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Posts Tagged ‘Technion’


Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Qualcomm Co-Founder Awarded the Technion Medal

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
By: Jennifer Frey

Dr. Irwin Jacobs, Co-Founder, Chairman and CEO Emeritus of Qualcomm, was honored on May 20 with the Technion Medal, the greatest recognition by the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, awarded only every three to five years. He received the medal during a festive event in Haifa, marking 20 years of Qualcomm activities in Israel.

Technion President Professor Peretz Lavie spoke about the long-standing friendship with the Technion and generous philanthropic activities of Dr. Jacobs and his wife Joan. The Technion’s Graduate School is named for them, as is the Center for Communications and Information Technologies (CCIT). Those gifts have supported Technion graduate students — arguably the engine behind any successful university— and have helped the CCIT promote cooperation and information flow between academia and industry. Recently, they made a $133 million gift to name the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute (JTCII), a key component of the new applied science campus in New York.

Lavie and Jacobs, Technion Medal
(From left) Technion President Peretz Lavie, and Joan and Irwin Jacobs

 

President Lavie expressed his appreciation to Dr. Jacobs: “Thank you so very much for all you have done for the Technion, engineering, the field of telecom, academia, Israel, and future scientists. You are truly a great leader, model citizen, and a real ‘mensch.’”

Dr. Jacobs returned the gratitude, saying it is not the Technion that needs to thank him, but rather he who needs to thank the Technion. “Many of Qualcomm’s employees are Technion graduates,” he said. “The company would not have attained many of its achievements if it hadn’t been for its brilliant employees.”

In 1993, Dr. Jacobs directed the then still young, San Diego-based digital wireless telecommunications company to launch Qualcomm Israel in Haifa to take advantage of Technion brainpower (the Mt. Carmel campus is about a 15-minute drive). Since then, Qualcomm Israel has become a key source of high-tech innovation in Israel, moving into such creative ventures as “Tagg,” a device that allows pet owners to track their pet’s location and activity level. Qualcomm’s recent investments in Israeli start-ups rival similar activities in all of Europe.

The Technion Medal was established in 1996 to award “exceptional individuals who have made unstinting efforts to advance humanity; … contribute to the welfare of the Jewish people and the State of Israel; and … strengthen the industrial, scientific and economic infrastructure of Israel.” Irwin Jacobs joins a short list of just 12 other Technion Medal recipients that includes Israel Supreme Court Justice Moshe Landau and Israeli war hero Gen. (Res.) Amos Horev — both former Technion Presidents; Technion graduate Uzia Galil, one of the founders of Israel’s high-tech industry, and the late Henry Taub, who held almost every honor and position within the American Technion Society (ATS), including national President and Chair of the Technion International Board of Governors for 13 years.

Dr. Jacobs earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University and his master’s and doctorate degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He taught at both MIT and at University of California, San Diego, co-authored an engineering textbook and co-founded Linkabit Corporation, before helping start Qualcomm. The Technion recognized Dr. Jacobs with an honorary doctorate in 2000, and in 1996, the American Technion Society (ATS) granted him its highest honor, the Albert Einstein Award. He and his wife are Technion Guardians — a designation reserved for those who have reached the highest level of support.

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and a key to Israel’s renown as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Its three Nobel Prize winners exemplify academic excellence. Technion people, ideas and inventions make immeasurable contributions to the world including life-saving medicine, sustainable energy, computer science, water conservation and nanotechnology. The Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute is a vital component of Cornell NYC Tech, and a model for graduate applied science education that is expected to transform New York City’s economy.

American Technion Society (ATS) donors provide critical support for the Technion—more than $1.9 billion since its inception in 1940. Based in New York City, the ATS and its network of chapters across the U.S. provide funds for scholarships, fellowships, faculty recruitment and chairs, research, buildings, laboratories, classrooms and dormitories, and more.

http://www.ats.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=7845&news_iv_ctrl=1161

 

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Mayor Bloomberg Officially Transfers 12 Acres of Roosevelt Island to “Cornell Tech” – Technion-Cornell’s Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute (JTCII)

UPDATED on 12/19/2013

Carnegie Mellon University Will Open the Fourth New Applied Sciences Program in NYC

NYC and Columbia to Create Institute for Data Sciences & Engineering

Jul 30, 2012  |  NYC.gov

http://www.mikebloomberg.com/index.cfm?objectid=D867EFB0-C29C-7CA2-F4B1FEBC8B06249D

To view the new renderings of the campus

http://tech.cornell.edu/future-campus/

Full news release issued by the City of New York,

Mayor Bloomberg Officially Transfers 12 Acres of Roosevelt Island to Cornell Tech

Dec 19, 2013  |  NYC.gov

Mayor Bloomberg, Cornell University President David J. Skorton, and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology President Peretz Lavie today formally executed a 99-year lease between the City of New York and Cornell Tech, which will pave the way for construction of the Cornell Tech campus on Roosevelt Island, exactly two years after Cornell and academic partner Technion were named the first winners of the City’sApplied Sciences NYC competition.

