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Posts Tagged ‘lipid biosynthesis’


brown adipocyte protein CIDEA promotes lipid droplet fusion

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

 

 

The brown adipocyte protein CIDEA promotes lipid droplet fusion via a phosphatidic acid-binding

Parker, Nicholas T Ktistakis, Ann M Dixon, Judith Klein-Seetharaman, Susan Henry, Mark Christian Dirk Dormann, Gil-Soo Han, Stephen A Jesch, George M Carman, Valerian Kagan, et al.

eLife 2015;10.7554/eLife.07485     http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07485

 

Maintenance of energy homeostasis depends on the highly regulated storage and release of triacylglycerol primarily in adipose tissue and excessive storage is a feature of common metabolic disorders. CIDEA is a lipid droplet (LD)-protein enriched in brown adipocytes promoting the enlargement of LDs which are dynamic, ubiquitous organelles specialized for storing neutral lipids. We demonstrate an essential role in this process for an amphipathic helix in CIDEA, which facilitates embedding in the LD phospholipid monolayer and binds phosphatidic acid (PA). LD pairs are docked by CIDEA trans-complexes through contributions of the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal dimerization region. These complexes, enriched at the LD-LD contact site, interact with the cone-shaped phospholipid PA and likely increase phospholipid barrier permeability, promoting LD fusion by transference of lipids. This physiological process is essential in adipocyte differentiation as well as serving to facilitate the tight coupling of lipolysis and lipogenesis in activated brown fat.

 

Evolutionary pressures for survival in fluctuating environments that expose organisms to times of both feast and famine have selected for the ability to efficiently store and release energy in the form of triacyclglycerol (TAG). However, excessive or defective lipid storage is a key feature of common diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and the metabolic syndrome (1). The organelles that are essential for storing and mobilizing intracellular fat are lipid droplets (LDs) (2). They constitute a unique cellular structure where a core of neutral lipids is stabilized in the hydrophilic cytosol by a phospholipid monolayer embedding LD-proteins. While most mammalian 46 cells present small LDs (<1 Pm) (3), white (unilocular) adipocytes contain a single giant LD occupying most of their cell volume. In contrast, brown (multilocular) adipocytes hold multiple LDs of lesser size, increasing the LD surface/volume ratio which facilitates the rapid consumption of lipids for adaptive thermogenesis (4).

The exploration of new approaches for the treatment of metabolic disorders has been stimulated by the rediscovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans (5, 6) and by the induction of multilocular brown-like cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) (7). The multilocular morphology of brown adipocytes is a defining characteristic of these cells along with expression of genes such as Ucp1. The acquisition of a unilocular or multilocular phenotype is likely to be controlled by the regulation of LD growth. Two related proteins, CIDEA and CIDEC promote LD enlargement in adipocytes (8-10), with CIDEA being specifically found in BAT. Together with CIDEB, they form the CIDE (cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector) family of LD-proteins, which have emerged as important metabolic regulators (11).

Different mechanisms have been proposed for LD enlargement, including in situ neutral lipid synthesis, lipid uptake and LD-LD coalescence (12-14). The study of CIDE 62 proteins has revealed a critical role in the LD fusion process in which a donor LD progressively transfers its content to an acceptor LD until it is completely absorbed (15). However, the underlying mechanism by which CIDEC and CIDEA facilitate the interchange of triacylglycerol (TAG) molecules between LDs is not understood. In the present study, we have obtained a detailed picture of the different steps driving this LD enlargement process, which involves the stabilization of LD pairs, phospholipid binding, and the permeabilization of the LD monolayer to allow the transference of lipids.

 

CIDEA expression mimics the LD dynamics observed during the differentiation of brown adipocytes

Phases of CIDEA activity: LD targeting, LD-LD docking and LD growth

A cationic amphipathic helix in C-term drives LD targeting

The amphipathic helix is essential for LD enlargement

LD-LD docking is induced by the formation of CIDEA complexes

CIDEC differs from CIDEA in its dependence on the N-term domain

CIDEA interacts with Phosphatidic Acid

PA is required for LD enlargement

 

The Cidea gene is highly expressed in BAT, induced in WAT following cold exposure (46), and is widely used by researchers as a defining marker to discriminate brown or brite adipocytes from white adipocytes (7, 28). As evidence indicated a key role in the LD biology (47) we have characterized the mechanism by which CIDEA promotes LD enlargement, which involves the targeting of LDs, the docking of LD pairs and the transference of lipids between them. The lipid transfer step requires the interaction of CIDEA and PA through a cationic amphipathic helix. Independently of PA-binding, this helix is also responsible for anchoring CIDEA in the LD membrane. Finally, we demonstrate that the docking of LD pairs is driven by the formation of CIDEA complexes involving the N-term domain and a C-term interaction site.

