Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘hydrogen transfer’


The Colors of Respiration and Electron Transport

Reporter & Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

 

 

Molecular Biology of the Cell. 4th edition

Electron-Transport Chains and Their Proton Pumps
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/

Having considered in general terms how a mitochondrion uses electron
transport to create an electrochemical proton gradient, we need to
examine the mechanisms that underlie this membrane-based energy-conversion process. In doing so, we also accomplish a larger purpose.
As emphasized at the beginning of this chapter, very similar chemi-
osmotic mechanisms are used by mitochondria, chloroplasts, archea,
and bacteria. In fact, these mechanisms underlie the function of nearly
all living organisms— including anaerobes that derive all their energy
from electron transfers between two inorganic molecules. It is therefore
rather humbling for scientists to remind themselves that the existence
of chemiosmosis has been recognized for only about 40 years.

mitochondria

mitochondria

 

Overview of The Electron Transport Chain

Overview of The Electron Transport Chain

We begin with a look at some of the principles that underlie the electron-transport process, with the aim of explaining how it can pump protons
across a membrane.

Although protons resemble other positive ions such as Na+ and K+
in their movement across membranes, in some respects they are unique.
Hydrogen atoms are by far the most abundant type of atom in living
organisms; they are plentiful not only in all carbon-containing
biological molecules, but also in the water molecules that surround
them. The protons in water are highly mobile, flickering through the
hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules by rapidly
dissociating from one water molecule to associate with its neighbor,
as illustrated in Figure 14-20A. Protons are thought to move across a
protein pump embedded in a lipid bilayer in a similar way: they
transfer from one amino acid side chain to another, following a
special channel through the protein.

Protons are also special with respect to electron transport. Whenever
a molecule is reduced by acquiring an electron, the electron (e -) brings
with it a negative charge. In many cases, this charge is rapidly
neutralized by the addition of a proton (H+) from water, so that
the net effect of the reduction is to transfer an entire hydrogen atom,
H+ + e – (Figure 14-20B). Similarly, when a molecule is oxidized,
a hydrogen atom removed from it can be readily dissociated into
its constituent electron and proton—allowing the electron to
be transferred separately to a molecule that accepts electrons,
while the proton is passed to the water. Therefore, in a membrane
in which electrons are being passed along an electron-transport
chain, pumping protons from one side of the membrane to
another can be relatively simple. The electron carrier merely
needs to be arranged in the membrane in a way that causes it to
pick up a proton from one side of the membrane when it accepts
an electron, and to release the proton on the other side of the
membrane as the electron is passed to the next carrier molecule
in the chain (Figure 14-21).

protons pumped across membranes ch14f21

protons pumped across membranes ch14f21

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/bin/ch14f21.gif

Figure 14-21

How protons can be pumped across membranes. As an electron
passes along an electron-transport chain embedded in a lipid-bilayer
membrane, it can bind and release a proton at each step.
In this diagram, electron carrier B picks up a proton (H+)
from one (more…)

e_transfer

e_transfer

The Redox Potential Is a Measure of Electron Affinities

In biochemical reactions, any electrons removed from one
molecule are always passed to another, so that whenever one
molecule is oxidized, another is reduced. Like any other chemical r
eaction, the tendency of such oxidation-reduction reactions, or
redox reactions, to proceed spontaneously depends on the free-
energy change (ΔG) for the electron transfer, which in turn
depends on the relative affinities of the two molecules for electrons.

Because electron transfers provide most of the energy for living
things, it is worth spending the time to understand them. Many
readers are already familiar with acids and bases, which donate
and accept protons (see Panel 2-2, pp. 112–113). Acids and bases
exist in conjugate acid-base pairs, in which the acid is readily
converted into the base by the loss of a proton. For example,
acetic acid (CH3COOH) is converted into its conjugate base
(CH3COO-) in the reaction:

Image ch14e3.jpg

In exactly the same way, pairs of compounds such as NADH and
NAD+ are called redox pairs, since NADH is converted to NAD+
by the loss of electrons in the reaction:

Image ch14e4.jpg

NAD+_NADH

NAD+_NADH

NADH is a strong electron donor: because its electrons are held
in a high-energy linkage, the free-energy change for passing its
electrons to many other molecules is favorable (see Figure 14-9).
It is difficult to form a high-energy linkage. Therefore its redox
partner, NAD+, is of necessity a weak electron acceptor.

The tendency to transfer electrons from any redox pair can be
measured experimentally. All that is required is the formation
of an electrical circuit linking a 1:1 (equimolar) mixture of the
redox pair to a second redox pair that has been arbitrarily selected
as a reference standard, so the voltage difference can be measured
between them (Panel 14-1, p. 784). This voltage difference is
defined as the redox potential; as defined, electrons move
spontaneously from a redox pair like NADH/NAD+ with a low
redox potential (a low affinity for electrons) to a redox pair like
O2/H2O with a high redox potential (a high affinity for electrons).
Thus, NADH is a good molecule for donating electrons to the
respiratory chain, while O2 is well suited to act as the “sink” for
electrons at the end of the pathway. As explained in Panel 14-1,
the difference in redox potential, ΔE0′, is a direct measure of
the standard free-energy change (ΔG°) for the transfer of an
electron from one molecule to another.

Proteins of inner space

Proteins of inner space

energetics-of-cellular-respiration

energetics-of-cellular-respiration

Box Icon

Panel 14-1

Redox Potentials.

Electron Transfers Release Large Amounts of Energy

As just discussed, those pairs of compounds that have the most negative
redox potentials have the weakest affinity for electrons and therefore
contain carriers with the strongest tendency to donate electrons.
Conversely, those pairs that have the most positive redox potentials
have the strongest affinity for electrons and therefore contain carriers
with the strongest tendency to accept electrons. A 1:1 mixture of NADH
and NAD+ has a redox potential of -320 mV, indicating that NADH has
a strong tendency to donate electrons; a 1:1 mixture of H2O and ½O2
has a redox potential of +820 mV, indicating that O2 has a strong
tendency to accept electrons. The difference in redox potential is
1.14 volts (1140 mV), which means that the transfer of each electron
from NADH to O2 under these standard conditions is enormously
favorable, where ΔG° = -26.2 kcal/mole (-52.4 kcal/mole for the two
electrons transferred per NADH molecule; see Panel 14-1). If we
compare this free-energy change with that for the formation of the
phosphoanhydride bonds in ATP (ΔG° = -7.3 kcal/mole, see Figure 2-75), we see that more than enough energy is released by the oxidization
of one NADH molecule to synthesize several molecules of ATP from
ADP and Pi.

 Phosphate dependence of pyruvate oxidation

Phosphate dependence of pyruvate oxidation

Living systems could certainly have evolved enzymes that would
allow NADH to donate electrons directly to O2 to make water in the reaction:

Image ch14e5.jpg

But because of the huge free-energy drop, this reaction would proceed
with almost explosive force and nearly all of the energy would be released
as heat. Cells do perform this reaction, but they make it proceed much
more gradually by passing the high-energy electrons from NADH to
O2 via the many electron carriers in the electron-transport chain.
Since each successive carrier in the chain holds its electrons more
tightly, the highly energetically favorable reaction 2H+ + 2e – + ½O2
→ H2O is made to occur in many small steps. This enables nearly half
of the released energy to be stored, instead of being lost to the
environment as heat.

Spectroscopic Methods Have Been Used to Identify Many Electron
Carriers in the Respiratory Chain

Many of the electron carriers in the respiratory chain absorb visible
light and change color when they are oxidized or reduced. In general,
each has an absorption spectrum and reactivity that are distinct enough
to allow its behavior to be traced spectroscopically, even in crude mixtures.
It was therefore possible to purify these components long before their
exact functions were known. Thus, the cytochromes were discovered
in 1925 as compounds that undergo rapid oxidation and reduction in
living organisms as disparate as bacteria, yeasts, and insects. By observing
cells and tissues with a spectroscope, three types of cytochromes were
identified by their distinctive absorption spectra and designated
cytochromes a, b, and c. This nomenclature has survived, even though
cells are now known to contain several cytochromes of each type and
the classification into types is not functionally important.

The cytochromes constitute a family of colored proteins that are
related by the presence of a bound heme group, whose iron atom
changes from the ferric oxidation state (Fe3+) to the ferrous oxidation
state (Fe2+) whenever it accepts an electron. The heme group consists
of a porphyrin ring with a tightly bound iron atom held by four nitrogen
atoms at the corners of a square (Figure 14-22). A similar porphyrin ring
is responsible for the red color of blood and for the green color of
leaves, being bound to iron in hemoglobin and to magnesium in
chlorophyll, respectively.

