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My Cancer Genome from Vanderbilt University: Matching Tumor Mutations to Therapies & Clinical Trials

My Cancer Genome from Vanderbilt University: Matching Tumor Mutations to Therapies & Clinical Trials

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

GenomOncology Collaborates With Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center for the Commercial Development of My Cancer Genome™ Tools

February 10, 2014

Westlake, OH. February 10, 2014 – GenomOncology and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) today announced a partnership for the exclusive commercial development of a decision support tool based on My Cancer Genome™, an online precision cancer medicine knowledge resource for physicians, patients, caregivers and researchers.

Through this collaboration, GenomOncology and VICC will enhance My Cancer Genome through the development of a new genomics content management tool. The MyCancerGenome.org website will remain free and open to the public. In addition, GenomOncology will develop a decision support tool based on My Cancer Genome™ data that will enable automated interpretation of mutations in the genome of a patient’s tumor, providing actionable results in hours versus days. According to the terms of the agreement, all commercial use of My Cancer Genome™ in any form will be licensed through GenomOncology.

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) launched My Cancer Genome™ in January 2011 as an integral part of their Personalized Cancer Medicine Initiative that helps physicians and researchers track the latest developments in precision cancer medicine and connect with clinical research trials. This web-based information tool is designed to quickly educate clinicians on the rapidly expanding list of genetic mutations that impact cancers and enable the research of treatment options based on specific mutations. For more information on My Cancer Genome™ visitwww.mycancergenome.org/about/what-is-my-cancer-genome.

“The future of cancer diagnostics and treatment is genomics-based precision medicine. Therapies based on the specific genetic alterations that underlie a patient’s cancer not only result in better outcomes but often have less adverse reactions,” commented Manuel Glynias, President and CEO of GenomOncology. “A resource like My Cancer Genome™ that matches tumor mutations to therapies and makes information accessible and convenient is an incredibly valuable tool. Our collaboration with Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center on My Cancer Genome™ is designed to keep this resource comprehensive, scalable and easy for clinicians to use.”

“We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with GenomOncology to enhance My Cancer Genome™ and develop tools for other hospitals, labs and cancer centers to use for patient care,” said Mia Levy M.D., Ph.D., co-founder of the My Cancer Genome™ site. “We believe in the need for high-quality, curated information to educate physicians and give them confidence as they make treatment decisions for patients.”

About Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, a National Cancer Institute–designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, conducts basic, translational, and clinical research that offers adult and pediatric oncology treatment. VICC is a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network along with 22 other leading centers working together to improve quality and effectiveness of cancer care. For more information about VICC and precision medicine visit www.vicc.org.

About GenomOncology

GenomOncology is enabling precision medicine by translating next generation sequencing data into actionable information for clinicians and researchers. In collaboration with molecular pathologists and physicians, GenomOncology has developed the GO Clinical Workbench™, a decision support tool with a step-by-step workflow that takes raw data from the sequencer and translates the specific molecular profile of each patient’s tumor genome into an actionable clinical report. GenomOncology’s research platform, GenomAnalytics™, allows scientists to analyze one or hundreds of genomes simultaneously to look for causal variants, reducing the time required to understand the genomic alterations that lead to new discoveries about the biology of cancer. More information can be found on the company’s website at www.genomoncology.com.

For more information regarding this announcement, please contact:

Jane Krug, PR Contact
Phone: 504-390-5935
Email: jane@genomoncology.com

 

SOURCE

http://www.genomoncology.com/news/vicc/

 

GenomOncology’s President and CEO

MANUEL J GLYNIAS

Mr. Glynias is a serial entrepreneur with over 25 years of experience in bioinformatics. Prior to GenomOncology, Manuel was a partner at Rosetta, a leading interactive marketing agency, where he helped develop big data solutions for ecommerce clients. In the late 90’s, Manuel was the founder and CEO of NetGenics, a venture-backed provider of discovery informatics to the biopharmaceutical industry and academic research centers. He also developed a number of other commercial software platforms including MacGene, Gene Works, and Primer Express. Manuel has an AB in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Harvard College.

GenomOncology’s BUSINESS MODEL

Our success depends on your success! The business model is comprised of two main components:

Up front fee

Nominal fee covers installation support, configuring the Workbench to your specification, designing and developing custom report(s) and training your team.

Per sample fee

GenomOncology is paid on signed-out clinical reports. This philosophy aligns GenomOncology with your Laboratory as we are incentivized to offer world-class support and solutions to differentiate your clinical NGS program. There is no annual license fee.

Optional Services

GenomOncology provides a variety of additional services including support of assay validation, integration with LIS / EMR, and custom new feature development.

 

VIEW VIDEOS

http://www.mycancergenome.org/about/what-is-my-cancer-genome/

GenomAnalytics THREE Video Demonstrations

http://www.genomoncology.com/knowledge-center/videos/

 

SOURCE

http://www.genomoncology.com/clinical/business-model/

 

What Is My Cancer Genome?

  • ​My Cancer Genome is a personalized cancer medicine knowledge resource for physicians, patients, caregivers and researchers.
  • My Cancer Genome gives up-to-date information on what mutations make cancers grow and related therapeutic implications, including available clinical trials.
  • My Cancer Genome is a one-stop tool that matches tumor mutations to therapies, making information accessible and convenient for busy clinicians.
  • For information about application programming interfaces (APIs) and licensing, please contact My Cancer Genome’s content licensee, GenomOncology, at mcg@genomoncology.com or 440-617-6087.


http://www.mycancergenome.org

Development Team

http://www.mycancergenome.org/about/development-team/

Mia Levy M.D., Ph.D., co-founder of the My Cancer Genome site. “We believe in the need for high-quality, curated information to educate physicians and give them confidence as they make treatment decisions for patients.”