CIDE proteins appeared during vertebrate evolution by the combination of an ancestor N-term domain and a LD-binding C-term domain (35). In spite of this, the full process of LD enlargement can be induced in yeast by the sole exogenous expression of 395 CIDEA, indicating that in contrast to SNARE-triggered vesicle fusion, LD fusion by lipid transference does not require the coordination of multiple specific proteins (48). Whereas vesicle fusion implicates an intricate restructuring of the phospholipid bilayers, LD fusion is a spontaneous process that the cell has to prevent by tightly controlling their phospholipid composition (23). However, although phospholipid-modifying enzymes have been linked with the biogenesis of LDs (49, 50), the implication of phospholipids in physiologic LD fusion processes has not been previously described.

Complete LD fusion by lipid transfer can last several hours, during which the participating LDs remain in contact. Our results indicate that both the N-term domain and a C-term dimerization site (aa 126-155) independently participate in the docking of LD pairs by forming trans interactions (Fig. 7). Certain mutations in the dimerization sites that do not eliminate the interaction result in a decrease on the TAG transference efficiency, reflected on the presence of small LDs docked to enlarged LDs. This suggests that in addition to stabilizing the LD-LD interaction, the correct conformation of the 409 CIDEA complexes is necessary for optimal TAG transfer. Furthermore, the formation of stable LD pairs is not sufficient to trigger LD fusion by lipid transfer. In fact, although LDs can be tightly packed in cultured adipocytes, no TAG transference across neighbour LDs is observed in the absence of CIDE proteins (15), showing that the phospholipid monolayer acts as a barrier impermeable to TAG. Our CG-MD simulations indicate that certain TAG molecules can escape the neutral lipid core of the LD and be integrated within the aliphatic chains of the phospholipid monolayer. This could be a transition state 416 prior to the TAG transference and our data indicates that the docking of the amphipathic helix in the LD membrane could facilitate this process. However, the infiltrated TAGs in LD membranes in the presence of mutant helices, or even in the absence of docking, suggests that this is not enough to complete the TAG transference.

To be transferred to the adjacent LD, the TAGs integrated in the hydrophobic region of the LD membrane should cross the energy barrier defined by the phospholipid polar heads, and the interaction of CIDEA with PA could play a role in this process, as suggested by the disruption of LD enlargement by the mutations preventing PA-binding (K167E/R171E/R175E) and the inhibition of CIDEA after PA depletion. The minor effects observed with more conservative substitutions in the helix, suggests that the presence of positive charges is sufficient to induce TAG transference by attracting anionic phospholipids present in the LD membrane. PA, which requirement is indicated by our PA-depletion experiments, is a cone-shaped anionic phospholipid which could locally destabilize the LD monolayer by favoring a negative membrane curvature incompatible with the spherical LD morphology (51). Interestingly, while the zwitterion PC, the main component of the monolayer, stabilizes the LD structure (23), the negatively charged PA promote their coalescence (29). This is supported by our CD-MD results which resulted in a deformation of the LD shape by the addition of PA. We propose a model in which the C-term amphipathic helix positions itself in the LD monolayer and interacts with PA molecules in its vicinity, which might include trans interactions with PA in the adjacent LD. The interaction with PA disturbs the integrity of the phospholipid barrier at the LD-LD interface, allowing the LD to LD transference of TAG molecules integrated in the LD membrane (Fig. 7). Additional alterations in the LD composition could be facilitating TAG transference, as differentiating adipocytes experience a reduction in saturated fatty acids in the LD phospholipids (52), and in their PC/PE ratio (53) which could increase the permeability of the LD membranes, and we previously observed that a change in the molecular structures of TAG results in an altered migration pattern to the LD surface (32).