The structure of the heme group attached covalently to cytochrome c ch14f22

The structure of the heme group attached covalently to cytochrome c ch14f22

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/bin/ch14f22.jpg

Figure 14-22. The structure of the heme group attached covalently
to cytochrome c.

Figure 14-22

The structure of the heme group attached covalently to cytochrome c.
The porphyrin ring is shown in blue. There are five different
cytochromes in the respiratory chain. Because the hemes in different
cytochromes have slightly different structures and (more…)

Iron-sulfur proteins are a second major family of electron carriers. In these
proteins, either two or four iron atoms are bound to an equal number of
sulfur atoms and to cysteine side chains, forming an iron-sulfur center
on the protein (Figure 14-23). There are more iron-sulfur centers than
cytochromes in the respiratory chain. But their spectroscopic detection
requires electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, and they are less
completely characterized. Like the cytochromes, these centers carry one
electron at a time.

structure of iron sulfur centers ch14f23

structure of iron sulfur centers ch14f23

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/bin/ch14f23.jpg

Figure 14-23. The structures of two types of iron-sulfur centers.

Figure 14-23

The structures of two types of iron-sulfur centers. (A) A center of the
2Fe2S type. (B) A center of the 4Fe4S type. Although they contain
multiple iron atoms, each iron-sulfur center can carry only one
electron at a time. There are more than seven different (more…)

The simplest of the electron carriers in the respiratory chain—and
the only one that is not part of a protein—is a small hydrophobic
molecule that is freely mobile in the lipid bilayer known as ubiquinone,
or coenzyme Q. A quinone (Q) can pick up or donate either one or
two electrons; upon reduction, it picks up a proton from the medium
along with each electron it carries (Figure 14-24).

quinone electron carriers ch14f24

quinone electron carriers ch14f24

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/bin/ch14f24.jpg

Figure 14-24. Quinone electron carriers.

Figure 14-24

Quinone electron carriers. Ubiquinone in the respiratory chain picks
up one H+ from the aqueous environment for every electron it accepts,
and it can carry either one or two electrons as part of a hydrogen atom
(yellow). When reduced ubiquinone donates (more…)

In addition to six different hemes linked to cytochromes, more than
seven iron-sulfur centers, and ubiquinone, there are also two copper
atoms and a flavin serving as electron carriers tightly bound to respiratory-chain proteins in the pathway from NADH to oxygen. This pathway
involves more than 60 different proteins in all.

As one would expect, the electron carriers have higher and higher
affinities for electrons (greater redox potentials) as one moves along
the respiratory chain. The redox potentials have been fine-tuned
during evolution by the binding of each electron carrier in a particular
protein context, which can alter its normal affinity for electrons. However,
because iron-sulfur centers have a relatively low affinity for electrons,
they predominate in the early part of the respiratory chain; in contrast,
the cytochromes predominate further down the chain, where a higher
affinity for electrons is required.

The order of the individual electron carriers in the chain was
determined by sophisticated spectroscopic measurements (Figure 14-25),
and many of the proteins were initially isolated and characterized as
individual polypeptides. A major advance in understanding the
respiratory chain, however, was the later realization that most of
the proteins are organized into three large enzyme complexes.

path of electrons ch14f25

path of electrons ch14f25

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/bin/ch14f25.gif

Figure 14-25. The general methods used to determine the path of
electrons along an electron-transport chain.

Figure 14-25

The general methods used to determine the path of electrons along
an electron-transport chain. The extent of oxidation of electron
carriers a, b, c, and d is continuously monitored by following their
distinct spectra, which differ in their oxidized and (more…)

The Respiratory Chain Includes Three Large Enzyme Complexes
Embedded in the Inner Membrane

Membrane proteins are difficult to purify as intact complexes
because they are insoluble in aqueous solutions, and some of
the detergents required to solubilize them can destroy normal
protein-protein interactions. In the early 1960s, however, it
was found that relatively mild ionic detergents, such as deoxycholate,
can solubilize selected components of the inner mitochondrial
membrane in their native form. This permitted the identification
and purification of the three major membrane-bound respiratory
enzyme complexes in the pathway from NADH to oxygen (Figure 14-26).
As we shall see in this section, each of these complexes acts as an
electron-transport-driven H+ pump; however, they were
initially characterized in terms of the electron carriers that
they interact with and contain:

mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26904/bin/ch14f26.gif

Figure 14-26. The path of electrons through the three respiratory
enzyme complexes.

Figure 14-26

The path of electrons through the three respiratory enzyme complexes.
The relative size and shape of each complex are shown. During the
transfer of electrons from NADH to oxygen (red lines), ubiquinone
and cytochrome c serve as mobile carriers that ferry (more…)

The NADH dehydrogenase complex (generally known as complex I)
is the largest of the respiratory enzyme complexes, containing more
than 40 polypeptide chains. It accepts electrons from NADH and
passes them through a flavin and at least seven iron-sulfur centers
to ubiquinone. Ubiquinone then transfers its electrons to a second
respiratory enzyme complex, the cytochrome b-c1 complex.

The cytochrome b-c1 complex contains at least 11 different
polypeptide chains and functions as a dimer. Each monomer
contains three hemes bound to cytochromes and an iron-sulfur
protein. The complex accepts electrons from ubiquinone
and passes them on to cytochrome c, which carries its electron
to the cytochrome oxidase complex.

The cytochrome oxidase complex also functions as a dimer; each
monomer contains 13 different polypeptide chains, including two
cytochromes and two copper atoms. The complex accepts one electron
at a time from cytochrome c and passes them four at a time to oxygen.

The cytochromes, iron-sulfur centers, and copper atoms can carry
only one electron at a time. Yet each NADH donates two electrons,
and each O2 molecule must receive four electrons to produce water.
There are several electron-collecting and electron-dispersing points
along the electron-transport chain where these changes in electron
number are accommodated. The most obvious of these is cytochrome
oxidase.

An Iron-Copper Center in Cytochrome Oxidase Catalyzes Efficient
O2 Reduction

Because oxygen has a high affinity for electrons, it releases a
large amount of free energy when it is reduced to form water.
Thus, the evolution of cellular respiration, in which O2 is
converted to water, enabled organisms to harness much more
energy than can be derived from anaerobic metabolism. This
is presumably why all higher organisms respire. The ability of
biological systems to use O2 in this way, however, requires a
very sophisticated chemistry. We can tolerate O2 in the air we
breathe because it has trouble picking up its first electron; this
fact allows its initial reaction in cells to be controlled closely by
enzymatic catalysis. But once a molecule of O2 has picked up one
electron to form a superoxide radical (O2 -), it becomes dangerously
reactive and rapidly takes up an additional three electrons wherever
it can find them. The cell can use O2 for respiration only because
cytochrome oxidase holds onto oxygen at a special bimetallic
center, where it remains clamped between a heme-linked iron
atom and a copper atom until it has picked up a total of four electrons.
Only then can the two oxygen atoms of the oxygen molecule be
safely released as two molecules of water (Figure 14-27).

Figure 14-27. The reaction of O2 with electrons in cytochrome oxidase.

Figure 14-27

The reaction of O2 with electrons in cytochrome oxidase. As indicated,
the iron atom in heme a serves as an electron queuing point; this
heme feeds four electrons into an O2 molecule held at the bimetallic
center active site, which is formed by the other (more…)

The cytochrome oxidase reaction is estimated to account for 90%
of the total oxygen uptake in most cells. This protein complex is
therefore crucial for all aerobic life. Cyanide and azide are extremely
toxic because they bind tightly to the cell’s cytochrome oxidase
complexes to stop electron transport, thereby greatly reducing
ATP production.

Although the cytochrome oxidase in mammals contains 13
different protein subunits, most of these seem to have a subsidiary
role, helping to regulate either the activity or the assembly of the
three subunits that form the core of the enzyme. The complete
structure of this large enzyme complex has recently been determined
by x-ray crystallography, as illustrated in Figure 14-28. The atomic
resolution structures, combined with mechanistic studies of the effect
of precisely tailored mutations introduced into the enzyme by genetic
engineering of the yeast and bacterial proteins, are revealing the
detailed mechanisms of this finely tuned protein machine.

Figure 14-28. The molecular structure of cytochrome oxidase.

