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Reported by: Dr. Venkat S. Karra, Ph.D.

Biologists create first predictive computational model of gene networks

Biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have spent the last decade or so detailing how these gene networks control development in sea-urchin embryos. Now, for the first time, they have built a computational model of one of these networks.

This model, the scientists say, does a remarkably good job of calculating what these networks do to control the fates of different cells in the early stages of sea-urchin development—confirming that the interactions among a few dozen genes suffice to tell an embryo how to start the development of different body parts in their respective spatial locations. The model is also a powerful tool for understanding gene regulatory networks in a way not previously possible, allowing scientists to better study the genetic bases of both development and evolution.

The researchers described their computer model in a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The model encompasses the gene regulatory network that controls the first 30 hours of the development of endomesoderm cells, which eventually form the embryo’s gut, skeleton, muscles, and immune system. This network—so far the most extensively analyzed developmental gene regulatory network of any animal organism—consists of about 50 regulatory genes that turn one another on and off.

To create the model, the researchers distilled everything they knew about the network into a series of logical statements that a computer could understand.

By computing the results of each sequence hour by hour, the model determines when and where in the embryo each gene is on and off. Comparing the computed results with experiments, the researchers found that the model reproduced the data almost exactly. “It works surprisingly well,” the researchers say.

Read more at:

rdmag

California Institute of Technology

 

 

 

 

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