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Archive for the ‘Music therapy’ Category


Art Therapy

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

University Of Houston Brain Study Explores Intersection Of Art And Science

The theory that the brain has a positive response to art is not new to science. But a researcher at the University of Houston is using a different approach to test that belief.

This is your brain. This is your brain on art. Any questions? 🍳🤗🎨🗝 yes in fact this raises a TON of questions!

Jennifer Schwartz

 

When I’m at an art museum, I never know what piece will catch my eye.

On this particular visit to the University of Houston’s Blaffer Art Museum, it’s an art installation by Matthew Buckingham. It consists of is a 16-millimeter film projector on a pedestal, projecting a flickering black and white image of the numbers “1720” on a small screen suspended in mid-air. The music coming from the projector is a baroque flute sonata by Bach.

Picture of Matthew Buckingham's "1720"

Matthew Buckingham’s exhibit, “1720” (2009) is a continuous 16 mm film projection of the date on a suspended screen. A movement from Bach’s Sonata in G for Flute and Continuo plays as the soundtrack accompanied by the flickering sound of the film reel.

http://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/15141909/BRAIN-ON-ART-FEATURE-MP3.mp3

http://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/2016/01/20/134348/university-of-houston-brain-study-explores-intersection-of-art-and-science/

 

So, if someone could look into my head at this moment and see what’s going on in my brain, would they be able to see that I like what I’m looking at?

Dr. Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal, (better known as “Pepe”) is in the process of finding out. The University of Houston College of Engineering professor is collecting neural data from thousands of people while they engage in creative activities, whether it’s dancing, playing music, making art, or, in my case, viewing it.

“(The hypothesis is) that there will be brain patterns associated with aesthetic preference that are recruited when you perceive art and make a judgement about art,” Contreras-Vidal says.

Last October, three local artists – Dario Robleto, JoAnn Fleischhauer, and Lily Cox-Richard – took part in an event that allowed people to watch what was going on in their brains as they created art. The process involved fitting each artist with EEG caps, which look like swim caps with 64 electrodes attached. As they worked on their pieces, a screen on the wall showed their brain activity in blots of blue and yellow.

Picture of Contreras-Vidal

Contreras-Vidal at the Blaffer’s “Your Brain on Art” event in October.     Amy Bishop | Houston Public Media

To Cox-Richard, it’s a unique chance to help bridge the worlds of art and science.

“Being able to contribute and have it be a two-way street is part of what seemed like a really excellent opportunity for all of us to push this conversation forward,” she says.

It was just one of a series of similar experiments Contreras-Vidal has launched. The project is being made possible by funding from the National Science Foundation to advance science and health by studying the brain in action. Contreras-Vidal explains that, even though art is used as a form of therapy, there’s still a mystery surrounding what’s taking place up there to make it therapeutic.

While there have already been studies showing how creativity influences the brain, this one is different. What separates it from others is the fact that the brain is being monitored outside of the lab, such as while walking through a museum, creating art in a studio, or even dancing onstage.

“It’s as real as it gets,” Contreras-Vidal says. “We are not showing you pictures inside a scanner, which is a very different environment.”

Which brings me back to that art installation of the film projector at the Blaffer. While staring at it, I wonder, “What does my brain activity look like right now?”

I decided to find out. In the second part of this story, we’ll pick up with my EEG gallery stroll, followed by a visit to Contreras-Vidal’s laboratory to get the results.

http://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/15173424/IMG_1276.jpg

As Houston Public Media Arts and Culture reporter, Amy Bishop spotlights Houston’s dynamic creative community. Her stories have brought national exposure to the local arts scene through NPR programs such as Here and Now.

 

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Music Therapy

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

What is Music Therapy

http://www.musictherapy.org/about/listserv/

http://www.musictherapy.org/about/musictherapy/

What is Music Therapy?

Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.

Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strengths and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to, and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in the therapeutic context, clients’ abilities are strengthened and transferred to other areas of their lives. Music therapy also provides avenues for communication that can be helpful to those who find it difficult to express themselves in words. Research in music therapy supports its effectiveness in many areas such as: overall physical rehabilitation and facilitating movement, increasing people’s motivation to become engaged in their treatment, providing emotional support for clients and their families, and providing an outlet for expression of feelings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=UlqWw36onD4

 

Fact Sheets for Music Therapy with Individual Populations:

AMTA Strategic Priorities for Specific Populations:

References and Bibliographies:

 

History of Music Therapy

The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato. The 20th century profession formally began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Veterans hospitals around the country to play for the thousands of veterans suffering both physical and emotional trauma from the wars. The patients’ notable physical and emotional responses to music led the doctors and nurses to request the hiring of musicians by the hospitals. It was soon evident that the hospital musicians needed some prior training before entering the facility and so the demand grew for a college curriculum. A very brief historical glimpse of this fascinating profession follows, below.

 Earliest references

The earliest known reference to music therapy appeared in 1789 in an unsigned article in Columbian Magazine titled “Music Physically Considered.” In the early 1800s, writings on the therapeutic value of music appeared in two medical dissertations, the first published by Edwin Atlee (1804) and the second by Samuel Mathews (1806). Atlee and Mathews were both students of Dr. Benjamin Rush, a physician and psychiatrist who was a strong proponent of using music to treat medical diseases. The 1800s also saw the first recorded music therapy intervention in an institutional setting (Blackwell’s Island in New York) as well as the first recorded systematic experiment in music therapy (Corning’s use of music to alter dream states during psychotherapy).

Early Associations

Interest in music therapy continued to gain support during the early 1900s leading to the formation of several short-lived associations. In 1903, Eva Augusta Vescelius founded the National Society of Musical Therapeutics. In 1926, Isa Maud Ilsen founded the National Association for Music in Hospitals. And in 1941, Harriet Ayer Seymour founded the National Foundation of Music Therapy. Although these organizations contributed the first journals, books, and educational courses on music therapy, they unfortunately were not able to develop an organized clinical profession.

Early Educational Programs and Advocates

In the 1940s, three persons began to emerge as innovators and key players in the development of music therapy as an organized clinical profession. Psychiatrist and music therapist Ira Altshuler, MD promoted music therapy in Michigan for three decades. Willem van de Wall pioneered the use of music therapy in state-funded facilities and wrote the first “how to” music therapy text,Music in Institutions (1936). E. Thayer Gaston, known as the “father of music therapy,” was instrumental in moving the profession forward in terms of an organizational and educational standpoint. The first music therapy college training programs were also created in the 1940s. Michigan State University established the first academic program in music therapy (1944) and other universities followed suit, including the University of Kansas, Chicago Musical College, College of the Pacific, and Alverno College.

National Association for Music Therapy

The National Association for Music Therapy (NAMT) was founded at a meeting in New York City on June 2, 1950. NAMT succeeded where previous music therapy associations previously failed by creating a constitution and bylaws, developing standards for university-level educational and clinical training requirements, making research and clinical training a priority, creating a registry and, later, board-certification requirements, and publishing research and clinical journals.

Music Therapy Around the World and on the Web  

Music Therapy ENews

Music Therapy ENews is an announcement-only, electronic newsletter published by the American Music Therapy Association. It is not a discussion listserv. ENews brings timely information on music therapy to its subscribers, focusing on conferences, music therapy education and training opportunities, media alerts, on-line resources, and other information important to the profession of music therapy. Members are welcome to submit announcements and other materials for consideration by emailing the editor at ENews@musictherapy.org. AMTA reserves editorial rights on all submissions. ENews subscription is free.

The Music Therapy ListServ

The Music Therapy ListServ is a discussion forum where people can discuss the use of music to restore, maintain, and improve mental and physical health.

To join the ListServ, send an E-mail, including your first and last name, to the list owners: Alexandra Mesquita-Baer(alex.baer@comcast.net) or Lynne Hockenbury (LynneHock@aol.com) For AMTA members, please include your membership number to speed up the process.

It is a free service and you can cancel your subscription at any time. To cancel, send an email to listproc@ukans.edu without a subject or signature. In the body of your message, type:

UnsubMUSTHP-L

This ListServ is run independently of AMTA.