Figure 14-28

The molecular structure of cytochrome oxidase. This protein
is a dimer formed from a monomer with 13 different protein
subunits (monomer mass of 204,000 daltons). The three colored
subunits are encoded by the mitochondrial genome, and they
form the functional (more…)

Electron Transfers Are Mediated by Random Collisions in
the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane

The two components that carry electrons between the three
major enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain—ubiquinone
and cytochrome c—diffuse rapidly in the plane of the inner
mitochondrial membrane. The expected rate of random collisions
between these mobile carriers and the more slowly diffusing
enzyme complexes can account for the observed rates of electron
transfer (each complex donates and receives an electron about
once every 5–20 milliseconds). Thus, there is no need to postulate
a structurally ordered chain of electron-transfer proteins in the
lipid bilayer; indeed, the three enzyme complexes seem to exist as
independent entities in the plane of the inner membrane, being
present in different ratios in different mitochondria.

The ordered transfer of electrons along the respiratory chain
is due entirely to the specificity of the functional interactions
between the components of the chain: each electron carrier is
able to interact only with the carrier adjacent to it in the sequence
shown in Figure 14-26, with no short circuits.

Electrons move between the molecules that carry them in
biological systems not only by moving along covalent bonds
within a molecule, but also by jumping across a gap as large
as 2 nm. The jumps occur by electron “tunneling,” a quantum-
mechanical property that is critical for the processes we are
discussing. Insulation is needed to prevent short circuits that
would otherwise occur when an electron carrier with a low redox
potential collides with a carrier with a high redox potential. This
insulation seems to be provided by carrying an electron deep
enough inside a protein to prevent its tunneling interactions
with an inappropriate partner.

How the changes in redox potential from one electron carrier
to the next are harnessed to pump protons out of the mitochondrial
matrix is the topic we discuss next.

A Large Drop in Redox Potential Across Each of the Three Respiratory
Enzyme Complexes Provides the Energy for H+ Pumping

We have previously discussed how the redox potential reflects
electron affinities (see p. 783). An outline of the redox potentials
measured along the respiratory chain is shown in Figure 14-29.
These potentials drop in three large steps, one across each major
respiratory complex. The change in redox potential between any
two electron carriers is directly proportional to the free energy
released when an electron transfers between them. Each enzyme
complex acts as an energy-conversion device by harnessing some
of this free-energy change to pump H+ across the inner membrane,
thereby creating an electrochemical proton gradient as electrons
pass through that complex. This conversion can be demonstrated
by purifying each respiratory enzyme complex and incorporating
it separately into liposomes: when an appropriate electron donor
and acceptor are added so that electrons can pass through the complex,
H+ is translocated across the liposome membrane.

Figure 14-29. Redox potential changes along the mitochondrial
electron-transport chain.

Figure 14-29

Redox potential changes along the mitochondrial electron-transport
chain. The redox potential (designated E′0) increases as electrons
flow down the respiratory chain to oxygen. The standard free-energy
change, ΔG°, for the transfer (more…)

The Mechanism of H+ Pumping Will Soon Be Understood in
Atomic Detail

Some respiratory enzyme complexes pump one H+ per electron
across the inner mitochondrial membrane, whereas others pump
two. The detailed mechanism by which electron transport is coupled
to H+ pumping is different for the three different enzyme complexes.
In the cytochrome b-c1 complex, the quinones clearly have a role.
As mentioned previously, a quinone picks up a H+ from the aqueous
medium along with each electron it carries and liberates it when it
releases the electron (see Figure 14-24). Since ubiquinone is freely
mobile in the lipid bilayer, it could accept electrons near the inside
surface of the membrane and donate them to the cytochrome b-c1
complex near the outside surface, thereby transferring one H+
across the bilayer for every electron transported. Two protons are
pumped per electron in the cytochrome b-c1 complex, however, and
there is good evidence for a so-called Q-cycle, in which ubiquinone
is recycled through the complex in an ordered way that makes this
two-for-one transfer possible. Exactly how this occurs can now be
worked out at the atomic level, because the complete structure of
the cytochrome b-c1 complex has been determined by x-ray
crystallography (Figure 14-30).

Figure 14-30. The atomic structure of cytochrome b-c 1.

Figure 14-30

The atomic structure of cytochrome b-c 1. This protein is a dimer.
The 240,000-dalton monomer is composed of 11 different protein
molecules in mammals. The three colored proteins form the
functional core of the enzyme: cytochrome b (green), cytochrome (more…)

Allosteric changes in protein conformations driven by electron
transport can also pump H+, just as H+ is pumped when ATP
is hydrolyzed by the ATP synthase running in reverse. For both the
NADH dehydrogenase complex and the cytochrome oxidase complex,
it seems likely that electron transport drives sequential allosteric
changes in protein conformation that cause a portion of the protein
to pump H+ across the mitochondrial inner membrane. A general
mechanism for this type of H+ pumping is presented in Figure 14-31.

Figure 14-31. A general model for H+ pumping.

Figure 14-31

A general model for H+ pumping. This model for H+ pumping
by a transmembrane protein is based on mechanisms that are
thought to be used by both cytochrome oxidase and the light-driven
procaryotic proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin. The protein
is driven through (more…)

H+ Ionophores Uncouple Electron Transport from ATP Synthesis

Since the 1940s, several substances—such as 2,4-dinitrophenol—
have been known to act as uncoupling agents, uncoupling electron
transport from ATP synthesis. The addition of these low-molecular-weight organic compounds to cells stops ATP synthesis by mitochondria
without blocking their uptake of oxygen. In the presence of an
uncoupling agent, electron transport and H+ pumping continue at
a rapid rate, but no H+ gradient is generated. The explanation for
this effect is both simple and elegant: uncoupling agents are lipid-
soluble weak acids that act as H+ carriers (H+ ionophores), and
they provide a pathway for the flow of H+ across the inner mitochondrial
membrane that bypasses the ATP synthase. As a result of this short-
circuiting, the proton-motive force is dissipated completely, and
ATP can no longer be made.

Respiratory Control Normally Restrains Electron Flow
Through the Chain

When an uncoupler such as dinitrophenol is added to cells,
mitochondria increase their oxygen uptake substantially because
of an increased rate of electron transport. This increase reflects
the existence of respiratory control. The control is thought to
act via a direct inhibitory influence of the electrochemical proton
gradient on the rate of electron transport. When the gradient is
collapsed by an uncoupler, electron transport is free to run unchecked
at the maximal rate. As the gradient increases, electron transport
becomes more difficult, and the process slows. Moreover, if an
artificially large electrochemical proton gradient is experimentally
created across the inner membrane, normal electron transport
stops completely, and a reverse electron flow can be detected in
some sections of the respiratory chain. This observation suggests
that respiratory control reflects a simple balance between the
free-energy change for electron-transport-linked proton pumping
and the free-energy change for electron transport—that is, the
magnitude of the electrochemical proton gradient affects both
the rate and the direction of electron transport, just as it affects
the directionality of the ATP synthase (see Figure 14-19).

Respiratory control is just one part of an elaborate interlocking
system of feedback controls that coordinate the rates of glycolysis,
fatty acid breakdown, the citric acid cycle, and electron transport.
The rates of all of these processes are adjusted to the ATP:ADP ratio,
increasing whenever an increased utilization of ATP causes the ratio
to fall. The ATP synthase in the inner mitochondrial membrane,
for example, works faster as the concentrations of its substrates
ADP and Pi increase. As it speeds up, the enzyme lets more H+ flow
into the matrix and thereby dissipates the electrochemical proton
gradient more rapidly. The falling gradient, in turn, enhances the
rate of electron transport.

Similar controls, including feedback inhibition of several key enzymes
by ATP, act to adjust the rates of NADH production to the rate of
NADH utilization by the respiratory chain, and so on. As a result of
these many control mechanisms, the body oxidizes fats and sugars
5–10 times more rapidly during a period of strenuous exercise than
during a period of rest.

Natural Uncouplers Convert the Mitochondria in Brown Fat into
Heat-generating Machines

In some specialized fat cells, mitochondrial respiration is normally
uncoupled from ATP synthesis. In these cells, known as brown fat
cells, most of the energy of oxidation is dissipated as heat rather
than being converted into ATP. The inner membranes of the large
mitochondria in these cells contain a special transport protein that
allows protons to move down their electrochemical gradient, by-
passing ATP synthase. As a result, the cells oxidize their fat stores
at a rapid rate and produce more heat than ATP. Tissues containing
brown fat serve as “heating pads,” helping to revive hibernating animals
and to protect sensitive areas of newborn human babies from the cold.

