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Posts Tagged ‘3D biological structure’


3D Imaging of Cancer Cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

3D Imaging of Cancer Cells Could Lead to Improved Ability of Pathologists and Radiologists to Plan Cancer Treatments and Monitor Cell Interactions

Dark Daily Apr 8th 2016        Jon Stone

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/3d-imaging-cancer-cells-could-lead-improved-ability-plan-joseph-colao

 

3D Imaging of Cancer Cells Could Lead to Improved Ability of Pathologists and Radiologists to Plan Cancer Treatments and Monitor Cell Interactions.

New technology from researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center enables the ability to study cancer cells in their native microenvironments.

Imaging research is one step closer to giving clinicians a way to do high-resolution scans of malignant cells in order to diagnose cancer and help identify useful therapies. If this technology were to prove successful in clinical studies, it might change how anatomic pathologists and radiologists diagnose and treat cancer.

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed a way to create near-isotropic, high-resolution scans of cells within their microenvironments. The process involves utilizing a combination of two-photonBessel beams and specialized filtering.

New Imaging Approach Could be Useful to Both Pathologists and Radiologists

In a recent press release, senior author Reto Fiolka, PhD, said “there is clear evidence that the environment strongly affects cellular behavior—thus, the value of cell culture experiments on glass must at least be questioned. Our microscope is one tool that may bring us a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer cell behavior, since it enables high-resolution imaging in more realistic tumor.”

In a study in Developmental Cell, Erik S. Welf, PhD, et al, described the new microenvironmental selective plane illumination microscopy (meSPIM). When developing the technology, the team outlined three goals:

1. The microscope design must not prohibitively constrain microenvironmental properties.

2. Spatial and temporal resolution must match the cellular features of interest.

3. Spatial resolution must be isotropic to avoid spatial bias in quantitative measurements.

This new technology offers pathologists and medical laboratory scientists a new look at cancer cells and other diseases. The study notes that meSPIM eliminates the influence of stiff barriers, such as glass slide covers, while also allowing a level of control over both mechanical and chemical influences that was previously impossible.

Early meSPIM Research Reveals New Cell Behaviors

Early use of meSPIM in observing melanoma cells is already offering new insights into the relationship between the cell behavior of cellular- and subcellular-scale mechanisms and the microenvironment in which these cells exist. The study notes, “The ability to image fine cellular details in controllable microenvironments revealed morphodynamic features not commonly observed in the narrow range of mechanical environments usually studied in vitro.”

One such difference is the appearance of blebbing. Created by melanoma cells and lines, these small protrusions are thought to aid in cell mobility and survival. Using meSPIM, observers could follow the blebbing process in real-time. Formation of blebs on slides and within an extracellular matrix (ECM) showed significant differences in both formation and manipulation of the surrounding microenvironment.

The team is also using meSPIM to take a look at membrane-associated biosensor and cytosolic biosensor signals in 3D. They hope that investigation of proteins such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C will help to further clarify the roles these signals play in reorientation of fibroblasts.

meSPIM combined with computer vision enables imaging, visualization, and quantification of how cells alter collagen fibers over large distances within an image volume measuring 100 mm on each side. (Photo Copyright: Welf and Driscoll et al.)

The research team believes this opens new possibilities for studying diseases at a subcellular level, saying, “Cell biology is necessarily restricted to studying what we can measure. Accordingly, while the last hundred years have yielded incredible insight into cellular processes, unfortunately most of these studies have involved cells plated onto flat, stiff surfaces that are drastically different from the in vivo microenvironment …

“Here, we introduce an imaging platform that enables detailed subcellular observations without compromising microenvironmental control and thus should open a window for addressing these fundamental questions of cell biology.”

Limitations of meSPIM

One significant issue associated with the use of meSPIM is the need to process the large quantity of data into useful information. Algorithms currently allow for automatic bleb detection. However, manual marking, while time consuming, still provides increased accuracy. Researchers believe the next step in improving the quality of meSPIM scans lie in computer platforms designed to extract and process the scan data.

Until this process is automated, user bias, sample mounting, and data handling will remain risks for introducing errors into the collected data. Yet, even in its early stages, meSPIM offers new options for assessing the state of cancer cells and may eventually provide pathologists and radiologists with additional information when creating treatment plans or assessments.

 

Seeing cancer cells in 3-D (w/ Video)

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-cancer-cells-d-video.html

 

Cancer in 3-D

http://cdn.phys.org/newman/csz/news/800/2016/cancerin3d.png

Extracted surfaces of two cancer cells. (Left) A lung cancer cell colored by actin intensity near the cell surface. Actin is a structural molecule that is integral to cell movement. (Right) A melanoma cell colored by PI3-kinase activity near the cell surface. PI3K is a signaling molecule that is key to many cell processes. Credit: Welf and Driscoll et al.

Cancer cells don’t live on glass slides, yet the vast majority of images related to cancer biology come from the cells being photographed on flat, two-dimensional surfaces—images that are sometimes used to make conclusions about the behaviour of cells that normally reside in a more complex environment. But a new high-resolution microscope, presented February 22 in Developmental Cell, now makes it possible to visualize cancer cells in 3D and record how they are signaling to other parts of their environment, revealing previously unappreciated biology of how cancer cells survive and disperse within living things.

“There is clear evidence that the environment strongly affects cellular behavior—thus, the value of cell culture experiments on glass must at least be questioned,” says senior author Reto Fiolka, an optical scientist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “Our is one tool that may bring us a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer cell behavior, since it enables high-resolution imaging in more realistic tumor environments.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-cancer-cells-d-video.html#jCp

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A step forward in diagnostics

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

3D Imaging of Cancer Cells Could Lead to Improved Ability of Pathologists and Radiologists to Plan Cancer Treatments and Monitor Cell Interactions

DARK DAILY   4/8/2016   info@DarkDaily.com  http://www.darkdaily.com/#axzz45En6Xbfr

 

Imaging research is one step closer to giving clinicians a way to do high-resolution scans of malignant cells in order to diagnose cancer and help identify useful therapies. If this technology were to prove successful in clinical studies, it might change how anatomic pathologists and radiologists diagnose and treat cancer.

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed a way to create near-isotropic, high-resolution scans of cells within their microenvironments. The process involves utilizing a combination of two-photonBessel beams and specialized filtering.

New Imaging Approach Could be Useful to Both Pathologists and Radiologists

In a recent press release, senior author Reto Fiolka, PhD, said “there is clear evidence that the environment strongly affects cellular behavior—thus, the value of cell culture experiments on glass must at least be questioned. Our microscope is one tool that may bring us a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer cell behavior, since it enables high-resolution imaging in more realistic tumor.”