Cornell Tech is a revolutionary model for graduate-level technology education and is establishing itself as a world-leading institution, conferring graduate degrees and conducting research that drives technology, innovation, commercialization and the creation and retention of businesses and jobs in New York City. The land transfer will allow for groundbreaking on the campus to begin in January, with the first classrooms on Roosevelt Island set to open in 2017. Cornell Tech students began classes this fall in space donated by Google at their Chelsea headquarters on Eighth Avenue. Construction of the entire 2 million square foot build-out, which will span 12 acres on Roosevelt Island and house approximately 2,000 students and nearly 280 faculty and researchers, will be completed by 2043.

New details and renderings for the first phase of the full campus were also released today, revealing how the physical campus will be designed to support Cornell Tech’s focus on innovation, entrepreneurship and collaboration between academia and industry. Mayor Bloomberg and President Skorton signed the lease documents at a City Hall ceremony to finalize the official land transfer to Cornell Tech, where they were joined by President Lavie, Deputy Mayor for Economic Development Robert K. Steel, New York City Economic Development Corporation President Kyle Kimball, U.S. Representative Carolyn Maloney, Council Member and Borough President-Elect Gale Brewer, Council Member Jessica Lappin, Cornell Tech Vice President Cathy Dove, Cornell Board Chair Robert Harrison, Cornell Provost Kent Fuchs, Cornell Tech Dean Daniel Hutenlocher, Forest City Ratner Companies President and CEO MaryAnne Gilmartin, and Hudson Companies Principal David Kramer.

“Our goal has been to make New York City the global capital of technological innovation, and this new campus on Roosevelt Island is a central part of our strategy for achieving it,” said Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. “It is one of the most ambitious and forward-looking economic development projects any city has ever undertaken, and it’s going to help add thousands of new jobs to our economy in the decades ahead.”

“The State was proud to work closely with the Mayor’s Office, RIOC and Cornell because we strongly believe that the path to New York State’s continued economic growth will largely be defined by partnerships that start with our State’s academic institutions,” said Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. “This project leverages two of the world’s most notable institutions in a way that will help foster technological innovation within New York State, while creating jobs and spurring business investment.”

“Cornell Tech is the proof that government and universities can work together to innovate and support economic growth, and we will be forever grateful for Mayor Bloomberg’s leadership in making this campus possible,” said Cornell University President David J. Skorton. “The Roosevelt Island campus is being built for the future, to be the place that generates the next big ideas, the new companies and extraordinary talent that will change New York and the world.”

“Thanks to Mayor Bloomberg’s vision, New York City is fast becoming a leading global center of innovation,” said Technion President Peretz Lavie. “Through the Joan & Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute, our international partnership with Cornell Tech, we look forward to helping to further the city’s future as the technology capital of the world.”

Applied Sciences NYC was launched by Mayor Bloomberg in 2011 in an effort to capitalize on the considerable recent growth and even larger opportunity for future growth in technology-related jobs and businesses in New York City, and builds on the Bloomberg Administration’s record of creating a more diversified economy for the City’s future. In July 2011, NYCEDC issued an RFP seeking a university, institution or consortium to develop and operate a new or expanded campus in the City in exchange for City capital, access to City-owned land and the full support and partnership of the Bloomberg Administration, and subsequently received seven responses from 17 world-class institutions from around the globe. Cornell Tech was the first of four Applied Sciences projects to be announced by the City in an effort to strengthen New York City’s global competiveness – including its growing technology sector – and ensure that the City establishes itself as a worldwide hub of science, research, innovation and urban solutions for the digital age and the information economy. Cornell Tech was selected for this initiative based on its innovative model for graduate technology education and its emphasis on the intersections between academia and industry and forward-thinking areas of study. When completed, the new Roosevelt Island campus alone will nearly double the number of full-time, graduate engineering students enrolled in leading New York City Master’s and Ph.D. programs.

The four Applied Sciences NYC projects that have been announced by the Mayor include:

  • Cornell Tech on Roosevelt Island
  • The Center for Urban Science and Progress in Downtown Brooklyn, operated by an international consortium led by New York University
  • The Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering at Columbia University
  • Carnegie Mellon University’s Integrative Media Program at Steiner Studios in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Collectively, the four Applied Sciences NYC projects are expected to generate more than $33.2 billion in nominal economic activity, over 48,000 permanent and construction jobs, and approximately 1,000 spin-off companies by 2046, fulfilling the initiative’s goal of dramatically transforming the City’s economy for the 21st century. These institutions are already strengthening the City’s position as a hub of science, research, innovation and world-class urban solutions in a global economy driven by technological fluency and innovation.

“Mayor Bloomberg’s Applied Sciences initiative will transform the City’s economy, doubling the number of engineering faculty and graduate students in New York City. These are the skills we need to compete in the knowledge and information economy of the 21st Century,” said Deputy Mayor for Economic Development Robert K. Steel. “The closing of the Cornell Tech lease is a major step toward that goal and I congratulate Presidents Skorton and Lavie on this critical moment in the arc of Cornell and the Technion’s history.”

“Over only two years, thanks to an unprecedented model of collaboration across City and State government, top academic institutions, and the private sector, we have transformed Applied Sciences NYC from a visionary idea into a physical reality that is already reshaping our City,” said NYCEDC President Kyle Kimball. “Since selecting Cornell and the Technion as our first winners, in partnership with the Health and Hospitals Corporation we have built and opened a new hospital in Harlem that is currently serving former Coler-Goldwater patients; secured all necessary approvals for the Roosevelt Island campus; selected three additional Applied Sciences winners; and launched classes. Thanks to Mayor Bloomberg’s leadership, this initiative will create jobs, businesses, and technologies, resulting in transformative economic activity that will help secure the City’s future.”