During LD fusion by lipid transfer, the pressure gradient experienced by LDs favors TAG flux from small to large LDs (15). However, the implication of PA, a minor component of the LD membrane, could represent a control mechanism, as it is plausible that the cell could actively influence the TAG flux direction by differently regulating the levels of PA in large and small LDs, which could be controlled by the activity of enzymes such as AGPAT3 and LIPIN-1J (13, 30). This is a remarkable possibility, as a switch in the favored TAG flux direction could promote the acquisition of a multilocular phenotype and facilitate the browning of WAT (24). Interestingly, Cidea mRNA is the LD protein- encoding transcript that experiences the greatest increase during the cold-induced process by which multilocular BAT-like cells appear in WAT (24). Furthermore, in BAT, cold exposure instigates a profound increase in CIDEA protein levels that is independent of transcriptional regulation (54). The profound increase in CIDEA is coincident with elevated lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis that occurs in both brown and white adipose tissues after E-adrenergic receptor activation (55). It is likely that CIDEA has a central role in coupling these processes to package newly synthesized TAG in LDs for subsequent lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation. Importantly, BAT displays high levels of glycerol kinase activity (56, 57) that facilitates glycerol recycling rather than release into the blood stream, following induction of lipolysis (58), which occurs in WAT. Hence, the reported elevated glycerol released from cells depleted of CIDEA (28) is likely to be a result of decoupling lipolysis from the ability to efficiently store the products of lipogenesis in LDs and therefore producing a net increase in detected extracellular glycerol. This important role of CIDEA is supported by the marked depletion of TAG in the BAT of Cidea null mice following overnight exposure to 4 °C (28) and our findings that CIDEA-dependent LD enlargement is maintained in a lipase negative yeast strain.

Cidea and the genes that are required to facilitate high rates of lipolysis and lipogenesis are associated with the “browning” of white fat either following cold exposure (46) or in genetic models such as RIP140 knockout WAT (59). The induction of a brown- like phenotype in WAT has potential benefits in the treatment and prevention of metabolic disorders (60). Differences in the activity and regulation of CIDEC and CIDEA could also be responsible for the adoption of unilocular or multilocular phenotypes. In addition to their differential interaction with PLIN1 and 5, we have observed that CIDEC is more resilient to the deletion of the N-term than CIDEA, indicating that it may be less sensitive to regulatory posttranslational modifications of this domain. This robustness of CIDEC activity together with its potentiation by PLIN1, could facilitate the continuity of the LD enlargement in white adipocytes until the unilocular phenotype is achieved. In contrast, in brown adipocytes expressing CIDEA the process would be stopped at the multilocular stage for example due to post-translational modifications that modulate the function or stability of the protein or alteration of the PA levels in LDs.

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Liver Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Hepatosteatosis

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

1. Absence of adipose triglyceride lipase protects from hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

Fuchs CD, Claudel T, Kumari P, Haemmerle G, et al.
LabExpMol Hepatology, Medical Univ of Graz, Austria.
Hepatology. 2012 Jul;56(1):270-80.   http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.25601. Epub 2012 May 29.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by

  • triglyceride (TG) accumulation and
  • endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.

Fatty acids (FAs) may trigger ER stress, therefore,

  •  the absence of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL/PNPLA2)-
    • the main enzyme for intracellular lipolysis,
  • releasing FAs, and
  • closest homolog to adiponutrin (PNPLA3)

recently implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD-

  • could protect against hepatic ER stress.

Wild-type (WT) and ATGL knockout (KO) mice

  •  were challenged with tunicamycin (TM) to induce ER stress.

Markers of hepatic

  •  lipid metabolism,
  • ER stress, and
  • inflammation were explored
    • for gene expression by
    •  serum biochemistry,
    • hepatic TG and FA profiles,
    • liver histology,
    • cell-culture experiments were performed in Hepa1.6 cells
  • after the knockdown of ATGL before FA and TM treatment.

TM increased hepatic TG accumulation in ATGL KO, but not in WT mice. Lipogenesis and β-oxidation
were repressed at the gene-expression level
(sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1c,
fatty acid synthase, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase 2, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 alpha) in
both WT and ATGL KO mice. Genes for very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) synthesis (microsomal
triglyceride transfer protein and apolipoprotein B)

  •  were down-regulated by TM in WT
  • and even more in ATGL KO mice,
  • which displayed strongly reduced serum VLDL cholesterol levels.

ER stress markers were induced exclusively in TM-treated WT, but not ATGL KO, mice:

  •  glucose-regulated protein,
  • C/EBP homolog protein,
  • spliced X-box-binding protein,
  • endoplasmic-reticulum-localized DnaJ homolog 4, and
  • inflammatory markers Tnfα and iNos.