Music Therapy Around the World

AMTA’s International Relations Committee

The purpose of the AMTA International Relations Committee is to promote networking between music therapists around the world and to facilitate awareness of international issues among AMTA members both within the United States and abroad. Information below is provided to share information on national music therapy organizations throughout the world. If you are familiar with websites of national organizations which are not included here, feel free to send their contact us and suggest they be included.

Worldwide Music Therapy Organizations
International Music Therapy Associations
Sharing Organizations
A Music Therapy Moment   
Every music therapist has a wealth of stories about that exquisite musical/clinical moment when art and science come together to create an awareness, an accomplishment, a breakthrough. These stories – poignant, insightful, or humorous – show the power and effect of music therapy, and can help to build understanding of the benefits and applications of music therapy.  These stories – along with the latest news and research in music therapy – bring the power of music therapy to people around the world, helping to educate and inspire and ensure access to quality music therapy services for every child, teen, and adult.

The Transformative Power of Working with People Who Are Facing Death

Our work as music therapists never stops giving us powerful experiences and lessons. This seems to be magnified when spending one’s days with people who are facing death. With this experience, music therapists are sensitized to the extreme emotions surrounding death, and can empathize with these patients and their families.

I had the privilege of working with an older man, who I’ll refer to as Mr. Smith, and who dearly touched my heart. Countless patients of mine have touched me, but Mr. Smith will remain in my memory as vividly as I saw him in the very hours we spent together.

At the end of life, there is a certain amount of one’s will that determines when one dies. I have seen people hold on to their lives with extreme pain and labored breathing, for weeks, just to reconcile a broken relationship with a loved one. That being said, there is simply no substitute for the beautiful and seamless opportunity that music therapy provides for people to complete their lives with dignity.

Music allowed Mr. Smith to die peacefully. The two songs that he specifically requested conveyed the messages he needed to share before departing from this world. Music therapy provided him the crucial opportunity or medium to express what he felt.

Since Mr. Smith was in a great deal of pain at the end of his life, we never engaged in very formal lyric analysis; however, Mr. Smith naturally expressed his analysis of these songs in small, intermittent statements during our sessions.

The first song he requested was Send In The Clowns, by Stephen Sondheim. This song, to Mr. Smith, highlighted the gross irony that, in stark contrast to the beauty and potential happiness in this world, there is often great emotional and physical pain in our final hours. The grand exit and culmination of our lives is often marked “not with a bang, but a whimper,” as T.S. Elliot so poignantly writes. It is a cold reality; a cruel joke that often leaves us bitter. Send in the Clowns validated and beautifully conveyed feelings for Mr. Smith when he could not. He said “I used to be able to sing and dance, and now-” he paused and closed his eyes, wincing from a shooting pain- “well, I’m here in this place.” “This place” was where people came to die. Mr. Smith knew that, because, in addition to being fully alert and oriented, he had a sister who had passed away there just two years before.

The second song he requested was “Try to Remember,” from the Broadway musical The Fantastiks. This is a beautiful song that he particularly wanted his family to hear. There are several lines in this song that Mr. Smith highlighted by mouthing the words to his wife:

“Try to remember… and follow.”
“Without a hurt the heart is hollow.”

“Deep in December it’s nice to remember the fire of September that made us mellow.”

I’ve wondered what Mr. Smith’s room would’ve been like without music therapy. Mr. & Mrs. Smith had four children- one who’d been estranged- all of whom were quite anxious. No one’s anxiety exceeded that of his wife, however. I was able to witness the facilitation of tears, hugs, and precious family interactions by our music therapy sessions together.

I’ve also wondered how my life would be without the experience and privilege of working with Mr. Smith. It is impossible to know for sure, but I can say that I am better able to keep an eye on the big picture of my life after working with him.

My time with Mr. Smith instilled in me a powerfully transformative thought. The music of our lives remains long after our bodies pass away; the love contained therein is eternal and will last beyond our pain.

Written by Sharon Graham, MM, MT-BC

 

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