“Cornell Tech is extremely grateful for the unwavering support of the Roosevelt Island community throughout the public review process and we are committed to being great neighbors during construction and beyond,” said Cornell Tech Vice President Cathy S. Dove. “We are also fortunate to have such extraordinary development partners in Forest City Ratner and Hudson/Related to help us make this vision a reality.”

“We are thrilled to be working with Cornell and so many great partners to help create a truly extraordinary new place on Roosevelt Island,” said Forest City Ratner Companies President and CEO MaryAnne Gilmartin. “Under Mayor Bloomberg’s watch the City’s tech sector has grown enormously and we are well poised as a company and as a project to continue with that growth at Cornell Tech.”

“With Mayor Bloomberg’s vision guiding the way, Cornell Tech will be at the leading edge of the next generation in tech and applied sciences,” said David Kramer, partner of The Hudson Companies. “We look forward to bringing out-of-the-box thinking to a best-in-class building on the forefront of design and sustainability.”

“I am pleased to join Mayor Bloomberg for this monumental step toward making the Cornell Tech campus a reality. I have strongly supported bringing Cornell Tech to Roosevelt Island from the very beginning of this process,” said U.S. Representative Carolyn Maloney. “The campus holds great promise for Roosevelt Island and for New York City, attracting future leaders in the technology and engineering industry. Many of the amenities included in the plans will be open and available to the public, including areas of park space. I commend Cornell for its transparency during the planning process and commitment to being a good neighbor to Island residents.”

“Cornell Tech will generate opportunities and innovations for generations to come, and today we take a step closer to our city’s future,” said Council Member Jessica Lappin.

“I applaud Mayor Bloomberg, Cornell Tech, and the Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation on their historic lease signing to build a new applied sciences campus on Roosevelt Island,” said Manhattan Borough President-Elect Gale A. Brewer. “This partnership will play a key role in the growth of New York City’s tech sector in the coming years, and will attract new development to Roosevelt Island. I look forward to working with all parties to ensure the success of this venture.”

Academic uses of the campus are anticipated to include classrooms, laboratories, teaming areas, and lecture halls, as well as start-up incubator/accelerator space to encourage entrepreneurship. The remainder of the space in the campus will be devoted to corporate co-location space designed to facilitate the interaction between academia and industry, residential uses, an executive education center, and ancillary uses, such as retail in support of the faculty, staff and students on the campus, as well as the creation of new open space.

While planning is underway for the opening of the permanent campus in 2017, Cornell Tech is already operating in temporary space in Manhattan. The campus master plan, designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill with James Corner Field Operations, includes a number of innovative features and facilities across a river-to-river campus with expansive views, a series of green, public spaces, and a seamless integration of indoor and outdoor areas. Cornell Tech will combine cutting edge technologies to create one of the most environmentally friendly and energy-efficient campuses in the world, not only employing, but developing new environmental technology.

A sustainable and innovative academic building will be designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects and, in a significant departure from traditional academic facilities, take its cue from the tech world by offering open-plan space and extensive collaborative workspaces. The phase one academic building, if completed today, would be the largest net-zero energy building in eastern United States, with all of its power generated on campus.

A corporate co-location building, designed by Weiss/Manfredi and developed by Forest City Ratner Companies, will bring together corporate innovators, world-class researchers and energetic start-ups under one roof, a concrete reflection of the campus’ mission of fusing academia and industry to encourage innovation for the public good. Cornell Tech will be an anchor tenant. Renderings of this building and the academic building were released today, and are available at tech.cornell.edu/press/.

Ensuring that the campus is active 24/7, a residential building, designed by Handel Architects and developed by Hudson and Related Companies, will be built to provide convenient and affordable campus housing for students, faculty and staff. It will rely on passive sustainable design features to reduce energy usage and further advance the campus’ sustainability goals.

Plans are also under underway for an Executive Education Center and Hotel, which will help ensure that Cornell Tech is a magnet in New York City for innovation by providing conference, executive program and academic workshop space along with a hotel and destination restaurant.

The 12-acre footprint of the Cornell Tech campus includes the site of the former Goldwater Specialty Hospital and Nursing Facility, which has been replaced by the new state-of-the art, 365-bed, $300 million Henry J. Carter Specialty Hospital in Harlem, built by NYCEDC, which is operated by the NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation and provides world-class medical care for New Yorkers in need of highly specialized, complex treatment. Former Goldwater patients were relocated to the new hospital last month. The campus footprint also includes property formerly controlled by the Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation. Cornell Tech has spent the past year working with the Roosevelt Island community on plans to minimize the impact of construction on residents, including deployment of the largest barging program in New York City to remove demolition materials from the site.

Cornell Tech classes began earlier this year in space donated by Google in Chelsea. The school now includes masters and Ph.D. students, world-class faculty and established collaborations with dozens of industry-leading organizations contributing to graduate study in areas such as Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Information Science, Operations Research and Business. Cornell Tech also launched its commitment to partnership with New York City’s public school students earlier this year, working with numerous organizations to bring tech education to a diverse audience. A director of K-12 education for Cornell Tech will be announced early in 2014.