Total hepatic FA profiling revealed a higher palmitic acid/oleic acid (PA/OA) ratio in WT mice.
Phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor-

  • known to be involved in FA-derived ER stress and
  • blocked by OA-
  • was increased in TM-treated WT mice only.

In line with this, in vitro OA protected hepatocytes from TM-induced ER stress. Lack of ATGL may protect from
hepatic ER stress through alterations in FA composition. ATGL could constitute a new therapeutic strategy
to target ER stress in NAFLD.
PMID: 22271167 Diabetes Obes Metab. 2010 Oct;12 Suppl 2:83-92.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-1326.2010.01275.x.

2. Hepatic steatosis: a role for de novo lipogenesis and the transcription factor SREBP-1c.
Ferré P, Foufelle F. INSERM, and Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris, Paris, France.    PMID: 21029304

Excessive availability of plasma fatty acids and lipid synthesis from glucose (lipogenesis) are important determinants of steatosis.
Lipogenesis is an insulin- and glucose-dependent process that is under the control of specific transcription factors,

Insulin induces the maturation of SREBP-1c in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).

  • SREBP-1c in turn activates glycolytic gene expression,
    • allowing glucose metabolism, and
    • lipogenic genes in conjunction with ChREBP.

Lipogenesis activation in the liver of obese markedly insulin-resistant steatotic rodents is then paradoxical.
It appears the activation of SREBP-1c and thus of lipogenesis is

  •  secondary in the steatotic liver to an ER stress.

The ER stress activates the

  •  cleavage of SREBP-1c independent of insulin,
  • explaining the paradoxical stimulation of lipogenesis
  • in an insulin-resistant liver.

Inhibition of the ER stress in obese rodents

  •  decreases SREBP-1c activation and lipogenesis and
  • improves markedly hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity.
  • ER is thus worth considering as a potential therapeutic target for steatosis and metabolic syndrome.

3. SREBP-1c transcription factor and lipid homeostasis: clinical perspective
Ferré P, Foufelle F
Inserm, Centre de Recherches Biomédicales des Cordeliers, Paris, France.
Horm Res. 2007;68(2):72-82. Epub 2007 Mar 5. PMID:17344645

Insulin has long-term effects on glucose and lipid metabolism through its control on the expression of specific genes.
In insulin sensitive tissues and particularly in the liver,

  •  the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) transduces the insulin signal, which is
  • synthetized as a precursor in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum
  • which requires post-translational modification to yield its transcriptionally active nuclear form.

Insulin activates the transcription and the proteolytic maturation of SREBP-1c, which induces the

  •  expression of a family of genes
  • involved in glucose utilization and fatty acid synthesis and
  • can be considered as a thrifty gene.

Since a high lipid availability is

  •  deleterious for insulin sensitivity and secretion,
  • a role for SREBP-1c in dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes
  • has been considered in genetic studies.

SREBP-1c could also participate in

  •  hepatic steatosis observed in humans
  • related to alcohol consumption and
  • hyperhomocysteinemia
  • concomitant with a ER-stress and
  • insulin-independent SREBP-1c activation.

4. Hepatic steatosis: a role for de novo lipogenesis and the transcription factor SREBP-1c
Ferré P, Foufelle F
INSERM, Centre de Recherches des Cordeliers and Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris, Paris, France.
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2010 Oct;12 Suppl 2:83-92. PMID: 21029304
http://dx.doiorg/10.1111/j.1463-1326.2010.01275.x.

Lipogenesis in liver steatosis is

  •  an insulin- and glucose-dependent process
  • under the control of specific transcription factors,
  • sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c),
  • activated by insulin and carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP)

Insulin induces the maturation of SREBP-1c in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).
SREBP-1c in turn activates glycolytic gene expression, allowing –

  •  glucose metabolism in conjunction with ChREBP.

activation of SREBP-1c and lipogenesis is secondary in the steatotic liver to ER stress, which

  •  activates the cleavage of SREBP-1c independent of insulin,
  • explaining the stimulation of lipogenesis in an insulin-resistant liver.
  • Inhibition of the ER stress in obese rodents decreases SREBP-1c activation and improves
  • hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity.

