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Cardiovascular Risk Inflammatory Marker: Risk Assessment for Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke – Atherosclerosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Updated on 10/3/2018

Treatment concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

Published:November 13, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32865-9

Interleukin 1β has multiple potential mechanisms that contribute to the pathogenesis of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease.

Induction of interleukin 6 leads to the release of acute phase reactants including hsCRP. Thus, hsCRP serves as a surrogate marker of the overall inflammatory milieu,

often in situations where patients have multiple co-morbidities,

with a cumulative dose-response indicating a higher risk.

References

  • Ridker PM
  • Everett BM
  • Thuren T
  • et al.
Antiinflammatory therapy with canakinumab for atherosclerotic disease.

N Engl J Med. 2017; 3771119-1131

  • Libby P
Interleukin-1 beta as a target for atherosclerosis therapy: biological basis of CANTOS and beyond.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017; 702278-2289

  • Pokharel Y
  • Sharma PP
  • Qintar M
  • et al.
High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and health status outcomes after myocardial infarction.

Atherosclerosis. 2017; 26616-23

  • Wang A
  • Liu J
  • Li C
  • et al.
Cumulative exposure to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts the risk of cardiovascular disease.

J Am Heart Assoc. 2017; 6e005610

    • Ridker PM
    • MacFadyen JG
    • Everett BM
    • et al.

on behalf of the CANTOS Trial Group

Relationship of C-reactive protein reduction to cardiovascular event reduction following treatment with canakinumab: a secondary analysis from the CANTOS randomised controlled trial.

Lancet. 2017; (published online Nov 13.)

SOURCE

 

 

 

 

Cardiovascular Risk Inflammatory Marker: Risk Assessment for Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic StrokeAtherosclerosis.

 

Watch VIDEO

webinar

Lp-PLA2 Overview Webinar

Source: http://www.plactest.com/healthcare/webinar

Watch VIDEO

 american-heart-association-2007-lppla2-highlights

American Heart Association 2007 Lp-PLA2 Presentation

Source: http://www.plactest.com/healthcare/american-heart-association-2007-lppla2-highlights

diaDexus’s PLAC, the test measuting Lp-PLA2 as a novel and valuable cardiovascular risk inflammatory marker a vascular-specific inflammatory marker implicated in the formation of rupture-prone plaque, and is the only blood test cleared by the FDA to assess risk for coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke associated with atherosclerosis. (2003 and in 2005 received additional clearance as an aid in the assessment of risk for ischemic stroke associated with atherosclerosis.)

 

In 2007 the PLAC Test was granted a Category I CPT Code (83698) by the American Medical Association and is reimbursed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) with a National Limitation Amount (NLA) of $47.77 in the 2011 CMS Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule.

In July 2010, diaDexus completed a reverse merger with VaxGen. diaDexus currently trades on the OTC Bulletin Board (DDXS.OB).

 

PLAC Test is an alternative to C- Reactive Protein Test

 

The PLAC® Test is a simple blood test to detect Lp-PLA2 in the bloodstream. It is used to help predict risk for coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke associated with atherosclerosis.

 

  • The PLAC Test measures Lp-PLA2
    (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2), a vascular-specific inflammatory enzyme implicated in the formation of rupture-prone plaque. It is plaque rupture and thrombosis, not stenosis, that causes the majority of cardiac events.
  • A substantial body of evidence, including over 100 studies and abstracts in peer-reviewed journals and conferences, support Lp-PLA2 as a cardiovascular risk marker that provides new information, over and above traditional risk factors.
  • Consistent with ATP III and European guidelines, the PLAC Test should be used as an adjunct to traditional risk factor assessment to identify which moderate or high risk patients, as initially assessed by traditional risk factors, may actually be at higher risk.
  • An elevated PLAC Test may indicate a need for more aggressive patient management.
    • 50% of cardiovascular events strike in patients with unremarkable lipid levels, highlighting the prevalence of hidden cardiovascular risk.
    • LDL-C and total cholesterol have proven not to be reliable predictors of stroke; the PLAC Test addresses this unmet clinical need.
  • Lipid lowering therapies, including statins, are proven to reduce cardiovascular events regardless of baseline LDL-C levels.

 

Basic Science of Lp-PLA2

The PLAC® Test measures Lp-PLA2 (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2) a vascular-specific inflammatory enzyme implicated in the formation of rupture-prone plaque. It is plaque rupture and thrombosis that cause the majority of cardiac events, not stenosis.

 

 

 

 

Lp-PLA2 is a calcium-independent serine lipase that is associated with both low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and, to a lesser extent, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in human plasma and serum and is distinct from other phospholipases such as cPLA2 and sPLA2. Lp-PLA2 is produced by macrophages and other inflammatory cells and is expressed in greater concentrations in advanced atherosclerotic lesions than early-stage lesions.

 

Lp-PLA2 has demonstrated modest intra- and inter-individual variation, commensurate with other cardiovascular lipid markers and substantially less than C-reactive protein (CRP). In addition, Lp-PLA2 is not elevated in systemic inflammatory conditions, and may be a more specific marker of vascular inflammation. The relatively small biological variation of Lp-PLA2 and its specificity are of value in the detection and monitoring of cardiovascular risk.

