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Archive for the ‘Minerals in Medicine’ Category


Micronutrients, Macronutrients and Dietary Patterns: Nutrition and Fertility

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Folic acid. Folic acid is important for germ cell production and pregnancy. The recommended daily dose to prevent neural tube defects is 400-800 µg. Women who take folic acid-containing multivitamins are less likely to be anovulatory, and the time to achieve a pregnancy is reduced. Those who consume more than 800 µg of folic acid daily are more likely to conceive with assisted reproductive technology (ART) than those whose daily intake is less than 400 µg.

Vitamin D. Vitamin D may affect fertility through receptors found in the ovaries and endometrium. An extremely low vitamin D level (< 20 ng/mL) is associated with higher risk for spontaneous miscarriage risk. Some reports suggest that women with adequate vitamin D levels (> 30 ng/mL) are more likely to conceive after ART when compared with those whose vitamin D levels are insufficient (20-30 ng/mL), or deficient (< 20 ng/mL). These findings, however, are inconclusive.

Carbohydrates. Dietary carbohydrates affect glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, and by these mechanisms can affect reproduction. The impact is most pronounced among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In women with PCOS, a reduction in glycemic load improves insulin sensitivity as well as ovulatory function. Whole grains have antioxidant effects and also improve insulin sensitivity, thereby positively influencing reproduction.

Omega-3 supplements. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids lower the risk for endometriosis. Increased levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are associated with higher clinical pregnancy and live birth rates.

Protein and dairy. Some reports suggest that dairy protein intake lowers ovarian reserve. Other reports suggest improved ART outcomes with increased dairy intake. Meat, fish, and dairy products, however, can also serve as vehicles for environmental contamination that may adversely affect the embryo. Fish, on the other hand, has been shown to exert positive effects on fertility.

Dietary approach. In general, a Mediterranean diet is favored (high intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, chicken, and olive oil) among women diagnosed with infertility.

Recommendations

A well-balanced diet, rich in vegetables and fruits, is preferred for infertile women and should provide the required micro- and macronutrients. It remains common for patients consume a wide variety of vitamin, mineral, and micronutrient supplements daily.[4] Supplements should not replace food sources of vitamins and trace elements because of differences in bioavailability (natural versus synthetic), and inaccuracy of label declarations may result in suboptimal intake of important nutrients.[5,6] Furthermore, naturally occurring vitamins and micronutrients are more efficiently absorbed.

With respect to overall diet, women are advised to follow a caloric intake that won’t contribute to being overweight or obese. Obesity is on the rise among younger people, including children. Obese women have a lower chance of conceiving and are less likely to have an uncomplicated pregnancy.[7] Proper weight can be maintained with an appropriate diet and regular exercise.

Finally, women must abstain from substances that are potentially harmful to pregnancy (eg, smoking, alcohol, recreational drugs, high caffeine intake).

Causes of Infertility

  • ovulatory defect,
  • tubal occlusion,
  • low sperm counts), and many

Factors lower the chance of pregnancy

  • older age,
  • lower ovarian reserve,
  • endometriosis

Factors can’t be altered

  • age and
  • ovarian reserve

Modifiable Factors:

  • body weight and
  • lifestyle habits

 

REFERENCES

SOURCE

http://Peter Kovacs. Food and Fertility: What Should Women Consume When Trying to Conceive? – Medscape – Dec 06, 2018.

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Live 11:00 AM- 12:00 Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health : Opening Remarks October 19, 2018

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

11:00 Welcome

 

 

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

Director and President of the Sbarro Health Research Organization, College of Science and Technology, Temple University

Welcome to this symposium on Italian lifestyle and health.  This is similar to a symposium we had organized in New York.  A year ago Bloomberg came out with a study on higher longevity of the italian population and this study was concluded that this increased longevity was due to the italian lifestyle and diet especially in the southern part of Italy, a region which is older than Rome (actually founded by Greeks and Estonians).  However this symposium will delve into the components of this healthy Italian lifestyle which contributes to this longevity effect.  Some of this work was done in collaboration with Temple University and sponsored by the Italian Consulate General in Philadelphia ( which sponsors programs in this area called Ciao Philadelphia).