ER is thus a new partner in steatosis and metabolic syndrome

5. Pharmacologic ER stress induces non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an animal model
Jin-Sook Leea, Ze Zhenga, R Mendeza, Seung-Wook Hac, et al.
Wayne State University SOM, Detroit, MI
Toxicology Letters 20 May 2012; 211(1):29–38      http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2012.02.017

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress refers to a condition of

  •  accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen, which is known to
  • activate an intracellular stress signaling termed
  • Unfolded Protein Response (UPR).

A number of pharmacologic reagents or pathophysiologic stimuli

  •  can induce ER stress and activation of the UPR signaling,
  • leading to alteration of cell physiology that is
  • associated with the initiation and progression of a variety of diseases.

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), characterized by hepatic steatosis and inflammation, has been considered the
precursor or the hepatic manifestation of metabolic disease. In this study, we delineated the

  • toxic effect and molecular basis
  • by which pharmacologic ER stress,
  • induced by a bacterial nucleoside antibiotic tunicamycin (TM),
  • promotes NASH in an animal model.

Mice of C57BL/6J strain background were challenged with pharmacologic ER stress by intraperitoneal injection of TM. Upon TM injection,

  •  mice exhibited a quick NASH state characterized by
  • hepatic steatosis and inflammation.

TM-treated mice exhibited an increase in –

  •  hepatic triglycerides (TG) and a –
  • decrease in plasma lipids, including
  • plasma TG,
  • plasma cholesterol,
  • high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and
  • low-density lipoprotein (LDL),

In response to TM challenge,

  •  cleavage of sterol responsive binding protein (SREBP)-1a and SREBP-1c,
  •  the key trans-activators for lipid and sterol biosynthesis,
  • was dramatically increased in the liver.

Consistent with the hepatic steatosis phenotype, expression of

  •  some key regulators and enzymes in de novo lipogenesis and lipid droplet formation was up-regulated,
  • while expression of those involved in lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation was down-regulated
  • in the liver of mice challenged with TM.

TM treatment also increased phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitors (IκB),

  •  leading to the activation of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory pathway in the liver.

Our study not only confirmed that pharmacologic ER stress is a strong “hit” that triggers NASH, but also demonstrated

  •  crucial molecular links between ER stress,
  • lipid metabolism, and
  • inflammation in the liver in vivo.

Highlights
► Pharmacologic ER stress induced by tunicamycin (TM) induces a quick NASH state in vivo.
► TM leads to dramatic increase in cleavage of sterol regulatory element-binding protein in the liver.
► TM up-regulates lipogenic genes, but down-regulates the genes in lipolysis and FA oxidation.
► TM activates NF-κB and expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines in the liver.
Abbreviations
ER, endoplasmic reticulum; TM, tunicamycin; NASH, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; NAFLD,
non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; TG, triglycerides; SREBP, sterol responsive binding protein;
NF-κB, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B; IκB, NF-κB inhibitor
Keywords: ER stress; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Tunicamycin; Lipid metabolism; Hepatic inflammation
Figures and tables from this article:

Fig. 1. TM challenge alters lipid profiles and causes hepatic steatosis in mice. (A) Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of liver mRNA isolated from mice challenged with TM or vehicle control. Total liver mRNA was isolated at 8 h or 30 h after injection with vehicle or TM (2 μg/g body weight) for real-time RT-PCR analysis. Expression values were normalized to β-actin mRNA levels. Fold changes of mRNA are shown by comparing to one of the control mice. Each bar denotes the mean ± SEM (n = 4 mice per group); **P < 0.01. Edem1, ER degradation enhancing, mannosidase alpha-like 1. (B) Oil-red O staining of lipid droplets in the livers of the mice challenged with TM or vehicle control (magnification: 200×). (C) Levels of TG in the liver tissues of the mice challenged with TM or vehicle control. (D) Levels of plasma lipids in the mice challenged with TM or vehicle control. TG, triglycerides; TC, total plasma cholesterol; HDL, high-density lipoproteins; VLDL/LDL, very low and low density lipoproteins. For C and D, each bar denotes mean ± SEM (n = 4 mice per group); *P < 0.05; **P < 0.01.

