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Posts Tagged ‘clonal cells’


Latest research efforts reported in the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, 2012

Curator: Ritu Saxena, Ph.D.

‘Triple negative breast cancer’ or TNBC, as the name suggests, is a classification of breast cancers lacking the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor expression as well as amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2).

Unlike other breast cancer types, treating TNBC is a challenge mainly because of the absence of well-defined molecular targets and because of disease heterogeneity. Currently, neoadjuvant chemotherapies are in use to treat TNBC patients. Some, around 30%, patients respond completely to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have good outcomes after surgery. However, if there is a residual disease after therapy, outcomes are poor.

Therefore, current focus of the field is to first understand the complexity of the disease, both at genomic and molecular level and look for targets. Also, several combination chemotherapies are currently under trial to determine the efficacy, overall response rate, progression-free survival and other relevant factors for patients suffering with different forms of TNBC.

Recently, in the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS 2012), several abstarcts related to TNBC research, both clinical and pre-clinical. Here is a compilation of some of the abstracts and their relevance in the field of TNBC research:

Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Subtypes, Molecular Targets, and Therapeutic Approaches, Pietenpol JA, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (Nashville, TN), Abstract no. ES2-2.

In order to better understand the complexity of TNBC, an integrative and comprehensive genomic and molecular analysis is required. The analysis would give important cues to developing and administering effective therapeutic agents. The group has compiled an extensive number of TNBC gene expression profiles and initiated molecular subtyping of the disease. Differential GE was used to designate 25 TNBC cell line models representative of the following subtypes:

  •  two basel-like TNBC subtypes with cell cycle and DDR gene expression signatures (BL1 and BL2);
  • two mesenchymal subtypes with high expression of genes involved in differentiation and growth factor pathways (M and MSL);
  • an immunomodulatory (IM) type;
  • a luminal subtype driven by androgen signaling (LAR)

The pharmacological drugs were chosen on the basis of the genetic pathways active in the cell lines with the abovementioned TNBC subtypes. It was observed that BL1 and BL2 subtype cell lines respond to cisplatin. Mesenchymal, basal, and luminal subtype lines with aberrations in PI3K signaling and have the greatest sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors.

The LAR subtype cell lines express AR and are uniquely sensitive to bicalutamide (AR antagonist). The experiment was a proof-of-concept that the best therapy could be based on TNBC subtypes.

The group has also developed a web-based subtyping tool referred to as “TNBCtype,” for candidate TNBC tumor samples using our gene expression metadata and classification methods. The approach would enable alignment of TNBC patients to appropriate targeted therapies.

The Clonal and Mutational Composition of Triple Negative Breast Cancers: Aparicio S, University of British Columbia (Vancouver, BC), Canada. Abstract no. ES2-3.

The abstract is on the same lines, TNBC heterogeneity that is. The concept of clonal heterogeneity in cancers, the spatial and temporal variation in clonal composition, is the focal point of the discussion. The group has developed next generation sequencing approaches and applied them to the understanding of mutational and clonal composition of primary TNBC. They have demonstrated that both mutational composition and clonal structure of primary TNBC is in fact a complete spectrum, a notion that is far from the previous one that stated TNBC to be a distinct disease. The authors add “clonal analysis suggests a means by which the genetic complexity might be reduced by following patient evolution over time and space.” The specific implications of the mutational and transcriptome landscapes of TNBC in relation to possible disease biologies were discussed in the symposium.

Profiling of triple-negative breast cancers after neoadjuvant chemotherapy identifies targetable molecular alterations in the treatment-refractory residual disease:

Balko JM, etal, Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN); Foundation Medicine, (Cambridge, MA); Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas, Lima, Peru

In the absence of hormone receptors and hence lack of targets, Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is increasingly used in patients with TNBC. NAC can induce a pathologic complete response (pCR) in ∼30% of patients which portends a favorable prognosis. In contrast, patients with residual disease (RD) in the breast at surgical resection exhibit worse outcomes. The authors hypothesize that “profiling residual TNBC after NAC would identify molecularly targetable lesions in the chemotherapy resistant component of the tumor and that the persistent tumor cells would mirror micro-metastases which ultimately recur in such patients.” The researchers utilized targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) for 182 oncogenes and tumor suppressors in a CLIA certified lab (Foundation Medicine, Cambridge, MA) and gene expression profiling (NanoString) of the RD after NAC in 102 patients with TNBC. The RD was stained for Ki67, which has been reported to predict outcome after NAC in unselected breast cancers. Out of the 89 evaluable post-NAC tumors, 57 (64%) were basal-like; 19% HER2-enriched; 6% luminal A; 6% luminal B and 5% normal-like. Of 81 tumors evaluated by NGS, 89% demonstrated mutations in TP53, 27% were MCL1-amplified, and 21% were MYC-amplified.

