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Posts Tagged ‘female reproductive system’


Reproductive Genetic Dx | Nov. 18-19 | Boston, MA
Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.
Reproductive Genetic Diagnostics
Advances in Carrier Screening, Preimplantation Diagnostics, and POC Testing
November 18-19, 2015  |  Boston, MA
healthtech.com/reproductive-genetic-diagnosticsMount Sinai Hospital’s Dr. Tanmoy Mukherjee to Present at Reproductive Genetic Diagnostics ConferenceTanmoy MukherjeePodcastNumerical Chromosomal Abnormalities after PGS and D&C
Tanmoy Mukherjee, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Mount Sinai Hospital
This review provides an analysis of the most commonly identified numerical chromosome abnormalities following PGS and first trimester D&C samples in an infertile population utilizing ART. Although monosomies comprised >50% of all cytogenetic anomalies identified following PGS, there were very few identified in the post D&C samples. This suggests that while monosomies occur frequently in the IVF population, they commonly do not implant.

In a CHI podcast, Dr. Mukherjee discusses the current challenges facing reproductive specialists in regards to genetic diagnosis of recurrent pregnancy loss, as well as how NGS is affecting this type of testing > Listen to Podcast

Register  SAVE up to $200, Register by October 9

Learn More  |  Present a Poster  |  Sponsorship & Exhibit Information  |  View Brochure

CONFERENCE-AT-A-GLANCE

ADVANCES IN NGS AND OTHER TECHNOLOGIES

Keynote Presentation: Current and Expanding Invitations for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD)
Joe Leigh Simpson, MD, President for Research and Global Programs, March of Dimes Foundation

Next-Generation Sequencing: Its Role in Reproductive Medicine
Brynn Levy, Professor of Pathology & Cell Biology, CUMC; Director, Clinical Cytogenetics Laboratory, Co-Director, Division of Personalized Genomic Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University Medical Center, and the New York Presbyterian Hospital

CCS without WGA
Nathan Treff, Director, Molecular Biology Research, Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Adjunct Faculty Member, Department of Genetics, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey

Concurrent PGD for Single Gene Disorders and Aneuploidy on a Single Trophectoderm Biopsy
Rebekah S. Zimmerman, Ph.D., FACMG, Director, Clinical Genetics, Foundation for Embryonic Competence

Live Birth of Two Healthy Babies with Monogenic Diseases and Chromosome Abnormality Simultaneously Avoided by MALBAC-based Combined PGD and PGS
Xiaoliang Sunney Xie, Ph.D., Mallinckrodt Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

Good Start GeneticsAnalytical Validation of a Novel NGS-Based Pre-implantation Genetic Screening Technology
Mark Umbarger, Ph.D., Director, Research and Development, Good Start Genetics


CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR ADVANCED TESTING TECHNOLOGIES

Expanded Carrier Screening for Monogenic Disorders
Peter Benn, Professor, Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, University of Connecticut Health Center

Oocyte Mitochondrial Function and Testing: Implications for Assisted Reproduction
Emre Seli, MD, Yale School of Medicine

Preventing the Transmission of Mitochondrial Diseases through Germline Genome Editing
Alejandro Ocampo, Ph.D., Research Associate, Gene Expression Laboratory – Belmonte, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Silicon BiosystemsRecovery and Analysis of Single (Fetal) Cells: DEPArray Based Strategy to Examine CPM and POC
Farideh Bischoff, Ph.D., Executive Director, Scientific Affairs, Silicon Biosystems, Inc.

> Sponsored Presentation (Opportunities Available)

Numerical Chromosomal Abnormalities after PGS and D&C
Tanmoy Mukherjee, M.D., Assistant Clinical Professor, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science, Mount Sinai Hospital

EMBRYO PREPARATION, ASSESSMENT, AND TREATMENT

Guidelines and Standards for Embryo Preparation: Embryo Culture, Growth and Biopsy Guidelines for Successful Genetic Diagnosis
Michael A. Lee, MS, TS, ELD (ABB), Director, Laboratories, Fertility Solutions

Current Status of Time-Lapse Imaging for Embryo Assessment and Selection in Clinical IVF
Catherine Racowsky, Professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School; Director, IVF Laboratory, Brigham & Women’s Hospital

The Curious Case of Fresh versus Frozen Transfer
Denny Sakkas, Ph.D., Scientific Director, Boston IVF

Why Does IVF Fail? Finding a Single Euploid Embryo is Harder than You Think
Jamie Grifo, M.D., Ph.D., Program Director, New York University Fertility Center; Professor, New York University Langone Medical Center

