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Posts Tagged ‘Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics’


Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

German firm Alacris Theranostics today announced a deal with GlaxoSmithKline for the application of Alacris’ Modcell System for drug stratification.

The technology, which was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics and is licensed exclusively to Alacris, will be used by GSK for early stage cancer drug discovery. GSK will provide Alacris with preclinical biology data from a cancer drug discovery project. Alacris will apply its systems biology model to determine the in silico effect of the inhibitor in its “virtual clinical trial,” and then suggest cancer cell lines, as well as cancers, that may be likely responders to the inhibitor.

The process will be based on whole-genome and transcriptome data integrated in Alacris’ cancer model ModCell.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Based in Berlin, Alacris develops personalized medicine approaches directed at cancer. Its ModCell approach is based on next-generation sequencing and kinetic pathway information, as well as mutation and drug databases.

SOURCE:

http://www.genomeweb.com//node/1153161?hq_e=el&hq_m=1408239&hq_l=2&hq_v=e1df6f3681

 

What is the strategy of the Competition

Foundation Medicine, AstraZeneca to ID Genetic Mutations for Cancer Drug Development

November 12, 2012

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Foundation Medicine today announced a deal with AstraZeneca aimed at predicting a patient’s response or resistance to targeted medicines.

The firms are partnering to identify genomic mutations in cancer-related tumor genes that may prove helpful to AstraZeneca in developing new therapies for patients. Foundation Medicine also was granted right of first negotiation for developing potential diagnostic products.

According to Susan Galbraith, vice president and head of the AstraZeneca Oncology Innovative Medicines Unit, the collaboration will allow the drug firm to “identify tumor-specific defects and alterations that can be used for patient segmentation.”

Financial and other terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

“We are helping companies like AstraZeneca achieve deeper insight into their programs and trials with our unique cancer expertise and our ability to provide genomic information that can impact clinical treatment decisions,” Michael Pellini, president and CEO of Foundation Medicine, said in a statement. “Together, we expect to enable a more individualized, targeted approach to cancer drug development and clinical trials.”

The partnership is the most recent in a string of deals that Cambridge, Mass.-based Foundation Medicine has forged in recent months with drug firms. It follows a collaboration with Eisai last month, Clovis Oncologyin August, and Novartis in June.

SOURCE:

Life Tech to Partner with Bristol-Myers Squibb for CDx Development

September 17, 2012

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Life Technologies said today that it would collaborate with Bristol-Myers Squibb to develop companion diagnostics. Initially, the companies will partner on an oncology project with the option to expand collaborative efforts across a range of disease areas.

Life Tech will utilize a variety of its technology platforms including both next-generation and Sanger sequencing instruments, qPCR, flow cytometry, and immuno-histochemistry.

“The pharmaceutical industry is increasingly turning its focus to discovering and delivering targeted, personalized medications,” Life Tech’s President of Medical Sciences, Ronnie Andrews, said in a statement. “As more and more targeted drugs come onto the market in the next decade, there will be a growing need for diagnostics that can help predict which patients will benefit from which drugs.”

The agreement is part of Life Tech’s strategy to expand and develop its diagnostic business through both internal development and also partnerships and acquisitions.

Internally, the company has said that it plans to build out its medical sciences business across multiple technologies and develop assays across five disease areas: oncology, inherited disease, neurological disorders, transplant diagnostics, and infectious diseases.

In addition, in July it acquired direct-to-consumer genomic testing company Navigenics, which gave Life Tech access to its CLIA certified laboratory.

SOURCE:

http://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/life-tech-partner-bristol-myers-squibb-cdx-development

 

Life Tech, Boston Children’s Hospital to Develop Sequencing Workflows on Ion Proton in CLIA Lab

June 20, 2012

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Life Technologies said today that it will collaborate with Boston Children’s Hospital to develop next-generation sequencing workflows in a CLIA and CAP certified laboratory.

As part of the collaboration, the hospital plans to purchase Life Tech’s Ion Proton, a benchtop, semiconductor sequencing machine.

David Margulies, director of the Gene Partnership Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, said in statement that the deal is an “important first step toward providing informed, personalized care for patients whose conditions are difficult to treat.”

The deal is Life Tech’s second announced this week to develop sequencing protocols for the Ion Proton in collaboration with a children’s hospital. Earlier this week, it said it would work with the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, which has launched a new Centre for Genetic Medicine and plans to install four Proton machines.

Paul Billings, Life Tech’s chief medical officer, commented in a statement that these kinds of partnerships are “essential to our medical sciences strategy as we seek to assist researchers in discovering improved diagnostics and treatments for genetic conditions.”

In a separate announcement today, Life Tech said that it is collaborating with the University of North Texas Health Science Center’s Institute of Applied Genetics to use the firm’s Ion Personal Genome Machine system to further the center’s forensic DNA research. Life Tech said that it will collaborate with the center to train forensic analysts in applying next-gen sequencing to their research.

Foundation Medicine, Novartis Ink New Deal for Clinical Oncology Programs

June 07, 2012

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Foundation Medicine today said it and Novartis have reached a new agreement to use Foundation’s clinical grade, next-generation sequencing to support the drug firm’s clinical oncology programs.

The three-year agreement builds on a 2011 deal between the firms and calls for the use of Foundation Medicine’s molecular information platform across many of Novartis’ Phase 1 and Phase 2 oncology clinical programs. The initial collaboration generated “very interesting” data, and this type of tumor genomic profiling has become an important part of Novartis’ clinical trials, Foundation Medicine said.

Foundation Medicine’s sequencing capabilities allow for the rapid analysis of hundreds of cancer-related genes from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples, and earlier this year its laboratory in Cambridge, Mass., gained Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments certification. Novartis plans to use the technology to align clinical trial enrollment and outcome analysis with the genomic profile of patient tumors, accelerating the development of Novartis’ portfolio of targeted cancer therapeutics and expanding treatment options for patients.

Foundation Medicine added that it may develop additional diagnostic products from the partnership.

“The comprehensive molecular assessment of Novartis’ Oncology clinical trial samples is expected to help to bring potentially lifesaving therapies to the right patients more quickly, and we expect that the wealth of molecular information will help fundamentally improve the way cancer is understood and treated,” Michael Pellini, president and CEO of Foundation Medicine, said in a statement.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

SOURCE:

Carestream Teams with Beatson Institute on Molecular Imaging Efforts

May 14, 2012
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Carestream Molecular Imaging announced today that it will collaborate with the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research on preclinical imaging approaches in oncology.

The partners will use Carestream’s Alibri trimodal imaging system, which combines PET, SPECT, and CT modalities in one platform. The system is being used by the Beatson Institute in its research into cancer cell behavior, as well as the development of new therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic tools.

The Beatson Institute, which is a core-funded institute of Cancer Research UK and is based in Glasgow, Scotland, said the Carestream technology would be used by its own researchers, as well as its close collaborators including the West of Scotland Cancer Center.

“The combination of PET, SPECT, and CT technologies in one instrument provides investigators at our institutions the flexibility to support research programs across many areas of cancer research such as biomarker, theranostics, and drug development,” Kurt Anderson, research professor and director of the Beatson Advanced Imaging Resource, said in a statement.

 

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