Bacteria Also Exploit Chemiosmotic Mechanisms to Harness Energy

Bacteria use enormously diverse energy sources. Some, like animal
cells, are aerobic; they synthesize ATP from sugars they oxidize to
CO2 and H2O by glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and a respiratory
chain in their plasma membrane that is similar to the one in the
inner mitochondrial membrane. Others are strict anaerobes, deriving
their energy either from glycolysis alone (by fermentation) or from an
electron-transport chain that employs a molecule other than oxygen
as the final electron acceptor. The alternative electron acceptor can
be a nitrogen compound (nitrate or nitrite), a sulfur compound
(sulfate or sulfite), or a carbon compound (fumarate or carbonate),
for example. The electrons are transferred to these acceptors by a
series of electron carriers in the plasma membrane that are comparable
to those in mitochondrial respiratory chains.

Despite this diversity, the plasma membrane of the vast majority of
bacteria contains an ATP synthase that is very similar to the one in
mitochondria. In bacteria that use an electron-transport chain to
harvest energy, the electron-transport pumps H+ out of the cell and
thereby establishes a proton-motive force across the plasma membrane
that drives the ATP synthase to make ATP. In other bacteria, the
ATP synthase works in reverse, using the ATP produced by glycolysis
to pump H+ and establish a proton gradient across the plasma
membrane. The ATP used for this process is generated by
fermentation processes (discussed in Chapter 2).

Thus, most bacteria, including the strict anaerobes, maintain a proton
gradient across their plasma membrane. It can be harnessed to drive
a flagellar motor, and it is used to pump Na+ out of the bacterium via
a Na+-H+ antiporter that takes the place of the Na+-K+ pump of
eucaryotic cells. This gradient is also used for the active inward transport
of nutrients, such as most amino acids and many sugars: each nutrient is
dragged into the cell along with one or more H+ through a specific symporter
(Figure 14-32). In animal cells, by contrast, most inward transport across
the plasma membrane is driven by the Na+ gradient that is established by the
Na+-K+ pump.

Figure 14-32. The importance of H+-driven transport in bacteria.

Figure 14-32

The importance of H+-driven transport in bacteria. A proton-motive force
generated across the plasma membrane pumps nutrients into the cell and
expels Na+. (A) In an aerobic bacterium, an electrochemical proton gradient
across the plasma membrane is produced (more…)

Some unusual bacteria have adapted to live in a very alkaline
environment and yet must maintain their cytoplasm at a physiological
pH. For these cells, any attempt to generate an electrochemical H+
gradient would be opposed by a large H+ concentration gradient in
the wrong direction (H+ higher inside than outside). Presumably for
this reason, some of these bacteria substitute Na+ for H+ in all of their
chemiosmotic mechanisms. The respiratory chain pumps Na+ out of
the cell, the transport systems and flagellar motor are driven by an
inward flux of Na+, and a Na+-driven ATP synthase synthesizes
ATP. The existence of such bacteria demonstrates that the principle
of chemiosmosis is more fundamental than the proton-motive force
on which it is normally based.

Summary

The respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane contains
three respiratory enzyme complexes through which electrons pass on
their way from NADH to O2.

Each of these can be purified, inserted into synthetic lipid vesicles,
and then shown to pump H+ when electrons are transported through it.
In the intact membrane, the mobile electron carriers ubiquinone and
cytochrome c complete the electron-transport chain by shuttling between
the enzyme complexes. The path of electron flow is NADH → NADH
dehydrogenase complex → ubiquinone → cytochrome b-c1 complex →
cytochrome c → cytochrome oxidase complex → molecular oxygen (O2).

The respiratory enzyme complexes couple the energetically favorable
transport of electrons to the pumping of H+ out of the matrix. The
resulting electrochemical proton gradient is harnessed to make ATP
by another transmembrane protein complex, ATP synthase, through
which H+ flows back into the matrix. The ATP synthase is a reversible
coupling device that normally converts a backflow of H+ into ATP
phosphate bond energy by catalyzing the reaction ADP + Pi → ATP,
but it can also work in the opposite direction and hydrolyze ATP to
pump H+ if the electrochemical proton gradient is sufficiently reduced.
Its universal presence in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and procaryotes
testifies to the central importance of chemiosmotic mechanisms in cells.

By agreement with the publisher, this book is accessible by the search
feature, but cannot be browsed.

Copyright © 2002, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis,
Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, and Peter Walter; Copyright © 1983, 1989,
1994, Bruce Alberts, Dennis Bray, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith
Roberts, and James D. Watson .

Read Full Post »

Pentose Shunt, Electron Transfer, Galactose, more Lipids in brief


Pentose Shunt, Electron Transfer, Galactose, more Lipids in brief

Reviewer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Pentose Shunt, Electron Transfer, Galactose, and other Lipids in brief

This is a continuation of the series of articles that spans the horizon of the genetic
code and the progression in complexity from genomics to proteomics, which must
be completed before proceeding to metabolomics and multi-omics.  At this point
we have covered genomics, transcriptomics, signaling, and carbohydrate metabolism
with considerable detail.In carbohydrates. There are two topics that need some attention –
(1) pentose phosphate shunt;
(2) H+ transfer
(3) galactose.
(4) more lipids
Then we are to move on to proteins and proteomics.

Summary of this series:

The outline of what I am presenting in series is as follows:

  1. Signaling and Signaling Pathways
    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/12/signaling-and-signaling-pathways/
  2. Signaling transduction tutorial.
    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/12/signaling-transduction-tutorial/
  3. Carbohydrate metabolism
    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/13/carbohydrate-metabolism/

Selected References to Signaling and Metabolic Pathways published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, include the following: 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/14/selected-references-to-signaling-
and-metabolic-pathways-in-leaders-in-pharmaceutical-intelligence/

  1. Lipid metabolism

4.1  Studies of respiration lead to Acetyl CoA
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/18/studies-of-respiration-lead-to-acetyl-coa/

4.2 The multi-step transfer of phosphate bond and hydrogen exchange energy
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/19/the-multi-step-transfer-of-phosphate-
bond-and-hydrogen-exchange-energy/

5.Pentose shunt, electron transfers, galactose, and other lipids in brief

6. Protein synthesis and degradation

7.  Subcellular structure

8. Impairments in pathological states: endocrine disorders; stress
hypermetabolism; cancer.

Section I. Pentose Shunt

Bernard L. Horecker’s Contributions to Elucidating the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

Nicole Kresge,     Robert D. Simoni and     Robert L. Hill

The Enzymatic Conversion of 6-Phosphogluconate to Ribulose-5-Phosphate
and Ribose-5-Phosphate (Horecker, B. L., Smyrniotis, P. Z., and Seegmiller,
J. E.      J. Biol. Chem. 1951; 193: 383–396

Bernard Horecker

Bernard Leonard Horecker (1914) began his training in enzymology in 1936 as a
graduate student at the University of Chicago in the laboratory of T. R. Hogness.
His initial project involved studying succinic dehydrogenase from beef heart using
the Warburg manometric apparatus. However, when Erwin Hass arrived from Otto
Warburg’s laboratory he asked Horecker to join him in the search for an enzyme
that would catalyze the reduction of cytochrome c by reduced NADP. This marked
the beginning of Horecker’s lifelong involvement with the pentose phosphate pathway.

During World War II, Horecker left Chicago and got a job at the National Institutes of
Health (NIH) in Frederick S. Brackett’s laboratory in the Division of Industrial Hygiene.
As part of the wartime effort, Horecker was assigned the task of developing a method
to determine the carbon monoxide hemoglobin content of the blood of Navy pilots
returning from combat missions. When the war ended, Horecker returned to research
in enzymology and began studying the reduction of cytochrome c by the succinic
dehydrogenase system.

Shortly after he began these investigation changes, Horecker was approached by
future Nobel laureate Arthur Kornberg, who was convinced that enzymes were the
key to understanding intracellular biochemical processes
. Kornberg suggested
they collaborate, and the two began to study the effect of cyanide on the succinic
dehydrogenase system. Cyanide had previously been found to inhibit enzymes
containing a heme group, with the exception of cytochrome c. However, Horecker
and Kornberg found that

  • cyanide did in fact react with cytochrome c and concluded that
  • previous groups had failed to perceive this interaction because
    • the shift in the absorption maximum was too small to be detected by
      visual examination.