Beginning in January, the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute at Cornell Tech will welcome a number of postdoctoral students to the current campus. Later in 2014, the Jacobs Institute will launch a master’s degree program in Connective Media designed to educate the entrepreneurial engineers and technologists needed in the media sector to steward the continuing digital transformation of the industry. Students in this two-year program will receive degrees from both Technion and Cornell. Also in 2014, Cornell Tech will launch a Johnson MBA that will combine business, technology, innovation and entrepreneurship in a fast-paced, hands-on learning environment.

Cornell Tech will host entrepreneurs-in-residence, organize business competitions, provide legal support for startups, reach out to existing companies to form research partnerships and sponsor research, and establish a pre-seed financing program to support promising research. In addition, the campus will structure its on-site tech transfer office to facilitate startup formation and technology licensing. Cornell Tech will also invest $150 million that will be solely devoted to start-up businesses in the City.

In keeping with the focus on community involvement contained in the RFP, the Cornell Tech proposal outlined a number of areas in which the universities will touch the lives of New Yorkers — the type of involvement to which both schools have been committed for many years in their primary campus communities. Plans for community involvement in New York City include the creation of education enhancement programs that will impact a minimum of 10,000 New York City students and 200 New York City teachers per year. Cornell Tech also intends to work closely with PS/IS 217 on Roosevelt Island to enrich their curricula and participate in STEM-oriented programming. They will also work to meet the goals of the City’s HireNYC employment program and develop partnerships for job placement and training. In furtherance of its community outreach goals, Cornell Tech will offer significant programming on and off its campus designed to engage with residents of Roosevelt Island and the larger City. Cornell’s campus plan will further create new public open space on the campus.

SOURCE

Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute: momentous gift of $133 million to create the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute (JTCII)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

We are pleased to share some exciting news

     Jacobses.JPG
Irwin and Joan Jacobs on the Technion campus

Technion Guardians Joan and Irwin Jacobs, of San Diego, have made a momentous gift of $133 million to name the Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute. Dr. Irwin Jacobs, Founding Chairman and CEO Emeritus of Qualcomm, and his wife Joan will create the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute (JTCII). The JTCII is a key component of Cornell Tech, whose permanent campus will eventually be located on Roosevelt Island. The funds will help support curriculum initiatives, faculty and graduate students, and industry interactions in a two-year graduate program.

The gift is being announced today by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg during a press conference at New York City Hall, together with Joan and Irwin Jacobs, Technion President Peretz Lavie and Cornell President David J. Skorton. You can view the press conference at: www.nyc.gov starting at 3:00 p.m. EDT.

The Jacobses are both Cornell alumni who have a long history of supporting both institutions. Their visionary support of the Technion includes the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Graduate School and the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Center for Communications and Information Technologies. A member of the Technion International Board of Governors, Dr. Jacobs is a Life Trustee of the American Technion Society National Board of Regents, and a member of the ATS San Diego Chapter. He received the ATS’ highest honor, The Albert Einstein Award, in 1996, and a Technion Honorary Doctorate in 2000.

The JTCII plans to offer a two-year interdisciplinary program where students concurrently earn dual master’s degrees — one from Cornell and one from the Technion. This degree program will allow students to specialize in applied information-based sciences in one of three hubs focused around leading New York City industries — Connective Media, Healthier Living and The Built Environment — while honing their entrepreneurial skills. The first area of specialization will be in Connective Media, and is slated to begin in the fall of 2014. Research will also be focused on the hub areas.

A novel program for Postdoctoral Innovation Fellows will launch in fall 2013. The aim is to support individuals who seek to commercialize their research ideas in the stimulating environment of the JTCII, while taking full advantage of the entrepreneurial network of Cornell Tech and the proximity to New York City-based markets. Dr. Jacobs, along with Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, serves as an advisor to Cornell Tech, the overall campus that is part of Cornell University.

We thank the Jacobses for their generous support.

To view the JTCII webpage visit: tech.cornell.edu/jtcii

Find out more at: www.ats.org/NYC


Arrow Technion: Israel’s Hard Drive — as published in NY TimesIn case you missed it, The New York Times published a wonderful article about the Technion, featured on the cover page of its Education Life section on April 14, 2013. The article credits the Technion for transforming the once quiet city of Haifa into a high-tech center.Click here to read the storyClick here to read a NY Times story on Cornell Tech

http://support.ats.org/site/MessageViewer?em_id=25624.0&dlv_id=37691

The Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion–Cornell Innovation Institute (JTCII) is an academic partnership between two of the world’s most distinguished academic institutions, the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and Cornell University.

The JTCII is a central component of the new Cornell Tech campus in New York City. It will offer unique graduate degree programs and foster applied research by faculty, students and fellows, in collaboration with industry partners.

JOAN AND IRWIN JACOBS

On April 22, Dr. Irwin Mark Jacobs, Founding Chairman and CEO Emeritus of Qualcomm, and his wife Joan Klein Jacobs, announced a $133 million gift to Cornell University and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology to create the Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute.

