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Live 2:30-4:30 PM  Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health:  October 19, 2018

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

2:30 Mediterranean Diet, Intangible Heritage and Sustainable Tourism?

Prof. Fabio Parasecoli, PhD.

 

 

Nutrition and Food Department, New York University

We focus on more of the cultural aspects and the relevance of this diet to tourism in Italy where there is a high rate of unemployment.  The diet is interesting from a touristic standpoint as the diet have the perspective of the different ingredients inherent in Italy.  The mediterranean diet food pyramid totally different than US.  How do we explain to consumers these medical concepts; for example in China, Germany they are using different ways to explain the benefits of this diet.

A Cultural Formation

  • a way of life, for tourism there is the way of life people want to adopt (easiest way to do this is go to the Mediterranean and learn the lifestyle)
  • so for example Olive Garden for marketing purposes sent a few chefs for half a day training so the image of learning to cook in the mediterranean diet style can be very powerful communicative tool
  • 2003 UNESCO Convention for Safeguarding the Culturing Heritage: protecting landscapes but then decided to protect other intangible heritage like oral, language, oral traditions like transmitting recipes, social and festive events (how do we cook how do we grow tomatoes, wheat etc)
  • UNESCO: promoted France Gastronomic, Mediterranean Diet, and traditional Mexican Cuisine (Mayan)
  • defined Greece, Italy, Morroco then included Cyprus Crotia and Portugal in the Mediterranean diet
  • has it been used for promotion: no UNESCO did not use this since does not safeguard the culture
  • (gastrodiplomacy); like Korea and kimchie; included in the list of cultural cuisine but can create tourist bubbles as you tourism places like hotels don’t always use; for reasons of economy or safety or accessibility , local food
  • Centrality of Territorio:  food consumed from tourist should come from the area

Sustainable Tourism: a form of tourism where have the intention to get to know the place;

have to think in three ways

  1. environmental
  2. social
  3. cultural

how do we make a circular economy so no waste; for example certain companies using food waste to make other products

Tourism clusters made of many groups; he is working on a way to jump start these networks in Nigeria;

Sustainable Food Supply Chain Tourism can be used as way to engage people and promote the diet

Question: are there regions where people are not adopting the diet because of taste, preferences

Yes there is always a problem with accessibility, affordability, trade issues and regional acceptance. For instance in Australia a big push back against the Mediterranean diet.  Medical professionals need to work with communication experts and media experts in developing ways to communicate the benefits since “no one wants to be preached at” and “as economies get richer people want to be more modern and try new things”

In Nigeria we are working with many different industries like transportation, engineers, the IT industry and chefs to build a scalable model

 

3.00 Italy as a Case Study: Increasing Students’ Level of Awareness of the Historical, Cultural, Political and Culinary Significance of Food

Prof. Lisa Sasson

Nutrition and Food Department, New York University

Started a program at NYU to understand food  from a nutritionist and historical point of view as a cultural heritage in Italy, but when students came back students mentioned it changed their food shopping habits

they described diet as wine, pasta, and olive oil

Artisional Production:  understanding the taste and flavor; she wanted them to learn about the food culture and educate their tastes

Food Memories: how we pass on recipes and food aromas, food tastes.  The students were experienced food in a unique way for the first time, experiencing what cheese, quality oil other foods when fresh tastes like.  Artisional foods may be expensive but need only a little of it because the tastes and flavors are so potent due to the phytochemicals

Within six months students:

  1. increased consumption of weekly wine consumption with meals
  2. increased consuming satisfying meals
  3. increased time consuming meals

In the womb the fetus is actually acquiring sense of taste (amniotic fluid changes with mother diet; can detect flavor chemicals)

Student Perceptions after a study Abroad Program

  • eating foods local and seasonal
  • replacing butter with quality olive oil
  • using herbs
  • very little sugar
  • unsweetened beverages
  • limiting red meats
  • fish a couple of times a week
  • dairy in moderation
  • no processed foods

Eating and Dining for Americans is a Challenge:  The students ate well and satisfying meals but ate alot but did not gain weight

3:30 Italian Migration and Global Diaspora

Dr. Vincenzo Milione, PhD

Director of Demographics Studies, Calandra Institute, City University of New York

for a PDF of this presentation please click heresbarro handout.

Dr. Millione used the U.S. Census Bureau Data to estimate the growth of the Italian diaspora descendants in host countries in the Americas and to determine the mixed global ancestry of Italian descendants.