Greetings: Fucsia Nissoli Fitzgerald, Deputy elected in the Foreign Circumscription – North and Central America Division

Speaking for the Consulate General is Francesca  Cardurani-Meloni.   I would like to talk briefly about the Italian cuisine and its evolution, from the influence of the North and South Italy, economic factors, and influence by other cultures.  Italian cooking is about simplicity, cooking with what is in season and freshest.  The meal is not about the food but about comfort around the table, and comparible to a cullinary heaven, about sharing with family and friends, and bringing the freshest ingredients to the table.

Consul General, Honorable Pier Attinio Forlano, General Consul of Italy in Philadelphia

 

11:30 The Impact of Environment and Life Style in Human Disease

Prof. Antonio Giordano MD, PhD.

 

 

 

To follow or Tweet on Twitter please use the following handles (@) and hashtags (#):

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@SbarroHealth

@Pharma_BI 

@ItalyinPhilly

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# hashtags


#healthydiet

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#health

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ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE: Dr. Andrew M. Freeman, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, J317, Denver, Colorado 80206. E-mail: andrew@docandrew.com.

Item Level of Evidence Available and Included in This Paper Recommendations for Patients Dietary pattern with added fats, fried food, eggs, organ and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages (Southern diet pattern) Prospective studies Avoid Dietary cholesterol RCTs and prospective studies along with meta-analyses Limit Canola oil RCT meta-analyses show improvement in lipids but no prospective studies or RCTs for CVD outcomes In moderation Coconut oil RCT meta-analyses and observational studies on adverse lipid effects. No prospective studies or RCTs for CVD outcomes Avoid Sunflower oil No prospective studies or RCTs for CVD outcomes In moderation Olive oil RCTs supporting improved CVD outcomes In moderation Palm oil RCTs and observation studies showing worsened CVD outcomes Avoid Antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables RCTs and observational studies showing improved CVD outcomes and improvements in blood lipids Frequent Antioxidant supplements RCTs and prospective and observational studies show potential harm Avoid Nuts RCT and large prospective and meta-analysis studies showing improved CVD outcomes In moderation Green leafy vegetables Large meta-analyses and variably sized observational studies as well as a large prospective study Frequent Protein from plant sources Large observational and prospective studies Frequent Gluten-containing foods Observational studies and RCTs Avoid if sensitive or allergic
CENTRAL ILLUSTRATION Evidence for Cardiovascular Health Impact of Foods Reviewed Summary of heart-harmful and heart-healthy foods/diets Coconut oil and palm oil are high in saturated fatty acids and raise cholesterol Extra-virgin olive oil reduces some CVD outcomes when Blueberries and strawberries (>3 servings/week) induce protective antioxidants 30 g serving of nuts/day. Portion control is necessary to avoid weight gain.† Green leafy vegetables have significant cardioprotective properties when consumed daily Plant-based proteins are significantly more heart-healthy compared to animal proteins Eggs have a serum cholesterol-raising effect Juicing of fruits/vegetables with pulp removal increases Southern diets caloric concentration* (added fats and oils, fried foods, eggs, organ and processed meats, sugar-sweetened drinks) High-dose antioxidant supplements Juicing of fruits/vegetables without pulp removal* Gluten-containing foods (for people without gluten-related disease) Evidence of harm; limit or avoid Evidence of benefit; recommended Inconclusive evidence; for harm or benefit Sunflower oil and other liquid vegetable oils consumed in moderate quantities Freeman, A.M. et al. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017;69(9):1172–87. This figure summarizes the foods discussed in this paper that should be consumed often, and others that should be avoided from a cardiovascular health perspective. *It is important to note that juicing becomes less of a benefit if calorie intake increases because of caloric concentration with pulp removal. †Moderate quantities are required to prevent caloric excess.
Source: J Am Coll Cardiol
Curated by: Emily Willingham, PhD
May 30, 2018

Takeaway

  • Antioxidants and niacin are tied to increased all-cause mortality, and other popular supplements offer little detectable cardiovascular (CV) benefit.
  • Folic acid and B6 and B12 might offer some stroke protection.