The Jacobses are both Cornell alumni who have a long history of supporting both Cornell and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. They have established the Irwin M. and Joan K. Jacobs Scholars and Fellows Programs and the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Professorship, both in the College of Engineering, as well as the Joan Klein Jacobs Cornell Tradition Fellowship in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell. Dr. Jacobs is a former member of the Cornell University Council and Mrs. Jacobs served on the President’s Council of Cornell Women. In recognition of their distinguished service to Cornell, Dr. and Mrs. Jacobs were both elected Presidential Councillors in 2005. The Jacobses’ visionary support of the Technion includes the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Graduate School and the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Center for Communications and Information Technologies. A member of the Technion International Board of Governors, Dr. Jacobs is a Life Trustee of the American Technion Society National Board of Regents, and a member of the ATS San Diego Chapter. Dr. Jacobs, along with Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, is a member of Cornell Tech’s Steering Committee.

Dr. and Mrs. Jacobs are among the world’s most generous philanthropists. Their support has had a significant impact on numerous cultural, medical, educational, and civic organizations. The engineering school at the University of California, San Diego bears Dr. and Mrs. Jacobs’ names, as do the performing arts center of the campus’ La Jolla Playhouse and the new UCSD Medical Center.


PROGRAMS & RESEARCH

The JTCII fuses academic excellence with real-world applications through its unique two-year dual master’s degree program. The first class of students will begin in the Fall of 2014. Prospective JTCII faculty members will be accomplished scientists, engineers and technologists with proven entrepreneurial skills who can effectively engage with industry.

The JTCII departs from traditional academic departments and is organized in interdisciplinary hubs selected for their relevance to the New York City economy. The three hub areas are: Connective Media, which focuses on mobile and interactive media; Healthier Life, which will create solutions for better health care outcomes; and the Built Environment, which aims to increase the efficiency and sustainability of large-scale urban environments. In addition, a dynamic Industrial Affiliates program will provide a valuable source of local experts and seasoned entrepreneurial mentors.

In Fall 2013, the JTCII will launch a Postdoctoral Innovation Fellows program to encourage entrepreneurial efforts among highly qualified scientists. The program will provide fellows with rich ties to the emerging New York City tech ecosystem, access to industrial mentors and seasoned entrepreneurs, and connections to the local venture capital and legal communities.

JTCII in the News

The Technion: Israel’s Hard DriveTHE NEW YORK TIMES

Building a Better Tech SchoolTHE NEW YORK TIMES

Alliance Formed Secretly to Win Deal for CampusTHE NEW YORK TIMES


THE LEADERSHIP

Craig Gotsman

Founding Director, Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Innovation Institute

Daniel Huttenlocher

Dean and Vice Provost, Cornell Tech

David J. Skorton

President, Cornell University

Peretz Lavie

President, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
Board of Directors

CHAIRKent FuchsProvost, Cornell University

Arnon BenturExecutive Vice President and Director General, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

Lance CollinsDean of the College of Engineering, Cornell University

Joanne DeStefanoVice President for Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Cornell University

Moshe EizenbergProfessor (Emeritus) of Materials Engineering and Former Vice President for Research, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

Paul FeiginSenior Executive Vice President, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

Daniel HuttenlocherDean and Vice Provost, Cornell Tech

Adam ShwartzChair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology

WHY NYC?

In 2010, the City of New York launched its groundbreaking Applied Sciences NYC program, an unparalleled opportunity to build world-class applied sciences and engineering campuses.

With Applied Sciences NYC, the city’s Economic Development Corporation seeks to dramatically expand capacity in the applied sciences to maintain global competitiveness and create jobs. By creating campuses like Cornell Tech, innovative new ideas lead to spinoff companies right here in the city that will transform its economy. The next high growth company—a Google, Amazon, or Facebook—may emerge in NYC.

ABOUT THE PARTNERS

Cornell University

Cornell University, one of the world’s powerhouse universities, is both a private university and a land grant institution of New York State, with 21,400 students in Ithaca, New York, Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City and Qatar, United Arab Emirates. An Ivy League institution, Cornell awarded the nation’s first university doctorate degrees in electrical engineering and industrial engineering. There are forty Nobel Laureates with Cornell affiliations.

Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and the cornerstone of Israel’s renown as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Alongside this, its three Nobel Prize Laureates exemplify traditional academic excellence. Technion people, ideas and inventions make important contributions to the world, including life-saving medicine, sustainable energy, computer software, water conservation and nanotechnology.

FIND MORE INFORMATION

Download the press release here. Visit our press kit for images.

For media inquiries, contact Jonathan Rosen.

For all other inquiries, contact David Keating.


By 
Published: April 12, 2013

IF all the hopes and hype are warranted, a nondescript third-floor loft in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan offers a glimpse of the future, for New York City and for Cornell University. In truth, it doesn’t look like much — just cubicles and meeting rooms in space donated by Google. But looks deceive; here, with little fanfare, Cornell’s new graduate school of applied sciences is being rolled out.

Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Rajit Manohar, associate dean for academic affairs at Cornell Tech, teaching a physical computing class.

Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

The charter class had to accept a high degree of uncertainty. Cornell has made it clear that, in many ways, this is not your typical university program.

The sparkling, sprawling new campus on Roosevelt Island filled with gee-whiz technology — still just ink on paper. The thousands of students and staff, the transformative effect on the city’s economy, the integration withthe Technion-Israel Institute of Technology — those all remain in the future, too.

But just 13 months after being awarded the prize in Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s contest to create a new science school, Cornell NYC Tech got up and running. Eight students enrolled in January in what is being called the beta class, a one-year master’s program in computer science. And Cornell has made it clear that, in many ways, this is not the usual university program.