In a study in Developmental Cell, Erik S. Welf, PhD, et al, described the new microenvironmental selective plane illumination microscopy (meSPIM). When developing the technology, the team outlined three goals:

1. The microscope design must not prohibitively constrain microenvironmental properties.

2. Spatial and temporal resolution must match the cellular features of interest.

3. Spatial resolution must be isotropic to avoid spatial bias in quantitative measurements.

This new technology offers pathologists and medical laboratory scientists a new look at cancer cells and other diseases. The study notes that meSPIM eliminates the influence of stiff barriers, such as glass slide covers, while also allowing a level of control over both mechanical and chemical influences that was previously impossible.

Early meSPIM Research Reveals New Cell Behaviors

Early use of meSPIM in observing melanoma cells is already offering new insights into the relationship between the cell behavior of cellular- and subcellular-scale mechanisms and the microenvironment in which these cells exist. The study notes, “The ability to image fine cellular details in controllable microenvironments revealedmorphodynamic features not commonly observed in the narrow range of mechanical environments usually studied in vitro.”

One such difference is the appearance of blebbing. Created by melanoma cells and lines, these small protrusions are thought to aid in cell mobility and survival. Using meSPIM, observers could follow the blebbing process in real-time. Formation of blebs on slides and within an extracellular matrix (ECM) showed significant differences in both formation and manipulation of the surrounding microenvironment.

The team is also using meSPIM to take a look at membrane-associated biosensorand cytosolic biosensor signals in 3D. They hope that investigation of proteins such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C will help to further clarify the roles these signals play in reorientation of fibroblasts.

 

meSPIM-500ppi

meSPIM combined with computer vision enables imaging, visualization, and quantification of how cells alter collagen fibers over large distances within an image volume measuring 100 mm on each side. (Photo Copyright: Welf and Driscoll et al.)   http://www.darkdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/meSPIM-500ppi-220×300.jpg

 

Seeing cancer cells in 3-D (w/ Video)

February 22, 2016

Cancer in 3-D

Extracted surfaces of two cancer cells. (Left) A lung cancer cell colored by actin intensity near the cell surface. Actin is a structural molecule that is integral to cell movement. (Right) A melanoma cell colored by PI3-kinase activity near the cell surface. PI3K is a signaling molecule that is key to many cell processes. Credit: Welf and Driscoll et al.  http://cdn.phys.org/newman/csz/news/800/2016/cancerin3d.png

Cancer cells don’t live on glass slides, yet the vast majority of images related to cancer biology come from the cells being photographed on flat, two-dimensional surfaces—images that are sometimes used to make conclusions about the behaviour of cells that normally reside in a more complex environment. But a new high-resolution microscope, presented February 22 in Developmental Cell, now makes it possible to visualize cancer cells in 3D and record how they are signaling to other parts of their environment, revealing previously unappreciated biology of how cancer cells survive and disperse within living things.

“There is clear evidence that the environment strongly affects cellular behavior—thus, the value of cell culture experiments on glass must at least be questioned,” says senior author Reto Fiolka, an optical scientist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “Our is one tool that may bring us a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer cell behavior, since it enables high-resolution imaging in more realistic tumor environments.”

In their study, Fiolka and colleagues, including co-senior author Gaudenz Danuser, and co-first authors Meghan Driscoll and Erik Welf, also of UT Southwestern, used their microscope to image different kinds of skin cancer cells from patients. They found that in a 3D environment (where cells normally reside), unlike a glass slide, multiple melanoma cell lines and primary melanoma cells (from patients with varied genetic mutations) form many small protrusions called blebs. One hypothesis is that this blebbing may help the survive or move around and could thus play a role in skin cancer cell invasiveness or drug resistance in patients.

The researchers say that this is a first step toward understanding 3D biology in tumor microenvironments. And since these kinds of images may be too complicated to interpret by the naked eye alone, the next step will be to develop powerful computer platforms to extract and process the information.

“When we conceived of this project, we first asked what we wanted to measure and then designed a microscope and analytical platform to achieve this goal,” says co-first author Erik Welf, a cell biologist. “We hope that now instead of asking what we can measure, scientists will ask what we must measure in order to make meaningful contributions to cancer cell biology.”

The microscope control software and image analytical code are freely available to the scientific community.

More information: Developmental Cell, Welf and Driscoll et al.: “Quantitative Multiscale Cell Imaging in Controlled 3D Microenvironments” dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2016.01.022

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-cancer-cells-d-video.html#jCp

Quantitative Multiscale Cell Imaging in Controlled 3D Microenvironments

Erik S. Welf4, Meghan K. Driscoll4, Kevin M. Dean, Claudia Schäfer, Jun Chu, Michael W. Davidson, Michael Z. Lin, Gaudenz Danusercorrespondence , Reto Fiolkacorrespondence
Dev Cell  22 Feb 2016;  Volume 36, Issue 4:462–475     DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2016.01.022
Highlights
  • meSPIM allows microenvironmentally conscious 3D imaging/analysis of subcellular biology
  • Precisely controlled microenvironments reveal diverse morphological phenotypes
  • Isotropic resolution and high speed enable the quantification of 3D cell signaling and morphodynamics
  • Multiscale quantification of microenvironmental reorganization by cells

Summary

The microenvironment determines cell behavior, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood because quantitative studies of cell signaling and behavior have been challenging due to insufficient spatial and/or temporal resolution and limitations on microenvironmental control. Here we introduce microenvironmental selective plane illumination microscopy (meSPIM) for imaging and quantification of intracellular signaling and submicrometer cellular structures as well as large-scale cell morphological and environmental features. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by showing that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment regulate the transition of melanoma cells from actin-driven protrusion to blebbing, and we present tools to quantify how cells manipulate individual collagen fibers. We leverage the nearly isotropic resolution of meSPIM to quantify the local concentration of actin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling on the surfaces of cells deep within 3D collagen matrices and track the many small membrane protrusions that appear in these more physiologically relevant environments.