BEST PRACTICES AND ETHICS

Genetic Counseling Bridges the Gap between Complex Genetic Information and Patient Care
MaryAnn W. Campion, Ed.D., MS, CGC; Director, Master’s Program in Genetic Counseling; Assistant Dean, Graduate Medical Sciences; Assistant Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Boston University School of Medicine

Ethical Issues of Next-Generation Sequencing and Beyond
Eugene Pergament, M.D., Ph.D., FACMG, Professor, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern; Attending, Northwestern University Medical School Memorial Hospital

Closing Panel: The Future of Reproductive Genetic Diagnostics: Is Reproductive Technology Straining the Seams of Ethics?
Moderator:
Mache Seibel, M.D., Professor, OB/GYN, University of Massachusetts Medical School; Editor, My Menopause Magazine; Author, The Estrogen Window
Panelists:
Rebekah S. Zimmerman, Ph.D., FACMG, Director, Clinical Genetics, Foundation for Embryonic Competence
Denny Sakkas, Ph.D., Scientific Director, Boston IVF
Michael A. Lee, MS, TS, ELD (ABB), Director of Laboratories, Fertility Solutions
Nicholas Collins, MS, CGC, Manager, Reproductive Health Specialists, Counsyl

Arrive Early and Attend Advances in Prenatal Molecular Diagnostics – Register for Both Events and SAVE!

Prenatal Molecular Dx | Nov. 16-18 | Boston, MA

CHI, 250 First Avenue, Suite 300, Needham, MA, 02494, Tel: 781-972-5400 | Fax: 781-972-5425

 

 

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Cilia and the Oviduct

Author: Aashir Awan, PhD

In a previous article, there was a discussion on the role of primary cilia in ovarian cancers with specific context to the hedgehog signal transduction system.  The article helped to highlight not only the role that this organelle plays in ovarian cancer tumorigenesis but also hints at perhaps a mechanistic explanation at the molecular level (Egeberg et al., 2012).  In this review, we focus on primary cilia and some of the signal transduction pathways it helps to coordinate within the oviduct.  Motile cilia are probably better known in their roles  aiding in the movement of the oocyte.  But, in the last few years, research has been undertaken to study the sensory role of the cilium in the female reproductive system.  As such, Drs. Christensen and Stefan Teilmann (University of Copenhagen) undertook a few studies to show the importance of three different signal transduction systems that are being coordinated by the cilium in this particular tissue.

Fig2Their first paper demonstrated that progesterone receptor was localized to the cilia on the epithelial layer of cells surrounding the oviduct and specifically to the lower half of the ciliary length which can be seen in the immunofluorescence analysis of the progesterone receptor profile in the left hand-side figure (Teilmann et al., 2006).  Furthermore, the expression of this receptor is markedly increased upon exposure to gonadotrophin hormones indicating that there is a feedback loop that is sensitive to hormonal regulation.  Previously, it had been shown that progesterone regulates the activity of the outer dynein arms of the cilium through specific effector molecules (Fliegauf et al., 2005).  Thus, the progesterone released upon ovulation would be thought to directly affect the ciliated epiethlium in order to help facilitate the movement of the oocyte through the oviduct thereby highlighting the important role of the cilium (and the signal transduction pathway) to the overall physiology of the female reproductive system.  This work has recently been reproduced by Dr. Larrson’s group in Sweden (Bylander et al., 2013).

Fig1

The Christensen group continued further studies by localizing the angipoeiten receptors, Tie-1 and Tie-2, to the primary cilia of the ovarian surface epithelial as well as the oviduct as seen in the figure on right showing an immunoflourescent micrograph of the infundibulum (Teilmann and Christensen 2005).  Since the expression of their agonist, Ang1, increases during ovulation (Hazzard et al., 1999), both these receptors are thought to play a role in vascularization of the tissue surrounding the developing follicles.  Also, using this  reasoning, the paper argues that the Ang/Tie signaling axis plays an important and general role by serving as an anti-apoptotic system to maintain a dedifferentiated phenotype of both endothelial cells.