Not long ago, three young high-tech entrepreneurs sat with the students, talking about failure. They talked about questionable technical, financial or personnel decisions in start-up businesses they had created or worked in, about companies they had seen disintegrate, and about detours into projects they later discarded.

A question was asked about Andrew Mason, co-founder of Groupon, who had been fired a day earlier as the company’s chief executive.

“We should all be so lucky as to build a company that the investors care enough about to fire us,” Tim Novikoff, the C.E.O. of a small company making mobile phone software, said with a wave of his arm around the table, prompting laughter from the students and knowing nods from the Cornell Tech staff. A rail-thin man with the deep-set eyes of someone who could use a little more sleep, Mr. Novikoff is in his early 30s, making him the oldest of the three visitors.

“It’s a miracle if a start-up gets off the ground,” he said. “The last six months I’ve had no income, I have no health insurance. But I got to fly out to a C.E.O. conference and talk with Ashton Kutcher about mobile video for 10 minutes.”

The visitors urged the students to take risks but to expect, at least at first, a precarious existence, riddled with setbacks, that will require obsessiveness and a thick skin — and they made it sound like the grandest of adventures. None of them made the reference, but they could all have been citing Samuel Beckett’s maxim: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Scenes like this play out each week at Cornell Tech, part of an unorthodox curriculum designed to eschew the traditional detached, highly academic approach to learning. Instead, business, technology and real-world experience is baked into the coursework.

“There’s no parallel to that in any traditional computer science program I’m aware of,” said Dan Huttenlocher, dean of Cornell Tech. “We’re taking a page from business schools.”

The practicums are organized by Greg Pass, a Cornell alumnus who was the chief technology officer at Twitter and now is the chief entrepreneurial officer of the graduate school. They are held in an informal setting each Friday with entrepreneurs from the city’s blooming tech sector, who are often no more than a few steps ahead of where the students are.

Reinforcing the sense that the work produce practical results, the United States Commerce Department has stationed a patent officer on the premises to help with patent applications and commercial strategies — an arrangement that federal officials say is a first.

A business class is mandatory, in addition to the usual technical courses. And the students are required, in each semester, to work with mentors from the private sector to design and create new products. Two of the students, Alex Kopp and Andrew Li, are working with a Google engineer on open-source software that predicts the severity of weather events.

“In Ithaca, you take a bunch of classes and then you have your one master’s project — you work on it alone,” said Mr. Kopp, who transferred from a master’s program at Cornell’s main campus. “It typically doesn’t have a business aspect to it, or you might be working on something that a professor is doing. This has a very different feel to it.”

Information technology is the common thread through the eight degrees the school plans to offer. Three will be dual master’s degrees from Cornell and the Technion, based on three “hubs” rather than traditional departments. One hub program, “connective media,” has largely been mapped out — though professors warn that it is subject to change as technology changes — and will deal with designing the mobile, fragmented and endlessly malleable technology that makes everyone a media creator as well as consumer. The other hubs, still under development, are being called “healthier life” (systems to improve health care delivery as well as personal technology) and “built environment” (computing applied to the physical world around us, from robotic devices to smart building design to real-time traffic information).

The curriculum will not be confined to standard disciplines, but will combine fields like electrical engineering, software development and social sciences, and professors will teach across those boundaries.

In fact, no professor has an office, not even the dean, and Dr. Huttenlocher insists they will not when the campus moves to Roosevelt Island, either. Instead, each person has a desk with low dividers, and people can grab conference rooms as needed — much like the headquarters of a small tech company.

“We’re trying to separate personal space from private space, to create an environment with constant interaction,” he said. “Believe it or not, this is a very important piece of the culture we’re trying to create.”

Some of Cornell Tech’s approach can be seen in Deborah Estrin’s computer networking course. She invites important innovators in the field to poke holes in conventional wisdom and get the students thinking about questions that go far beyond the curriculum.

One week, Bob Evans, a project manager at Google, challenged a cliché in software development, “Good, fast or cheap — pick two,” meaning you can’t have all three. To Mr. Evans, fast and cheap — and highly adaptable — is good by definition, allowing engineers to identify needed updates, repairs and new features. Creating a polished product before it is ever put to use is pointless, he told the class, because it will always need to be changed.

“Software is one brief moment of creation and a lifetime of maintenance,” he said.

Another week, Dr. Estrin’s guest was Scott Shenker, chief scientist of the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. “I’m going to ask you questions,” he said at the outset. “The most important thing to know is I don’t care about your answer. It’s to get you to think.”

In acerbic fashion, he argued that the Internet protocols that are a foundation of global communication are fundamentally flawed, hinder traffic rather than help it and require billions of dollars in networking equipment that will soon become unnecessary.

In fact, Dr. Estrin had helped develop those very protocols before taking a turn into wireless sensing systems, and then applying those systems to health care. Her nonprofit organization, Open mHealth, develops open-source software that collects, combines and analyzes streams of data from devices that monitor the human body, be it one’s physical activity or blood sugar.

Cornell officials consider it a coup to have gotten Dr. Estrin, who recently finished a 10-year project at the University of California, Los Angeles, backed by the National Science Foundation.

Reading Cornell’s proposal, with its hubs on connective media and healthier life, Dr. Estrin said,“I felt like I had been part of the team writing it.”