Two years later, Kornberg invited Horecker and Leon Heppel to join him in setting up
a new Section on Enzymes in the Laboratory of Physiology at the NIH. Their Section on Enzymes eventually became part of the new Experimental Biology and Medicine
Institute and was later renamed the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic
Diseases.

Horecker and Kornberg continued to collaborate, this time on

  • the isolation of DPN and TPN.

By 1948 they had amassed a huge supply of the coenzymes and were able to
present Otto Warburg, the discoverer of TPN, with a gift of 25 mg of the enzyme
when he came to visit. Horecker also collaborated with Heppel on 

  • the isolation of cytochrome c reductase from yeast and 
  • eventually accomplished the first isolation of the flavoprotein from
    mammalian liver.

Along with his lab technician Pauline Smyrniotis, Horecker began to study

  • the enzymes involved in the oxidation of 6-phosphogluconate and the
    metabolic intermediates formed in the pentose phosphate pathway.

Joined by Horecker’s first postdoctoral student, J. E. Seegmiller, they worked
out a new method for the preparation of glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate, 
both of which were not yet commercially available.
As reported in the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) Classic reprinted here, they

  • purified 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from brewer’s yeast (1), and 
  • by coupling the reduction of TPN to its reoxidation by pyruvate in
    the presence of lactic dehydrogenase
    ,
  • they were able to show that the first product of 6-phosphogluconate oxidation,
  • in addition to carbon dioxide, was ribulose 5-phosphte.
  • This pentose ester was then converted to ribose 5-phosphate by a
    pentose-phosphate isomerase.

They were able to separate ribulose 5-phosphate from ribose 5- phosphate and demonstrate their interconversion using a recently developed nucleotide separation
technique called ion-exchange chromatography. Horecker and Seegmiller later
showed that 6-phosphogluconate metabolism by enzymes from mammalian
tissues also produced the same products
.8

Bernard Horecker

Bernard Horecker

http://www.jbc.org/content/280/29/e26/F1.small.gif

Over the next several years, Horecker played a key role in elucidating the

  • remaining steps of the pentose phosphate pathway.

His total contributions included the discovery of three new sugar phosphate esters,
ribulose 5-phosphate, sedoheptulose 7-phosphate, and erythrose 4-phosphate, and
three new enzymes, transketolase, transaldolase, and pentose-phosphate 3-epimerase.
The outline of the complete pentose phosphate cycle was published in 1955
(2). Horecker’s personal account of his work on the pentose phosphate pathway can
be found in his JBC Reflection (3).1

Horecker’s contributions to science were recognized with many awards and honors
including the Washington Academy of Sciences Award for Scientific Achievement in
Biological Sciences (1954) and his election to the National Academy of Sciences in
1961. Horecker also served as president of the American Society of Biological
Chemists (now the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) in 1968.

Footnotes

  • 1 All biographical information on Bernard L. Horecker was taken from Ref. 3.
  • The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

References

  1. ↵Horecker, B. L., and Smyrniotis, P. Z. (1951) Phosphogluconic acid dehydrogenase
    from yeast. J. Biol. Chem. 193, 371–381FREE Full Text
  2. Gunsalus, I. C., Horecker, B. L., and Wood, W. A. (1955) Pathways of carbohydrate
    metabolism in microorganisms. Bacteriol. Rev. 19, 79–128  FREE Full Text
  3. Horecker, B. L. (2002) The pentose phosphate pathway. J. Biol. Chem. 277, 47965–
    47971 FREE Full Text

The Pentose Phosphate Pathway (also called Phosphogluconate Pathway, or Hexose
Monophosphate Shunt) is depicted with structures of intermediates in Fig. 23-25
p. 863 of Biochemistry, by Voet & Voet, 3rd Edition. The linear portion of the pathway
carries out oxidation and decarboxylation of glucose-6-phosphate, producing the
5-C sugar ribulose-5-phosphate.

Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidation of the aldehyde
(hemiacetal), at C1 of glucose-6-phosphate, to a carboxylic acid in ester linkage
(lactone). NADPserves as electron acceptor.

6-Phosphogluconolactonase catalyzes hydrolysis of the ester linkage (lactone)
resulting in ring opening. The product is 6-phosphogluconate. Although ring opening
occurs in the absence of a catalyst, 6-Phosphogluconolactonase speeds up the
reaction, decreasing the lifetime of the highly reactive, and thus potentially
toxic, 6-phosphogluconolactone.

Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation of
6-phosphogluconate, to yield the 5-C ketose ribulose-5-phosphate. The
hydroxyl at C(C2 of the product) is oxidized to a ketone. This promotes loss
of the carboxyl at C1 as CO2.  NADP+ again serves as oxidant (electron acceptor).

pglucose hd

pglucose hd

https://www.rpi.edu/dept/bcbp/molbiochem/MBWeb/mb2/part1/images/pglucd.gif

Reduction of NADP+ (as with NAD+) involves transfer of 2e- plus 1H+ to the
nicotinamide moiety.

nadp

NADPH, a product of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway, functions as a reductant in
various synthetic (anabolic) pathways, including fatty acid synthesis.

NAD+ serves as electron acceptor in catabolic pathways in which metabolites are
oxidized. The resultant NADH is reoxidized by the respiratory chain, producing ATP.

nadnadp

https://www.rpi.edu/dept/bcbp/molbiochem/MBWeb/mb2/part1/images/nadnadp.gif

Regulation: 
Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase is the committed step of the Pentose
Phosphate Pathway. This enzyme is regulated by availability of the substrate NADP+.
As NADPH is utilized in reductive synthetic pathways, the increasing concentration of
NADP+ stimulates the Pentose Phosphate Pathway, to replenish NADPH.

The remainder of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway accomplishes conversion of the
5-C ribulose-5-phosphate to the 5-C product ribose-5-phosphate, or to the 3-C
glyceraldehyde -3-phosphate and the 6-C fructose-6-phosphate (reactions 4 to 8
p. 863).

Transketolase utilizes as prosthetic group thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a
derivative of vitamin B1.

tpp

tpp

https://www.rpi.edu/dept/bcbp/molbiochem/MBWeb/mb2/part1/images/tpp.gif

Thiamine pyrophosphate binds at the active sites of enzymes in a “V” conformation.The amino group of the aminopyrimidine moiety is close to the dissociable proton,
and serves as the proton acceptor. This proton transfer is promoted by a glutamate
residue adjacent to the pyrimidine ring.

The positively charged N in the thiazole ring acts as an electron sink, promoting
C-C bond cleavage. The 3-C aldose glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate is released.
2-C fragment remains on TPP.

FASEB J. 1996 Mar;10(4):461-70.   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8647345

Reviewer

The importance of this pathway can easily be underestimated.  The main source for
energy in respiration was considered to be tied to the

  • high energy phosphate bond in phosphorylation and utilizes NADPH, converting it to NADP+.

glycolysis n skeletal muscle in short term, dependent on muscle glycogen conversion
to glucose, and there is a buildup of lactic acid – used as fuel by the heart.  This
pathway accounts for roughly 5% of metabolic needs, varying between tissues,
depending on there priority for synthetic functions, such as endocrine or nucleic
acid production.

The mature erythrocyte and the ocular lens both are enucleate.  85% of their
metabolic energy needs are by anaerobic glycolysis.  Consider the erythrocyte
somewhat different than the lens because it has iron-based hemoglobin, which
exchanges O2 and CO2 in the pulmonary alveoli, and in that role, is a rapid
regulator of H+ and pH in the circulation (carbonic anhydrase reaction), and also to
a lesser extent in the kidney cortex, where H+ is removed  from the circulation to
the urine, making the blood less acidic, except when there is a reciprocal loss of K+.
This is how we need a nomogram to determine respiratory vs renal acidosis or
alkalosis.  In the case of chronic renal disease, there is substantial loss of
functioning nephrons, loss of countercurrent multiplier, and a reduced capacity to
remove H+.  So there is both a metabolic acidosis and a hyperkalemia, with increased
serum creatinine, but the creatinine is only from muscle mass – not accurately
reflecting total body mass, which includes visceral organs.  The only accurate
measure of lean body mass would be in the linear relationship between circulating
hepatic produced transthyretin (TTR).

The pentose phosphate shunt is essential for

  • the generation of nucleic acids, in regeneration of red cells and lens – requiring NADPH.

Insofar as the red blood cell is engaged in O2 exchange, the lactic dehydrogenase
isoenzyme composition is the same as the heart. What about the lens of and cornea the eye, and platelets?  The explanation does appear to be more complex than
has been proposed and is not discussed here.

