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Trans-apical Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient with Severe and Complex Left Main Coronary Artery Disease (LMCAD)

Writer: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Significant, defined as a greater than 50 percent narrowing, left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD) is found in 4 to 6 percent of all patients who undergo coronary arteriography [1]. When present, it is associated with multivessel coronary artery disease (MVCAD) about 70 percent of the time [2,3].

Most patients are symptomatic and at high risk of cardiovascular events, since occlusion of this vessel compromises flow to at least 75 percent of the left ventricle, unless it is protected by collateral flow or a patent bypass graft to either the left anterior descending or circumflex artery. Studies performed before revascularization with coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) became the standard of care revealed a poor prognosis for these patients, with three-year survival as low as 37 percent [4]. CABG, when directly compared to medical therapy, is associated with significantly better cardiovascular outcomes, including mortality [5].

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting has generally been restricted to such patients considered inoperable or at high risk for CABG, or with prior CABG and at least one patent graft to the left anterior descending or circumflex artery (so-called “protected” left main disease). Graft patency is important in this setting in the event of acute or late closure after PCI. However, evidence is increasing to support the use of PCI with stenting in some cases. (See ‘PCI versus CABG’ below.)

Asymptomatic patients with left main lesions felt to not be hemodynamically significant should be managed with preventative therapies. Patients with anginal symptoms attributable to lesions elsewhere should be managed with therapies similar to those used in other patients with coronary artery disease. (See “Overview of the care of patients with stable ischemic heart disease”.)

This topic will discuss most aspects of the management of patients with LMCAD. The approach to patients with multivessel coronary artery disease without LMCAD is discussed elsewhere. (See “Bypass surgery versus percutaneous intervention in the management of stable angina pectoris: Recommendations”.)

http://www.uptodate.com/contents/management-of-left-main-coronary-artery-disease

 

Management of significant left main coronary disease before and after trans-apical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe and complex arterial disease.

Source

Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York.

Abstract

We report the case of an 81-year-old woman with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, extremely significant peripheral arterial disease, and obstructive coronary artery disease who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention via a transaxillary conduit immediately before a trans-apical transcatheter aortic valve replacement performed with a transfemoral device. After deployment of the transcatheter heart valve, there was a left main coronary obstruction and the patient required an emergent PCI. This multifaceted case clearly underlines the importance of a well functioning heart team including the interventional cardiologist, the cardiovascular surgeon, and the echocardiographer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

This is an interesting surgical case presented by the Columbia University Cardiovascular Surgery team, illustrating the importance of combined team skills in the most difficult of cases.  It is part of a series on cardiovascular surgery.

Management of significant left main coronary disease before and after trans-apical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe and complex arterial disease.

Paradis JM, George I, and Kodali S
Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions  (2013)

Introduction

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve (THV) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvin, CA) has been shown to reduce mortality when compared to medical therapy alone for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis deemed unsuitable for surgical aortic valve replacement due to multiple co-morbidities. The Edwards SAPIEN THV, sizes 23 and 26 mm, and the RetroFlex 3 transfemoral delivery system, have been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for commercial use outside of the PARTNER clinical trial for patients considered inoperable.  However, an alternative site needs to be selected for patients with peripheral arteries inadequate for transfemoral TAVR.  Although not fully validated, the transapical approach or the transaortic route using a balloon expandable THV,  appears to be appropriate for this specific purpose.  Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) is often found in patients with severe aortic stenosis. in > 50% of patients with aortic stenosis over 70 years of age and in > 65% of patients who are  over 80 years of age. There is no established guideline for managing significant CAD in the context of TAVR, including the appropriate revascularization strategy as well as the timing of interventions.

Case Report

An 81-year-old woman  presented with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, extremely significant peripheral arterial disease, and obstructive coronary artery disease. She had a six-month history prior to admission of progressive exertional shortness of breath and fatigue, and a long history fo hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and severe peripheral vascular disease.  In 2003, she underwent a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, with grafting of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, a saphenous vein graft (SVG) to the first obtuse marginal (OM) branch, and a SVG to the right coronary artery (RCA). Due to associated severe mitral regurgitation, a mitral valve ring annuloplasty was also performed. A transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed severe aortic stenosis with a peak gradient across the aortic valve of 63 mm Hg, a mean gradient of 39 mm Hg, and an aortic valve area of 0.8 cm2.  The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 64% while the pulmonary artery systolic pressure was measured at 28 mm Hg.  Extreme calcification and tortuosity precluded the advancement of any wire, catheter, or sheath, contributing to two attempts at cardiac catheterization prior to transfer with a total occlusion of the distal abdominal aorta, at the level of the aorto-iliac bifurcation, and the left main, proximal LAD, proximal left circumflex, and the proximal RCA all had greater than 70% coronary lesions. In addition, ostial total occlusions were seen in both SVGs.
left main coronary artery
After transfer, a cardiac catheterization through the right radial artery was attempted without success due to calcification and tortuosity in the arterial bed.  An 80% distal left main lesion was clearly identified with a Judkins left 3.5 guiding catheter.  There was non-flow limiting coronary disease in the left circumflex and competitive retrograde flow seen in the LIMA graft, but they still were unable to cannulate the RCA and the SVGs. It was determined that the patient was inoperable, on grounds of her significant frailty, reoperative status and overall comorbid state (Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk score of 11%). Furthermore, due to the occlusion of the distal aorta, the patient was unsuitable for a TAVR via the transfemoral approach.
They chose to approach her PCI via a conduit on the right axillary artery and perform a concomitant TAVR from a trans-apical approach due to the serious limiting condition of the patient.  She underwent percutaneous coronary intervention via a transaxillary conduit immediately before a trans-apical transcatheter aortic valve replacement performed with a transfemoral device.  Excellent flow from the conduit was noted. A 7 French (Fr) sheath was connected to the end of the conduit, which was kept long to allow better maneuverability (Fig. 1). A Rosen wire was passed with some difficulty to the aortic root, and was switched to a stiff wire in an attempt to straighten the vessel.
PowerPoint Presentation
Fig. 1. Transaxillary conduit used during the procedure. A 7 French sheath was connected to an 8 mm dacron graft, which was previously sewn to the axillary artery.
After deployment of the transcatheter heart valve, there was a left main coronary obstruction and the patient required an emergent PCI.  This multifaceted case clearly underlines the importance of a well functioning heart team including the interventional cardiologist, the cardiovascular surgeon, and the echocardiographer. A Xience
V everolimus eluting stent 3.5 mm  18 mm was implanted starting 2 mm distal to the ostium of the left main, extending in the proximal portion of the left circumflex artery. After one post-dilatation with a non-compliant balloon, the final angiographic result was excellent.
They used a Retroflex 3 transfemoral delivery sheath to perform the trans-apical TAVR. They estimated the size and length of the ventricular cavity, and then placed markers on the delivery sheath (prior to insertion) indicating the appropriate length of sheath to remain outside the heart (Fig. 2).
PowerPoint Presentation
Fig. 2. Marker placed on the RetroFlex 3 transfemoral sheath to safely guide its insertion inside the left ventricular cavity during the trans-apical transcatheter aortic valve replacement.
A 23 mm Edwards SAPIEN valve was selected and deployed under fluoroscopic and transesophageal echocardiographic guidance. Immediately after deployment, turbulent flow was noted within the left main with the color Doppler on TEE, indicating a new obstruction of the left main, which a left coronary angiogram showed to be a severe proximal lesion.  Through the trans-axillary conduit, a  guiding catheter was laboriously brought in the ascending aorta and cannulated the left main artery which permitted a predilation and a stent insertion in the ostial portion of the left main.  She was discharged to a rehabilitation facility 7 days after the procedure.
On follow-up TTE, the LVEF was 55% without any significant wall motion abnormality. There was no aortic regurgitation, and the peak and mean gradients were 14.9 mm Hg and 8.0 mm Hg, respectively. The patient is still doing well more than 6 months after the procedure. She is now in NYHA class 2 and has not had any recurrent hospitalization for congestive heart failure.
Discussion
This report is a case of a complex percutaneous coronary intervention of the left main coronary artery via a right axillary conduit followed immediately by an off label commercial transapical TAVR using the Retro-Flex 3 trans-femoral introducer sheath, complicated finally by a new left main coronary obstruction mandating another PCI. It is the first description of a TAVR procedure preceded and followed by a left main trans-axillary PCI. The role of TEE (color Doppler) in the diagnosis of a very rare TAVR complication is also noteworthy. In a recent meta-analysis of 3,519 patients from 16 studies using the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) definitions, the pooled estimate rate of coronary
obstruction following TAVR was only 0.7%. Obviously, the early recognition and treatment of this hazard is imperative.
The surgical management of this patient also warrants discussion. The hybrid surgical approach of accessing the axillary artery via a conduit provides numerous advantages:
(1) the ascending aorta, coronaries, and aortic valve are easily accessible;
(2) transition to cardiopulmonary bypass or extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation, if needed, is quick; and
(3) long-term morbidity is minimal for the patient when compared to aorto-iliac, aortic, or femoral conduits.
Finally, the heart team approach not only allowed the realization of a difficult coronary
stent implantation through an unusual transaxillary graft followed by a transapical TAVR in a patient with significant peripheral arterial disease, but also permitted the early  recognition and management of a potentially fatal left main obstruction. Considerations such as team-based care, close communication between the different specialties
involved and careful planning for outlining management of potential complications are therefore essential for the success of a TAVR program.

REFERENCES

 1. Leon MB, Smith CR, Mack M, Miller DC, Moses JW, Svensson LG, et al. Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation for aortic stenosis in patients who cannot undergo surgery. N Engl J Med 2010;363:1597–1607.
2. Iung B. Interface between valve disease and ischaemic heart disease. Heart 2000;84:347–352.
3. Wenaweser P, Pilgrim T, Guerios E, Stortecky S, Huber C, Khattab AA, et al. Impact of coronary artery disease and percutaneous coronary intervention on outcomes in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.
EuroIntervention 2011;7:541–548.
4. Genereux P, Head SJ, Van Mieghem NM, Kodali S, Kirtane AJ, Xu K, et al. Clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement using valve academic research consortium definitions: A weighted meta-analysis of 3,519 patients from 16 studies.
J Am Coll Cardiol 2012;59:2317–2326.
Three coronary artery bypass grafts, a LIMA to...

Three coronary artery bypass grafts, a LIMA to LAD and two saphenous vein grafts – one to the right coronary artery (RCA) system and one to the obtuse marginal (OM) system. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

heart with coronary arteries

heart with coronary arteries (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Micrograph of an artery that supplies the hear...

Micrograph of an artery that supplies the heart with significant atherosclerosis and marked luminal narrowing. Tissue has been stained using Masson’s trichrome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Other Related articles on this topic published on this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, include the following:

Investigational Devices: Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Valve Transapical Deployment

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN 6/6/2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/04/investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-heart-valve/

Lev-Ari, A. 2/12/2013 Clinical Trials on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to be conducted by American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/12/american-college-of-cardiologys-and-the-society-of-thoracic-surgeons-entrance-into-clinical-trials-is-noteworthy-read-more-two-medical-societies-jump-into-clinical-trial-effort-for-tavr-tech-f/

Lev-Ari, A. 8/13/2012 Coronary Artery Disease – Medical Devices Solutions: From First-In-Man Stent Implantation, via Medical Ethical Dilemmas to Drug Eluting Stents https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/13/coronary-artery-disease-medical-devices-solutions-from-first-in-man-stent-implantation-via-medical-ethical-dilemmas-to-drug-eluting-stents/

Lev-Ari, A. 7/18/2012 Percutaneous Endocardial Ablation of Scar-Related Ventricular Tachycardia

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/18/percutaneous-endocardial-ablation-of-scar-related-ventricular-tachycardia/

Lev-Ari, A. 6/22/2012 Competition in the Ecosystem of Medical Devices in Cardiac and Vascular Repair: Heart Valves, Stents, Catheterization Tools and Kits for Open Heart and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/competition-in-the-ecosystem-of-medical-devices-in-cardiac-and-vascular-repair-heart-valves-stents-catheterization-tools-and-kits-for-open-heart-and-minimally-invasive-surgery-mis/

Lev-Ari, A. 6/19/2012 Executive Compensation and Comparator Group Definition in the Cardiac and Vascular Medical Devices Sector: A Bright Future for Edwards Lifesciences Corporation in the Transcatheter Heart Valve Replacement Market

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/19/executive-compensation-and-comparator-group-definition-in-the-cardiac-and-vascular-medical-devices-sector-a-bright-future-for-edwards-lifesciences-corporation-in-the-transcatheter-heart-valve-replace/

Lev-Ari, A. 6/22/2012 Global Supplier Strategy for Market Penetration & Partnership Options (Niche Suppliers vs. National Leaders) in the Massachusetts Cardiology & Vascular Surgery Tools and Devices Market for Cardiac Operating Rooms and Angioplasty Suites

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/global-supplier-strategy-for-market-penetration-partnership-options-niche-suppliers-vs-national-leaders-in-the-massachusetts-cardiology-vascular-surgery-tools-and-devices-market-for-car/

 We reported on the following Medical Devices News:

Lev-Ari A. 4/6/2012.  Investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-heart-valve. 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/04/investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-heart-valve/

Cardiac Surgery Theatre in China vs. in the US: Cardiac Repair Procedures, Medical Devices in Use, Technology in Hospitals, Surgeons’ Training and Cardiac Disease Severity”    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/08/cardiac-surgery-theatre-in-china-vs-in-the-us-cardiac-repair-procedures-medical-devices-in-use-technology-in-hospitals-surgeons-training-and-cardiac-disease-severity/

Acute Chest Pain/ER Admission: Three Emerging Alternatives to Angiography and PCI    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/10/acute-chest-painer-admission-three-emerging-alternatives-to-angiography-and-pci/

FDA Pending 510(k) for The Latest Cardiovascular Imaging Technology
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/28/fda-pending-510k-for-the-latest-cardiovascular-imaging-technology/

PCI Outcomes, Increased Ischemic Risk associated with Elevated Plasma Fibrinogen not Platelet Reactivity
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/10/pci-outcomes-increased-ischemic-risk-associated-with-elevated-plasma-fibrinogen-not-platelet-reactivity/

The ACUITY-PCI score: Will it Replace Four Established Risk Scores — TIMI, GRACE, SYNTAX, and Clinical SYNTAX
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/03/the-acuity-pci-score-will-it-replace-four-established-risk-scores-timi-grace-syntax-and-clinical-syntax/

Coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients referred for coronary angiography: Predicted by Serum Protein Profiles
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/29/coronary-artery-disease-in-symptomatic-patients-referred-for-coronary-angiography-predicted-by-serum-protein-profiles/

Ablation Devices Market to 2016 – Global Market Forecast and Trends Analysis by Technology, Devices & Applications
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/23/ablation-devices-market-to-2016-global-market-forecast-and-trends-analysis-by-technology-devices-applications/

Heart Renewal by pre-existing Cardiomyocytes: Source of New Heart Cell Growth Discovered
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/23/heart-renewal-by-pre-existing-cardiomyocytes-source-of-new-heart-cell-growth-discovered/

To Stent or Not? A Critical Decision
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/23/to-stent-or-not-a-critical-decision/

Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement for Inoperable Severe Aortic Stenosis

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/03/transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-for-inoperable-severe-aortic-stenosis/

New Definition of MI Unveiled, Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR)CT for Tagging Ischemia

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/27/new-definition-of-mi-unveiled-fractional-flow-reserve-ffrct-for-tagging-ischemia/

New Drug-Eluting Stent Works Well in STEMI
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/new-drug-eluting-stent-works-well-in-stemi/

Expected New Trends in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medical Devices
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/17/expected-new-trends-in-cardiology-and-cardiovascular-medical-devices/

Read Full Post »


Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR): Postdilatation to Reduce Paravalvular Regurgitation During TAVR with a Balloon-expandable Valve

Reviewer: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

This report is one in a series on advances in cardiovascular surgery.  This report particularly focuses on the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a major study carried out at Columbia University Medical Center, involving reduction of paravalvular regurgitation post TAVI.

Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2013 Feb;6(1):85-91. doi: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.112.971614. Epub 2013 Jan 22.

Efficacy and safety of postdilatation to reduce paravalvular regurgitation during balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Daneault BKoss EHahn RTKodali SWilliams MRGénéreux PParadis JMGeorge IReiss GRMoses JWSmith CRLeon MB.

Source

Columbia University Medical Center/New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) is common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and may be associated with adverse outcomes. Postdilatation (PD) has been proposed to treat PVR without being formally studied. We performed a study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PD after balloon expandable TAVR.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Consecutive cases of TAVR were reviewed for clinical outcomes. Procedural transesophageal echocardiography imaging was reviewed for a subgroup of consecutive patients. PVR areas seen on a short-axis view were measured immediately after deployment, after PD, and at the completion of the study. Stent dimensions measured using angiography and the Paieon’s C-THV system pre- and post-PD were compared. Between May 2007 and November 2011, 259 patients underwent TAVR at our institution. PD was performed in 106 patients (41%). These patients had larger annulus, lower cover-index; more often had transfemoral access and implantation of a 26 mm valve. There was a nonsignificant greater rate of cerebrovascular events in PD patients. There was no significant difference in major aortic injury and permanent pacemaker implantation rates between groups. TTE studies were reviewed in 58 patients (35 with PD and 23 without PD). PD patients had larger PVR areas immediately after deployment (40.3±17.1 versus 15.4±14.2 mm(2); P<0.0001). There was significant reduction in PVR area attributable to PD (21.7±9.3 mm(2); P<0.0001). Spontaneous regression of PVR was seen in both groups. PD increased stent dimensions.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates the efficacy of PD at reducing PVR in patients with greater than mild PVR after balloon-expandable TAVR.

PMID: 23339841

Efficacy and Safety of Postdilatation to Reduce Paravalvular Regurgitation During Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

Daneault R, Koss E, Hahn RT, Kodali S, Williams MR, et al.
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2013;6:85-91. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/circinterventions.112.971614

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a new alternative treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis, who are at high risk or deemed inadequate candidates for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement. Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) is common after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) reported in 80% to 96% of TAVR cases Moreover, moderate and severe degrees of regurgitation are associated with worse clinical outcomes While the risk factors are known and include: smaller cover index, annulus eccentricity, and the degree and distribution of leaflet calcifications, postdilatation (PD) of balloon expandable valves after implantation, including transcatheter heart valve (THV) traumatic aorta injury, cerebrovascular embolus, and conduction block may outweigh the potential benefits from reduction in aortic regurgitation. Therefore, these investigators performed a study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PD after balloon expandable TAVR.

What Is Known

• Significant paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associatedwith increased mortality.
• Calcifications, undersized prosthesis, and malposition are causes of paravalvular regurgitation.

Study Design

Procedural and in-hospital outcomes for all consecutive patients treated between May 2007 and November 2011 with Edwards SAPIEN THV (Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA) as part of the PARTNER and PARTNER 2 trials were reviewed both prospectively and retrospectively. Information on PD was collected retrospectively from chart and imaging review for the period between 2007 and August 2010, and prospectively after August 2010. PD was performed in cases where PVR was qualitatively more than mild, by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), immediately after THV implantation. There were 259 patients who underwent TAVR. PD was performed in 106 patients (41%). Procedural transesophageal echocardiography imaging was reviewed for a subgroup of consecutive patients. PVR areas seen on a short-axis view were measured immediately after deployment, after PD, and at the completion of the study. Stent dimensions measured using angiography and the Paieon’s C-THV system pre- and post-PD were compared, and TTE studies were reviewed in 58 patients (35 with PD and 23 without PD).

Endpoints

Neurological events were defined using valve academic research consortium definitions.14 Cover-index is defined as: 100×([THV diameter–TEE annulus diameter]/THV diameter).3 Clinical end points for the current analysis included 30-day mortality, in-hospital stroke or transient ischemic attack, procedural related major aortic injury (aortic dissection, aortic wall hematoma, or annulus/aortic rupture) and need for new permanent pacemaker during the index hospitalization. Echocardiographic end points included spontaneous reduction of PVR [difference between PVR1 and PVR3 in the non-PD group (PD−) and difference between PVR2 and PVR3 in the PD group (PD+)], and reduction of PVR attributable to PD
(PVR1−PVR2) in the PD+. Angiographic end points included additional expansion of IF, OF, and minimal diameters of stents after PD.

Results and Clinical Outcomes

No valve embolization occurred during PD. No patient required implantation of a second THV after PD. Multiple PD was performed in 4 cases. There was no statistically significant
difference between the 2 groups in the incidence of neurological events, although they were more frequent in patients with PD. Permanent pacemaker implantation during the index hospitalization was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Major aortic injuries were rare and occurred at a similar rate between both groups with no aortic annulus rupture in either group.

These (PD) patients had larger annulus, lower cover-index; more often had transfemoral access and implantation of a 26 mm valve. There was a nonsignificant greater rate of cerebrovascular events in PD patients. There was no significant difference in major aortic injury and permanent pacemaker implantation rates between groups.
PD patients had larger PVR areas immediately after deployment (40.3±17.1 versus 15.4±14.2 mm2; P<0.0001). There was significant reduction in PVR area attributable to PD (21.7±9.3 mm2; P<0.0001). Spontaneous regression of PVR was seen in both groups.
PD increased stent dimensions. There was a significant increase in the OF, IF, and minimal diameters after PD of 26 mm valves. The changes were not statistically significant for the 23 mm valves. There was a greater expansion in the IF and OF diameters compared with the minimal diameter.

Discussion

This study is the second that demonstrates the efficacy of PD at reducing postdeployment PVR in patients with greater than mild PVR after balloon-expandable TAVR. Moreover, judicious use of PD for greater than mild PVR is not associated with excess morbidity or mortality, although some concerns regarding cerebral embolism deserve comment. When it occurs, PVR is a significant cause of nonstructural prosthetic valve dysfunction. The anatomic positioning and resultant physiology of THV, however, are different from surgical valves. After surgical aortic valve replacement, most commonly PVR is attributable to infection, suture dehiscence, or fibrosis and calcification of the native annulus, resulting in inadequate contact or gaps between the sewing ring and annulus. Because THVs do not have a sewing ring traditional dehiscence cannot occur. For balloon-expandable THV, significant PVR most commonly results from incomplete prosthesis apposition to the native annulus.

What the Study Adds

• Additional postdilatation can reduce the magnitude of paravalvular regurgitation.
• Spontaneous regression of paravalvular regurgitation occurs within minutes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.
• Postdilatation may be associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular events.

Other TAVR related articles published on this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

Lev-Ari, A. 2/12/2013 Clinical Trials on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to be conducted by American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/12/american-college-of-cardiologys-and-the-society-of-thoracic-surgeons-entrance-into-clinical-trials-is-noteworthy-read-more-two-medical-societies-jump-into-clinical-trial-effort-for-tavr-tech-f/

  

Lev-Ari, A. 8/13/2012 Coronary Artery Disease – Medical Devices Solutions: From First-In-Man Stent Implantation, via Medical Ethical Dilemmas to Drug Eluting Stents https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/13/coronary-artery-disease-medical-devices-solutions-from-first-in-man-stent-implantation-via-medical-ethical-dilemmas-to-drug-eluting-stents/

 

Lev-Ari, A. 7/18/2012 Percutaneous Endocardial Ablation of Scar-Related Ventricular Tachycardia

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/18/percutaneous-endocardial-ablation-of-scar-related-ventricular-tachycardia/

 

Lev-Ari, A. 6/22/2012 Competition in the Ecosystem of Medical Devices in Cardiac and Vascular Repair: Heart Valves, Stents, Catheterization Tools and Kits for Open Heart and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/competition-in-the-ecosystem-of-medical-devices-in-cardiac-and-vascular-repair-heart-valves-stents-catheterization-tools-and-kits-for-open-heart-and-minimally-invasive-surgery-mis/

Lev-Ari, A. 6/19/2012 Executive Compensation and Comparator Group Definition in the Cardiac and Vascular Medical Devices Sector: A Bright Future for Edwards Lifesciences Corporation in the Transcatheter Heart Valve Replacement Market

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/19/executive-compensation-and-comparator-group-definition-in-the-cardiac-and-vascular-medical-devices-sector-a-bright-future-for-edwards-lifesciences-corporation-in-the-transcatheter-heart-valve-replace/

 

Lev-Ari, A. 6/22/2012 Global Supplier Strategy for Market Penetration & Partnership Options (Niche Suppliers vs. National Leaders) in the Massachusetts Cardiology & Vascular Surgery Tools and Devices Market for Cardiac Operating Rooms and Angioplasty Suites

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/global-supplier-strategy-for-market-penetration-partnership-options-niche-suppliers-vs-national-leaders-in-the-massachusetts-cardiology-vascular-surgery-tools-and-devices-market-for-car/

 We reported on the following Medical Devices News:

Cardiac Surgery Theatre in China vs. in the US: Cardiac Repair Procedures, Medical Devices in Use, Technology in Hospitals, Surgeons’ Training and Cardiac Disease Severity”    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/08/cardiac-surgery-theatre-in-china-vs-in-the-us-cardiac-repair-procedures-medical-devices-in-use-technology-in-hospitals-surgeons-training-and-cardiac-disease-severity/

Acute Chest Pain/ER Admission: Three Emerging Alternatives to Angiography and PCI    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/10/acute-chest-painer-admission-three-emerging-alternatives-to-angiography-and-pci/

FDA Pending 510(k) for The Latest Cardiovascular Imaging Technology
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/28/fda-pending-510k-for-the-latest-cardiovascular-imaging-technology/

PCI Outcomes, Increased Ischemic Risk associated with Elevated Plasma Fibrinogen not Platelet Reactivity
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English: This is a video clip from a living, b...

English: This is a video clip from a living, beating pig heart that was prepared in the laboratory as a working Langendorf preparation. The heart was arrested, connected to the perfusion system and restarted. The working fluid was oxygenated balanced saline solution. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Phonocardiograms from normal and abno...