SOURCE:

http://www.plactest.com/healthcare/basic-science.html

 

 

Clinical Utility of the PLAC Test

 

The PLAC® Test Measures Lp-PLA2, a Unique Marker  
The PLAC Test for Lp-PLA2 is the only blood test cleared by the FDA to aid in assessing risk for both coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke associated with atherosclerosis. The PLAC Test measures lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), a vascular-specific biomarker implicated in the formation of rupture-prone plaque. The majority of all heart attacks and strokes are caused by plaque rupture and thrombosis (clots) – not stenosis (narrowing of arteries).

Lp-PLA2 is a unique marker for vascular-specific inflammation and is produced by macrophages in inflamed plaque. Lp-PLA2 provides additive risk information when combined with other markers such as hs-CRP to help you personalize your treatment options, beyond the limitations of the traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors.

The PLAC Test Helps Identify Hidden Risk
Lp-PLA2 is an independent risk marker for stroke. At every level of blood pressure, an Lp-PLA2 value above the median almost doubles the risk for stroke.  Current stroke guidelines include consideration of Lp-PLA2 measurement in asymptomatic patients to identify those who may be at increased risk of stroke.

The PLAC Test Helps Improve Patient Management 
Periodic measurement of the amount of Lp-PLA2 in the blood for patients with 2 or more CVD risk factors can aid clinical decisions for at-risk patients, allowing you to assess or reassess the effect of lipid lowering therapies on vascular inflammation, intensify therapeutic lifestyle changes, and reinforces doctors’ recommendations for patient management.

 

 

 

 

Essential Information to Guide Treatment

In accordance with ATP III Guidelines, patients with 2 or more CV risk factors may be candidates for advanced lipid testing.

Measure the amount of Lp-PLA2 in your patient’s blood stream with the PLAC Test to determine whether they may be at increased risk for heart attack or stroke.

If the PLAC Test results are 200 ng/mL or greater, cardiovascular disease may be present. Review your patient’s advanced lipid panel results to determine where more aggressive patient management may be needed.

 

* additional reduction of Lp-PLA2 seen when added to statin therapy.

Based on:

Shalwitz R, et al. ATVB Annual Mtg. 2007.

Kuvin J, et al. Am J Cardiol. 2006.

Albert M, et al. Atherosclerosis 2005.

Schaefer EJ, et al. Am J Cardiol. 2005.

Saougos VG, et al. ATVB 2007.

Muhlestein JB, et al. JACC 2006.

      Early detection and more aggressive treatment can help prevent cardiovascular events.


 

SOURCE:

http://www.plactest.com/Default.aspx?PageID=4620488&A=PrinterView

 

 

REFERENCES

 

Pathophysiology and Genetics Studies

 

A Twin Study of Heritability of Plasma Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) Mass and ActivityLenzini L, Antezza K, Caroccia B, Wolfert RL, Szczech R, Cesari M, Narkiewicz K, Williams CJ, Rossi GP. A Twin Study of Heritability of Plasma Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) Mass and Activity. Atherosclerosis. 2009; 205(1): 181-5.

Enhanced Expression of Lp-PLA2 and Lysophosphatidylcholine in Symptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic PlaqueMannheim D, Herrmann J, Versari D, Gössl M, Meyer FB, McConnell JP, Lerman LO, Lerman A. Enhanced Expression of Lp-PLA2 and Lysophosphatidylcholine in Symptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque. Stroke. 2008; 39: 1448-55.

Expression of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Carotid Artery Plaques Predicts Long-term Cardiac OutcHerrmann J, Mannheim D, Wohlert C, Versari D, Meyer FB, McConnell JP, Gössl M, Lerman LO, Lerman A. Expression of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Carotid Artery Plaques Predicts Long-term Cardiac Outcome. Eur. Heart J. 2009 Dec; 30(23): 2930-8.

Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 is an Independent Marker for Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in HumansYang EH, McConnell JP, Lennon RJ, Barsness GW, Pumper G, Hartman SJ, Rihal CS, Lerman LO, Lerman A. Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 is an Independent Marker for Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Humans. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2006; 26(1): 106-11.

Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Protein Expression in the Natural Progression of Human Coronary AtherosclerosisKolodgie FD, Burke AP, Skorija KS, Ladich E, Kutys R, Makuria AT, Virmani R. Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Protein Expression in the Natural Progression of Human Coronary Atherosclerosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2006; 26: 2523-9.

 

Therapeutic Modulation Studies

 

Cardiovascular Events With Increased Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Low High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial.Robins SJ, Collins D, JJ, Bloomfield HE, Asztalos BF. Cardiovascular Events With Increased Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Low High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2008; 28(6): 1172-8.