Section II. Mitochondrial NADH – NADP+ Transhydrogenase Reaction

There is also another consideration for the balance of di- and tri- phospopyridine
nucleotides in their oxidized and reduced forms.  I have brought this into the
discussion because of the centrality of hydride tranfer to mitochondrial oxidative
phosphorylation and the energetics – for catabolism and synthesis.

The role of transhydrogenase in the energy-linked reduction of TPN 

Fritz HommesRonald W. Estabrook∗∗

The Wenner-Gren Institute, University of Stockholm
Stockholm, Sweden
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 11, (1), 2 Apr 1963, Pp 1–6
http://dx.doi.org:/10.1016/0006-291X(63)90017-2

In 1959, Klingenberg and Slenczka (1) made the important observation that incubation of isolated

  • liver mitochondria with DPN-specific substrates or succinate in the absence of phosphate
    acceptor resulted in a rapid and almost complete reduction of the intramitochondrial TPN.

These and related findings led Klingenberg and co-workers (1-3) to postulate

  • the occurrence of an ATP-controlled transhydrogenase reaction catalyzing the reduction of
    mitochondrial TPN by DPNH. A similar conclusion was reached by Estabrook and Nissley (4).

The present paper describes the demonstration and some properties of an

  • energy-dependent reduction of TPN by DPNH, catalyzed by submitochondrial particles.

Preliminary reports of some of these results have already appeared (5, 6 ) , and a
complete account is being published elsewhere (7).We have studied the energy- dependent reduction of TPN by PNH with submitochondrial particles from both
rat liver and beef heart. Rat liver particles were prepared essentially according to
the method of Kielley and Bronk (8), and beef heart particles by the method of
Low and Vallin (9).

PYRIDINE NUCLEOTIDE TRANSHYDROGENASE  II. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR
AND MECHANISM OF THE
 TRANSHYDROGENASE REACTION*

BY  NATHAN 0. KAPLAN, SIDNEY P. COLOWICK, AND ELIZABETH F. NEUFELD
(From the McCollum-Pratt Institute, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore,
Maryland)  J. Biol. Chem. 1952, 195:107-119.
http://www.jbc.org/content/195/1/107.citation

NO Kaplan

NO Kaplan

Sidney Colowick

Sidney Colowick

Elizabeth Neufeld

Elizabeth Neufeld

Kaplan studied carbohydrate metabolism in the liver under David M. Greenberg at the
University of California, Berkeley medical school. He earned his Ph.D. in 1943. From
1942 to 1944, Kaplan participated in the Manhattan Project. From 1945 to 1949,
Kaplan worked with Fritz Lipmann at Massachusetts General Hospital to study
coenzyme A. He worked at the McCollum-Pratt Institute of Johns Hopkins University
from 1950 to 957. In 1957, he was recruited to head a new graduate program in
biochemistry at Brandeis University. In 1968, Kaplan moved to the University of
California, San Diego
, where he studied the role of lactate dehydrogenase in cancer. He also founded a colony of nude mice, a strain of laboratory mice useful in the study
of cancer and other diseases. [1] He was a member of the National Academy of
Sciences.One of Kaplan’s students at the University of California was genomic
researcher Craig Venter.[2]3]  He was, with Sidney Colowick, a founding editor of the scientific book series Methods
in Enzymology
.[1]

http://books.nap.edu/books/0309049768/xhtml/images/img00009.jpg

Colowick became Carl Cori’s first graduate student and earned his Ph.D. at
Washington University St. Louis in 1942, continuing to work with the Coris (Nobel
Prize jointly) for 10 years. At the age of 21, he published his first paper on the
classical studies of glucose 1-phosphate (2), and a year later he was the sole author on a paper on the synthesis of mannose 1-phosphate and galactose 1-phosphate (3). Both papers were published in the JBC. During his time in the Cori lab,

Colowick was involved in many projects. Along with Herman Kalckar he discovered
myokinase (distinguished from adenylate kinase from liver), which is now known as
adenyl kinase. This discovery proved to be important in understanding transphos-phorylation reactions in yeast and animal cells. Colowick’s interest then turned to
the conversion of glucose to polysaccharides, and he and Earl Sutherland (who
will be featured in an upcoming JBC Classic) published an important paper on the
formation of glycogen from glucose using purified enzymes (4). In 1951, Colowick
and Nathan Kaplan were approached by Kurt Jacoby of Academic Press to do a
series comparable to Methodem der Ferment Forschung. Colowick and Kaplan
planned and edited the first 6 volumes of Methods in Enzymology, launching in 1955
what became a series of well known and useful handbooks. He continued as
Editor of the series until his death in 1985.

The Structure of NADH: the Work of Sidney P. Colowick

Nicole KresgeRobert D. Simoni and Robert L. Hill

On the Structure of Reduced Diphosphopyridine Nucleotide

(Pullman, M. E., San Pietro, A., and Colowick, S. P. (1954)

J. Biol. Chem. 206, 129–141)

Elizabeth Neufeld
·  Born: September 27, 1928 (age 85), Paris, France
·  EducationQueens College, City University of New YorkUniversity of California,
Berkeley

http://fdb5.ctrl.ucla.edu/biological-chemistry/institution/photo?personnel%5fid=45290&max_width=155&max_height=225

In Paper I (l), indirect evidence was presented for the following transhydrogenase
reaction, catalyzed by an enzyme present in extracts of Pseudomonas
fluorescens:

TPNHz + DPN -+ TPN + DPNHz

The evidence was obtained by coupling TPN-specific dehydrogenases with the
transhydrogenase and observing the reduction of large amounts of diphosphopyridine nucleotide (DPN) in the presence of catalytic amounts of triphosphopyridine
nucleotide (TPN).

In this paper, data will be reported showing the direct

  • interaction between TPNHz and DPN, in thepresence of transhydrogenase alone,
  • to yield products having the propertiesof TPN and DPNHZ.

Information will be given indicating that the reaction involves

  • a transfer of electrons (or hydrogen) rather than a phosphate 

Experiments dealing with the kinetics and reversibility of the reaction, and with the
nature of the products, suggest that the reaction is a complex one, not fully described
by the above formulation.

Materials and Methods [edited]

The TPN and DPN used in these studies were preparations of approximately 75
percent purity and were prepared from sheep liver by the chromatographic procedure
of Kornberg and Horecker (unpublished). Reduced DPN was prepared enzymatically with alcohol dehydrogenase as described elsewhere (2). Reduced TPN was prepared by treating TPN with hydrosulfite. This treated mixture contained 2 pM of TPNHz per ml.
The preparations of desamino DPN and reduced desamino DPN have been
described previously (2, 3). Phosphogluconate was a barium salt which was kindly
supplied by Dr. B. F. Horecker. Cytochrome c was obtained from the Sigma Chemical Company.

Transhydrogenase preparations with an activity of 250 to 7000 units per mg. were
used in these studies. The DPNase was a purified enzyme, which was obtained
from zinc-deficient Neurospora and had an activity of 5500 units per mg. (4). The
alcohol dehydrogenase was a crystalline preparation isolated from yeast according to the procedure of Racker (5).

Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from yeast and a 10 per cent pure preparation of the TPN-specific cytochrome c reductase from liver (6) were gifts of Dr. B. F.
Horecker.

DPN was assayed with alcohol and crystalline yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. TPN was determined By the specific phosphogluconic acid dehydrogenase from yeast and also by the specific isocitric dehydrogenase from pig heart. Reduced DPN was
determined by the use of acetaldehyde and the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.
All of the above assays were based on the measurement of optical density changes
at 340 rnp. TPNHz was determined with the TPN-specific cytochrome c reductase system. The assay of the reaction followed increase in optical density at 550 rnp  as a measure of the reduction of the cytochrome c after cytochrome c
reductase was added to initiate the reaction. The changes at 550 rnp are plotted for different concentrations of TPNHz in Fig. 3, a. The method is an extremely sensitive and accurate assay for reduced TPN.

Results
[No Figures or Table shown]

Formation of DPNHz from TPNHz and DPN-Fig. 1, a illustrates the direct reaction between TPNHz and DPN to form DPNHZ. The reaction was carried out by incubating TPNHz with DPN in the presence of the
transhydrogenase, yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, and acetaldehyde. Since the yeast dehydrogenase is specific for DPN,

  • a decrease in absorption at340 rnp can only be due to the formation of reduced DPN. It can
    be seen from the curves in Fig. 1, a that a decrease in optical density occurs only in the
    presence of the complete system.