Fig3

Finally, Dr. Christensen’s group also demonstrated a unique localization of polycystins 1 and 2 to the primary cilia of ovarian granulose cells (Teilmann et al., 2005).  These calcium cation channels have been shown to sense the flow of urine in the kidney in monitoring general homeostasis and whose mutations have been shown to cause polycystic kidney disesase (Pazour et al.,2002; Yoder et al., 2002).  As with the progesterone receptor, there is a marked effect on polycystins concentration upon gonadrotrophin stimulation as clearly seen on the left-hand side figure (the arrow show ciliary localization of the polycystin 2 receptor; also, note the dramatic increase in polycystin 2 immunofluorescence in the infundibulum).  Further, the Ca2+ permeable cation channel, TRP vaniloid 4 (TRPV4) was found to be localized to the motile cilia in specific subpopulation of epithelial cells within the ampulla and isthmus.  Thus, the localization of these receptors  indicates that the primary cilia would again be involved in a sensory role perhaps by affecting the differentiation and maturation of the emerging oocyte and in relaying physiological information upon ovulatation to the epithelial cells of the surrounding oviduct.

One can imagine that these are probably only a partial list of the important receptor molecules localized thus far to the  cilia that exist within the female reproductive system.  Since more and more receptor molecules are being found within the relatively small confines of this organelle, one can hypothesize that perhaps the signal transduction mechanism between different receptor molecules is ocurring within the cilium itself perhaps even independent of what may be occurring in the cell body. Since reproductive and fertility issues remain a problem in the medical field, it behooves us to continue research into the overall contributions of  this organelle within the female reproductive system.

REFERENCES

Bylander ALind KGoksör MBillig HLarsson DJ. 2013 The classical progesterone receptor mediates the rapid reduction of fallopian tube ciliary beat frequency by progesterone. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 11:33.

Egeberg DLLethan MManguso RSchneider LAwan AJørgensen TSByskov AGPedersen LBChristensen ST. 2012 Primary cilia and aberrant cell signaling in epithelial ovarian cancer. Cilia. 1:15.

Fliegauf MOlbrich HHorvath JWildhaber JHZariwala MAKennedy MKnowles MROmran H. 2005 Mislocalization of DNAH5 and DNAH9 in respiratory cells from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 171:1343-1349.

Hazzard TMMolskness TAChaffin CLStouffer RL. 1999 Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin regulation by gonadotrophin and steroids in macaque granulosa cells during the peri-ovulatory interval. Mol Hum Reprod. 5:1115-1121.

Pazour GJ, San Agustin JT, Follit JA, Rosenbaum JL, Witman GB.20002 Polycystin-2 localizes to kidney cilia and the ciliary level is elevated in orpk mice with polycystic kidney disease. Curr Biol. 12:R378-R380.

Teilmann SC, Christensen ST. 2005 Localization of the angiopoietin receptors Tie-1 and Tie-2 on the primary cilia in the femalereproductive organs. Cell Biol Int.29:340-346.

Teilmann SCByskov AGPedersen PAWheatley DNPazour GJChristensen ST. 2005 Localization of transient receptor potential ion channels in primary and motile cilia of the female murine reproductive organs. Mol Reprod Dev. 71:444-452.

Teilmann SCClement CAThorup JByskov AGChristensen ST. 2006 Expression and localization of the progesterone receptor in mouse and human reproductive organs. J Endocrinol. 191:525-535.

Yoder BKHou XGuay-Woodford LM. 2002 The polycystic kidney disease proteins, polycystin-1, polycystin-2, polaris, and cystin, are co-localized in renal cilia. J Am Soc Nephrol. 13:2508-2516.

 

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

Increasing evidence derived from experimental and clinical studies suggests that the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis (HPT) and the hypothalamic–pitutitary–ovarian axis (HPO) are physiologically related and act together as a unified system in a number of pathological conditions. The suggestion that specific thyroid hormone receptors at the ovarian level might regulate reproductive function, as well as the suggested influence of estrogens at the higher levels of the HPT axis, seems to integrate the reciprocal relationship of these two major endocrine axes. Both hyper- and hypothyroidism may result in menstrual disturbances. In hyperthyroidism the most common manifestation is simple oligomenorrhea. Anovulatory cycles are very common. Increased bleeding may also occur, but it is rare. Hypothyroidism in girls can cause alterations in the pubertal process; this is usually a delay, but occasionally it can result in pseudoprecocious puberty. In mature women hypothyroidism usually is associated with abnormal menstrual cycles characterized mainly by polymenorrhea, especially anovulatory cycles, and an increase in fetal wastage.

Thyrotoxicosis and the female reproductive system
Increased sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentration is characteristic of hyperthyroidism so much so that this globulin is used as a test of thyroid function, reflecting the tissue response to the thyroid hormones. Serum levels of estradiol and testosterone should thus be interpreted with this fact in mind because their total amounts are increased out of proportion to the free levels. Also, women with thyrotoxicosis have a decrease in the metabolic clearance rates of testosterone and of estradiol, an increase in the 5α/5β-reduced metabolites in the urine, and an increase in catechol estrogens in the urine at the expense of estriol and other 16-hydroxylated estrogen metabolites. Southern et al. have found an increase in the peripheral aromatization of androgens to estrogens in some thyrotoxic women. Other studies, however, did not confirm these findings and suggested that any increase in the peripheral aromatization of androgens is likely to be due to an increase in the peripheral blood flow and and not to the direct effect of T4 on the aromatase complex. One of the earliest clinical changes observed in thyrotoxicosis was the occurrence of amenorrhea, which was first reported in 1840. Amenorrhea has been reported frequently since then, but a number of other changes in menstrual cycles have been noted, including anovulation, oligomenorrhea, and menometrorrhagia, which is more common in hypothyroidism. Whether these changes are due to a direct action of T4 on the ovary and uterus or on the pituitary and hypothalamus or both is uncertain. The effect of T4 on fertility is less well established, although the disturbances in menstrual cycles will obviously disturb fertility. With therapy, the menstrual cycles return to their regular pattern for the individual. In summary, thyrotoxicosis occurring in prepubertal girls may result in slightly delayed menarche. In adult women, the effects of thyrotoxicosis on the reproductive system are seen on the hypothalamic–pituitary axis with alterations in gonadotropin release and also in the circulating levels of SHBG, which alter steroid metabolism or biologic activity. These effects produce the variable clinical picture seen in women with thyrotoxicosis.

Hyperthyroidism and physical development
Children born with neonatal Graves’ disease have no defects in the reproductive system that can be related to this disease. Physical development is normal, however, and skeletal growth is often accelerated without a modification of final height. The delay in puberty may be related to the impact of thyrotoxicosis on body composition (i.e., decreased percentage of body fat), which is thought to be related to the onset of puberty and menarche. Rarely, thyrotoxicosis may occur in children in association with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cafe au lait pigmentation, and precocious puberty (McCune-Albright syndrome). Precosity has been described in one-third of the affected girls; and large, unilateral follicular cysts may be present and presumably are responsible for the sexual precocity of the gonadotropin-independent type. Thyrotoxicosis results from single or multiple thyroid adenomas.

Hyperthyroidism and menstrual cycle
Thyrotoxicosis occurring before puberty has been reported to delay sexual maturation and the onset of menses, although Saxena did note that, in thyrotoxic girls, the mean age of menarche was slightly advanced over that of their control population without endocrine disease. The association of thyrotoxicosis and precocity in this disorder appears to be coincidental. Although ovulatory menstrual cycles occur in women with thyrotoxicosis, menstrual disturbances are common. Therefore, the possibility of pregnancy should be considered in an amenorrheic thyrotoxic woman. This is important because many of these women may receive treatment with radioactive iodine, which is contraindicated in pregnancy. Oligomenorrhea is the most common abnormality, and it may progress to amenorrhea, first described in the classic study by von Basedow. Polymenorrhea is distinctly less frequent, in comparison to its occurrence in hypothyroidism. The frequency of these menstrual disorders varies in different series. Benson and Dailey found that out of 221 hyperthyroid patients 58% had oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea and 5% polymenorrhea. This is in general agreement with other older studies such as those of Goldsmith et al. More recently, in India Joshi et al. found menstrual irregularities in 64.7% of hyperthyroid women, compared to 17.2% of healthy controls. These irregularities sometimes preceded thyroid dysfunction. However, Krassas et al. found irregular cycles in only 21.5% out of 214 thyrotoxic patients. These discrepant results may be attributed to either genetic and other factors or to more delayed diagnosis in India than in Greece. The weight loss and psychologic disturbances (primarily anxiety) seen in thyrotoxicosis may also contribute to sexual dysfunction. Thyrotoxic women frequently present with increased LH, FSH, and estrogen levels; and the gonadotropin response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is increased, although the mid-cycle LH peak may be reduced or absent.