Several pathways were found to be altered:

  • PI3K/mTOR pathway (AKT1-3, PIK3CA, PIK3R1, RAPTOR, PTEN, and TSC1)
  • Cell cycle genes (amplifications of CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6, CCND1-3, and CCNE1); loss of RB
  • DNA repair pathway (BRCA1/2, ATM)
  • Ras/MAPK pathway (KRAS, RAF1, NF1)
  • Sporadic growth factor receptor (amplifications occurred in EGFR, KIT, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, MET, FGFR1, FGFR2, and IGF1R.

NGS identified 7 patients with ERBB2 gene amplification. NGS could assist in the identification of ERBB2-overexpressing tumors misclassified at the time of diagnosis.

Amplifications of MYC were independently associated with poor recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). In contrast to the earlier notion, high post-NAC Ki67 score did not predict poor RFS or OS in this predominantly TNBC cohort.

The authors concluded that “the diversity of lesions in residual TNBCs after NAC underscores the need for powerful and broad molecular approaches to identify actionable molecular alterations and, in turn, better inform personalized therapy of this aggressive disease.”

Identification of Novel Synthetic-Lethal Targets for MYC-Driven Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Goga A, etal, UCSF (San Francisco, CA), Abstract No. S3-8

Reiterating the greatest challenge of the TNBC treatment, no targeted agents currently exist against TNBC. The group at UCSF has discovered that TNBC frequently express high levels of the MYC proto-oncogene. The discovery has led them to identify new “synthetic-lethal” strategies to selectively kill TNBC with MYC overexpression. “Synthetic lethality arises when a combination of mutations in two or more genes leads to cell death, whereas a mutation in only one of these genes has little effect. Using this strategy, we can take advantage of the elevated MYC signaling in TNBC to selectively kill them, while sparing normal tissues in which MYC is expressed at much lower levels”

The researchers performed a shRNA synthetic-lethal screen in the human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), to identify new molecules, such as cell cycle kinases, which when inhibited can preferentially kill TNBC cells. A high-throughput screen of ∼2000 shRNAs, that target the human kinome (∼ 600 kinases) when performed, led to the identification of 13 kinases whose inhibition by >1 shRNAs gave rise to >50% inhibition of cell growth. ARK5 and GSK3A were the two other kinases that were shown to have a synthetic-lethal interaction with MYC. Since these two kinases have been identified in other studies, it gives validity to the ability to the methods of Goga etal in identifying synthetic-lethal targets. The group is currently characterizing and validating the 11 novel targets identified in this screen, using human cancer cell lines as well as mouse cancer models to determine the impact of inhibiting these targets on triple-negative breast cancer development and proliferation.

Reference:

Dent R, etal.  Triple-negative breast cancer: clinical features and patterns of recurrence (2007) Clin Cancer Res 13, 4429-4434.

Lehmann BD, etal. Identification of human triple-negative breast cancer subtypes and preclinical models for selection of targeted therapies (2011) J Clin Invest. 121: 2750-67.

Chen X, etal. TNBCtype: A Subtyping Tool for Triple- Negative Breast Cancer. (2012) Cancer informatics 11, 147-156.

Abstracts presented in SABCS 2012 can be accessed here.

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Author, reporter: Tilda Barliya PhD

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide after lung cancer, the fifth most  common cause of cancer death, and the leading  cause of cancer death in women. the global burden of  breast cancer exceeds all other cancers and the incidence  rates of breast cancer are increasing (1,2).

The heterogeneity of breast cancers makes them both a fascinating and challenging solid tumor to diagnose and treat. Here is a great review of the molecular pathology of breast cancer progression (3).

The molecular pathology of breast cancer progression” by Alessandro Bombonati  and Dennis C Sgroi.

Breast cancer is the most frequent carcinoma in females and the second most common cause of cancer related mortality in women. Approximately 54 000 and 207 000 new cases of in situ and invasive breast carcinoma, respectively. Overall, breast cancer incidence rates have levelled off since 1990, with a decrease of 3.5%/year from 2001 to 2004.  Most notably, during this same time period, breast cancer mortality rates have declined 24%, with the largest impact among young women and women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease.

The decline in breast cancer mortality has been attributed to the combination of early detection with screening programmes and the advent of more efficacious adjuvant progression have aided in the discovery of novel pathway-specific targeted therapeutics, and the emergence of such effective therapeutics is currently driving the need for molecular-based, ‘patient-tailored’ treatment planning.

Proposed models of human breast cancer progression

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Epidemiological and morp

hological observations led to the formulation of several linear models of breast cancer initiation, transformation and

progression. Figure 1

The ductal and lobular subtypes constitute the majority of all breast cancers worldwide, with the ductal subtype accounting for 40–75% of all diagnosed cases.

The classic model of breast cancer progression of the ductal type proposes thatneoplastic evolution initiates in normal epithelium (normal), progresses to flat epithelial atypia (FEA), advances to atypical ductalhyperplasia (ADH), evolves to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and culminates as invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC).

The model of lobular neoplasia proposes a multi-step progression from normal epithelium to atypicallobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC).