THE staff and students at Cornell Tech can be seen as pioneers or guinea pigs — or both — and it was a select group who were ready to play that role (one of the original eight has already dropped out). The student body is intentionally small. They had to accept a high degree of uncertainty about what lay ahead and a very short time frame for deciding on their futures, and they had to be in the metropolitan area, or ready to move on short notice.

Classes started on Jan. 21. Some arrived in the city unsure of their schedules. Less than a month before they started, it remained unclear whether Cornell would find housing for those traveling from other parts of the country (it did).

“For me, from hearing about the program to applying was less than a month, and from that to getting to New York City was just another couple of months,” said Greg Tobkin, 27. A Williams College graduate, he had set out to earn a doctorate in computational biology at Cornell but left the program after three years and moved back to his hometown, San Francisco.

“I looked at biotech jobs, but it was a bad time to be looking, if you had zero actual biotech experience,” he said. After a year, “I started looking at master’s programs that had really rigorous comp sci and would also give me a chance to explore industry, so it was as if the Cornell Tech program were written for me.” He added: “Each week, we go visit some new start-up that is (a) awesome and (b) looking to hire.”

Ted Krum, like Mr. Tobkin, turned a career roadblock into an opportunity, but his change of direction was more profound. Mr. Krum, 47, who lives in Garden City, Long Island, had a job in finance before being downsized last year. He had studied computer science at Yale — he later got an M.B.A. at the University of Chicago — and his early work in finance involved writing software. He considered applying to Cornell Tech for a job, but his wife, an executive recruiter, suggested he apply as a student.

“We spent many evenings after our son was in bed figuring out if this was right, if we could swing it financially,” he said. Tuition comes to $43,185.

Mr. Krum’s computing knowledge was out of date, and studying alongside students half his age, he would have some catching up to do: “I thought, what’s the bigger risk, staying put in financial services and swimming against the tide of tens of thousands of job cuts, or going back to my first love, computers, and a field that’s actually growing?”

One thing the students have in common is being excited, not intimidated, by doing something so untested. Mr. Krum called it “the hottest ticket to the hottest show in town.”

Building Cornell Tech is decidedly seat of the pants. Dr. Huttenlocher still does not have a good idea how many new students the school will enroll in September, how many professors it will have then, or what classes it will offer. Nor is anyone sure how fast the various programs will be designed by the professors and authorized by New York State. State approval for dual degrees with the Technion, which has not operated in New York before, is more complex — one reason that, at the outset, the courses are Cornell’s alone.

Though Cornell and the Technion are taking it further, the relationship between most engineering and computer science schools and the business world is already so fluid as to startle someone with a liberal arts background. Professors routinely take breaks from academia to go into business. Former students and professors create companies based on work done within university walls and reach back into them to collaborate and recruit talent. Universities often own pieces of new ventures.

This kind of cross-pollination helped create thriving tech sectors in the areas surrounding the Technion, Stanford, the University of Texas and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — something Mayor Bloomberg wants for New York. And it is of growing importance to universities, not just for their ability to draw top faculty and students, but also for their finances. “Technology transfer,” the private-sector use of university-born innovations, has become a multibillion-dollar source of revenue for schools.

When Mayor Bloomberg asked business leaders about the city’s economic prospects, the complaint he said he heard most often was a shortage of top-notch talent in computer science and engineering. The hope was that a new graduate school could turn the tech sector into another pillar of the city’s economy, like finance, medicine and media. In 2010, the mayor announced a contest, offering city-owned land on Roosevelt Island worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and up to $100 million worth of capital improvements.

Columbia, New York University, Carnegie Mellon and others submitted proposals, but only one, Stanford, proposed a project as big as Cornell’s. Columbia and N.Y.U. already had engineering schools in the city and plans for expansion, while Stanford had a thriving relationship with Silicon Valley.

More than any other bidder, Cornell saw the contest as a potential game changer. An Ivy League university with highly ranked programs in computer science and engineering, Cornell had a geographic disadvantage. Ithaca, small and remote, was not likely to become the heart of a new Silicon Valley.

But New York City, with a growing lineup of tech businesses and a large contingent of Cornell alumni, was a second home to the university — site of its medical school, part of its labor relations school and architecture school and other facilities. For years, Cornell has offered a bus service between the city and Ithaca, making the four-and-a-half-hour drive several times daily.

City officials said no university worked as hard as Cornell to accommodate and impress them, and in December 2011, Cornell’s joint bid with the Technion was named the winner. Columbia and N.Y.U. were also awarded grants to expand tech offerings in what Mayor Bloomberg dubs Applied Sciences NYC.

Last month, plans for the 12-acre campus on Roosevelt Island won approval from the City Planning Commission and have gone to the City Council for final approval. When finished, in about 25 years, the campus is projected to have more than 2,000 students and two million square feet of space. The timetable calls for the first building to open in 2017.

David J. Skorton, Cornell’s president, says that helping create one of the world’s great tech environments may be the university’s most important venture of the next generation. “It’s a terrific opportunity to create a model institution for 21st-century higher education in the applied sciences,” Dr. Skorton said, “and it boosts the visibility of the university as a whole.”

He also cites the rather old-school benefit of being in the thick of things.

“Interactions can occur at a very long distance now, but you still see that many, many serendipitous steps forward are based on the old concept of bumping into people, having lunch, that personal interaction,” Dr. Skorton said. “We’re already seeing that in the temporary campus, in the Google space.