Read more: 3D Imaging of Cancer Cells Could Lead to Improved Ability of Pathologists and Radiologists to Plan Cancer Treatments and Monitor Cell Interactions | Dark Daily http://www.darkdaily.com/3d-imaging-of-cancer-cells-could-lead-to-improved-ability-of-pathologists-and-radiologists-to-plan-cancer-treatments-and-monitor-cell-interactions-301#ixzz45Enp2yT0

The research team believes this opens new possibilities for studying diseases at a subcellular level, saying, “Cell biology is necessarily restricted to studying what we can measure. Accordingly, while the last hundred years have yielded incredible insight into cellular processes, unfortunately most of these studies have involved cells plated onto flat, stiff surfaces that are drastically different from the in vivo microenvironment …

“Here, we introduce an imaging platform that enables detailed subcellular observations without compromising microenvironmental control and thus should open a window for addressing these fundamental questions of cell biology.”

Limitations of meSPIM

One significant issue associated with the use of meSPIM is the need to process the large quantity of data into useful information. Algorithms currently allow for automatic bleb detection. However, manual marking, while time consuming, still provides increased accuracy. Researchers believe the next step in improving the quality of meSPIM scans lie in computer platforms designed to extract and process the scan data.

Until this process is automated, user bias, sample mounting, and data handling will remain risks for introducing errors into the collected data. Yet, even in its early stages, meSPIM offers new options for assessing the state of cancer cells and may eventually provide pathologists and radiologists with additional information when creating treatment plans or assessments.

 

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3D DNA Images  Nanoscale design of printed vascular tissue

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

New Detailed 3D DNA Images Could Aid Nanoscale Designs

This video shows techniques that scientists used to produce 3-D reconstructions of shape fluctuations in double-helix DNA segments attached to gold nanoparticles [Lei Zhang, Dongsheng Lei, Jessica M. Smith, Meng Zhang, Huimin Tong, Xing Zhang, Zhuoyang Lu, Jiankang Liu, A. Paul Alivisatos, and Gang “Gary” Ren]

 

Flexible double-helix DNA segments connected to gold nanoparticles are revealed from the 3-D density maps (purple and yellow) reconstructed from individual samples using a Berkeley Lab-developed technique called individual-particle electron tomography or IPET. Projections of the structures are shown in the background grid.[Berkeley Lab]

 

The general chemical structure of the DNA helix was described by James Watson and Francis Crick in 1953. Over the years that followed, scientists intensely studied the molecular structure of DNA to understand its behaviorin vivo and to exploit its unique properties for nanotechnology purposes.

Now, an international team of scientists working at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has captured the first high-resolution 3D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached at either end to gold nanoparticles. The images detail the flexible structure of the DNA segments, which appear as nanoscale jump ropes.

Using a cutting-edge electron microscopy (EM) technique, called individual-particle electron tomography (IPET), the researchers were able to visualize the shapes of the coiled DNA strands, which were sandwiched between polygon-shaped gold nanoparticles, and reconstruct high-resolution 3D images. The EM technique was coupled with a protein-staining process and sophisticated software that provided structural details to the scale of approximately 2 nanometers (two billionths of a meter).

“We had no idea about what the double-strand DNA would look like between the nanogold particles,” noted senior study author Gang Ren, Ph.D., staff scientist in the Molecular Foundry at Berkeley Lab. “This is the first time for directly visualizing an individual double-strand DNA segment in 3-D.”

The findings from this study were published recently in Nature Communications in an article entitled “Three-Dimensional Structural Dynamics and Fluctuations of DNA-Nanogold Conjugates by Individual-Particle Electron Tomography.”

Dr. Ren and his colleagues hope their unique imaging technique will aid in the use of DNA segments as building blocks for molecular devices that function as nanoscale drug-delivery systems, markers for biological research, and components for computer memory and electronic devices. Additionally, the research team speculates that the new method could also lead to images of important disease-relevant proteins that have proven elusive for other imaging techniques and of the assembly process that forms DNA from separate, individual strands.

The Berkeley Lab scientists flash froze samples to preserve their structure for study with cryo-EM imaging. The distance between the two gold particles in individual samples varied from 20 to 30 nanometers based on different shapes observed in the DNA segments. They then collected a series of tilted images of the stained objects and reconstructed 14 electron-density maps that detailed the structure of individual samples using the IPET technique. They gathered a dozen confirmations for the samples and found the DNA shape variations were consistent with those measured in the flash-frozen cryo-EM samples.

While the 3D reconstructions show the basic nanoscale structure of the samples, the investigators are looking at the next steps, which will be to work on improving the resolution to the subnanometer scale.

“Even in this current state we begin to see 3D structures at 1- to 2-nanometer resolution,” Dr. Ren explained. “Through better instrumentation and improved computational algorithms, it would be promising to push the resolution to that visualizing a single DNA helix within an individual protein.”

In future studies, Dr. Ren noted that researchers could attempt to improve the imaging resolution for complex structures that incorporate more DNA segments as a sort of “DNA origami”—with the hope of building and better characterizing nanoscale molecular devices using DNA segments that can, for example, store and deliver drugs to targeted areas of the body.

“DNA is easy to program, synthesize, and replicate, so it can be used as a special material to quickly self-assemble into nanostructures and to guide the operation of molecular-scale devices,” Dr. Ren stated. “Our current study is just a proof of concept for imaging these kinds of molecular devices’ structures.”

 

Three-dimensional structural dynamics and fluctuations of DNA-nanogold conjugates by individual-particle electron tomography

Lei ZhangDongsheng LeiJessica M. Smith, …., Jiankang LiuA. Paul Alivisatos & Gang Ren
Nature Communications7,Article number:11083
           doi:10.1038/ncomms11083

DNA base pairing has been used for many years to direct the arrangement of inorganic nanocrystals into small groupings and arrays with tailored optical and electrical properties. The control of DNA-mediated assembly depends crucially on a better understanding of three-dimensional structure of DNA-nanocrystal-hybridized building blocks. Existing techniques do not allow for structural determination of these flexible and heterogeneous samples. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy and negative-staining electron tomography approaches to image, and three-dimensionally reconstruct a single DNA-nanogold conjugate, an 84-bp double-stranded DNA with two 5-nm nanogold particles for potential substrates in plasmon-coupling experiments. By individual-particle electron tomography reconstruction, we obtain 14 density maps at ~2-nm resolution. Using these maps as constraints, we derive 14 conformations of dsDNA by molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational variation is consistent with that from liquid solution, suggesting that individual-particle electron tomography could be an expected approach to study DNA-assembling and flexible protein structure and dynamics.