The Pseudomonas enzyme is essential for the formation of DPNH2. It is noteworthy
that, under the conditions of reaction in Fig. 1, a,

  • approximately 40 per cent of theTPNH, reacted with the DPN.

Fig. 1, a also indicates that magnesium is not required for transhydrogenase activity.  The reaction between TPNHz and DPN takes place in the absence of alcohol
dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde
. This can be demonstrated by incubating the
two pyridine nucleotides with the transhydrogenase for 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
minutes

FIG. 1. Evidence for enzymatic reaction of TPNHt with DPN.

  • Rate offormation of DPNH2.

(b) DPN disappearance and TPN formation.

(c) Identification of desamino DPNHz as product of reaction of TPNHz with desamino DPN.  (assaying for reduced DPN by the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase technique.

Table I (Experiment 1) summarizes the results of such experiments in which TPNHz was added with varying amounts of DPN.

  • In the absence of DPN, no DPNHz was formed. This eliminates the possibility that TPNH 2 is
    converted to DPNHz
  • by removal ofthe monoester phosphate grouping.

The data also show that the extent of the reaction is

  • dependent on the concentration of DPN.

Even with a large excess of DPN, only approximately 40 per cent of the TPNHzreacts to form reduced DPN. It is of importance to emphasize that in the above
experiments, which were carried out in phosphate buffer, the extent of  the reaction

  • is the same in the presence or absence of acetaldehyde andalcohol dehydrogenase.

With an excess of DPN and different  levels of TPNHZ,

  • the amount of reduced DPN which is formed is
  • dependent on the concentration of TPNHz(Table I, Experiment 2).
  • In all cases, the amount of DPNHz formed is approximately
    40 per cent of the added reduced TPN.

Formation of TPN-The reaction between TPNHz and DPN should yield TPN as well as DPNHz.
The formation of TPN is demonstrated in Table 1. in Fig. 1, b. In this experiment,
TPNHz was allowed to react with DPN in the presence of the transhydrogenase
(PS.), and then alcohol and alcohol dehydrogenase were added . This
would result in reduction of the residual DPN, and the sample incubated with the
transhydrogenase contained less DPN. After the completion of the alcohol
dehydrogenase reaction, phosphogluconate and phosphogluconic dehydrogenase (PGAD) were added to reduce the TPN. The addition of this TPN-specific
dehydrogenase results in an

  • increase inoptical density in the enzymatically treated sample.
  • This change represents the amount of TPN formed.

It is of interest to point out that, after addition of both dehydrogenases,

  • the total optical density change is the same in both

Therefore it is evident that

  • for every mole of DPN disappearing  a mole of TPN appears.

Balance of All Components of Reaction

Table II (Experiment 1) shows that,

  • if measurements for all components of the reaction are made, one can demonstrate
    that there is
  • a mole for mole disappearance of TPNH, and DPN, and
  • a stoichiometric appearance of TPN and DPNH2.
  1. The oxidized forms of the nucleotides were assayed as described
  2. the reduced form of TPN was determined by the TPNHz-specific cytochrome c reductase,
  3. the DPNHz by means of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase plus

This stoichiometric balance is true, however,

  • only when the analyses for the oxidized forms are determined directly on the reaction

When analyses are made after acidification of the incubated reaction mixture,

  • the values found forDPN and TPN are much lower than those obtained by direct analysis.

This discrepancy in the balance when analyses for the oxidized nucleotides are
carried out in acid is indicated in Table II (Experiment 2). The results, when
compared with the findings in Experiment 1, are quite striking.

Reaction of TPNHz with Desamino DPN

Desamino DPN

  • reacts with the transhydrogenase system at the same rate as does DPN (2).

This was of value in establishing the fact that

  • the transhydrogenase catalyzesa transfer of hydrogen rather than a phosphate transfer reaction.

The reaction between desamino DPN and TPNHz can be written in two ways.

TPN f desamino DPNHz

TPNH, + desamino DPN

DPNH2 + desamino TPN

If the reaction involved an electron transfer,

  • desamino DPNHz would be
  • Phosphate transfer would result in the production of reduced

Desamino DPNHz can be distinguished from DPNHz by its

  • slowerrate of reaction with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (2, 3).

Fig. 1, c illustrates that, when desamino DPN reacts with TPNH2, 

  • the product of the reaction is desamino DPNHZ.

This is indicated by the slow rate of oxidation of the product by yeast alcohol
dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde.

From the above evidence phosphate transfer 

  • has been ruled out as a possible mechanism for the transhydrogenase reaction.

Inhibition by TPN

As mentioned in Paper I and as will be discussed later in this paper,

  • the transhydrogenase reaction does not appear to be readily reversible.

This is surprising, particularly since only approximately 

  • 40 per cent of the TPNHz undergoes reaction with DPN
    under the conditions described above. It was therefore thought that
  • the TPN formed might inhibit further transfer of electrons from TPNH2.

Table III summarizes data showing the

  • strong inhibitory effect of TPN on thereaction between TPNHz and DPN.

It is evident from the data that

  • TPN concentration is a factor in determining the extent of the reaction.

Effect of Removal of TPN on Extent of Reaction

A purified DPNase from Neurospora has been found

  • to cleave the nicotinamide riboside linkagesof the oxidized forms of both TPN and DPN
  • without acting on thereduced forms of both nucleotides (4).

It has been found, however, that

  • the DPNase hydrolyzes desamino DPN at a very slow rate (3).

In the reaction between TPNHz and desamino DPN, TPN and desamino DPNH:,

  • TPNis the only component of this reaction attacked by the Neurospora enzyme
    at an appreciable rate

It was  thought that addition of the DPNase to the TPNHZ-desamino DPN trans-
hydrogenase reaction mixture

  • would split the TPN formed andpermit the reaction to go to completion.

This, indeed, proved to be the case, as indicated in Table IV, where addition of
the DPNase with desamino DPN results in almost

  • a stoichiometric formation of desamino DPNHz
  • and a complete disappearance of TPNH2.

Extent of Reaction in Buffers Other Than Phosphate

All the reactions described above were carried out in phosphate buffer of pH 7.5.
If the transhydrogenase reaction between TPNHz and DPN is run at the same pH
in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffer (TRIS buffer)

  • with acetaldehydeand alcohol dehydrogenase present,
  • the reaction proceeds muchfurther toward completion 
  • than is the case under the same conditions ina phosphate medium (Fig. 2, a).

The importance of phosphate concentration in governing the extent of the reaction
is illustrated in Fig. 2, b.

In the presence of TRIS the transfer reaction

  • seems to go further toward completion in the presence of acetaldehyde
    and 
    alcohol dehydrogenase
  • than when these two components are absent.

This is not true of the reaction in phosphate,

  • in which the extent is independent of the alcoholdehydrogenase system.

Removal of one of the products of the reaction (DPNHp) in TRIS thus

  • appears to permit the reaction to approach completion,whereas
  • in phosphate this removal is without effect on the finalcourse of the reaction.

The extent of the reaction in TRIS in the absence of alcohol dehydrogenase
and acetaldehyde
 is

  • somewhat greater than when the reaction is run in phosphate.

TPN also inhibits the reaction of TPNHz with DPN in TRIS medium, but the inhibition

  • is not as marked as when the reaction is carried out in phosphate buffer.

Reversibility of Transhydrogenase Reaction;

Reaction between DPNHz and TPN

In Paper I, it was mentioned that no reversal of the reaction could be achieved in a system containing alcohol, alcohol dehydrogenase, TPN, and catalytic amounts of
DPN.

When DPNH, and TPN are incubated with the purified transhydrogenase, there is
also

  • no evidence for reversibility.

This is indicated in Table V which shows that

  • there is no disappearance of DPNHz in such a system.

It was thought that removal of the TPNHz, which might be formed in the reaction,
could promote the reversal of the reaction. Hence,

  • by using the TPNHe-specific cytochrome c reductase, one could
  1. not only accomplishthe removal of any reduced TPN,
  2. but also follow the course of the reaction.

A system containing DPNH2, TPN, the transhydrogenase, the cytochrome c
reductase, and cytochrome c, however, gives

  • no reduction of the cytochrome

This is true for either TRIS or phosphate buffers.2

Some positive evidence for the reversibility has been obtained by using a system
containing

  • DPNH2, TPNH2, cytochrome c, and the cytochrome creductase in TRIS buffer.