  • Italian emigration to the US happened in two waves
  1.            Wave 1: early 1900 peaking between 1901 and 1911 (turn of century)
  2.            Wave 2: 1951-1971 (post WWII)

This pattern was similar between North and South America although South American had first Italian immigration; in 1860 we got rid of slavery so many jobs not filled new orleans

Developing a mathematical model of Italian diaspora: the model is centered on the host country population dynamics but descendants are separated into first generation and multi generation

Model dependent on:

  • birth and death rates
  • first generation population growth
  • multi generational population growth
  • emigration from host country over time

He was able to calculate an indices he termed Year of Italianization Change (YIC): the year the growth of the multi generation supercedes the first generation immigrant population 

Country Year of Italianlization Change (YIC)
Brazil 1911
Uruguay 1915
Argentina 1918
USA 1936
Venezuela 1963
Canada 1968
Australia 1988

 

note: as a result there is an increasing loss of language and traditional customs with host country cultural adaptation among the native born descendants

In addition, over the last 20 years Italian-American population growth demonstrates that Italian-American self-identity in the United States has increased.  The census data identified two ancestries of the respondent.  In mixed ancestry Italian-American respondents to the extent they identify Italian first demonstrating the strong Italian-American identity.

The foreign born Italian Americans mirror the immigration pattern of Italian immigration from Italy until 1980 where more Italian Americans self identify as foreign born in other countries and not in Italy

Summary

  • over 5 million Italians have emigrated from Italy from 1980 to present
  • most went to North and South America but many went to other global countries
  • the Italian immigration to the different countries in the Americas varies over the period of mass emigration when the growth of multi generational Italian descendants is greater then first generation Italians (Year of Italianization Change) goes from 1911 in Brazil to 1988 in Australia
  • Immigrants to the USA was not just from Italy but from almost all nations globally over all geographical continents
  • Italina immigrants descendants greatly grew after 1930 with appreciable increase with other ethnicities such that 61% of Italian Americans are mixed ancestry in 2014: to date mixed ancestry represents 98% of Italian Americans
  • younger italian americans more likely to have mixed ancestry with Central and South America, Asian and African ethnicities

over time during immigration eating habits has changed but more research is needed if and how the italian recipes and diet has changed as well

 

4:15 Conclusions

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

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Announcement 11AM- 5PM: Live Conference Coverage  from Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health @S.H.R.O. and Temple University October 19, 2018

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

 The Sbarro Health Research Organization, in collaboration with the Consulate General of Italy in Philadelphia will sponsor a symposium on the Mediterranean Diet and Human Health on October 19, 2018 at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA.  This symposium will discuss recent finding concerning the health benefits derived from a Mediterranean-style diet discussed by the leaders in this field of research.

Mediterranean Diet

The description of the Mediterranean Diet stems from the nutritionist Ancel Keys, who in 1945, in the wake of the US Fifth Army, landed in Southern Italy, where he observed one of the highest concentrations of centenarians in the world. He also noticed that cardiovascular diseases, widespread in the USA, were less frequent there. In particular, among the Southern Italians, the prevalence of “wellness” diseases such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, was particularly associated with fat consumption, suggesting that the main factor responsible for the observations was the type of diet traditionally consumed among people facing the Mediterranean Sea, which is low in animal fat, as opposed to the Anglo-Saxon diet. The link between serum cholesterol and coronary heart disease mortality was subsequently demonstrated by the Seven Countries Study. Later, the concept of Mediterranean Diet was extended to a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, fish and olive oil as the main source of lipid, shared among people living in Spain, Greece, Southern Italy and other countries facing the Mediterranean basin …

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

   

 

The Symposium will be held at:

Biolife Science Building, Room 234

Temple University, 1900 North 12th street

Philadelphia, PA 19122

 

For further information, please contact:

Ms. Marinela Dedaj – Sbarro Institute,  Office #: 215-204-9521

 

11:00 Welcome

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

Director and President of the Sbarro Health Research Organization, College of Science and Technology, Temple University

 

Greetings

Fucsia Nissoli Fitzgerald

Deputy elected in the Foreign Circumscription – North and Central America Division

 

Consul General, Honorable Pier Attinio Forlano

General Consul of Italy in Philadelphia

 

11:30 The Impact of Environment and Life Style in Human Disease

Prof. Antonio Giordano MD, PhD.

