Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘American Hematologic Society’


Understanding the Stem Cell Niche: A Webinar by The Scientist

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

The Scientist

nature stem cell

Schematic diagram showing some of the factors implicated in each process. Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) bound to the bone-marrow niche are mobilized in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or cyclophosphamide, or after peripheral myeloablation following treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). After extravasation from the bone-marrow cords into the microvasculature, HSCs enter the circulation and are distributed to peripheral tissues such as the spleen or liver. HSCs locate close to endothelial cells in the splenic red pulp. They home to the bone-marrow cords through the circulation, a process that is controlled by a number of adhesion molecules such as very late antigen 4 (VLA4), VLA5, lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA1) or selectins. After entering the bone marrow, HSCs specifically lodge in the niche, a process requiring membrane-bound stem-cell factor (SCF), CXC-chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), osteopontin (OPN), hyaluronic acid, and their corresponding receptors. CXCR4, CXC-chemokine receptor 4; E-selectin, endothelial-cell selectin; P-selectin, platelet selectin; PSGL1, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1.

 

Understanding the Stem Cell Niche

  This presentation will begin on Tuesday, December 01, 2015 at 02:30 PM Eastern Standard Time.
   

Free Webinar
Tuesday December 1, 2015
2:30 – 4:00 PM EST

Stem cells provide an attractive model to study human physiology and disease. However, technical challenges persist in the biological characterization and manipulation of stem cells in their native microenvironment. The Scientist brings together a panel of experts to discuss interactions between stem cells and external cues, and the role of the stem cell niche in development and disease. Topics to be covered include the molecular mechanisms of hematopoietic stem cell niche interactions and techniques for engineering 3-D stem-cell microenvironments. Following the presentations, attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions concerning their specific applications and receive answers in real-time.

Speakers:

Dr. Jon Hoggatt, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Cancer Center and Center for Transplantation Sciences, Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Todd McDevitt, Senior Investigator, Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Professor, Department of Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, UCSF.

 

Understanding the Stem Cell Niche
Click Here To Watch The Video

To find out about our upcoming events follow us on Twitter @LabMgrEvents

 

Notes from Webinar:

Hematopoetic stem cells good model since now we have liquid biopsies (as a result field has skyrocketed).

Two processes involved with stem cells finding their niche

  1. Homing; CXCR4-SDK1 dependent process into the bone marrow.
  2. Mobilization: stem cells moving from bone into blood (found that GMCSF main factor responsible for this process)

Dr. Raymond Schofield was one of the first to propose the existence of this stem cell niche (each progenitor will produce a unique factor {possibly a therapeutic target} for example leptin+ receptor target perivascular cells so one target is good for only a small subset of stem cells)

Therefore it may be possible or advantageous to target the whole stem cell milieu. One such possible target they are investigating is CD26 (dipeptyl peptidase). The diabetes drug Januvia is an inhibitor of CD26.

It was also noticed if inhibit the GMCSF receptor complex can inhibit the whole stem cell niche.

Prostoglandins and stem cell niche

  • Indomethacin blocks the mobilization step
  • Prostaglandin E increases homing
  • GMCSF and malaxocam (COX2 inhibitor) flattens osteoblast cells and may be a mechanism how inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis blocks mobilization
  • Found that the PGE4 receptor is ultimately responsible for the NSAID effect

The niche after G-CSF

Dr. Hoggat found that macrophages are supplying the factors that support the niche. He will be presenting the findings at 2015 Hematology conference. (See information about his conference presentation here).

From the 57th Annual American Society of Hematology Meeting (2015) please see Dr. Hoggat’s moderated section Hematopoiesis and Stem Cells: Microenvironment, Cell Adhesion and Stromal Stem Cells: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

 

Relevant articles from Dr. Hoggat

Anti-CD47 Therapy Is More Than a Dinner Bell October 19, 2015

Dr. Hoggatt looks at the therapeutic effects of blocking CD47 aside from alerting macrophages to devour tumor cells.

Hematopoietic Stem Cells Should Hold Their Breath August 12, 2015

Dr. Hoggatt and Hannah Rasmussen discuss new approaches to the use of hematopoietic stem cells considering observer effects that emerge due to our experimental systems for HSCs.