Organic–inorganic-hybridized nanocrystals are a valuable class of new materials that are suitable for addressing many emerging challenges in biological and material sciences1, 2. Nanogold and quantum dot conjugates have been used extensively as biomolecular markers3, 4, whereas DNA base pairing has directed the self-assembly of discrete groupings and arrays of organic and inorganic nanocrystals in the formation of a network solid for electronic devices and memory components5. Discretely hybridized gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA were developed as a molecular ruler to detect sub-nanometre distance changes via plasmon-coupling-mediated variations in dark-field light scattering3, 6. For many of these applications, it is desirable to obtain nanocrystals functionalized with discrete numbers of DNA strands7, 8. In all of these circumstances, the soft components can fluctuate, and the range of these structural deviations have not previously been determined with a degree of rigour that could help influence the future design and use of these assemblies.

Conformational flexibility and dynamics of the DNA-nanogold conjugates limit the structural determination by X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single-particle cryo-electron microscopic (cryo-EM) reconstruction because they do not crystallize, are not sufficiently small for nuclear magnetic resonance studies and cannot be classified into a limited number of classes for single-particle EM reconstruction. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) structure averaged from tens of thousands of different macromolecular particles obtained without prior knowledge of the macromolecular structural flexibility could result in an absence of flexible domains upon using the single-particle reconstruction method, for example, two ankyrin repeated regions of TRPV1 were absent in its atomic resolution 3D density map9.

A fundamental experimental solution to reveal the structure of a flexible macromolecule should be based on the determination of each individual macromolecule’s structure10. Electron tomography (ET) provides high-resolution images of a single object from a series of tilted viewing angles11. ET has been applied to reveal the 3D structure of a cell section and an individual bacterium at nanometre-scale resolution12. However, reconstruction from an individual macromolecule at an intermediate resolution (1–3nm) remains challenging due to small molecular weight and low image contrast. Although, the first 3D map of an individual macromolecule, a fatty acid synthetase molecule, was reconstructed from negative-staining (NS) ET by Hoppe et al.13, serious doubts have been raised regarding the validity of this structure14, as this molecule received a radiation dose hundreds of times greater than the reported damage threshold15. Recently, we investigated the possibility based on simulated and real experimental NS and cryo-ET images10. We showed that a single-protein 3D structure at an intermediate resolution (1–3nm) is potentially achieved using our proposed individual-particle ET (IPET) method10, 16, 17, 18. IPET, an iterative refinement process using automatically generated dynamic filters and soft masks, requires no pre-given initial model, class averaging or lattice, but can tolerate small tilt errors and large-scale image distortion via decreasing the reconstruction image size to reduce the negative effects on 3D reconstruction. IPET allows us to obtain a ‘snapshot’ single-molecule 3D structure of flexible proteins at an intermediate resolution, and can be even used to reveal the macromolecular dynamics and fluctuation17.

Here we use IPET, cryo-EM and our previously reported optimized NS (OpNS)19, 20 techniques to investigate the morphology and 3D structure of hybridized DNA-nanogold conjugates. These conjugates were self-assembled from a mixture of two monoconjugates, each consisting of 84-bp single-stranded DNA and a 5-nm nanogold particle. The dimers were separated by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and agarose gel electrophoresis as potential substrates in plasmon-coupling experiments. By OpNS-ET imaging and IPET 3D reconstruction, we reconstruct a total of 14 density maps at a resolution of ~2nm from 14 individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-nanogold conjugates. Using these maps as constraints, we derive 14 conformations of dsDNA by projecting a standard flexible dsDNA model onto the observed maps using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The variation of the conformations was largely consistent with that from liquid solution, and suggests that the IPET approach provides a most complete experimental determination of flexibility and fluctuation range of these directed nanocrystal assemblies to date. The general features revealed by this experiment can be expected to occur in a broad range of DNA-assembled nanostructures and flexible proteins.

 

Although the direct imaging of dsDNA has been previously reported using heavy metal shadowing32, 33 and NS methods34, 35, 36, to the best of our knowledge, the 3D structure of an individual dsDNA strand has not previously been achieved. It has been thought that individual dsDNA would be destroyed under the high energy of the electron beam before a 3D reconstruction, or even a 2D image, is able to be achieved. Our NS tilt images showing fibre-shaped dsDNA bridging two conjugated nanogold particles demonstrated that the dsDNA can in fact be directly visualized using EM, which is consistent with the recently reported single-molecule DNA sequencing technique via TEM36. The resolutions of our density maps ranged from ~14 to ~23Å, demonstrating that an intermediate-resolution 3D structure can be obtained for each individual macromolecule. This capability is consistent with our earlier report of a ~20-Å resolution 3D reconstruction of an individual IgG1 antibody using the same approach16, 17.

Notably, a total dose of ~2,000eÅ−2 used in our ET data acquisition is significantly above the limitation conventionally used in cryo-EM (~80–100eÅ−2), which can be suspected to have certain artefact from radiation damage. In cryo-EM, the radiation damage could cause sample bubbling, deformation and knockout effects; in NS, only the knockout phenomena is often observed, in which the protein is surrounded by heavy atoms that were kicked out by electron beam. Since the sample was coated with heavy metal atoms and were dried in air, the bubbling and deformation phenomena were not usually observed. The heavy metal atoms that coat the surface of the biomolecule can provide a much higher electron scattering than from a biomolecule only inside lighter atoms. The scattering is sufficiently high to provide enough image contrast at our 120-kV high tension; thus, a further increase to the scattering ability by reducing the high tension to 80kV may not be necessary for this NS sample. In addition, the heavy atoms can provide more radiation resistance and allow the sample to be imaged under a higher dose condition. The exact dose limitation for NS is still unknown. The radiation damage related artefact in NS samples is knockout, which could reduce the image contrast and lower the tilt image alignment accuracy and 3D reconstruction resolution. In our study, a total dose of 2,000eÅ−2 did not cause any obvious knockout phenomena, but provides a sufficiently high contrast for the otherwise barely visible DNA conformations in each tilt series. The direct confirmation of visible DNA in each tilt image is essentially important to us to validate each 3D reconstruction, especially considering this relatively new approach.

Our 3D reconstruction algorithm used an ab initio real-space reference-projection match iterative algorithm to correct the centres of each tilt images, in which the equal tilt angle step for 3D reconstruction of a low contrast and asymmetric macromolecule was used. This method is different from recently reported Fourier-based iterative algorithm, termed equally sloped tomography, in which the pseudo-polar fast Fourier transform, the oversampling method and internal lattice of a targeted nanoparticle are used to achieve 3D reconstruction at atomic resolution37.