 

Letter from the Editors

​The treatment of patients with cancer in the 21st century has evolved into a complicated algorithm, requiring knowledge of an individual patient’s tumor mutation status prior to initiating therapy. Making mastery of knowledge even more difficult, tumor mutational profiling studies have revealed a high degree of molecular heterogeneity among cancers, though they may appear similar at the histological level. Even within single genes, such as that encoded by EGFR in lung cancers, mutations can be associated with primary drug sensitivity, primary drug resistance, or acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, while other rarer EGFR mutations have less clear significance. Staying abreast of fast-paced research changes is difficult for time-pressed oncologists and medical caregivers. Knowledge about rare variants found in cancers is hard to track down, especially in busy clinics. As an increasing number of patients have their tumors genotyped, there will be—and is already—a dire need for an interactive, easily accessible educational tool that provides up-to-date information to physicians on the clinical relevance of mutations in cancers and mutation-specific clinical trial availability at the point of care. Until 2011, no such tool existed.

In January 2011, the Vanderbilt–Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) launched the nation’s first web-based precision cancer medicine knowledge resource, “My Cancer Genome,” to enable a genetically informed approach to cancer medicine. Created by Dr. Mia Levy and Dr. William Pao and containing content written by physicians and physician–scientists from around the world​, this online information tool is designed to quickly educate clinicians and others interested in the information. With just a few clicks, users of My Cancer Genome can get up-to-date information on the rapidly expanding list of genetic mutations that impact different cancers. Importantly, users can easily research various mutation-specific treatment and clinical trial options locally, nationally, and internationally.

The content is continually evolving. We started with cancers that are already recognized to have molecular heterogeneity and for which mutations already have relevance to existing and emerging targeted therapies. We plan to update the website regularly with new content, covering new genes and diseases. We welcome new contributors. No one person or institution can keep up with the pace and volume of data that is emerging. However, as a collaborative network, we can together move the field more quickly.

Because we believe that My Cancer Genome can eventually become self-sustaining, we have explored a wide variety of partnership opportunities. In February 2014, the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and My Cancer Genome announced an agreement with GenomOncology, a technology company developing clinical tools to analyze genomic cancer data. GenomOncology holds the exclusive license to My Cancer Genome content, with non-commercial use of the My Cancer Genome website and mobile apps continuing to be open to the public. As part of the partnership, the groups are developing a decision support tool based on My Cancer Genome data. For more information, please see the APIs and Licensing page​.

Sincerely yours,

Mia Levy, MD, PhD, and Christine Lovly, MD, PhD​

​​SOURCE

http://www.mycancergenome.org/about/letter-from-the-editors/

 

Cancers covered

 

 

2 Responses

  1. This is very insightful. There is no doubt that there is the bias you refer to. 42 years ago, when I was postdocing in biochemistry/enzymology before completing my residency in pathology, I knew that there were very influential mambers of the faculty, who also had large programs, and attracted exceptional students. My mentor, it was said (although he was a great writer), could draft a project on toilet paper and call the NIH. It can’t be true, but it was a time in our history preceding a great explosion. It is bizarre for me to read now about eNOS and iNOS, and about CaMKII-á, â, ã, ä – isoenzymes. They were overlooked during the search for the genome, so intermediary metabolism took a back seat. But the work on protein conformation, and on the mechanism of action of enzymes and ligand and coenzyme was just out there, and became more important with the research on signaling pathways. The work on the mechanism of pyridine nucleotide isoenzymes preceded the work by Burton Sobel on the MB isoenzyme in heart. The Vietnam War cut into the funding, and it has actually declined linearly since.

    A few years later, I was an Associate Professor at a new Medical School and I submitted a proposal that was reviewed by the Chairman of Pharmacology, who was a former Director of NSF. He thought it was good enough. I was a pathologist and it went to a Biochemistry Review Committee. It was approved, but not funded. The verdict was that I would not be able to carry out the studies needed, and they would have approached it differently. A thousand young investigators are out there now with similar letters. I was told that the Department Chairmen have to build up their faculty. It’s harder now than then. So I filed for and received 3 patents based on my work at the suggestion of my brother-in-law. When I took it to Boehringer-Mannheim, they were actually clueless.


    • This is very insightful. There is no doubt that there is the bias you refer to. 42 years ago, when I was postdocing in biochemistry/enzymology before completing my residency in pathology, I knew that there were very influential mambers of the faculty, who also had large programs, and attracted exceptional students. My mentor, it was said (although he was a great writer), could draft a project on toilet paper and call the NIH. It can’t be true, but it was a time in our history preceding a great explosion. It is bizarre for me to read now about eNOS and iNOS, and about CaMKII-á, â, ã, ä – isoenzymes. They were overlooked during the search for the genome, so intermediary metabolism took a back seat. But the work on protein conformation, and on the mechanism of action of enzymes and ligand and coenzyme was just out there, and became more important with the research on signaling pathways. The work on the mechanism of pyridine nucleotide isoenzymes preceded the work by Burton Sobel on the MB isoenzyme in heart. The Vietnam War cut into the funding, and it has actually declined linearly since.

      A few years later, I was an Associate Professor at a new Medical School and I submitted a proposal that was reviewed by the Chairman of Pharmacology, who was a former Director of NSF. He thought it was good enough. I was a pathologist and it went to a Biochemistry Review Committee. It was approved, but not funded. The verdict was that I would not be able to carry out the studies needed, and they would have approached it differently. A thousand young investigators are out there now with similar letters. I was told that the Department Chairmen have to build up their faculty. It’s harder now than then. So I filed for and received 3 patents based on my work at the suggestion of my brother-in-law. When I took it to Boehringer-Mannheim, they were actually clueless.



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