Changes in Lp-PLA2 activity in secondary prevention predict coronary events and treatment effect by pravastatin in long term intervention with pravastatin in ischemic disease (LIPID) TrialWhite HD, Simes J, Barnes, E et al. Changes in Lp-PLA2 activity in secondary prevention predict coronary events and treatment effect by pravastatin in long term intervention with pravastatin in ischemic disease (LIPID) Trial. Circulation, abstract 14857, AHA 2011

Differential Effect of Hypolipidemic Drugs on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2Saougos VG, Tambaki AP, Kalogirou M, Kostapanos M, Gazi IF, Wolfert RL, Elisaf M, Tselepis AD. Differential Effect of Hypolipidemic Drugs on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2007; 27: 2236-43.

Effects of Atorvastatin Versus Other Statins on Fasting and Postprandial C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Versus Control SubjectsSchaefer EJ, McNamara JR, Asztalos BF, Tayler T, Daly JA, Gleason JL, Seman LJ, Ferrari A, Rubenstein JJ. Effects of Atorvastatin Versus Other Statins on Fasting and Postprandial C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Versus Control Subjects. Am J Cardiol. 2005; 95: 1025-32.

Effects of Extended-Release Niacin on Lipoprotein Particle Size, Distribution, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Coronary Artery DiseaseKuvin JT, Dave DM, Sliney KA, Mooney P, Patel AR, Kimmelstiel CD, Karas RH. Effects of Extended-Release Niacin on Lipoprotein Particle Size, Distribution, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease. Am J Cardiol. 2006; 98: 743-5.

Cardiovascular Events With Increased Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Low High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial.Robins SJ, Collins D, JJ, Bloomfield HE, Asztalos BF. Cardiovascular Events With Increased Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Low High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2008; 28(6): 1172-8.

Changes in Lp-PLA2 activity in secondary prevention predict coronary events and treatment effect by pravastatin in long term intervention with pravastatin in ischemic disease (LIPID) TrialWhite HD, Simes J, Barnes, E et al. Changes in Lp-PLA2 activity in secondary prevention predict coronary events and treatment effect by pravastatin in long term intervention with pravastatin in ischemic disease (LIPID) Trial. Circulation, abstract 14857, AHA 2011

Differential Effect of Hypolipidemic Drugs on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2Saougos VG, Tambaki AP, Kalogirou M, Kostapanos M, Gazi IF, Wolfert RL, Elisaf M, Tselepis AD. Differential Effect of Hypolipidemic Drugs on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2007; 27: 2236-43.

Effects of Atorvastatin Versus Other Statins on Fasting and Postprandial C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Versus Control SubjectsSchaefer EJ, McNamara JR, Asztalos BF, Tayler T, Daly JA, Gleason JL, Seman LJ, Ferrari A, Rubenstein JJ. Effects of Atorvastatin Versus Other Statins on Fasting and Postprandial C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Versus Control Subjects. Am J Cardiol. 2005; 95: 1025-32.

Effects of Extended-Release Niacin on Lipoprotein Particle Size, Distribution, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Coronary Artery DiseaseKuvin JT, Dave DM, Sliney KA, Mooney P, Patel AR, Kimmelstiel CD, Karas RH. Effects of Extended-Release Niacin on Lipoprotein Particle Size, Distribution, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease. Am J Cardiol. 2006; 98: 743-5.

Cardiovascular Events With Increased Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Low High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial.Robins SJ, Collins D, JJ, Bloomfield HE, Asztalos BF. Cardiovascular Events With Increased Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 and Low High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol. The Veterans Affairs HDL Intervention Trial. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2008; 28(6): 1172-8.

Changes in Lp-PLA2 activity in secondary prevention predict coronary events and treatment effect by pravastatin in long term intervention with pravastatin in ischemic disease (LIPID) TrialWhite HD, Simes J, Barnes, E et al. Changes in Lp-PLA2 activity in secondary prevention predict coronary events and treatment effect by pravastatin in long term intervention with pravastatin in ischemic disease (LIPID) Trial. Circulation, abstract 14857, AHA 2011

Differential Effect of Hypolipidemic Drugs on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2Saougos VG, Tambaki AP, Kalogirou M, Kostapanos M, Gazi IF, Wolfert RL, Elisaf M, Tselepis AD. Differential Effect of Hypolipidemic Drugs on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2007; 27: 2236-43.

Effects of Atorvastatin Versus Other Statins on Fasting and Postprandial C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Versus Control SubjectsSchaefer EJ, McNamara JR, Asztalos BF, Tayler T, Daly JA, Gleason JL, Seman LJ, Ferrari A, Rubenstein JJ. Effects of Atorvastatin Versus Other Statins on Fasting and Postprandial C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease Versus Control Subjects. Am J Cardiol. 2005; 95: 1025-32.

Effects of Extended-Release Niacin on Lipoprotein Particle Size, Distribution, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Coronary Artery DiseaseKuvin JT, Dave DM, Sliney KA, Mooney P, Patel AR, Kimmelstiel CD, Karas RH. Effects of Extended-Release Niacin on Lipoprotein Particle Size, Distribution, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease. Am J Cardiol. 2006; 98: 743-5.

 

 

 

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