In this case, there is, of course, reduction of cytochrome c by TPNHZ, but,

  • when the transhydrogenase is present.,there is
  • additional reduction over and above that due to the added TPNH2.

This additional reduction suggests that some reversibility of the reaction occurred
under these conditions. Fig. 3, b shows

  • the necessity of DPNHzfor this additional reduction.

Interaction of DPNHz with Desamino DPN-

If desamino DPN and DPNHz are incubated with the purified Pseudomonas enzyme,
there appears

  • to be a transfer of electrons to form desamino DPNHz.

This is illustrated in Fig. 4, a, which shows the

  • decreased rate of oxidation by thealcohol dehydrogenase system
  • after incubation with the transhydrogenase.
  • Incubation of desamino DPNHz with DPN results in the formation of DPNH2,
  • which is detected by the faster rate of oxidation by the alcohol dehydrogenase system
  • after reaction of the pyridine nucleotides with thetranshydrogenase (Fig. 4, b).

It is evident from the above experiments that

the transhydrogenase catalyzes an exchange of hydrogens between

  • the adenylic and inosinic pyridine nucleotides.

However, it is difficult to obtain any quantitative information on the rate or extent of
the reaction by the method used, because

  • desamino DPNHz also reacts with the alcohol dehydrogenase system,
  • although at a much slower rate than does DPNH2.

DISCUSSION

The results of the balance experiments seem to offer convincing evidence that
the transhydrogenase catalyzes the following reaction.

TPNHz + DPN -+ DPNHz + TPN

Since desamino DPNHz is formed from TPNHz and desamino DPN,

  • thereaction appears to involve an electron (or hydrogen) transfer
  • rather thana transfer of the monoester phosphate grouping of TPN.

A number of the findings reported in this paper are not readily understandable in
terms of the above simple formulation of the reaction. It is difficult to understand
the greater extent of the reaction in TRIS than in phosphate when acetaldehyde
and alcohol dehydrogenase are present.

One possibility is that an intermediate may be involved which is more easily converted
to reduced DPN in the TRIS medium. The existence of such an intermediate is also
suggested by the discrepancies noted in balance experiments, in which

  • analyses of the oxidized nucleotides after acidification showed
  • much lower values than those found by direct analysis.

These findings suggest that the reaction may involve

  • a 1 electron ratherthan a 2 electron transfer with
  • the formation of acid-labile free radicals as intermediates.

The transfer of hydrogens from DPNHz to desamino DPN

  • to yield desamino DPNHz and DPN and the reversal of this transfer
  • indicate the unique role of the transhydrogenase
  • in promoting electron exchange between the pyridine nucleotides.

In this connection, it is of interest that alcohol dehydrogenase and lactic
dehydrogenase cannot duplicate this exchange  between the DPN and
the desamino systems.3  If one assumes that desamino DPN behaves
like DPN,

  • one might predict that the transhydrogenase would catalyze an
    exchange of electrons (or hydrogen) 3.

Since alcohol dehydrogenase alone

  • does not catalyze an exchange of electrons between the adenylic
    and inosinic pyridine nucleotides, this rules out the possibility
  • that the dehydrogenase is converted to a reduced intermediate
  • during electron between DPNHz and added DPN.

It is hoped to investigate this possibility with isotopically labeled DPN.
Experiments to test the interaction between TPN and desamino TPN are
also now in progress.

It seems likely that the transhydrogenase will prove capable of

  • catalyzingan exchange between TPN and TPNH2, as well as between DPN and

The observed inhibition by TPN of the reaction between TPNHz and DPN may
therefore

  • be due to a competition between DPN and TPNfor the TPNH2.

SUMMARY

  1. Direct evidence for the following transhydrogenase reaction. catalyzedby an
    enzyme from Pseudomonas fluorescens, is presented.

TPNHz + DPN -+ TPN + DPNHz

Balance experiments have shown that for every mole of TPNHz disappearing
1 mole of TPN appears and that for each mole of DPNHz generated 1 mole of
DPN disappears. The oxidized nucleotides found at the end of the reaction,
however, show anomalous lability toward acid.

  1. The transhydrogenase also promotes the following reaction.

TPNHz + desamino DPN -+ TPN + desamino DPNH,

This rules out the possibility that the transhydrogenase reaction involves a
phosphate transfer and indicates that the

  • enzyme catalyzes a shift of electrons (or hydrogen atoms).

The reaction of TPNHz with DPN in 0.1 M phosphate buffer is strongly
inhibited by TPN; thus

  • it proceeds only to the extent of about40 per cent or less, even
  • when DPNHz is removed continuously by meansof acetaldehyde
    and alcohol dehydrogenase.
  • In other buffers, in whichTPN is less inhibitory, the reaction proceeds
    much further toward completion under these conditions.
  • The reaction in phosphate buffer proceedsto completion when TPN
    is removed as it is formed.
  1. DPNHz does not react with TPN to form TPNHz and DPN in the presence
    of transhydrogenase. Some evidence, however, has been obtained for
    the reversibility by using the following system:
  • DPNHZ, TPNHZ, cytochromec, the TPNHz-specific cytochrome c reductase,
    and the transhydrogenase.
  1. Evidence is cited for the following reversible reaction, which is catalyzed
    by the transhydrogenase.

DPNHz + desamino DPN fi DPN + desamino DPNHz

  1. The results are discussed with respect to the possibility that the
    transhydrogenase reaction may
  • involve a 1 electron transfer with theformation of free radicals as intermediates.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  1. Coiowick, S. P., Kaplan, N. O., Neufeld, E. F., and Ciotti, M. M., J. Biol. Chem.,196, 95 (1952).
  2. Pullman, 111. E., Colowick, S. P., and Kaplan, N. O., J. Biol. Chem., 194, 593(1952).
  3. Kaplan, N. O., Colowick, S. P., and Ciotti, M. M., J. Biol. Chem., 194, 579 (1952).
  4. Kaplan, N. O., Colowick, S. P., and Nason, A., J. Biol. Chem., 191, 473 (1951).
  5. Racker, E., J. Biol. Chem., 184, 313 (1950).
  6. Horecker, B. F., J. Biol. Chem., 183, 593 (1950).

Section !II. 

Luis_Federico_Leloir_-_young

The Leloir pathway: a mechanistic imperative for three enzymes to change
the stereochemical configuration of a single carbon in galactose.

Frey PA.
FASEB J. 1996 Mar;10(4):461-70.    http://www.fasebj.org/content/10/4/461.full.pdf
PMID:8647345

The biological interconversion of galactose and glucose takes place only by way of
the Leloir pathway and requires the three enzymes galactokinase, galactose-1-P
uridylyltransferase, and UDP-galactose 4-epimerase.
The only biological importance of these enzymes appears to be to

  • provide for the interconversion of galactosyl and glucosyl groups.

Galactose mutarotase also participates by producing the galactokinase substrate
alpha-D-galactose from its beta-anomer. The galacto/gluco configurational change takes place at the level of the nucleotide sugar by an oxidation/reduction
mechanism in the active site of the epimerase NAD+ complex. The nucleotide portion
of UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose participates in the epimerization process in two ways:

1) by serving as a binding anchor that allows epimerization to take place at glycosyl-C-4 through weak binding of the sugar, and

2) by inducing a conformational change in the epimerase that destabilizes NAD+ and
increases its reactivity toward substrates.

Reversible hydride transfer is thereby facilitated between NAD+ and carbon-4
of the weakly bound sugars.

The structure of the enzyme reveals many details of the binding of NAD+ and
inhibitors at the active site
.

The essential roles of the kinase and transferase are to attach the UDP group
to galactose, allowing for its participation in catalysis by the epimerase. The
transferase is a Zn/Fe metalloprotein
, in which the metal ions stabilize the
structure rather than participating in catalysis. The structure is interesting
in that

  • it consists of single beta-sheet with 13 antiparallel strands and 1 parallel strand
    connected by 6 helices.

The mechanism of UMP attachment at the active site of the transferase is a double
displacement
, with the participation of a covalent UMP-His 166-enzyme intermediate
in the Escherichia coli enzyme. The evolution of this mechanism appears to have
been guided by the principle of economy in the evolution of binding sites.

PMID: 8647345 Free full text

Section IV.

More on Lipids – Role of lipids – classification

  • Energy
  • Energy Storage
  • Hormones
  • Vitamins
  • Digestion
  • Insulation
  • Membrane structure: Hydrophobic properties

Lipid types

lipid types

lipid types

nat occuring FAs in mammals

nat occuring FAs in mammals

Read Full Post »