 

12.00 The Italian Mediterranean Diet as a Model of Identity of a People with a Universal Good to Safeguard Health?

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

Director of the School of Specialization in Clinical Nutrition, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”

 

12:30 Environment and Health

Dr. Iris Maria Forte, PhD.

National Cancer Institute “Pascale” Foundation | IRCCS · Department of Research, Naples, Italy

 

13:00 Lunch

 

2:30 Mediterranean Diet, Intangible Heritage and Sustainable Tourism?

Prof. Fabio Parasecoli, PhD.

Nutrition and Food Department, New York University

 

3.00 Italy as a Case Study: Increasing Students’ Level of Awareness of the Historical, Cultural, Political and Culinary Significance of Food

Prof. Lisa Sasson

Nutrition and Food Department, New York University

 

3:30 Italian Migration and Global Diaspora

Dr. Vincenzo Milione, PhD

Director of Demographics Studies, Calandra Institute, City University of New York

 

4:00 Pasta Arte: New Model of Circular Agricultural Economy: When an Innovated Tradition Takes Care of You and of the Environment

Dr. Massimo Borrelli

CEO and Founder of Arte

 

4:15 Conclusions

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

 

Coordinator of the Symposium, Dr. Alessandra Moia, PhD.

 

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

Professor of Molecular Biology at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA where he is also Director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine. He is also Professor of Pathology at the University of Siena, Italy. He has published over 500 articles, received over 40 awards for his contributions to cancer research and is the holder of 17 patents.

 

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

Full Professor of Human Nutrition and Director of the Specialization School in Food Science at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. He is the Coordinator of the Specialization Schools in Food Science at the National University Council and Coordinator of the PhD. School of “Applied Medical-Surgical Sciences” Director of UOSD “Service of Clinical Nutrition, Parenteral Therapy and Anorexia”. He also serves as President of “Istituto Nazionale per la Dieta Mediterranea e la Nutrigenomica”.

 

Dr. Iris Maria Forte, PhD.

Iris Maria Forte is an oncology researcher of INT G. Pascale Foundation of Naples, Italy. She majored in Medical Biotechnology at the “Federico II” University of Naples, earned a PhD. in “Oncology and Genetics” at the University of Siena in 2012 and a Master of II level in “Environment and Cancer” in 2014. Iris Maria Forte has worked with Antonio Giordano’s group since 2008 and her research interests include both molecular and translational cancer research. She published 21 articles mostly focused in understanding the molecular basis of human cancer. She worked on different kinds of human solid tumors but her research principally focused on pleural mesothelioma and on cell cycle deregulation in cancer.

 

Prof. Fabio Parasecoli, PhD.

Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies. He has a Doctorate in Agricultural Sciences (Dr.sc.agr.) from Hohenheim University, Stuttgart (Germany), MA in Political Sciences from the Istituto Universitario Orientale, Naples (Italy), BA/MA in Modern Foreign Languages and Literature from the Università La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). His research explores the intersections among food, media, and politics. His most recent projects focus on Food Design and the synergies between Food Studies and design.

 

Prof. Lisa Sasson, MS

Dietetic Internship Director and a Clinical Associate Professor in the department. She has interests in dietetic education, weight and behavior management, and problem-based learning. She also is a private practice nutritionist with a focus on weight management. She serves as co-director of the Food, Nutrition and Culture program in Florence Italy, the New York State Dietetic Association and the Greater New York Dietetic Association (past president and treasurer).

 

Dr. Vincenzo Milione, PhD.

Director of Demographic Studies for The John D. Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College, City University of New York. He has conducted social science research on Italian Americans. His research has included the educational and occupational achievements; Italian language studies at the elementary and secondary levels, high school non-completion rates; negative media portrayals of ethnic populations including migration studies and global diaspora.

 

Dr. Massimo Borrelli

Agricultural entrepreneur, Manager of the Italian Consortium for Biogas (CIB) and delegate for the Bioeconomy National Department of Confagricoltura. He developed A.R.T.E based on a model of agricultural circular economy, beginning and ending in the ground. He constructed the first biogas plant in the territory creating a new way to make agriculture, investing in research and development, experimentation and most of all, in people. In a few short years, he succeeded to close the production chain producing goods characterized by their high quality and usage of renewable energy.