English: Phonocardiograms from normal and abnormal heart sounds (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement for Inoperable Severe Aortic Stenosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement for Inoperable Severe Aortic Stenosis

Raj R. Makkar, M.D., Gregory P. Fontana, M.D., Hasan Jilaihawi, M.D., Samir Kapadia, M.D., Augusto D. Pichard, M.D., Pamela S. Douglas, M.D., Vinod H. Thourani, M.D., Vasilis C. Babaliaros, M.D., John G. Webb, M.D., Howard C. Herrmann, M.D., Joseph E. Bavaria, M.D., Susheel Kodali, M.D., David L. Brown, M.D., Bruce Bowers, M.D., Todd M. Dewey, M.D., Lars G. Svensson, M.D., Ph.D., Murat Tuzcu, M.D., Jeffrey W. Moses, M.D., Matthew R. Williams, M.D., Robert J. Siegel, M.D., Jodi J. Akin, M.S., William N. Anderson, Ph.D., Stuart Pocock, Ph.D., Craig R. Smith, M.D., and Martin B. Leon, M.D. for the PARTNER Trial Investigators

N Engl J Med 2012; 366:1696-1704 May 3, 2012

Background

Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is the recommended therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable candidates for surgery. The outcomes beyond 1 year in such patients are not known.

Methods

We randomly assigned patients to transfemoral TAVR or to standard therapy (which often included balloon aortic valvuloplasty). Data on 2-year outcomes were analyzed.

Results

A total of 358 patients underwent randomization at 21 centers. The rates of death at 2 years were 43.3% in the TAVR group and 68.0% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001), and the corresponding rates of cardiac death were 31.0% and 62.4% (P<0.001). The survival advantage associated with TAVR that was seen at 1 year remained significant among patients who survived beyond the first year (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.92; P=0.02 with the use of the log-rank test). The rate of stroke was higher after TAVR than with standard therapy (13.8% vs. 5.5%, P=0.01), owing, in the first 30 days, to the occurrence of more ischemic events in the TAVR group (6.7% vs. 1.7%, P=0.02) and, beyond 30 days, to the occurrence of more hemorrhagic strokes in the TAVR group (2.2% vs. 0.6%, P=0.16). At 2 years, the rate of rehospitalization was 35.0% in the TAVR group and 72.5% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001). TAVR, as compared with standard therapy, was also associated with improved functional status (P<0.001). The data suggest that the mortality benefit after TAVR may be limited to patients who do not have extensive coexisting conditions. Echocardiographic analysis showed a sustained increase in aortic-valve area and a decrease in aortic-valve gradient, with no worsening of paravalvular aortic regurgitation.

Conclusions

Among appropriately selected patients with severe aortic stenosis who were not suitable candidates for surgery, TAVR reduced the rates of death and hospitalization, with a decrease in symptoms and an improvement in valve hemodynamics that were sustained at 2 years of follow-up. The presence of extensive coexisting conditions may attenuate the survival benefit of TAVR. (Funded by Edwards Lifesciences; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00530894.)

Supported by Edwards Lifesciences.

Disclosure forms provided by the authors are available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.

This article (10.1056/NEJMoa1202277) was published on March 26, 2012, and updated on August 30, 2012, at NEJM.org.

Source Information

From Cedars–Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles (R.R.M., H.J., R.J.S.); Lenox Hill Heart and Vascular Institute (G.P.F.) and Columbia University Medical Center and New York Presbyterian Hospital (S. Kodali, J.W.M., M.R.W., C.R.S., M.B.L.) — both in New York; Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland (S. Kapadia, L.G.S., M.T.); Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (A.D.P.); Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (P.S.D.); Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta (V.H.T., V.C.B.), University of British Columbia and St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada (J.G.W.); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (H.C.H., J.E.B.); Baylor Healthcare System (D.L.B., B.B.) and Medical City Dallas (T.M.D.) — both in Dallas; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA (J.J.A., W.N.A.); and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (S.P.).

Address reprint requests to Dr. Leon at Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, 161 Fort Washington Ave., 6th Fl., New York, NY 10032, or at mleon@crf.org.

The investigators, institutions, and research organizations participating in the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNERS) trial are listed in the Supplementary Appendix, available at NEJM.org.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1202277

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Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): risk for stroke and suitability for surgery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/07/transcatheter-aortic-valve-implantation-tavi-risky-and-costly-2/

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