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From Biospace News: GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Johnson & Johnson (JNJ)-Backed VC Firm Medicxi Launches $250 Million Fund For Life Science Startups

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

original article: http://www.biospace.com/News/glaxosmithkline-and-johnson-johnson-backed-vc-firm/407338/source=TopBreaking


Press release

Medicxi Ventures, Formerly Index Ventures Life Sciences, Launches as an Independent Venture Capital Firm and Announces Closing of a €210m Fund including GSK and Johnson & Johnson Innovation

LONDON, GENEVA and JERSEY, February 2, 2016 /PRNewswire/ —

  • Medicxi Ventures comprises all of the existing life sciences team, portfolio company investments and life sciences funds of Index Ventures
  • GSK and Johnson & Johnson Innovation expand their commitment to the asset-centric approach
  • Index Ventures technology practice remains unchanged

Medicxi Ventures, a new venture capital firm comprising all of the existing life sciences portfolio companies, funds and team from Index Ventures, today announces the close of Medicxi Ventures 1 (MV1), a new €210 million ($250 million) fund that will focus on early-stage life sciences investments. MV1 will predominantly invest in Europe and principally follow the “asset-centric” strategy pioneered by its partners at Index.

By investing in MV1, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Johnson & Johnson Innovation – JJDC, Inc. (JJDC) have renewed and expanded their commitment to the asset-centric approach, following the prior investment in Index Life 6 (IL-6) alongside other financial investors.

Medicxi Ventures starts its operations as one of the largest independent European life sciences focused investment firms. The Company’s mission is to focus on strengthening R&D innovation by providing solutions to unmet medical needs. Collaboration with pharmaceutical companies will continue to be a key strategy helping the firm to deliver on this mission.

Medicxi Ventures will be managed by four General Partners, Francesco De Rubertis, David Grainger, Kevin Johnson and Michèle Ollier, all of whom previously led the life sciences practice of Index Ventures. The four partners will form the executive management of the new firm.

Francesco De Rubertis, General Partner of Medicxi Ventures, said: “We are excited to take this next step in our evolution as a life sciences focused investment firm. A high percentage of the drugs approved every year by the FDA were discovered in European academic labs. By working in close partnership with academia, biotech and the pharmaceutical industry, we are committed to translating this high quality science in Europe into effective new medicines.”

He added: “It has been a privilege working with Neil Rimer, Giuseppe Zocco and the other tech partners at Index Ventures for the last 20 years and we have benefitted from their expertise in investing in and building high growth entrepreneurial companies.”

Dr Moncef Slaoui, Chairman Global Vaccines and GSKs representative on Medicxis Scientific Advisory Board, commented on the announcement: “We are delighted to support the Medicxi team and this early stage investment fund. We believe in the potential to create an exciting pipeline of new medicine candidates by collaborating and investing with an asset-centric model. The team at Medicxi has a proven track record in partnering with world-class entrepreneurs and scientists to translate disruptive science from academia and industry into new medicines with demonstrable patient benefits.”

Dr Richard Mason, Head, Johnson & Johnson Innovation, London, commented: “Johnson & Johnson Innovation is focused on enabling and advancing all stages of science and technology across the world’s most robust innovation ecosystems. We are optimistic that applying the asset-centric investment model of Medicxi across Europe and beyond will uncover the new and highly differentiated science and technology that is needed to turn early stage research into viable products and patient solutions. We are delighted to work closely with the Medicxi team to help increase the productivity and likelihood of success for the life sciences innovation community throughout the region. ”

The Scientific Advisory Board of the new fund will include some of the top R&D and business development executives from the two pharmaceutical companies as well as Medicxi-appointed executives. As in IL-6, the two pharmaceutical companies have not received any specific rights to the portfolio companies.

Neil Rimer, co-founder of Index Ventures, said: “The creation of Medicxi Ventures as a new entity is a natural evolution given that Index’ life sciences team has been operating autonomously within the firm for several years. Whilst Index and Medicxi will operate independently, we retain close ties and look forward to continuing to share ideas and expertise.”