 

Dr. Alessandra Moia, PhD.

Vice-President for Institutional and International Relations of the Istituto Nazionale per la Dieta Mediterranea e la Nutrigenomica (I.N.D.I.M.). Has managed relations with the academic institutions to increase awareness and develops projects for the diffusion of the Mediterranean Diet. She served as Director of Finance for the National Institute of Nutrition, for the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

 

About the Sbarro Health Research Organization

The Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO) is non-profit charity committed to funding excellence in basic genetic research to cure and diagnose cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and other chronic illnesses and to foster the training of young doctors in a spirit of professionalism and humanism. To learn more about the SHRO please visit www.shro.org

To follow or Tweet on Twitter please use the following handles (@) and hashtags (#):

@ handles


@S_H_R_O 

@SbarroHealth

@Pharma_BI 

@ItalyinPhilly

@WHO_Europe

@nutritionorg

# hashtags


#healthydiet

#MediterraneanDiet

#health

#nutrition

Please see related articles on Live Coverage of Previous Meetings on this Open Access Journal

Real Time Conference Coverage for Scientific and Business Media: Unique Twitter Hashtags and Handles per Conference Presentation/Session

LIVE – Real Time – 16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of Presentations on 11/16 – 11/17, 2016, The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

What’s Up with the Mediterranean Diet?

Why Heart Doctors Love It

 

Most of us have heard about the Mediterranean diet, which has generated interest from both the media and the medical community as the gold standard in healthy eating. But what’s all the fuss about – is this diet really worth all the attention?

The answer is yes, according toMurray Mittleman, MD, DrPH, a physician in the CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Director of the Master’s in Public Health program at Harvard Medical School, and Director of cardiovascular epidemiological research at BIDMC.

“The Mediterranean diet is a very healthy eating style that has been shown to improve cardiovascular risk factors – even for patients with established heart disorders,” Mittleman says.

What is the Mediterranean Diet?

While most healthy diets include produce, whole grains, and fish, the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle offer subtle differences that may reduce the risk for heart disease, while making it easier to stick to healthy eating habits.

According to the American Heart Association, traditional Mediterranean diets have the following characteristics in common:

  • High consumption of fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts and grains
  • Use of olive oil rather than saturated fats like butter, lard, and cottonseed, palm and coconut oils
  • Low to moderate consumption of dairy, eggs, fish and poultry
  • Very little red meat
  • Wine in low-to-moderate amounts

The Diet’s “Discovery”

Originating from the culture and traditional foods found in the area bordering the Mediterranean Sea, this diet first drew the attention of the American scientist Ancel Keys, who was stationed in Italy during World War II. Keys became convinced that middle-aged American men were experiencing heart attacks due to their diets and lifestyles. After conducting studies in the U.S., he began to work with researchers overseas in the first cross-cultural comparison of males and heart attack risk in what is known as the Seven Countries Study.

Starting in 1958, the Seven Countries Study followed 11,579 men, 40 to 59 years of age, in four regions of the world (United States, Northern Europe, Southern Europe and Japan). This study found that men in Southern Europe were far less likely to experience coronary deaths than those in the U.S. and Northern Europe. The study also began to identify the eating pattern known as the Mediterranean diet and its protective benefits.

Since then, “additional research has continued to show the beneficial effects of the diet,” says Mittleman. “The Lyon Diet Heart Study, conducted in the 1990s in France, showed that those who followed the Mediterranean Diet for three years had significantly fewer additional heart attacks and a 76 percent reduction in cardiovascular deaths compared to the control group.”

How Does it Work?

Murray A. Mittleman, MD, DrPH

The Mediterranean diet is a combination of many healthy choices that work together to promote good health, according to Mittleman.

“There is a low intake of refined carbs and very little processed food, which is an important distinction that also lowers fat and salt content,” he explains. “There is more variety in fruit and vegetable consumption, and portions are smaller than those commonly found in the U.S.”

Understanding how and why the Mediterranean diet works involves looking at each of the components that make up this particular style of eating.

Healthy Fats

The Mediterranean diet does not focus on limiting total fat consumption, but it does avoid the use of saturated fats and hydrogenated oils (trans fats), which both contribute to heart disease.

Most of the fat calories in a Mediterranean diet come from “good” or monounsaturated fats, mainly from olive oil and also from nuts.