It is generally challenging to achieve visualization and 3D reconstruction on an individual, small and asymmetric macromolecule by other conventional methods; our method demonstrated its capability for 3D reconstruction of 52kDa 84-bp dsDNA through these studies: IgG1 antibody 3D structural fluctuation17, peptide-induced conformational changes on flexible IgG1 antibody5, floppy liposome surface binding with 53-kDa proteins38, all of which suggest that this method could be used to serve the community as a novel tool for studying flexible macromolecular structures, dynamics and fluctuations of proteins, and for catching the intermediate 3D structure of protein assembling.

DNA-based self-assembling materials have been developed for use in materials science and biomedical research, such as DNA origami designed for targeted drug delivery. The structure, design and control require feedback from the 3D structure, which could validate the design hypothesis, optimize the synthesis protocol and improve the reproducible capability, while even providing insight into the mechanism of DNA-mediated assembly.

 

Printing Vascular Tissue

from Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

http://www.labtube.tv/video/printing-vascular-tissue

Printing vessel vasculature is essential for sustaining functional living tissues. Until now, bioengineers have had difficulty building thick tissues, lacking a method to embed vascular networks. A 3D bioprinting method invented at the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS embeds a grid of vasculature into thick tissue laden with human stem cells and connective matrix. Printed within a custom-made housing, this method can be used to create tissue of any shape. Once printed, an inlet and outlet own opposite ends are perfused with fluids, nutrients, and cell growth factors, which control stem cell differentiation and sustain cell functions. By flowing growth factors through the vasculature, stem cells can be differentiated into a variety of tissue cell types. This vascularized 3D printing process could open new doors to tissue replacement and engineering. Footage credit: David KA.S. Gladman, E. Matsumoto, L.K. Sanders, and J.A. Lewis / Wyss Institute at Harvard University For more information, please visit:

Scaling up tissue engineering

http://wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/250/

In this video, the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS team uses a customizable 3D bioprinting method to build a thick vascularized tissue structure comprising human stem cells, collective matrix, and blood vessel endothelial cells. Their work sets the stage for advancement of tissue replacement and tissue engineering techniques. Credit: Lewis Lab, Wyss Institute at Harvard University

view-source:https://player.vimeo.com/video/157497209

Bioprinting technique creates thick 3D tissues composed of human stem cells and embedded vasculature, with potential applications in drug testing and regenerative medicine

(CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts)  — A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has invented a method for 3D bioprinting thick vascularized tissue constructs composed of human stem cells, extracellular matrix, and circulatory channels lined with endothelial blood vessel cells. The resulting network of vasculature contained within these deep tissues enables fluids, nutrients and cell growth factors to be controllably perfused uniformly throughout the tissue. The advance is reported March 7 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“This latest work extends the capabilities of our multi-material bioprinting platform to thick human tissues, bringing us one step closer to creating architectures for tissue repair and regeneration,” says Wyss Core Faculty member Jennifer A. Lewis, Sc.D., senior author on the study, who is also the Hansörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at SEAS.

Three-dimensional bioprinting of thick vascularized tissues

David B. Koleskya,1Kimberly A. Homana,1Mark A. Skylar-Scotta,1, and Jennifer A. Lewisa,2     aSchool of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
PNAS  2016; 113(12): 3179–3184   http://dx.doi.org:/10.1073/pnas.1521342113

Significance

Current tissue manufacturing methods fail to recapitulate the geometry, complexity, and longevity of human tissues. We report a multimaterial 3D bioprinting method that enables the creation of thick human tissues (>1 cm) replete with an engineered extracellular matrix, embedded vasculature, and multiple cell types. These 3D vascularized tissues can be actively perfused with growth factors for long durations (>6 wk) to promote differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells toward an osteogenic lineage in situ. The ability to construct and perfuse 3D tissues that integrate parenchyma, stroma, and endothelium is a foundational step toward creating human tissues for ex vivo and in vivo applications.

The advancement of tissue and, ultimately, organ engineering requires the ability to pattern human tissues composed of cells, extracellular matrix, and vasculature with controlled microenvironments that can be sustained over prolonged time periods. To date, bioprinting methods have yielded thin tissues that only survive for short durations. To improve their physiological relevance, we report a method for bioprinting 3D cell-laden, vascularized tissues that exceed 1 cm in thickness and can be perfused on chip for long time periods (>6 wk). Specifically, we integrate parenchyma, stroma, and endothelium into a single thick tissue by coprinting multiple inks composed of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human neonatal dermal fibroblasts (hNDFs) within a customized extracellular matrix alongside embedded vasculature, which is subsequently lined with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). These thick vascularized tissues are actively perfused with growth factors to differentiate hMSCs toward an osteogenic lineage in situ. This longitudinal study of emergent biological phenomena in complex microenvironments represents a foundational step in human tissue generation.

The ability to manufacture human tissues that replicate the essential spatial (1), mechanochemical (2, 3), and temporal aspects of biological tissues (4) would enable myriad applications, including 3D cell culture (5), drug screening (6, 7), disease modeling (8), and tissue repair and regeneration (9, 10). Three-dimensional bioprinting is an emerging approach for creating complex tissue architectures (10, 11), including those with embedded vasculature (1215), that may address the unmet needs of tissue manufacturing. Recently, Miller et al. (15) reported an elegant method for creating vascularized tissues, in which a sacrificial carbohydrate glass is printed at elevated temperature (>100 °C), protectively coated, and then removed, before introducing a homogeneous cell-laden matrix. Kolesky et al. (14) developed an alternate approach, in which multiple cell-laden, fugitive (vasculature), and extracellular matrix (ECM) inks are coprinted under ambient conditions. However, in both cases, the inability to directly perfuse these vascularized tissues limited their thickness (1–2 mm) and culture times (<14 d). Here, we report a route for creating thick vascularized tissues (≥1 cm) within 3D perfusion chips that provides unprecedented control over tissue composition, architecture, and microenvironment over several weeks (>6 wk). This longitudinal study of emergent biological phenomena in complex microenvironments represents a foundational step in human tissue generation.