Notes for Editors

About Medicxi Ventures

Medicxi Ventures is based in London, Geneva and Jersey. It comprises all of the legacy portfolio companies, funds and the life sciences team of Index Ventures, and a new €210 million fund (MV1) that will focus on early-stage investments in life sciences. The Company’s mission is to invest and collaborate along the full healthcare continuum focusing on drug discovery and development and pharmaceutical innovation. Leading healthcare companies, GSK and Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC are investors in Medicxi Ventures’ funds.

Medicxi Ventures’ team has been investing in life sciences for over 20 years and has backed many successful companies, including Genmab (Nasdaq Copenhagen: GEN), PanGenetics (sold to AbbVie), Molecular Partners (SWX: MOLN), XO1 (sold to Janssen) Egalet (EGLT), Minerva Neurosciences (NERV) and Versartis (VSAR).

Please see http://www.medicxiventures.com for more information.

About the Medicxi Ventures Executive Team

  • Francesco De Rubertis joined Index in 1997 to lead the firm’s life sciences activity and has been involved with and overseen all of the investments that Index has made in life sciences
  • David Grainger joined Index in 2012. Prior to this, David led an internationally recognised research group in Cambridge University’s Department of Medicine, where he published more than 80 first author papers in leading journals including Nature, Science and Nature Medicine. He is an inventor on more than 150 patents and patent applications.
  • Kevin Johnson has been working with Index since 2003. He focuses on life sciences, especially drug development companies and was part of the management team that floated Cambridge Antibody Technology on the London Stock Exchange. Two of his products, Humira (Abbott Pharmaceutical) and Benlysta (Human Genome Sciences, GSK), are now on the market.
  • Michèle Ollier joined Index in 2006. She has spent more than 15 years in several development and marketing positions at Sanofi International, Bristol-Myers Squibb, RPR/Gencell/Aventis international and Serono International.

For further information, please contact:

Francesco De Rubertis
General Partner, Medicxi Ventures
francesco@medicxiventures.com
+44(0)207-154-2020

Katja Stout, Sylvie Berrebi
Citigate Dewe Rogerson
katja.stout@citigatedr.co.uk
Sylvie.berrebi@citigatedr.co.uk
+44(0)207-638-9571

Bill Douglass
Gotham Communications LLC
bill@gothamcomm.com
+1(646)504-0890

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Myocardial Infarction: The New Definition After Revascularization

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 7/31/2014

Myocardial Ischemia Symptoms

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/29/myocardial-ischemia-symptoms/

 

VIEW VIDEO

Gregg Stone, MD

Co-DIrector, Medical Research & Education Division Cardiovascular Research Foundation

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/MyocardialInfarction/42256?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2013-10-15&goback=%2Egmr_4346921%2Egde_4346921_member_5795830612724035588#%21

Primary source: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Source reference: Moussa I, et al “Consideration of a new definition of clinically relevant myocardial infarction after coronary revascularization: an expert consensus document from the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI)” J Am Coll Cardiol2013; 62: 1563-1570.

Additional source: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Source reference:White H “Avatar of the universal definition of periprocedural myocardial infarction” J Am Coll Cardiol 2013; 62: 1571-1574.

Moussa reported that he had no conflicts of interest.

Stone is a consultant for Boston Scientific, Eli Lilly, Daiichi Sankyo, and AstraZeneca. The other authors reported relationships with Guerbet, The Medicines Company, Bristol-Myers Squibb/Sanofi, Merck, Maya Medical, AstraZeneca, Abbott Vascular, Regado Biosciences, Janssen Pharma, Lilly/Daiichi Sankyo, St. Jude Medical, Medtronic, Terumo, Bridgepoint/Boston Scientific, Gilead, Boston Scientific, Eli Lilly, and Daiichi Sankyo.

White is co-chairman for the Task Force for the Universal Definiton of Myocardial Infarction; has received research grants from sanofi-aventis, Eli Lilly, The Medicines Company, the NIH, Pfizer, Roche, Johnson & Johnson, Schering-Plough, Merck Sharpe & Dohme, AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Daiichi Sankyo Pharma Development, and Bristol-Myers Squibb; and has served on advisory boards for AstraZeneca, Merck Sharpe & Dohme, Roche, and Regado Biosciences.

WASHINGTON, DC — A “clinically meaningful” definition of MI following PCI or CABG is urgently needed to replace the arbitrarily chosen “universal definition” proposed in recent years that has no relevance to patients and may be muddying clinical-trial results. Those are the conclusions of a new expert consensus document released Monday by the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI)[1].

The notion of a “universal definition of MI” was first proposed in 2000 and updated in 2007 and 2012. The 2012 document defines a PCI-related MI as an increase in cardiac troponin (cTn) of more than five times the upper limit of normal (ULN) during the first 48 hours postprocedure plus specific clinical or ECG features. Post-CABG, the definition is a cTn increase of >10 times the ULN, plus different clinical or ECG features.

The problem, lead author Dr Issam Moussa (Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL) told heartwire , is that these cutoffs were arbitrarily chosen and not based on any hard evidence that these biomarker levels spelled a poor prognosis. Moreover, “overnight, the rate of MI went from 5% following these procedures to 20% to 30%!” he said.

The SCAI committee, in its new document, focuses on post-PCI procedures and highlights the importance of acquiring baseline cardiac biomarkers and differentiating between patients with elevated baseline CK-MB (or cTn) in whom biomarker levels are stable or falling, as well as those in whom it hasn’t been established whether biomarkers are changing.

SCAI’s Proposed Clinically Meaningful MI Definitions

Group Definition
Normal baseline CK-MB CK-MB rise of >10x ULN or >5x ULN with new pathologic Q-waves in at least 2 contiguous leads or new persistent left bundle branch block
OR
In the absence of baseline CK-MB, a cTn rise of >70x ULN or a rise of>35 ULN plus new pathologic Q-waves in at least 2 contiguous leads or new persistent left bundle branch block
Elevated baseline biomarkers that are stable or falling A CK-MB or cTn rise that is equal (by an absolute increment) to the definitions described for patients with normal CK-MB at baseline.
Elevated baseline biomarkers that have not been shown to be stable or falling A CK-MB or cTn rise that is equal (by an absolute increment) to the definitions described for patients with normal CK-MB at baseline
Plus
New ST-segment elevation or depression
Plus
New-onset or worsening heart failure or sustained hypotension or other signs of a clinically relevant MI.

Moussa is quick to emphasize that these new clinically meaningful definitions have limited evidence to support them—and most of what exists supports CK-MB definitions, not cTn—but that the new document is based on the best scientific evidence available.

“We don’t want to come out with a definitive statement” saying this is the final word on MI definitions,” he stressed. “There is more science that needs to be done and there remains more uncertainty. We framed this to be inclusive and also to open the field for discussion.”

His hope is that this will lead to important changes in how patients are managed and money is spent. Currently, patients with clinically meaningless biomarker elevations may become unnecessarily panicked over news that they’ve had a “heart attack,” while hospital stays may be extended and further tests ordered on the basis of these results.

Moussa et al’s proposal also has important implications for clinical trials, he continued. Currently, for studies that include periprocedural MIs as an individual end point or as part of a composite end point, the very high number of biomarker-defined “MIs” collected in the trial could potentially overwhelm the true impact of any given therapy. “You are really using an end point that is truly not relevant to patients. . . . This could really affect the whole hypothesis.”

He’s expecting some push-back from cardiologists and academics, particularly those who championed the need for the universal definition in the first place, but believes most people will welcome a clinically meaningful definition.

