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Lesson 1 & 2 Cell Signaling & Motility: Lessons, Curations and Articles of reference as supplemental information: #TUBiol3373

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

UPDATED 2/05/2019

Syllabus for Cell Signaling & Motility for 2019

CELL SIGNALING AND MOTILITY (BIOL 3373)

SPRING 2017

Lectures:

Monday 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Biology Life Sciences, Room 342

Instructor:

Antonio Giordano, M.D., Ph.D.

Office hours: Biology Life Sciences Building, Room 431.

Friday: 12:00 noon – 2:00 PM. By appointment

(Phone: 215-2049520, or email: giordano@temple.edu).

Prerequisite:

BIO 3096, Cell Structure and Function (Minimum Grade of C- | May not be taken concurrently). 

Description:

The communication among cells is essential for the regulation of the development of an organism and for the control of its physiology and homeostasis. Aberrant cellular signaling events are often associated with human pathological conditions, such as cancer, neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases and so on. The full characterization of cell signaling systems may provide useful insights into the pathogenesis of several human maladies.

Text:

Molecular Biology of the Cell 6th Edition, Alberts et al. Garland Science. This textbook is available at the Temple Bookstore.

Grading:

The final grade will be based on the score of four examinations that include both group and individuals assignment. Each exam accounts for 25% of the final grade. There will be no make-up tests during the course. If you have a documented medical excuse and you contact me as soon as possible after the emergency, I will arrange a make-up exam. Complaints regarding the grading will not be considered later than two weeks after the test is returned.

Blackboard:

Announcements will be readily posted on Blackboard. It is your responsibility to check Blackboard periodically.

Attendance: Lecture attendance is mandatory. In addition, punctuality is expected.

Disabilities: Students with documented disabilities who need particular accommodation should contact me privately as soon as possible.

Honesty and Civility:

Students must follow the Temple’s Code of Conduct (see http://www.temple.edu/assistance/udc/coc.htm). This Code of Conduct prohibits: 1. Academic dishonesty and impropriety, including plagiarism and cheating. 2. Interfering or attempting to interfere with or disrupting the conduct of classes or any other activity of the University.”

Academic Rights and Responsibilities:

The policy of the University that regulates Student and Faculty Academic Rights and Responsibilities (Policy # 03.70.02) is available at the following web link: http://policies.temple.edu/getdoc.asp?policy_no=03.70.02

This policy sets the parameters for freedom to learn and freedom to teach, which constitute the pillars of academia.

 

SCHEDULE

This schedule is a general outline, which may be eventually modified. Changes will be announced in advance. Please, always check Blackboard and your email.

Date Topic
Jan 14 Introduction (course overview  and discussion of syllabus). General concepts: Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell; DNA, RNA  and proteins: Protein synthesis
Jan 21 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (no classes held)
Jan 28 DNA analysis, RNA analysis; Proteins analysis; Microscopy.
Feb 4 Signaling: general concepts; Introduction to G-proteins; signaling via G-proteins (1)
Feb 11 Exam 1: In class presentation (group assignment)
Feb 18 Signaling via G-proteins (2); tyrosine kinase receptors signaling; Ras-MAPK pathway.
Feb 25 Exam 2: In class presentation (group assignment)
March 4- 10 Spring break
Mar 11

 

Cytoskeleton:  Intermediate filaments; actin
Mar 18 Cytoskeleton: actin binding proteins; microtubules
Mar 25

 

Cytoskeleton: microtubules
April 1

 

Exam 3: in class Multiple choice questions (individual assignment)
Apr 8 Extracellular matrix; cell adhesion; coordinated polarization.
Apr  15 Cell motility and Wnt Signal Signaling. 
Apr  22 Medical consequences of aberrant signaling pathways; production of small molecules for protein kinases In cancer therapy.
Study days
May 6 Exam 4: In class presentation (group assignment)

 

Below is Powerpoint presentations for Lesson 1 and Lesson 2.  Please check for UPDATES on this page for additional supplemental information for these Lessons including articles from this Online Access Journal

 

cell signaling and motility 1 lesson

 

cell signaling and motility 2 lesson

The following articles and curations discuss about the new paradigm how we now envision DNA, in particular how we now understand that the important parts of the genome are not just the exons which code for proteins but also the intronic DNA, which contains all the regulatory elements such as promoters, lnDNA, miRNA sequences etc.  These are good reads for your presentations.

The Search for the Genetic Code

Junk DNA codes for valuable miRNAs

 

And on How the Cell Creates Diversity post the Genetic Code by Use of Post Translational Modifications to Bring Diversity to Protein Structure/Function

Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and Linking the Genome to the Metabolome

Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

Also there is a link to a Blood article using FISH to detect gene amplifications after Gleevec resistance onset here

Novel Mechanisms of Resistance to Novel Agents

Other Articles related to the #TUBiol3373 course include:

Lesson 9 Cell Signaling: Curations and Articles of reference as supplemental information for lecture section on WNTs: #TUBioll3373

Curation of selected topics and articles on Role of G-Protein Coupled Receptors in Chronic Disease as supplemental information for #TUBiol3373

 

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