 Fhttp://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0378427412000732-gr1.jpgigure options

Fig. 2. TM challenge leads to a quick NASH state in mice. (A) Histological examination of liver tissue sections of the mice challenged with TM (2 μg/g body weight) or vehicle control. Upper panel, hematoxylin–eosin (H&E) staining of liver tissue sections; the lower panel, Sirius staining of collagen deposition of liver tissue sections (magnification: 200×). (B) Histological scoring for NASH activities in the livers of the mice treated with TM or vehicle control. The grade scores were calculated based on the scores of steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning, lobular and portal inflammation, and Mallory bodies. The stage scores were based on the liver fibrosis. Number of mice examined is given in parentheses. Mean ± SEM values are shown. P-values were calculated by Mann–Whitney U-test.

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Fig. 3. TM challenge significantly increases levels of cleaved/activated forms of SREBP1a and SREBP1c in the liver. Western blot analysis of protein levels of SREBP1a (A) and SREBP1c (B) in the liver tissues from the mice challenged with TM (2 μg/g body weight) or vehicle control. Levels of GAPDH were included as internal controls. For A and B, the values below the gels represent the ratios of mature/cleaved SREBP signal intensities to that of SREBP precursors. The graph beside the images showed the ratios of mature/cleaved SREBP to precursor SREBP in the liver of mice challenged with TM or vehicle. The protein signal intensities shown by Western blot analysis were quantified by NIH imageJ software. Each bar represents the mean ± SEM (n = 3 mice per group); **P < 0.01. SREBP-p, SREBP precursor; SREBP-m, mature/cleaved SREBP.

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Fig. 4. TM challenge up-regulates expression of genes involved in lipogenesis but down-regulates expression of genes involved in lipolysis and FA oxidation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of liver mRNAs isolated from the mice challenged with TM (2 μg/g body weight) or vehicle control, which encode regulators or enzymes in: (A) de novo lipogenesis: PGC1α, PGC1β, DGAT1 and DGAT2; (B) lipid droplet production: ADRP, FIT2, and FSP27; (C) lipolysis: ApoC2, Acox1, and LSR; and (D) FA oxidation: PPARα. Expression values were normalized to β-actin mRNA levels. Fold changes of mRNA are shown by comparing to one of the control mice. Each bar denotes the mean ± SEM (n = 4 mice per group); **P < 0.01. (E and F) Isotope tracing analysis of hepatic de novo lipogenesis. Huh7 cells were incubated with [1-14C] acetic acid for 6 h (E) or 12 h (F) in the presence or absence of TM (20 μg/ml). The rates of de novo lipogenesis were quantified by determining the amounts of [1-14C]-labeled acetic acid incorporated into total cellular lipids after normalization to cell numbers.

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Fig. 5. TM activates the inflammatory pathway through NF-κB, but not JNK, in the liver. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated Iκ-B, total Iκ-B, phosphorylated JNK, and total JNK in the liver tissues from the mice challenged with TM (2 μg/g body weight) or vehicle control. Levels of GAPDH were included as internal controls. The values below the gels represent the ratios of phosphorylated protein signal intensities to that of total proteins.

 http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0378427412000732-gr5.jpg

Fig. 6. TM induces expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase responsive proteins in the liver. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses of liver mRNAs isolated from the mice challenged with TM (2 μg/g body weight) or vehicle control, which encode: (A) pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and IL6; and (B) acute-phase protein SAP and SAA3. Expression values were normalized to β-actin mRNA levels. Fold changes of mRNA are shown by comparing to one of the control mice. (C–E) ELISA analyses of serum levels of TNFα, IL6, and SAP in the mice challenged with TM or vehicle control for 8 h ELISA. Each bar denotes the mean ± SEM (n = 4 mice per group); *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01.

http://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0378427412000732-gr6.jpg

Corresponding author at: Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 E. Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201, USA. Tel.: +1 313 577 2669; fax: +1 313 577 5218.

The SREBP regulatory pathway. Brown MS, Goldst...

The SREBP regulatory pathway. Brown MS, Goldstein JL (1997). “The SREBP pathway: regulation of cholesterol metabolism by proteolysis of a membrane-bound transcription factor”. Cell 89 (3) : 331–340. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(00)80213-5. PMID 9150132. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Structure of the SREBF1 protein. Base...

English: Structure of the SREBF1 protein. Based on PyMOL rendering of PDB 1am9. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The SREBP regulatory pathway

The SREBP regulatory pathway (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Diagram of rough endoplasmic reticulu...

English: Diagram of rough endoplasmic reticulum by Ruth Lawson, Otago Polytechnic. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Micrograph demonstrating marked (macrovesicula...

Micrograph demonstrating marked (macrovesicular) steatosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Masson’s trichrome stain. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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