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Posts Tagged ‘dopamine-β-hydroxylase gene’


Dopamine-β-Hydroxylase Functional Variants

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

Deep sequencing identifies novel regulatory variants in the distal promoter region of the dopamine-β-hydroxylase gene.

OBJECTIVE:

Dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme that converts dopamine into norepinephrine, is a drug target in cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric disorders. We aimed to identify functional variants in this gene by deep sequencing and enzyme phenotyping in an Indian cohort.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Targeted resequencing of 12 exons and 10 kb upstream sequences of DBH in healthy volunteers (n=50) was performed using the Ion Personal Genome Machine System. Enzyme quantity and activity in their sera samples were determined by ELISA and ultra performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The association of markers with phenotypes was determined using Matrix eQTL. Global P-values for haplotypes generated using UNPHASED 3.1.5 were graphed using GrASP v.082 beta.

RESULTS:

Of the 49 variants identified, nine were novel (minor allele frequency≥0.01). Though individual markers associated with enzyme quantity did not withstand multiple corrections, a novel distal promoter block driven by rs113249250 (global P=1.5×10) was associated. Of the nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with enzyme activity, rs3025369, rs1076151 and rs1611115, all from the upstream region, withstood false discovery rate correction (false discovery rate=0.03, 0.03 and 2.9×10, respectively). Conditioning for rs1611115 identified rs1989787 also to affect activity. Importantly, we report an association of a novel haplotype block distal to rs1076151 driven by rs3025369 (global P=8.9×10) with enzyme activity. This regulatory SNP explained 4.9% of the total 46.1% of variance in DBH activity caused by associated SNPs.

CONCLUSION:

This first study combining deep sequencing and enzyme phenotyping identified yet another regulatory SNP suggesting that regulatory variants may be central in the physiological or metabolic role of this gene of therapeutic and pharmacological relevance.

 

 

Correlation of plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity with polymorphisms in DBH gene: a study on Eastern Indian population.

Plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase activity (plDbetaH) is tightly regulated by the DBH gene and several genetic polymorphisms have been found to independently exert their influence. In the present investigation, association of four DBH polymorphisms, DBH-STR, rs1611115, rs1108580, and rs2519152 with plDbetaH was examined in blood samples from 100 unrelated individuals belonging to the state of West Bengal, Eastern India. Genotypes obtained after PCR amplification and restriction digestion were used for statistical analyses. plDbetaH was measured using a photometric assay and its correlation with the genetic polymorphisms was analyzed using analysis of variance and linear regression. Moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between DBH-STR and rs1611115, while rs1108580 and rs2519152 were in strong LD. ‘T’ allele of rs1611115 showed strong negative correlation with plDbetaH, whereas DBH-STR, rs1108580 and rs2519152 had no major effect. Four haplotypes showed significant influence on plDbetaH. This is the first report on the effect of genetic polymorphisms on plDbetaH from the Indian sub-continent. rs1611115 was the only polymorphism that showed substantial control over plDbetaH. Other polymorphisms which did not show individual effects could possibly be part of larger haplotype blocks that carry the functional polymorphisms controlling plDbetaH.
Polymorphisms and low plasma activity of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase in ADHD children.
Attention-deficit Hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a multifactorial disorder clinically characterized by inattentiveness, impulsivity and hyperactivity. The occurrence of this disorder is between 3 and 6% of the children population, with boys predominating over girls at a ratio of 3:1 or more. The research of some candidate genes (DRD4, DAT, DRD5, DBH, 5HTT, HTR1B and SNAP25) brought consistent results confirming the heredity of ADHD syndromes. Dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) is an enzyme responsible for the conversion of dopamine into noradrenaline. Alteration of the dopamine/noradrenaline levels can result in hyperactivity. The DBH protein is released in response to stimulation. DBH activity, derived largely from sympathetic nerves, can be measured in human plasma. Patients with ADHD showed decreased activities of DBH in serum and urine. Low DBH levels correlate indirectly with the seriousness of the hyperkinetic syndrome in children [19,20]. In the DBH gene, the G444A, G910T, C1603T, C1912T, C-1021T, 5 -ins/del and TaqI polymorphisms occur frequently and may affect the function of gene products or modify gene expression and thus influence the progression of ADHD. This article reviews the DBH itself and polymorphisms in the DBH gene that influence the DBH activity in the serum and the CSF level of DBH. All those are evaluated in connection with ADHD.
Candidate gene studies of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
A growing body of behavioral and molecular genetics literature has indicated that the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. Family, twin, and adoption studies provide compelling evidence that genes play a strong role in mediating susceptibility to ADHD. Molecular genetic studies suggest that the genetic architecture of ADHD is complex, while the handful of genome-wide scans conducted thus far is not conclusive. In contrast, the many candidate gene studies of ADHD have produced substantial evidence implicating several genes in the etiology of the disorder. For the 8 genes for which the same variant has been studied in 3 or more case-control or family-based studies, 7 show statistically significant evidence of association with ADHD based on pooled odds ratios across studies: the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4), the dopamine D5 receptor gene (DRD5), the dopamine transporter gene (DAT), the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene (DBH), the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT), the serotonin receptor 1B gene (HTR1B), and the synaptosomal-associated protein 25 gene (SNAP25). Recent pharmacogenetic studies have correlated treatment nonresponse with particular gene markers, while preclinical studies have increased our understanding of gene expression paradigms and potential analogs for human trials. This literature review discusses the relevance and implications of genetic associations with ADHD for clinical practice and future research
Lack of significant association between -1021C–>T polymorphism in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Recent trends in medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that norepinephrine (NE) deficiency may contribute to the disease etiology. Dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) is the key enzyme which converts dopamine to NE and since DBH gene is considered a major quantitative trait locus for plasma DBH activity, genetic polymorphism may lead to altered NE neurotransmission. Several polymorphisms including a 5′ flanking -1021C–>T polymorphism, was reported to be associated with changed DBH activity and an association between -1021C–>T polymorphism with ADHD was observed in Han Chinese children. We have carried out family-based studies with three polymorphisms in the DBH gene, -1021C–>T polymorphism, exon 2*444g/a and intron 5 TaqI RFLP, to explore their association with Indian ADHD cases. Allele and genotype frequency of these polymorphisms in ADHD cases were compared with that of their parents and a control group. Haplotypes obtained were analyzed for linkage disequilibrium (LD). Haplotype-based haplotype relative risk analysis and transmission disequilibrium test showed lack of significant association between transmission of the polymorphisms and ADHD. A haplotype comprising of allele 1 of all polymorphisms showed a slight positive trend towards transmission from parents to ADHD probands. Strong LD was observed between *444g/a and TaqI RFLP in all the groups. However, low D’ values and corresponding log of odds scores in the control group as compared to the ADHD families indicated that, the incidence of the two polymorphisms being transmitted together could be higher in ADHD families.
Association of the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: genetic analysis of the Milwaukee longitudinal study.
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable and common disorder that partly reflects disturbed dopaminergic function in the brain. Recent genetic studies have shown that candidate genes involved in dopamine signaling and metabolism contribute to ADHD susceptibility. We have initiated genetic studies in a unique cohort of 158 ADHD and 81 control adult subjects who have been followed longitudinally since childhood in the Milwaukee study of ADHD. From this cohort, genetic analysis was performed in 105 Caucasian subjects with ADHD and 68 age and ethnicity-matched controls for the DRD4 exon 3 VNTR, the SLC6A3 (DAT1) 3′ UTR VNTR, dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) TaqI A polymorphism, and the DBH GT microsatellite repeat polymorphism that has been quantitatively associated with serum levels of DBH activity, but not previously studied in ADHD. Results indicate a significant association between the DBH TaqI A1 allele and ADHD (P = 0.018) with a relative risk of 1.33. The DBH GT repeat 4 allele, which is associated with high serum levels of DBH, occurred more frequently in the ADHD group than controls, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. Associations were not found with the SLC6A3 10 repeat or DRD4 7 repeat alleles. These results indicate that the DBH TaqI A allele, or another polymorphism in linkage disequilibrium with this allele, may confer increased susceptibility towards ADHD.
Polymorphisms of the dopamine transporter gene: influence on response to methylphenidate in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder.
Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a very common and heterogeneous childhood-onset psychiatric disorder, affecting between 3% and 5% of school age children worldwide. Although the neurobiology of ADHD is not completely understood, imbalances in both dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems have been implicated in the origin and persistence of core symptoms, which include inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. The role of a genetic component in its etiology is strongly supported by genetic studies, and several investigations have suggested that the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1; SLC6A3 locus) may be a small-effect susceptibility gene for ADHD. Stimulant medication has a well-documented efficacy in reducing ADHD symptoms. Methylphenidate, the most prescribed stimulant, seems to act mainly by inhibiting the dopamine transporter protein and dopamine reuptake. In fact, its effect is probably related to an increase in extracellular levels of dopamine, especially in brain regions enriched in this protein (i.e. striatum). It is also important to note that dopamine transporter densities seem to be particularly elevated in the brain of ADHD patients, decreasing after treatment with methylphenidate. Altogether, these observations suggest that the dopamine transporter does play a major role in ADHD. Among the several polymorphisms already described in the SLC6A3 locus, a 40 bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism has been extensively investigated in association studies with ADHD. Although there are some negative results, the findings from these reports indicate the allele with ten copies of the 40 bp sequence (10-repeat allele) as the risk allele for ADHD. Some investigations have suggested that this polymorphism can be implicated in dopamine transporter gene expression in vitro and dopamine transporter density in vivo, even though it is located in a non-coding region of the SLC6A3 locus. Despite all these data, few studies have addressed the relationship between genetic markers (specifically the VNTR) at the SLC6A3 locus and response to methylphenidate in ADHD patients. A significant effect of the 40 bp VNTR on response to methylphenidate has been detected in most of these reports. However, the findings are inconsistent regarding both the allele (or genotype) involved and the direction of this influence (better or worse response). Thus, further investigations are required to determine if genetic variation due to the VNTR in the dopamine transporter gene is able to predict different levels of clinical response and palatability to methylphenidate in patients with ADHD, and how this information would be useful in clinical practice.
Pharmacogenomics in psychiatry: the relevance of receptor and transporter polymorphisms.
The treatment of severe mental illness, and of psychiatric disorders in general, is limited in its efficacy and tolerability. There appear to be substantial interindividual differences in response to psychiatric drug treatments that are generally far greater than the differences between individual drugs; likewise, the occurrence of adverse effects also varies profoundly between individuals. These differences are thought to reflect, at least in part, genetic variability. The action of psychiatric drugs primarily involves effects on synaptic neurotransmission; the genes for neurotransmitter receptors and transporters have provided strong candidates in pharmacogenetic research in psychiatry. This paper reviews some aspects of the pharmacogenetics of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. A focus on serotonin, catecholamines and amino acid transmitter systems reflects the direction of research efforts, while relevant results from some genome-wide association studies are also presented. There are many inconsistencies, particularly between candidate gene and genome-wide association studies. However, some consistency is seen in candidate gene studies supporting established pharmacological mechanisms of antipsychotic and antidepressant response with associations of functional genetic polymorphisms in, respectively, the dopamine D2 receptor and serotonin transporter and receptors. More recently identified effects of genes related to amino acid neurotransmission on the outcome of treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar illness or depression reflect the growing understanding of the roles of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid dysfunction in severe mental illness. A complete understanding of psychiatric pharmacogenomics will also need to take into account epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, that influence individual responses to drugs.
Pharmacogenetics of psychotropic drug response.

OBJECTIVE:

Molecular genetic approaches provide a novel method of dissecting the heterogeneity of psychotropic drug response. These pharmacogenetic strategies offer the prospect of identifying biological predictors of psychotropic drug response and could provide the means of determining the molecular substrates of drug efficacy and drug-induced adverse events.

METHOD:

The authors discuss methods issues in executing pharmacogenetic studies, review the first generation of pharmacogenetic studies of psychotropic drug response, and consider future directions for this rapidly evolving field.

RESULTS:

Pharmacogenetics has been most commonly used in studies of antipsychotic drug efficacy, antidepressant drug response, and drug-induced adverse effects. Data from antipsychotic drug studies indicate that polymorphisms within the serotonin 2A and dopamine receptor 2 genes may influence drug efficacy in schizophrenia. Moreover, a growing body of data suggests a relationship between the serotonin transporter gene and clinical effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors used to treat depression. A significant relationship between genetic variation in the cytochrome P450 system and drug-induced adverse effects may exist for certain medications. Finally, a number of independent studies point to a significant effect of a dopamine D(3) receptor polymorphism on susceptibility to tardive dyskinesia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Initial research into the pharmacogenetics of psychotropic drug response suggests that specific genes may influence phenotypes associated with psychotropic drug administration. These results remain preliminary and will require further replication and validation. New developments in molecular biology, human genomic information, statistical methods, and bioinformatics are ongoing and could pave the way for the next generation of pharmacogenetic studies in psychiatry.

OBJECTIVE: Molecular genetic approaches provide a novel method of dissecting the heterogeneity of psychotropic drug response. These pharmacogenetic strategies offer the prospect of identifying biological predictors of psychotropic drug response and could provide the means of determining the molecular substrates of drug efficacy and drug-induced adverse events. METHOD: The authors discuss methods issues in executing pharmacogenetic studies, review the first generation of pharmacogenetic studies of psychotropic drug response, and consider future directions for this rapidly evolving field. RESULTS: Pharmacogenetics has been most commonly used in studies of antipsychotic drug efficacy, antidepressant drug response, and drug-induced adverse effects. Data from antipsychotic drug studies indicate that polymorphisms within the serotonin 2A and dopamine receptor 2 genes may influence drug efficacy in schizophrenia. Moreover, a growing body of data suggests a relationship between the serotonin transporter gene and clinical effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors used to treat depression. A significant relationship between genetic variation in the cytochrome P450 system and drug-induced adverse effects may exist for certain medications. Finally, a number of independent studies point to a significant effect of a dopamine D3 receptor polymorphism on susceptibility to tardive dyskinesia. CONCLUSIONS: Initial research into the pharmacogenetics of psychotropic drug response suggests that specific genes may influence phenotypes associated with psychotropic drug administration. These results remain preliminary and will require further replication and validation. New developments in molecular biology, human genomic information, statistical methods, and bioinformatics are ongoing and could pave the way for the next generation of pharmacogenetic studies in psychiatry.
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