The cell of origin of breast cancer: the clonal and stem cell hypotheses

The two leading models accounting for breast carcinogenesis are the sporadic clonal evolution model and the cancer stem cell (cSC) model. According to the sporadic clonal evolution hypothesis, any breast epithelial cell can be the target of random mutations. The cells with advantageous genetic and epigenetic alterations are selected over time to contribute to tumour progression. The third alternative cSC model postulates that only stem and progenitor cells (representing a small fraction of the tumor cells within the cancer) can initiate and maintain tumor progression. Figure 2.

Normal breast stem cells (nBSCs) are long-lived, tissue-resident cells capable of self-renewal activity and multi-lineage differentiation that can recapitulate the breast tubulolobular architecture that is composed of luminal and myoepithelial cells.

As normal breast cancer stem cells are long-time tissue residents, it has been proposed that such cells are candidates for accumulating genetic and epigenetic modifications. It has been further proposed that such molecular alterations result in deregulation of normal self-renewal, leading to the development of a cancer stem cell (cSC).

It is believed that the cSC undergoes asymmetrical division, maintaining the stem cell population while at the same time differentiating into committed progenitor(s) cells that give rise to the different breast cancer subtypes.

A second scenario, as it relates to breast cancer development, is one in which the cancer-initiating cells are derived from committed progenitor cells that spawn different breast cancer subtypes. Both scenarios are highly supported.

Molecular analysis of the different stages of breast cancer progression

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Genomic and transcriptomic data in combination with morphological and immunohistochemical data stratify the majority of breast cancers into a “low-grade-like” molecular pathway and a “high-grade-like” molecular pathway. Figure 3. The low-grade-like pathway (left hand side) is characterized by recurrent chromosomal loss of 16q, gains of 1q, a low-grade-like gene expression signature, and the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER+ and PR+). The progression (vertical arrows) along this pathway (green rectangles) culminates with the formation of low and intermediate grade invasive ductal, (LG IDC and IG IDC) and invasive lobular carcinomas including both the classic (ILC) and the pleomorphic variant (pILC). The tumors arising from the low grade pathway are classified as luminal consisting of a continuum of gene expression frequently associated with the absence (luminal A) or presence of HER2 expression (luminal B). The vast majority of ILCs and pILCs and their precursors cluster together within the luminal subtype. The high grade-like gene expression molecular pathway (right hand side) is characterized by recurrent gain of 11q13 (+11q13), loss of 13q (13q−), expression of a high-grade-like gene expression signature, amplification of 17q12 (17q12AMP), and lack of estrogen and progesterone receptors expression (ER− and PR−). The progression along this pathway (red rectangles) includes intermediate and high grade ductal carcinomas that are stratified as HER2, or basal-like, depending on the expression/amplification of HER2. The molecular apocrine subtype, characterized by the lack of ER expression and presence of AR expression, arises from the high grade pathway. The model also depicts intra-pathway tumor grade progression (horizontal arrows).

Although the genomic and transcriptomic data presented in this review support the divergent model of breast cancer progression, the clinical experience indicates that tumors within each pathway are still fairly heterogeneous with respect to clinical outcome suggesting that even this advanced molecular progression scheme is oversimplified.

The future application of massively parallel sequencing technologies to the preinvasive stages of breast cancer will assist in assessing intratumoral heterogeneity during the transition from preinvasive to invasive breast cancer, and may assist in identifying early tumor initiating genetic events.

Summary:

Over the past decade the integration of numerous genomic and transcriptomic analyses of the various stages of breast cancer has generated multiple novel insights in the complex process of breast cancer progression.

  • First, human breast cancer appears to progress along two distinct molecular genetic pathways that strongly associate with tumor grade.
  • Second, in the epithelial and non-epithelial components of the tumor microenvironment, the greatest molecular alterations (at the gene expression level) occur prior to local invasion.
  • Third, in the epithelial compartment, no major additional gene expression changes occur between the preinvasive and invasive stages of breast cancer.
  • Fourth, the non-epithelial compartment of the tumor micromilieu undergoes dramatic epigenetic and gene expression alterations occur during the transition form preinvasive to invasive disease. Despite these significant advances, we have only begun to scratch the surface of this multifaceted biological process. With the advent of additional novel high-throughput genetic, epigenetic and proteomic technologies, it is anticipated that the next decade of breast cancer research will gain an equally paralleled appreciation for the complexity breast cancer progression. It is with great hope that knowledge gained from such studies will provide for more effective strategies to not only treat, but also prevent breast cancer.

Ref:

1. http://www.nature.com/nrclinonc/journal/v7/n12/pdf/nrclinonc.2010.192.pdf

2. Jemal, a. et al. CA Cancer J. Clin. 60, 277–300; 2010

3. Alessandro Bombonati and Dennis C Sgro. The molecular pathology of breast cancer progression. J Pathol 2011; 223: 307–317.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/path.2808/pdf

http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3069504/

4. Rodney C. Richie and John O. Swanson. Breast Cancer: A Review of the Literature. J Insur Med 2003;35:85–101.

 

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