier – of MB isoenzyme CK at 6 hours and 12 hours later for diagnosis of heart attack.  We published the work in the prestigious journal, Clinical Chemistry and the President of the College of American Pathologists took note of the paper. I was finally sent home, without needing excess stay to the hospital environment.  I had physical therapy at home, and my bed was made on the first floor.  When I returned to work my infection site oozed, so I went to the Chief of Infectious Disease.  He prescribed a new quinolone antibiotic that could be taken orally. The infection subsided and it has never returned.

My sister came from San Diego, California and she brought me a recording she made for imaging to heal.  It went on that I was climbing a step to the heavens and getting better and better.  She also emphases laughing.

I can only look back and recall how fortunate I was to have the attention and kindness at that time. It was in excess of what many patients experience.  I do recall that the Hungarian-Cuban music teacher my daughter had had thousands of musical pieces and thousands of stories so that she was one of the most entertaining patients ever admitted to Bridgeport Hospital.

 

 

 

 

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NIMHD welcomes nine new members to the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) has announced the appointment of nine new members to the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NACMHD), NIMHD’s principal advisory board. Members of the council are drawn from the scientific, medical, and lay communities, so they offer diverse perspectives on minority health and health disparities.

The NACMHD, which meets three times a year on the National Institutes of Health campus, Bethesda, Maryland, advises the secretary of Health and Human Services and the directors of NIH and NIMHD on matters related to NIMHD’s mission. The council also conducts the second level of review of grant applications and cooperative agreements for research and training and recommends approval for projects that show promise of making valuable contributions to human knowledge.

The next meeting of the NACMHD will be held on Thursday, Sept. 10, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on the NIH campus. The meeting will be available on videocast at http://www.videocast.nih.gov.

NIMHD Director Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, M.D., is pleased to welcome the following new members

Margarita Alegría, Ph.D., is the director of the Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research at Cambridge Health Alliance and a professor in the department of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Boston. She has devoted her career to researching disparities in mental health and substance abuse services, with the goal of improving access to and equity and quality of these services for disadvantaged and minority populations.

Maria Araneta, Ph.D., a perinatal epidemiologist, is a professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests include maternal/pediatric HIV/AIDS, birth defects, and ethnic health disparities in type 2 diabetes, regional fat distribution, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic abnormalities.

Judith Bradford, Ph.D., is director of the Center for Population Research in LGBT Health and she co-chairs The Fenway Institute, Boston. Dr. Bradford has participated in health research since 1984, working with public health programs and community-based organizations to conduct studies on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and racial minority communities and to translate the results into programs to reduce health disparities.

Linda Burhansstipanov, Dr.P.H., has worked in public health since 1971, primarily with Native American issues. She is a nationally recognized educator on cancer prevention, community-based participatory research, navigation programs, cultural competency, evaluation, and other topics. Dr. Burhansstipanov worked with the Anschutz Medical Center Cancer Research Center — now the University of Colorado Cancer Research Center — in Denver for five years before founding Native American Cancer Initiatives, Inc., and the Native American Cancer Research Corporation.

Sandro Galea, M.D., a physician and epidemiologist, is the dean and a professor at the Boston University School of Public Health. Prior to his appointment at Boston University, Dr. Galea served as the Anna Cheskis Gelman and Murray Charles Gelman Professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York City. His research focuses on the causes of brain disorders, particularly common mood and anxiety disorders, and substance abuse.

Linda Greene, J.D., is Evjue Bascom Professor of Law at the University of Wisconsin–Madison Law School. Her teaching and academic scholarship include constitutional law, civil procedure, legislation, civil rights, and sports law. Most recently, she was the vice chancellor for equity, diversity, and inclusion at the University of California, San Diego.

Ross A. Hammond, Ph.D., a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C., is also director of the Center on Social Dynamics and Policy. His primary area of expertise is using mathematical and computational methods from complex systems science to model complex dynamics in economic, social, and public health systems. His current research topics include obesity etiology and prevention, tobacco control, and behavioral epidemiology.

Hilton Hudson, II, M.D., is chief of cardiothoracic surgery at Franciscan Healthcare, Munster, Indiana and a national ambassador for the American Heart Association. He also is the founder of Hilton Publishing, Inc., a national publisher dedicated to producing content on solutions related to health, wellness, and education for people in underserved communities. Dr. Hilton’s book, “The Heart of the Matter: The African American Guide to Heart Disease, Heart Treatment and Heart Wellness” has impacted at-risk patients nationwide.

Brian M. Rivers, Ph.D., M.P.H., currently serves on the research faculty at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida. He is also an assistant professor in the Department of Oncologic Sciences at the University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa. Dr. Rivers’ research efforts include examination of unmet educational and psychosocial needs and the development of communication tools, couple-centered interventions, and evidence-based methods to convey complex information to at-risk populations across the cancer continuum.

NIMHD is one of NIH’s 27 Institutes and Centers. It leads scientific research to improve minority health and eliminate health disparities by conducting and supporting research; planning, reviewing, coordinating, and evaluating all minority health and health disparities research at NIH; promoting and supporting the training of a diverse research workforce; translating and disseminating research information; and fostering collaborations and partnerships. For more information about NIMHD, visit http://www.nimhd.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

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