“I think many in the medical community will accept this because they have not really been using the universal definition in their day-to-day practice anyhow.” What’s more, the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) does not include the reporting of MI postangiography, in part because of concerns that the universal definition of MI overestimates the true incidence of this problem. “I think many in the community will look at this definition as more reflective of the true incidence of MI after angioplasty, and if it’s accepted, they are more likely to report it to databases like NCDR and use it to reflect quality-of-care processes.”

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/812533?nlid=35983_2105&src=wnl_edit_medp_card&uac=93761AJ&spon=2

  • ESC/ACCF/AHA/WHF Expert Consensus Document

Circulation.2012; 126: 2020-2035  Published online before print August 24, 2012,doi: 10.1161/​CIR.0b013e31826e1058

Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction

  1. Kristian Thygesen;
  2. Joseph S. Alpert;
  3. Allan S. Jaffe;
  4. Maarten L. Simoons;
  5. Bernard R. Chaitman;
  6. Harvey D. White
  7. the Writing Group on behalf of the Joint ESC/ACCF/AHA/WHF Task Force for the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction
  1. *Corresponding authors/co-chairpersons: Professor Kristian Thygesen, Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Tage-Hansens Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Tel: +45 7846-7614; fax: +45 7846-7619: E-mail: kristhyg@rm.dk. Professor Joseph S. Alpert, Department of Medicine, Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., P.O. Box 245037, Tucson AZ 85724, USA, Tel: +1 520 626 2763, Fax: +1 520 626 0967, E-mail: jalpert@email.arizona.edu. Professor Harvey D. White, Green Lane Cardiovascular Service, Auckland City Hospital, Private Bag 92024, 1030 Auckland, New Zealand. Tel: +64 9 630 9992, Fax: +64 9 630 9915, E-mail: harveyw@adhb.govt.nz.

Table of Contents

  • Abbreviations and Acronyms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2021

  • Definition of Myocardial Infarction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2022

  • Criteria for Acute Myocardial Infarction. . . . . . . . . . . .2022

  • Criteria for Prior Myocardial Infarction. . . . . . . . . . . .2022

  • Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2022

  • Pathological Characteristics of Myocardial Ischaemia and Infarction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2023

  • Biomarker Detection of Myocardial Injury With Necrosis. . .2023

  • Clinical Features of Myocardial Ischaemia and Infarction. . .2024

  • Clinical Classification of Myocardial Infarction. . . .2024
    • Spontaneous Myocardial Infarction (MI Type 1). . . .2024

    • Myocardial Infarction Secondary to an Ischaemic Imbalance (MI Type 2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2024

    • Cardiac Death Due to Myocardial Infarction (MI Type 3). .2025

    • Myocardial Infarction Associated With Revascularization Procedures (MI Types 4 and 5). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . …

New Definition for MI After Revascularization

Published: Oct 14, 2013 | Updated: Oct 15, 2013

By Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released a new definition for myocardial infarction (MI) following coronary revascularization aimed at identifying only those events likely to be related to poorer patient outcomes.

In the new criteria — published as an expert consensus document inCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology — creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) is the preferred cardiac biomarker over troponin, and much greater elevations are required to define a clinically relevant MI compared with the universal definition of MI proposed in 2007 and revised in 2012.

Also, the new definition uses the same biomarker elevation thresholds to identify MIs following both percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), whereas the universal definition has different thresholds for events following the two procedures.

“What we’ve really tried to emphasize in this classification scheme is the primary link between biomarker elevations and prognosis,” according to Gregg Stone, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation in New York City, one of the authors of the document.

“In the universal definition of MI, they even acknowledged that their criteria were arbitrary,” Stone said in an interview. “We’ve tried to reduce the arbitrariness of the cutoff values that we selected so that the researcher, academician, clinician, hospital administrator, etc., can be confident that these levels that we’re recommending are the ones that are associated with a worse prognosis for patients suffering periprocedural complications.”

The Change

The existing universal definition for MI defines events following PCI according to an increase in cardiac troponin to greater than five times the 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL) within 48 hours when baseline levels are normal, with confirmation by electrocardiogram (ECG), imaging, or symptoms.