Central to the fabrication of thick vascularized tissues is the design of biological, fugitive, and elastomeric inks for multimaterial 3D bioprinting. To satisfy the concomitant requirements of processability, heterogeneous integration, biocompatibility, and long-term stability, we first developed printable cell-laden inks and castable ECM based on a gelatin and fibrinogen blend (16). Specifically, these materials form a gelatin–fibrin matrix cross-linked by a dual-enzymatic, thrombin and transglutaminase (TG), strategy (Fig. 1and SI Appendix, Fig. S1). The cell-laden inks must facilitate printing of self-supporting filamentary features under ambient conditions as well as subsequent infilling of the printed tissue architectures by casting without dissolving or distorting the patterned construct (Fig. 1A). The thermally reversible gelation of the gelatin–fibrinogen network enables its use in both printing and casting, where gel and fluid states are required, respectively (SI Appendix, Fig. S2). Thrombin is used to rapidly polymerize fibrinogen (17), whereas TG is a slow-acting Ca2+-dependent enzymatic cross-linker that imparts the mechanical and thermal stability (18) needed for long-term perfusion. Notably, the cell-laden ink does not contain either enzyme to prevent polymerization during printing. However, the castable matrix contains both thrombin and TG, which diffuse into adjacent printed filaments, forming a continuous, interpenetrating polymer network, in which the native fibrillar structure of fibrin is preserved (SI Appendix, Fig. S3). Importantly, our approach allows arbitrarily thick tissues to be fabricated, because the matrix does not require UV curing (19), which has a low penetration depth in tissue (20) and can be readily expanded to other biomaterials, including fibrin and hyaluronic acid (SI Appendix, Fig. S4).

 

Fig. 1.

Fig. 1.

Three-dimensional vascularized tissue fabrication. (A) Schematic illustration of the tissue manufacturing process. (i) Fugitive (vascular) ink, which contains pluronic and thrombin, and cell-laden inks, which contain gelatin, fibrinogen, and cells, are printed within a 3D perfusion chip. (ii) ECM material, which contains gelatin, fibrinogen, cells, thrombin, and TG, is then cast over the printed inks. After casting, thrombin induces fibrinogen cleavage and rapid polymerization into fibrin in both the cast matrix, and through diffusion, in the printed cell ink. Similarly, TG diffuses from the molten casting matrix and slowly cross-links the gelatin and fibrin. (iii) Upon cooling, the fugitive ink liquefies and is evacuated, leaving behind a pervasive vascular network, which is (iv) endothelialized and perfused via an external pump. (B) HUVECs growing on top of the matrix in 2D, (C) HNDFs growing inside the matrix in 3D, and (D) hMSCs growing on top of the matrix in 2D. (Scale bar: 50 µm.) (E and F) Images of printed hMSC-laden ink prepared using gelatin preprocessed at 95 °C before ink formation (E) as printed and (F) after 3 d in the 3D printed filament where actin (green) and nuclei (blue) are stained. (G) Gelatin preprocessing temperature affects the plateau modulus and cell viability after printing. Higher temperatures lead to lower modulus and higher HNDF viability postprinting. (H) Photographs of interpenetrated sacrificial (red) and cell inks (green) as printed on chip. (Scale bar: 2 mm.) (I) Top-down bright-field image of sacrificial and cell inks. (Scale bar: 50 µm.). (J–L) Photograph of a printed tissue construct housed within a perfusion chamber (J) and corresponding cross-sections (K and L). (Scale bars: 5 mm.)

To construct thick, vascularized tissues within 3D perfusion chips, we coprinted cell-laden, fugitive, and silicone inks (Fig. 1 H and I). First, the silicone ink is printed on a glass substrate and cured to create customized perfusion chips (Movie S1 and SI Appendix, Fig. S1). Next, the cell-laden and fugitive inks are printed on chip, and then encapsulated with the castable ECM (Fig. 1 J–L and Movie S2). The fugitive ink, which defines the embedded vascular network, is composed of a triblock copolymer [i.e., polyethylene oxide (PEO)–polypropylene oxide (PPO)–PEO]. This ink can be removed from the fabricated tissue upon cooling to roughly 4 °C, where it undergoes a gel-to-fluid transition (14, 23). This process yields a pervasive network of interconnected channels, which are then lined with HUVECs. The resulting vascularized tissues are perfused via their embedded vasculature on chip over long time periods using an external pump (Movie S3) that generates smooth flow over a wide range of flow rates (24).

http://static-movie-usa.glencoesoftware.com/webm/10.1073/609/83291359a6e4390b2232b577cb8c8742d967acef/pnas.1521342113.sm03.webm

Movie S3.

Fluorescent microscopy video of different perfusion rates through the embedded vasculature within the printed 3D tissue microenvironments.

http://www.pnas.org/content/113/12/3179/F2.medium.gif

Fig. 2.

Three-dimensional vascularized tissues remain stable during long-term perfusion. (A) Schematic depicting a single HUVEC-lined vascular channel supporting a fibroblast cell-laden matrix and housed within a 3D perfusion chip. (B and C) Confocal microscopy image of the vascular network after 42 d, CD-31 (red), vWF (blue), and VE-Cadherin (magenta). (Scale bars: 100 µm.) (D) Long-term perfusion of HUVEC-lined (red) vascular network supporting HNDF-laden (green) matrix shown by top-down (Left) and cross-sectional confocal microscopy at 45 d (Right). (Scale bar: 100 µm.) (E) Quantification of barrier properties imparted by endothelial lining of channels, demonstrated by reduced diffusional permeability of FITC-dextran. (F) GFP-HNDF distribution within the 3D matrix shown by fluorescent intensity as a function of distance from vasculature.

http://static-movie-usa.glencoesoftware.com/webm/10.1073/609/83291359a6e4390b2232b577cb8c8742d967acef/pnas.1521342113.sm04.webm

Movie S4.

Confocal microscopy video of cross-section through vascularized tissue after 45 d of perfusion.

To explore emergent phenomena in complex microenvironments, we created a heterogeneous tissue architecture (>1 cm thick and 10 cm3 in volume) by printing a hMSC-laden ink into a 3D lattice geometry along with intervening in- and out-of-plane (vertical) features composed of fugitive ink, which ultimately transform into a branched vascular network lined with HUVECs. After printing, the remaining interstitial space is infilled with an HNDF-laden ECM (Fig. 3A) to form a connective tissue that both supports and binds to the printed stem cell-laden and vascular features. In this example, fibroblasts serve as model cells that surround the heterogeneously patterned stem cells and vascular network. These model cells could be replaced with either support cells (e.g., immune cells or pericytes) or tissue-specific cells (e.g., hepatocytes, neurons, or islets) in future embodiments. The embedded vascular network is designed with a single inlet and outlet that provides an interface between the printed tissue and the perfusion chip. This network is symmetrically branched to ensure uniform perfusion throughout the tissue, including deep within its core. In addition to providing transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste materials, the perfused vasculature is used to deliver specific differentiation factors to the tissue in a more uniform manner than bulk delivery methods, in which cells at the core of the tissue are starved of factors (25). This versatile platform (Fig. 3A) is used to precisely control growth and differentiation of the printed hMSCs. Moreover, both the printed cellular architecture and embedded vascular network are visible macroscopically with this thick tissue (Fig. 3B).