“Even with all our technology,” he added, “proximity still really matters.”

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MIT Skoltech Initiative: 61 Experts from 20 different Countries identified 120 Universities in the field of Entrepreneurship and Innovation


Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

The Technion – Israel Institute of Technology was today ranked 6th in the world by a survey conducted by MIT. The study evaluated entrepreneurship and innovation in higher education institutions worldwide. The ranking was compiled by 61 experts from 20 different countries. It identified 120 universities which demonstrate “a decisive impact and significant contribution in the field of entrepreneurship and innovation.”

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Technion followed MIT, Stanford, Cambridge, Imperial College and Oxford, but preceded the University of San Diego, Berkeley, ETH Swiss and the National University of Singapore. The report also placed  Israel 3rd  in terms of entrepreneurship and innovation, after the US and the UK, but ahead of Sweden, Singapore, Germany, the Netherlands, China and Canada.The survey, which was carried out in partnership with the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Russia, also placed the Technion first in the category of universities that create or support technological innovation even though they operate in a challenging environment.

Instituting an institutional E&I culture – for entrepreneurship and innovation – is considered among experts as the essential ingredient for sustaining a successful system. In this respect, the Technion is mentioned as an institution that possesses the ethos of aspiration and achievement.

This is the first stage (out of three) in the comprehensive survey. In his reaction to these most favorable results, Technion President Professor Peretz Lavie said, “Technion’s position among the top ten leading universities in the world in the areas of innovation and entrepreneurship brings us closer to fulfilling our mission goals: to be counted among the top ten leading universities in the world. This is not the first time the Technion has earned international acclaim such as this,” he continued. “The university’s contribution to Israel’s advanced technology industry is recognized around the world. Not by coincidence did we prevail in the New York City’s tender last year to establish a scientific-engineering research center in partnership with Cornell University. The city’s mayor, Michael Bloomberg, said then that the Technion is the only university in the world capable of successfully turning the economic tide of an entire country, from exporters of citrus fruit to a global center for advanced industry and an authority of knowledge. To date, 61 experts from around the world have endorsed this statement.”

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Inventors, Novel Prize Winners & Technology Leaders: IIT

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and a key to Israel’s reputation as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Its three Nobel Prize winners exemplify academic excellence.

 

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

New Life – The Healing Promise of Stem Cells

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Diseases and conditions where stem cell treatment is promising or emerging. Source: Wikipedia
Since the late 1990s, the Technion has been at the forefront of stem-cell research. Stem cells are the master keys because they can be converted into many different kinds of cells, opening many different doors to potential cures and treatments. Beating heart tissue is one of the major stem cell achievements from the Technion.
Healing the Heart
 
Technion scientists showed this year that they can turn skin tissue from heart attack patients into fresh, beating heart cells in a first step towards a new therapy for the condition. The procedure may eventually help scores of people who survive heart attacks but are severely debilitated by damage to the organ.
By creating new heart cells from a patient’s own tissues, doctors avoid the risk of the cells being rejected by the immune system once they are transplanted.Though the cells were not considered safe enough to put back into patients, they appeared healthy in the laboratory and beat in time with other cells in animal models.
“We have shown that it’s possible to take skin cells from an elderly patient with advanced heart failure and end up with his own beating cells in a laboratory dish that are healthy and young – the equivalent to the stage his heart cells were in when he was just born,” Prof. Lior Gepstein told the British national paper The Guardian.

Pancreatic Tissue for Diabetes

Prof. Shulamit Levenberg of the Technion, who has spent many years trying to create replacement human organs by building them up on a “scaffold,” has created tissue from the insulin-producing islets of Langerhans in the pancreas surrounded by a three-dimensional network of blood vessels.The tissue she and her team created has significant advantages over traditional transplant material that has been harvested from healthy pancreatic tissue.

“We have shown that the three-dimensional environment and the engineered blood vessels support the islets – and this support is important for the survival of the islets and for their insulin secretion activity”, says Prof. Levenberg of the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

In the Bones

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In collaboration with industry and global research partners, Technion scientists have grown human bone from stem cells in a laboratory. The development opens the way for patients to have broken bones repaired or even replaced with entire new ones grown outside the body from a patient’s own cells. The researchers started with stem cells taken from fat tissue. It took around a month to grow them into sections of fully-formed living human bone up to a couple of inches long. The success was reported by the UK national paper The Telegraph.

Stem Cell Proliferation

““These are our next generation of scientists and Nobel Laureates,” says Prof. Dror Seliktar, of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. “The future of the Technion relies on that.”

Seliktar and his research team at the Lokey Center for Biomaterials and Tissue Regeneration at Technion is working on a new material for the mass production of stem cells to make their commercial use viable on an industrial scale.

“In the biotechnology industries, there is an inherent need for expanding populations of stem cells for therapeutic purposes,” says Seliktar, who has published over 50 papers in the field, won over 14 awards and launched one of Israel’s promising biotech startups, Regentis Biomaterials.

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Prof. Joseph Itskovitz-Eldor of the Faculty of Medicine was on the international team that in 1998 first discovered the potential of stem cells to form any kind of tissue and pioneered stem-cell technology. The breakthrough garnered headlines around the world. He is the Director of the Technion Stem Cell Center.

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Other posts on this Scientific Web Site about innovations completed on this topic at the Technion are cited below:

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