“These plant-based fats don’t raise blood cholesterol levels the way saturated fat does,” says Mittleman. “In fact, monounsaturated fats actually help reduce LDL cholesterol levels when used in place of saturated or trans fats.”

Monounsaturated fats such as olive, canola, sesame, sunflower and corn oils contain alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid from plant sources. Omega-3 fatty acids lower triglycerides, moderate blood pressure, decrease blood clotting and improve the health of your blood vessels.

Light Protein Sources

Fish is frequently on the menu of the Mediterranean diet, and red meat is rarely served. Light in calories, fish is a beneficial substitute for meat-heavy Western cuisine, which is higher in unhealthy saturated fat. In addition, fish such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

Other plant-based protein sources, such as beans and nuts, also predominate in this style of eating. These vegetable protein sources are also light on saturated fat, helping to keep cholesterol and blood pressure in check.

Plenty of Produce

A wide variety of fruits and vegetables play an important role in the Mediterranean diet, and include fresh salads, greens sautéed in garlic and olive oil, soups, and vegetarian pasta dishes.

Fruits, such as melon, often serve as dessert, rather than the sweetened, high-fat concoctions that Western-style dining offers. Baked sweets are generally reserved for holidays or special occasions. Fresh produce provides phytonutrients that prevent and repair damage to cells and protect blood vessels. In addition, the added fiber in the diet slows the release of glucose in the blood stream, which is an important way to help prevent or control diabetes.

A Little Wine

Kenneth J. Mukamal, MD, MPH

The Mediterranean diet typically includes a small amount of wine. While red wine has antioxidant properties, the amount, frequency and style of enjoying wine is what makes this an important part of Mediterranean dining, according toDr. Kenneth J. Mukamal, an internist and cardiovascular researcher at BIDMC.

Mukamel served as lead researcher in a BIDMC study that linked the heart benefits of alcohol to the frequency of drinking. The study, which investigated 38,000 men over a 12-year period, was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in January 2003.

“The study confirmed that people who have one drink a day have the lowest rate of heart disease compared with non-drinkers or heavy drinkers,” says Mukamal. “It doesn’t seem to be the type of alcohol that matters; it’s the frequency. Individuals who drink a little bit three to-seven days a week are at lowest risk. There’s also evidence that alcohol consumed with meals — which is typical in the Mediterranean diet — is safest, providing a more gradual increase in blood alcohol levels.”

How much alcohol is appropriate? The American Heart Association recommends up to one drink a day for women and one to two drinks a day for men. Examples of one drink include 4 ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer, or 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits (80 proof).

Mukamal cautions that for some people, such as those who have or are at risk for breast cancer or hepatitis C, regular consumption of alcohol may not be advisable.

“It’s a complex mixture of potential risks and benefits, so it’s always worth a discussion with your doctor to be sure that drinking small amounts of alcohol is right for your situation,” he says.

Taking the Mediterranean Route

The incidence of heart disease and deaths in Mediterranean countries is lower than in the United States, but such statistics may not be entirely dependent upon diet. The Mediterranean diet is part of a lifestyle in which exercise, such as walking, is frequent. Families and friends gather to enjoy meals and each other’s company. And the pace of living seems less frenetic than elsewhere.

But you don’t have to go to Rome to live as the Romans do. With some planning and attention to diet and lifestyle, you can bring the flavor and health benefits of the Mediterranean into your own life.

The changes aren’t as severe as you might think. Here are some steps that can get you moving in the right direction:

  • Take a half-hour walk each day.
  • Use olive oil instead of butter or margarine.
  • Increase servings of fresh veggies and fruits – aim for at least seven per day.
  • Eat fish and poultry and minimize or eliminate red meat.
  • Aim for several meatless meals each week, incorporating legumes as a protein source when possible.
  • Use fresh herbs and spices to flavor food instead of salt.
  • Avoid foods that are processed, high in fat, or contain trans or saturated fat.
  • Have a small glass of wine with dinner, if your doctor agrees.
  • Invite your family and friends to join you!

“The Mediterranean diet is very sustainable and livable,” says Mittleman. “There’s a lot of variety for your palate and it’s easy to maintain. The heart-health benefits will pay you back for a lifetime.”

Above content provided by the CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. For advice about your medical care, consult your doctor.

Posted October 2012

http://bidmc.org/CentersandDepartments/Departments/CardiovascularInstitute/CVINewsletter/MediterraneanDiet.aspx

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