Fig. 3.

Fig. 3.

Osteogenic differentiation of thick vascularized tissue. (A) Schematic depicting the geometry of the printed heterogeneous tissue within the customized perfusion chip, wherein the branched vascular architecture pervades hMSCs that are printed into a 3D lattice architecture, and HNDFs are cast within an ECM that fills the interstitial space. (B) Photographs of a printed tissue construct within and removed from the customized perfusion chip. (C) Comparative cross-sections of avascular tissue (Left) and vascularized tissue (Right) after 30 d of osteogenic media perfusion with alizarin red stain showing location of calcium phosphate. (Scale bar: 5 mm.) (D) Confocal microscopy image through a cross-section of 1-cm-thick vascularized osteogenic tissue construct after 30 d of active perfusion and in situ differentiation. (Scale bar: 1.5 mm.) (E) Osteocalcin intensity across the thick tissue sample inside the red lines shown in C. (F) High-resolution image showing osteocalcin (purple) localized within hMSCs, and they appear to take on symmetric osteoblast-like morphologies. (Scale bar: 100 µm.) After 30 d (Gand H), thick tissue constructs are stained for collagen-I (yellow), which appears to be localized near hMSCs. (Scale bars: 200 µm.) (I) Alizarin red is used to stain calcium phosphate deposition, and fast blue is used to stain AP, indicating tissue maturation and differentiation over time. (Scale bar: 200 µm.)

In summary, thick, vascularized human tissues with programmable cellular heterogeneity that are capable of long-term (>6-wk) perfusion on chip have been fabricated by multimaterial 3D bioprinting. The ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant, 3D tissue microenvironments enables the exploration of emergent biological phenomena, as demonstrated by observations of in situ development of hMSCs within tissues containing a pervasive, perfusable, endothelialized vascular network. Our 3D tissue manufacturing platform opens new avenues for fabricating and investigating human tissues for both ex vivo and in vivo applications.

 

Steve Dufourny Hello Mr Bernstein, it is relevant.I have a model with quantum sphères and spherical volumes correlated with my theory of spherisation in theoretical physics(in a very simple resume quant sphères…..spherisation encodings…….Cosmol sphères…….Universal sphères with a central BH)more two équations about matter and energy and sphères.The quantizations and properties can be computed.The adn, amino acids ,protiens INE ASE are the keys.I search the main gravitationalcodes.It is more far than our standard model in logic.Regards

 

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FDA Guidance On Source Animal, Product, Preclinical and Clinical Issues Concerning the Use of Xenotranspantation Products in Humans – Implications for 3D BioPrinting of Regenerative Tissue

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

The FDA has submitted Final Guidance on use xeno-transplanted animal tissue, products, and cells into human and their use in medical procedures. Although the draft guidance was to expand on previous guidelines to prevent the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases, this updated draft may have implications for use of such tissue in the emerging medical 3D printing field.

This document is to provide guidance on the production, testing and evaluation of products intended for use in xenotransplantation. The guidance includes scientific questions that should be addressed by sponsors during protocol development and during the preparation of submissions to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), e.g., Investigational New Drug Application (IND) and Biologics License Application (BLA). This guidance document finalizes the draft guidance of the same title dated February 2001.

For the purpose of this document, xenotransplantation refers to any procedure that involves the transplantation, implantation, or infusion into a human recipient of either (a) live cells, tissues, or organs from a nonhuman animal source, or (b) human body fluids, cells, tissues or organs that have had ex vivo contact with live nonhuman animal cells, tissues or organs. For the purpose of this document, xenotransplantation products include live cells, tissues or organs used in xenotransplantation. (See Definitions in section I.C.)

This document presents issues that should be considered in addressing the safety of viable materials obtained from animal sources and intended for clinical use in humans. The potential threat to both human and animal welfare from zoonotic or other infectious agents warrants careful characterization of animal sources of cells, tissues, and organs. This document addresses issues such as the characterization of source animals, source animal husbandry practices, characterization of xenotransplantation products, considerations for the xenotransplantation product manufacturing facility, appropriate preclinical models for xenotransplantation protocols, and monitoring of recipients of xenotransplantation products. This document recommends specific practices intended to prevent the introduction and spread of infectious agents of animal origin into the human population. FDA expects that new methods proposed by sponsors to address specific issues will be scientifically rigorous and that sufficient data will be presented to justify their use.

Examples of procedures involving xenotransplantation products include:

  • transplantation of xenogeneic hearts, kidneys, or pancreatic tissue to treat organ failure,
  • implantation of neural cells to ameliorate neurological degenerative diseases,
  • administration of human cells previously cultured ex vivo with live nonhuman animal antigen-presenting or feeder cells, and
  • extracorporeal perfusion of a patient’s blood or blood component perfused through an intact animal organ or isolated cells contained in a device to treat liver failure.

The guidance addresses issues such as:

  1. Clinical Protocol Review
  2. Xenotransplantation Site
  3. Criteria for Patient Selection
  4. Risk/Benefit Assessment
  5. Screening for Infectious Agents
  6. Patient Follow-up
  7. Archiving of Patient Plasma and Tissue Specimens
  8. Health Records and Data Management
  9. Informed Consent
  10. Responsibility of the Sponsor in Informing the Patient of New Scientific Information

A full copy of the PDF can be found below for reference:

fdaguidanceanimalsourcesxenotransplatntation

An example of the need for this guidance in conjunction with 3D printing technology can be understood from the below article (source http://www.geneticliteracyproject.org/2015/09/03/pig-us-xenotransplantation-new-age-chimeric-organs/)

Pig in us: Xenotransplantation and new age of chimeric organs

David Warmflash | September 3, 2015 | Genetic Literacy Project

Imagine stripping out the failing components of an old car — the engine, transmission, exhaust system and all of those parts — leaving just the old body and other structural elements. Replace those old mechanical parts with a brand new electric, hydrogen powered, biofuel, nuclear or whatever kind of engine you want and now you have a brand new car. It has an old frame, but that’s okay. The frame wasn’t causing the problem, and it can live on for years, undamaged.