Prostaglandin E2 enhances hematopoietic stem cell homing, survival, and proliferation. Hoggatt J, Singh P, Sampath J, Pelus LM. Blood. 2009 May 28;113(22):5444-55. doi: 10.1182/blood-2009-01-201335. Epub 2009 Mar 26.

 

Prostaglandin E2 enhances long-term repopulation but does not permanently alter inherent stem cell competitiveness. Hoggatt J, Mohammad KS, Singh P, Pelus LM. Blood. 2013 Oct 24;122(17):2997-3000. doi: 10.1182/blood-2013-07-515288. Epub 2013 Sep 18.

 

Pharmacologic increase in HIF1α enhances hematopoietic stem and progenitor homing and engraftment. Speth JM, Hoggatt J, Singh P, Pelus LM. Blood. 2014 Jan 9;123(2):203-7. doi: 10.1182/blood-2013-07-516336. Epub 2013 Oct 28.

 

Blockade of prostaglandin E2 signaling through EP1 and EP3 receptors attenuates Flt3L-dependent dendritic cell development from hematopoietic progenitor cells. Singh P, Hoggatt J, Hu P, Speth JM, Fukuda S, Breyer RM, Pelus LM. Blood. 2012 Feb 16;119(7):1671-82. doi: 10.1182/blood-2011-03-342428. Epub 2011 Nov 22.

 

Recovery from hematopoietic injury by modulating prostaglandin E(2) signaling post-irradiation. Hoggatt J, Singh P, Stilger KN, Plett PA, Sampson CH, Chua HL, Orschell CM, Pelus LM. Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2013 Mar;50(3):147-53. doi: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2012.11.006. Epub 2012 Nov 30.

 

Pulse exposure of haematopoietic grafts to prostaglandin E2 in vitro facilitates engraftment and recovery. Pelus LM, Hoggatt J, Singh P. Cell Prolif. 2011 Apr;44 Suppl 1:22-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2184.2010.00726.x.

 

Pleiotropic effects of prostaglandin E2 in hematopoiesis; prostaglandin E2 and other eicosanoids regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Pelus LM, Hoggatt J. Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 2011 Nov;96(1-4):3-9. doi: 10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2011.06.004. Epub 2011 Jun 21. Review.

 

Differential stem- and progenitor-cell trafficking by prostaglandin E2. Hoggatt J, Mohammad KS, Singh P, Hoggatt AF, Chitteti BR, Speth JM, Hu P, Poteat BA, Stilger KN, Ferraro F, Silberstein L, Wong FK, Farag SS, Czader M, Milne GL, Breyer RM, Serezani CH, Scadden DT, Guise TA, Srour EF, Pelus LM. Nature. 2013 Mar 21;495(7441):365-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11929. Epub 2013 Mar 13.

 

Eicosanoid regulation of hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem and progenitor trafficking.Hoggatt J, Pelus LM. Leukemia. 2010 Dec;24(12):1993-2002. doi: 10.1038/leu.2010.216. Epub 2010 Sep 30. Review.

 

Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization with agents other than G-CSF. Hoggatt J, Pelus LM. Methods Mol Biol. 2012;904:49-67. doi: 10.1007/978-1-61779-943-3_4.

 

Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow niche to the blood compartment. Hoggatt J, Pelus LM. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2011 Mar 14;2(2):13. doi: 10.1186/scrt54. Review.

 

Engineering 3D Pluripotent Stem Cell Microenvironments by Todd McDevitt, Ph.D.

In recent years, it has finally been shown how to produce centrally derived (self assembling) organoids (microtissues).

 

How to specifically deliver specific morphogens in 3D organoids

 

  1. Microparticle (MP)-mediated delivery (can do in mouse and human): reduces the amount needed to be delivered

 

 

What are other effects of introduced MP in ES (embryonic stem cell) aggregates?

  1. a) physiocomechanical changes –mechanical effects of materials
  2. b) how changes in local presentation of factors affect bioavailbility and binding properties

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »