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Posts Tagged ‘cancer deaths’


State of the art in oncologic imaging of lungs.

Author-Writer: Dror Nir, PhD

 This is the second post in a series in which I will address the state of the art in oncologic imaging based on a review paper; Advances in oncologic imaging that provides updates on the latest approaches to imaging of 5 common cancers: breast, lung, prostate, colorectal cancers, and lymphoma. This paper is published at CA Cancer J Clin 2012. © 2012 American Cancer Society.

The paper gives a fair description of the use of imaging in interventional oncology based on literature review of more than 200 peer-reviewed publications.

In this post I summaries the chapter on lung cancer imaging.

Lung Cancer Imaging

“Lung cancer remains the most common cause of death from cancer worldwide, having resulted in 1.38 million deaths (18.2% of all cancer deaths) in 2008.48 It also represents the leading cause of death in smokers and the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the United States. In 2012, it was estimated that 226,160 new cases of lung cancer would be diagnosed (accounting for about 14% of cancer diagnoses) and that lung cancer would cause 160,340 deaths (about 29% of cancer deaths in men and 26% of cancer deaths in women) in the United States.1 The 1-year relative survival rate for the disease increased from 35% to 43% from 1975 through 1979 to 2003 through 2006.49 The 5-year survival rate is 53% for disease that is localized when first detected, but only 15% of lung cancers are diagnosed at this early stage.”

For cancer with such poor survival rates removal of the primary lesion by surgery at an early-stage disease is the best option. The current perception in regards to lung cancr is that patients may have subclinical disease for years before presentation. It is also known that early lung cancer lesions; adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) are slow-growing, doubling time which can exceed 2 years.52 But, since at present, no lung cancer early-detection biomarker is clinically available, the diagnosis of this disease is primarily based on symptoms, and detection often occurs after curative intervention and when it’s already too late – see: Update on biomarkers for the detection of lung cancer and also Diagnosing lung cancer in exhaled breath using gold nanoparticles. Until biomarker is found, the burden of screening for this disease is on imaging.

“AIS and MIA generally appear as a single peripheral ground-glass nodule on CT. A small solid component may be present if areas of alveolar collapse or fibroblastic proliferation are present,5051 but any solid component should raise concern for a more invasive lesion (Fig. 8). Growth over time on imaging can often be difficult to assess due to the long doubling time of these AIS and MIA, which can exceed 2 years.52 However, indicators other than growth, such as air bronchograms, increasing density, and pleural retraction within a ground-glass nodule are suggestive of AIS or MIA.

CT image shows a ground glass nodule, which is the typical appearance of AIS, in the right upper lobe.

CT image shows a ground glass nodule, which is the typical appearance of AIS, in the right upper lobe.

 

CT (A) demonstrated extensive consolidation with air bronchograms in the left upper lobe, which at surgical resection were found to represent adenocarcinoma of mixed subtype with predominate (70%) mucinous bronchioloalveolar subtype. PET imaging in the same patient (B) demonstrated uptake in the lingula higher than expected for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and probably due to secondary inflammation/infection. CT (C) obtained 3 years after images (A) and (B) demonstrated biopsy-proven recurrent soft-tissue mass near surgical site. Fused FDG/PET images (D) demonstrate no uptake in the area. This finding is consistent with the decreased uptake usually seen in tumors of bronchioloalveolar histology (new terminology of MIA).

CT (A) demonstrated extensive consolidation with air bronchograms in the left upper lobe, which at surgical resection were found to represent adenocarcinoma of mixed subtype with predominate (70%) mucinous bronchioloalveolar subtype. PET imaging in the same patient (B) demonstrated uptake in the lingula higher than expected for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma and probably due to secondary inflammation/infection. CT (C) obtained 3 years after images (A) and (B) demonstrated biopsy-proven recurrent soft-tissue mass near surgical site. Fused FDG/PET images (D) demonstrate no uptake in the area. This finding is consistent with the decreased uptake usually seen in tumors of bronchioloalveolar histology (new terminology of MIA).

In August 2011 the results of the “National Lung Screening Trial “ which was funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were published in NEJM; Reduced Lung-Cancer Mortality with Low-Dose Computed Tomographic Screening. This randomized study results showed that with low-dose CT screening of high-risk persons, there was a significant reduction of 20% in the mortality rate from lung cancer as compared to chest radiographs screening.

Based on these results one can find the following information regarding Lung Cancer Screening on the NCI web-site:

Three screening tests have been studied to see if they decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer.

The following screening tests have been studied to see if they decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer:

  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • Sputum cytology: Sputum cytology is a procedure in which a sample of sputum (mucus that is coughed up from the lungs) is viewed under a microscope to check for cancer cells.
  • Low-dose spiral CT scan (LDCT scan): A procedure that uses low-dose radiation to make a series of very detailed pictures of areas inside the body. It uses an x-ray machine that scans the body in a spiral path. The pictures are made by a computer linked to the x-ray machine. This procedure is also called a low-dose helical CT scan.

Screening with low-dose spiral CT scans has been shown to decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer in heavy smokers.

A lung cancer screening trial studied people aged 55 years to 74 years who had smoked at least 1 pack of cigarettes per day for 30 years or more. Heavy smokers who had quit smoking within the past 15 years were also studied. The trial used chest x-rays or low-dose spiral CT scans (LDCT) scans to check for signs of lung cancer.

LDCT scans were better than chest x-rays at finding early-stage lung cancer. Screening with LDCT also decreased the risk of dying from lung cancer in current and former heavy smokers.

Guide is available for patients and doctors to learn more about the benefits and harms of low-dose helical CT screening for lung cancer.

Screening with chest x-rays or sputum cytology does not decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer.

Chest x-ray and sputum cytology are two screening tests that have been used to check for signs of lung cancer. Screening with chest x-ray, sputum cytology, or both of these tests does not decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer.

The authors of Advances in oncologic imaging found out that for pre-treatment staging and post treatment follow-up of lung cancer patients mainly involves CT (preferably contrast enhanced, FDG PET and PET/CT. “Integrated PET/CT has been found to be more accurate than PET alone, CT alone, or visual correlation of PET and CT for staging NSCLC (Non-small-cell lung carcinoma).59 “

The standard treatment of choice for localized disease remains surgical resection with or without chemo-radiation therapy (stage dependant). “The current recommendations for routine follow-up after complete resection of NSCLC are as follows: for 2 years following surgery a contrast-enhanced chest CT scan every 4 to 6 months and then yearly non-contrast chest CT scans.62 Detection of recurrence on CT is the primary goal in the initial years, and therefore, optimally, a contrast-enhanced scan should be obtained to evaluate the mediastinum. In subsequent years, when identifying an early second primary lung cancer becomes of more clinical importance, a non-contrast CT chest scan suffices to evaluate the lung parenchyma.

CT (A) of 78-year-old male who was status post–left lobe lobectomy and left upper lobe wedge resection shows recurrent nodule at the surgical resection site. Fused PET/CT (B) demonstrates increased [18F]FDG uptake in the corresponding nodule at the surgical resection site consistent with recurrent tumor.

CT (A) of 78-year-old male who was status post–left lobe lobectomy and left upper lobe wedge resection shows recurrent nodule at the surgical resection site. Fused PET/CT (B) demonstrates increased [18F]FDG uptake in the corresponding nodule at the surgical resection site consistent with recurrent tumor.

In patients undergoing chemotherapies: “ [18F]FDG PET response correlates with histologic response.63 [18F]FDG PET scan data can provide an early readout of response to chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage lung cancer.64

In patients treated by recently developed “Targeted Therapies” such as Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) the authors found out that PET/CT is the preferred imaging modality for post treatment follow-up.

“ Most patients treated with pulmonary ablation will have had a pre-procedure CT or a fusion PET/CT scan, which allows more precise anatomic localization of abnormalities seen on PET. Generally, either CT or PET/CT is performed within a few weeks of the procedure to provide a new baseline to which future images can be compared to assess for changes in size, degree of enhancement or [18F]FDG avidity.67

CT (A) demonstrates new left upper lobe mass representing new primary NSCLC in a patient who had a status post–right pneumonectomy for a prior NSCLC. CT (B) obtained in the same patient 2 weeks after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) demonstrates the postablation density in the left upper lobe. Fused PET/CT (C) obtained 4 months after RFA demonstrates mild [18F]FDG uptake at RFA site in the left upper lobe consistent with posttreatment inflammation. Fused PET/CT (D) obtained 7 months after RFA demonstrates new focal [18F]FDG uptake at post-RFA-opacity consistent with recurrent tumor.

CT (A) demonstrates new left upper lobe mass representing new primary NSCLC in a patient who had a status post–right pneumonectomy for a prior NSCLC. CT (B) obtained in the same patient 2 weeks after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) demonstrates the postablation density in the left upper lobe. Fused PET/CT (C) obtained 4 months after RFA demonstrates mild [18F]FDG uptake at RFA site in the left upper lobe consistent with posttreatment inflammation. Fused PET/CT (D) obtained 7 months after RFA demonstrates new focal [18F]FDG uptake at post-RFA-opacity consistent with recurrent tumor.

Prostate Cancer Imaging

To be followed…

Other research papers related to the management of Lung cancer were published on this Scientific Web site:

Diagnosing lung cancer in exhaled breath using gold nanoparticles

Lung Cancer (NSCLC), drug administration and nanotechnology

Non-small Cell Lung Cancer drugs – where does the Future lie?

Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Lung Cancers

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