Hypothyroidism and the female reproductive system
Production of SHBG is decreased in hypothyroidism. As a result, serum estradiol and testosterone concentrations are reduced, although free levels of these hormones remain normal. The metabolism of both androgens and estrogens is also altered in hypothyroidism. Androgen secretion is decreased, and the metabolic transformation of testosterone shifts toward androstenedione rather than androsterone, the reverse of that seen in hyperthyroidism. With respect to estradiol and estrone, hypothyroidism favors metabolism of these steroids via 16α-hydroxylation over 2-oxygenation, resulting in increased formation of estriol at the expense of 2-hydroxyestrone and its derivative, 2-methohyestrone. The alterations in steroid metabolism disappear when the euthyroid state is restored. Serum FSH and LH values are usually normal, but the midcycle FSH and LH surge may be blunted or absent. In postmenopausal women, serum FSH and LH concentrations may be somewhat lower than expected, and the response to GnRH may be reduced. The anovulation is reflected in the frequent finding of aproliferative endometrium on endometrial biopsy. TRα-1 and TRβ-1 receptors have been found in follicular fluid. Earlier work indicated that thyroxine enhanced the action of gonadotropins on luteinization and progestin secretion by cultured granulosa cells, and it has been recently noted that in a group of infertile women, those with elevated TSH levels had a higher incidence of out-of-phase biopsies than women with normal TSH. The defects in hemostasis reported in hypothyroidism, such as decreased levels of factors VII, VIII, IX, and XI, may also contribute to the pathogenesis of polymenorrhea. Ovulation and conception can occur in mild hypothyroidism, but in the past those pregnancies that did occur were often associated with abortions in the first trimester, stillbirths, or prematurity. Recent studies indicate these events may be less common but that gestational hypertension occurs often in pregnant women with untreated hypothyroidism. Pregnancy occurring in women with myxedema has been reported to be uncommon, but this is somewhat hard to document and may be the result of anovulation. The use of L-thyroxine is not helpful in treating euthyroid patients for infertility, menstrual irregularity, or the premenstrual syndrome. Some myxedematous women will present with amenorrhea and galactorrhea and elevated serum prolactin concentrations. Thus, thyroid evaluation should be an essential part of the work-up in any person with galactorrhea. If hypothyroidism is the cause, the amenorrhea and galactorrhea and elevated serum prolactin will disappear promptly with thyroxine therapy. There is an increased incidence of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in individuals with Turner’s syndrome, and, although a chromosomal linkage between autoimmune disease and the X chromosome has been suggested, this has not been confirmed. Inherited abnormalities in serum TBG are X-linked, and patients with Turner’s syndrome may have low serum TBG values. Women with hypothyroidism have decreased metabolic clearance rates of androstenedione and estrone and increased peripheral aromatization. The ratio of 5α/5β metabolites of androgens is decreased in hypothyroid women, and there is an increase in the excretion of estriol and a decrease in the excretion of 2-hydroxyestrone and its derivative 2-methoxyestrone.

Hypothyroidism and physical development
The reproductive tract appears to develop normally in cretins; thus, hypothyroidism during fetal life does not appear to affect the normal development of the reproductive tract. Hypothyroidism in prepubertal years generally leads to short stature and may lead to a delay in sexual maturity.

Hypothyroidism and the menstrual cycle
An interesting syndrome described by Kendle and Van Wyk and Grumbach occurs not infrequently: it is characterized by precocious menstruation, galactorrhea, and sella enlargement in girls with juvenile hypothyroidism. The cause is thought to be an overlap in the pituitary production of TSH and gonadotropins, with the latter causing early ovarian secretion of estrogens and subsequent endometrial stimulation with vaginal bleeding. Prolactin levels are elevated, leading to galactorrhea. The estrogen and progesterone response of the ovary to human chorionic gonadotropin is increased, possibly from prolactin induction of ovarian LH receptors. In this way hyperprolactinemia may sensitize the ovaries to the low circulating gonadotropin levels present prepubertally. However, there is no pubertal increase in the adrenal production of androgen precursors, so that axillary and pubic hair are usually not apparent. Therapy with thyroxine in proper dosage results in prompt alleviation of the symptoms. In adult women, hypothyroidism results in changes in cycle length and amount of bleeding and has been reported in association with the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.108 In an Indian study, 68.2% of hypothyroid women had menstrual abnormalities, compared to 12.2% of healthy controls. Menorrhagia is a frequent complaint and is probably due to estrogen breakthrough bleeding secondary to anovulation, which is frequent in severe hypothyroidism. Some investigators have reported a high incidence of thyroid hypofunction in women with premenstrual syndrome. Most of the thyroid disease was subclinical hypothyroidism, defined as an augmented response of TSH to TRH. Many of the affected women were reported to have complete relief of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms with L-T4 therapy.

Source References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10818393

 

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