Why this matters

  • Supplements, including multivitamins, vitamins C and D, and calcium, remain hugely popular.
  • These authors evaluated supplement-related randomized controlled trials published before and since the US Preventive Services Task Force’s 2013 evidence review and 2014 recommendation statement.

Keyresults

  • 4 most common supplements (vitamins D and C, calcium, multivitamins) had no effect on CV outcomes, all-cause mortality.
  • With folic acid
    • Modest stroke reduction (2 studies: relative risk [RR], 0.80; P=.003).
    • CV disease reduction (5 studies: RR, 0.83; P=.002).
  • Other supplements
    • B-complex: reduced stroke risk, 9/12 trials (RR, 0.90; P=.04).
    • Niacin: taken with statin, tied to 10% increased all-cause mortality (P=.05).
    • Antioxidants: increased all-cause mortality, 21 trials (RR, 1.06; P=.05; without selenium: RR, 1.09 [95% CI, 1.04-1.13; P=.0002]).
    • No effect of vitamins A, B6, E, beta-carotene, minerals.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis, 179 randomized controlled trials (15 since 2013/2014).
  • Outcomes: all-cause/CV mortality, total CV disease risk/related outcomes.
  • Funding: Canada Research Chair Endorsement, others.

Limitations

  • No long-term cohort studies included.

  • Selected populations in clinical trials.

  • Supplement differences possible.

SOURCE

http://univadis.com/player/ykvkttzwr?m=1_20180531&partner=unl&rgid=5wrwznernxgefmacwqyebgmyb&ts=2018053100&o=tile_01_id

Other related articles in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

Nutrition: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/28/nutrition-articles-of-note-pharmaceuticalintelligence-com/

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“Minerals in Medicine” –  40 Minerals that are crucial to Human Health and Biomedicine: Exhibit by NIH Clinical Center and The Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Friday, September 9, 2016

NIH Clinical Center and The Smithsonian Institution partner to launch Minerals in Medicine Exhibition

What

The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, in partnership with The Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, will open a special exhibition of more than 40 minerals that are crucial to human health and biomedicine. “Minerals in Medicine” is designed to enthrall and enlighten NIH Clinical Center’s patients, their loved ones, and the NIH community. Media are invited into America’s Research Hospital, the NIH Clinical Center, to experience this unique exhibition during a ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday September 12 at 4pm.

Beyond taking in the minerals’ arresting beauty, spectators can learn about their important role in keeping the human body healthy, and in enabling the creation of life-saving medicines and cutting edge medical equipment that is used in the NIH Clinical Center and healthcare facilities worldwide. The exhibition, which is on an eighteen-month loan from the National Museum of Natural History, includes specimens that were handpicked from the museum’s vast collection by NIH physicians in partnership with Smithsonian Institution geologists. Some of the minerals on display were obtained regionally as they are part of the Maryland and Virginia landscape.

Who

  • John I. Gallin, M.D., Director of the NIH Clinical Center
  • Jeffrey E. Post, Ph.D., Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, Chair of the Department of Mineral Sciences and Curator of the National Gem and Mineral Collection

When

Monday, September 12, 2016, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Where

NIH Clinical Center (Building 10), 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892; 1st Floor near Admissions

How

RSVP encouraged, but not required, to attend in person. NIH Visitors Map: http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx

About the NIH Clinical Center: The NIH Clinical Center is the clinical research hospital for the National Institutes of Health. Through clinical research, clinician-investigators translate laboratory discoveries into better treatments, therapies and interventions to improve the nation’s health. More information: http://clinicalcenter.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-clinical-center-smithsonian-institution-partner-launch-minerals-medicine-exhibition

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