When challenged to design internal organs, tissue engineers are taking a similar approach, particularly with the most complex organs, like the heart, liver and kidneys. These organs have three dimensional structures that are elaborate, not just at the gross anatomic level, but in microscopic anatomy too. Some day, their complex connective tissue scaffolding, the stroma, might be synthesized from the needed collagen proteins with advanced 3-D printing. But biomedical engineering is not there yet, so right now the best candidate for organ scaffolding comes from one of humanity’s favorite farm animals: the pig.

Chimera alarmists connecting with anti-biotechnology movements might cringe at the thought of building new human organs starting with pig tissue, but if you’re using only the organ scaffolding and building a working organ from there, pig organs may actually be more desirable than those donated by humans.

How big is the anti-chimerite movement?

Unlike anti-GMO and anti-vaccination activists, there really aren’t too many anti-chemerites around. Nevertheless, there is a presence on the web of people who express concern about mixing of humans and non-human animals. Presently, much of their concern is focussed on the growing of human organs inside non-human animals, pigs included. One anti-chemerite has written that it could be a problem for the following reason:

Once a human organ is grown inside a pig, that pig is no longer fully a pig. And without a doubt, that organ will no longer be a fully human organ after it is grown inside the pig. Those receiving those organs will be allowing human-animal hybrid organs to be implanted into them. Most people would be absolutely shocked to learn some of the things that are currently being done in the name of science.

The blog goes on to express alarm about the use of human genes in rice and from there morphs into an off the shelf garden variety anti-GMO tirade, though with an an anti-chemeric current running through it. The concern about making pigs a little bit human and humans a little bit pig becomes a concern about making rice a little bit human. But the concern about fusing tissues and genes of humans and other species does not fit with the trend in modern medicine.

Utilization of pig tissue enters a new age 

pigsinus

A porcine human ear for xenotransplantation. source: The Scientist

For decades, pig, bovine and other non-human tissues have been used in medicine. People are walking around with pig and cow heart valves. Diabetics used to get a lot of insulin from pigs and cows, although today, thanks to genetic engineering, they’re getting human insulin produced by microorganisms modified genetically to make human insulin, which is safer and more effective.

When it comes to building new organs from old ones, however, pig organs could actually be superior for a couple of reasons. For one thing, there’s no availability problem with pigs. Their hearts and other organs also have all of the crucial components of the extracellular matrix that makes up an organ’s scaffolding. But unlike human organs, the pig organs don’t tend to carry or transfer human diseases. That is a major advantage that makes them ideal starting material. Plus there is another advantage: typically, the hearts of human cadavers are damaged, either because heart disease is what killed the human owner or because resuscitation efforts aimed at restarting the heart of a dying person using electrical jolts and powerful drugs.

Rebuilding an old organ into a new one

How then does the process work? Whether starting with a donated human or pig organ, there are several possible methods. But what they all have in common is that only the scaffolding of the original organ is retained. Just like the engine and transmission of the old car, the working tissue is removed, usually using detergents. One promising technique that has been applied to engineer new hearts is being tested by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Detergents pumped into the aorta attached to a donated heart (donated by a human cadaver, or pig or cow). The pressure keeps the aortic valve closed, so the detergents to into the coronary arteries and through the myocardial (heart muscle) and endocardial (lining over the muscle inside the heart chambers) tissue, which thus gets dissolved over the course of days. What’s left is just the stroma tissue, forming a scaffold. But that scaffold has signaling factors that enable embryonic stem cells, or specially programed adult pleuripotent cells to become all of the needed cells for a new heart.

Eventually, 3-D printing technology may reach the point when no donated scaffolding is needed, but that’s not the case quite yet, plus with a pig scaffolding all of the needed signaling factors are there and they work just as well as those in a human heart scaffold. All of this can lead to a scenario, possibly very soon, in which organs are made using off-the-self scaffolding from pig organs, ready to produce a custom-made heart using stem or other cells donated by new organ’s recipient.

David Warmflash is an astrobiologist, physician, and science writer. Follow @CosmicEvolution to read what he is saying on Twitter.

And a Great Article in The Scientist by Dr. Ed Yong Entitled

Replacement Parts

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

By Ed Yong | August 1, 2012

Source: http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/32409/title/Replacement-Parts/

.. where Joseph Vacanti and David Cooper figured that using

“engineered pigs without the a-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene that produces the a-gal residues. In addition, the pigs carry human cell-membrane proteins such as CD55 and CD46 that prevent the host’s complement system from assembling and attacking the foreign cells”

thereby limiting rejection of the xenotransplated tissue.

In addition to issues related to animal virus transmission the issue of optimal scaffolds for organs as well as the advantages which 3D Printing would have in mass production of organs is discussed:

To Vacanti, artificial scaffolds are the future of organ engineering, and the only way in which organs for transplantation could be mass-produced. “You should be able to make them on demand, with low-cost materials and manufacturing technologies,” he says. That is relatively simple for organs like tracheas or bladders, which are just hollow tubes or sacs. Even though it is far more difficult for the lung or liver, which have complicated structures, Vacanti thinks it will be possible to simulate their architecture with computer models, and fabricate them with modern printing technology. (See “3-D Printing,” The Scientist, July 2012.) “They obey very ordered rules, so you can reduce it down to a series of algorithms, which can help you design them,” he says. But Taylor says that even if the architecture is correct, the scaffold would still need to contain the right surface molecules to guide the growth of any added cells. “It seems a bit of an overkill when nature has already done the work for us,” she says.

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BioP3 technology could be an alternative to bioprinting organs

Reported by: Irina Robu,PhD

Even though its still in the development stages, BioP3 may be the future of bioprinting human organs. It is being developed by a a team led by Jeffrey Morgan, Brown University bioengineer and Dr. Andrew Blakely, a surgery fellow at Rhode Island Hospital. The concept of the technology is inspired by the same method in which electronic devices are manufactured, where different components are selected and then carefully put in place to form a whole. In this case, those components are “microtissues” – microscopic structures composed of living tissue. These are manufactured using a micromolding technique developed by Morgan, in which various types of living cells can be made to self-assemble into predetermined shapes such as spheres, rods or honeycomb slabs.

Within the BioP3 device, which looks like a small, clear plastic box, a selection of microtissues is stored in a central chamber. A nozzle, connected to various tubes and a microscope-like stage, is used to pick them up one at a time via suction. An operator can then move each component precisely to where it needs to be, gradually building up a 3D biological structure. The microtissues are enclosed in liquid, and the plumbing within the nozzle creates fluid suction, allowing the nozzle to pick up, carry, and release the living microtisues without doing any damage to them.

Source

http://www.gizmag.com/biop3/35330/

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