For CABG-related MI, the increase must be more than 10 times the 99th percentile URL within 48 hours when baseline levels are normal, with confirmation by ECG, angiography, or imaging.

But, Stone and colleagues wrote, the relationship between that degree of troponin elevation after a revascularization procedure and prognosis is not as strong as the association between a CK-MB elevation and patient outcomes.

Using a small elevation in troponin to define a post-procedure MI could find myocardial necrosis that is unlikely to be associated with poor clinical outcomes, which could have far-reaching implications, they wrote.

“Widespread adoption of an MI definition not clearly linked to subsequent adverse events such as mortality or heart failure may have serious consequences for the appropriate assessment of devices and therapies, may affect clinical care pathways, and may result in misinterpretation of physician competence,” they wrote.

To address that issue, the expert panel convened by SCAI sought to define clinically relevant MI after PCI or CABG.

A clinically relevant MI is defined in the new document based on an increase of at least 10 times the upper limit of normal in the level of CK-MB within 48 hours after a revascularization procedure when baseline levels are normal.

When the CK-MB level is not available, then an increase in troponin I or T of at least 70 times the upper limit of normal can be used to define a clinically relevant MI, according to the authors.

However, if an ECG shows new pathologic Q-waves in at least two contiguous leads or a new persistent left bundle branch block, then the thresholds can be lowered to at least five times and at least 35 times the upper limit of normal for CK-MB and troponin, respectively.

Further guidance is provided for identifying clinically relevant post-procedure MIs when the cardiac biomarker levels are elevated at baseline.

Dueling Definitions

Co-chairman of the Task Force for the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction, Harvey White, DSc, of Auckland City Hospital in Auckland, New Zealand, noted some limitations of the new definition, including the lack of a requirement for ischemic symptoms.

“Ischemic symptoms have always been a basic tenet of the diagnosis of MI, and it should be no different for a [PCI-related] MI,” he wrote in an accompanying editorial.

In addition, with the use of such large elevations in biomarker levels in the new definition, “there will be very few PCI-related events identified, and an opportunity to improve patient outcomes may be lost,” he wrote.

Troponin should remain the preferred biomarker over CK-MB, White argued, pointing to variability in and analytical issues with CK-MB assays, the need for sex-specific cutoffs for CK-MB levels, the need for higher thresholds of CK-MB to determine abnormalities because all individuals have circulating levels of the biomarker, and the reduced sensitivity and specificity of CK-MB.

Also, he said, CK-MB is becoming increasingly unavailable at medical centers.

“With CK-MB becoming obsolete, troponin will become the gold standard, and CK-MB will no longer have a role in defining PCI injury and infarction in clinical practice,” White wrote.

Stone admitted that troponin ultimately might be preferable to CK-MB because of its greater specificity, although the evidence does not yet support it.

“I think there’s a general desirability to move to troponins, although when you look at the data that’s out there it’s much stronger correlating CK-MB elevations to subsequent prognosis,” he said. “I think a lot of the troponin elevations are just noise or troponins are just too sensitive.”

Room for Both?

White noted in his editorial that “the rationale for the SCAI definition has been well articulated by its authors and may be appropriate in an individual trial, but it should not supplant the universal definition of MI,” he wrote.

When asked whether the new definition would replace the universal definition, Stone said there is a place for both sets of criteria.

“We would propose the clinically relevant definition be the one that is used to make most substantial decisions right now, [such as] trade-offs between efficacy and safety for new drugs and devices, in judging hospital systems and physicians, etc.,” he said. “But I do think there’s value in both, and they will both continue to evolve over time as new data becomes evident.”

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/MyocardialInfarction/42256?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2013-10-15&goback=%2Egmr_4346921%2Egde_4346921_member_5795830612724035588#%21 

Articles citing 

Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction

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  • The role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) for prognostic evaluation in sensitive cardiac troponin I negative chest pain patients in the emergency departmentEuropean Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care. 2013;2:203-210,
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